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1

Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Non-Thermal Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma Based Removal of Mercury Project Summary Powerspan Corp. will pilot test a multi-pollutant technology that converts mercury into mercuric oxide, nitrogen oxide...

3

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Experimental Study of Non-thermal Plasma Injection System Converting NOx in Simulated Diesel Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study the removal effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) after-treatment system on diesel engine harmful emissions, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor is designed, and the NOx removal effect is studied under the conditions of ... Keywords: Non-thermal Plasma(NTP), Dielectric Barrier Discharge(DBD, Diesel Engine, Nox

Jing Wang; Yixi Cai; Jun Wang; Dongli Ran

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Exhaust remediation using non-thermal (plasma) aftertreatments: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are four post combustion (nonthermal) plasma treatments on the table for reducing NOx in exhaust streams. This paper compares these techniques and suggests what appears to be a novel (8 inventions) and optimum path for development of auseful ehaust treatment system. We propose to use 5 GHz microwaves which will have a risetime of 20 ps, 100 times shorter than present state of the art and result in the best chemistry path by reduction ofplasma shielding, greater availability of atomic nitrogen, elimination of surface charging of dielectrics, avoidance of low threshold fields, and higher breakdown limit. We also propose combining a surface intrinsically into the plasma discharge. Novel embodiments are proposed for the pebbel bed discharge allowing an order of amgnitude increase of eidl-volume over the closest packing configuration.

Whealton, J.H.; Graves, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M applications (1, 2) . Synthesis gas or syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) are used as a major. The conventional reformers allowing syngas production are based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons (3) following

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

UBIQUITOUS NON-THERMALS IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

Scudder, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 54420 (United States); Karimabadi, H., E-mail: jack-scudder@uiowa.edu [SciberQuest, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NO{sub x} control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO{sub x} control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO{sub x} removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO{sub x} operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics.

Penetrante, B.M.

1993-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

NO{sub X} REDUCTION BEHAVIOR OF ALUMINA AND ZEOLITE CATALYSTS IN COMBINATION WITH NON-THERMAL PLASMA  

SciTech Connect

Lean burn gasoline and diesel engines provide improved fuel economy when compared to engines operating under stoichiometric fuel/air conditions. At the same time, lean burn and diesel engines present a problem for emission control. Because they operate under oxidizing conditions, the conventional three-way catalyst is not effective in NOx reduction [1,2]. In addition, the wide temperature range of automobile exhaust gases present a challenge for catalyst design. The temperature of exhaust gases from a light duty diesel engine can vary from 150 to 500 C, depending on the operating conditions. To date, a catalyst that operates with high NOx conversion efficiency over the entire operating range has not been found. Non-thermal plasma assisted catalysis has been shown to be a promising technology for NOx reduction in lean burn and diesel exhaust gases [3,4]. The approach exploited in this paper is to use a plasma in combination with several catalysts, each of which are active over unique temperature ranges. It was reported in the literature, that the one of the essential roles of plasma treatment is to oxidize NO to easier reducible NO2 [7]. In this contribution, the other important function of plasma treatment, namely partial oxidation of propylene, will be demonstrated.

Panov, A.G.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Non-Thermal Plasma Approach To Simultaneous Removal of NOx & Particulate Matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Develop predictive performance and plasma chemistry tools for an NTP reactor Insights for reactor optimization and energy efficiency Qualitative screening of reactor design concepts Develop working model to guide reactor design Power requirements and operating parameters Geometry and properties Gap width and thickness, barrier material and thickness, etc Voltage requirements, frequency, space velocity Insights on or resolution of operational issues Diagnosis and interpretation of experiments

Kupe, Joachim

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

A COMPACT CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE (CDD{trademark}) FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA GENERATION IN GASOLINE OR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Higher fuel economy targets and hybrid vehicles are increasing the marketability of diesel engines. But in order to implement the growth of diesels to achieve the fuel economy benefits, all emission regulation issues must be met. To do this traps and catalysts are being utilized. One of the main problems is finding a technology that enables the exhaust emission system to not only meet the emission requirements when new, but also to meet them at the regulated intermediate and full life requirements. Work is being done that enables catalysts to remain highly efficient throughout their full life. It is done by using a corona discharge device (CDD{trademark}) that introduces non-thermal plasma into the exhaust ahead of the converter. This low power device creates radicals that alter the chemistry of the exhaust so as to limit the poisoning of the catalyst. This can be done without so called ''purge'' cycles that lower fuel economy and degrade catalyst long-term durability. This device has been developed, not as a laboratory tool, but as a production ready product and is the first of its kind that is commercially available for testing. It is this product, the Corona Discharge Device, CDD{trademark}, which will be described.

Nowak,Victor J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability has not been observed. A new test cell specially designed to test the membranes has been constructed to provide basic science data on superpermeability.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

NOVEL COMPOSITE HYDROGEN-PERMEABLE MEMBRANES FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS FOR THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Experiments involving methane conversion reactions were conducted with a preliminary pulsed corona discharge reactor design in order to test and improve the reactor and membrane designs using a non-toxic reactant. This report details the direct methane conversion experiments to produce hydrogen, acetylene, and higher hydrocarbons utilizing a co-axial cylinder (CAC) corona discharge reactor, pulsed with a thyratron switch. The reactor was designed to accommodate relatively high flow rates (655 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s) representing a pilot scale easily converted to commercial scale. Parameters expected to influence methane conversion including pulse frequency, charge voltage, capacitance, residence time, and electrode material were investigated. Conversion, selectivity and energy consumption were measured or estimated. C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon products were analyzed with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). In order to obtain quantitative results, the complex sample spectra were de-convoluted via a linear least squares method. Methane conversion as high as 51% was achieved. The products are typically 50%-60% acetylene, 20% propane, 10% ethane and ethylene, and 5% propylene. First Law thermodynamic energy efficiencies for the system (electrical and reactor) were estimated to range from 38% to 6%, with the highest efficiencies occurring at short residence time and low power input (low specific energy) where conversion is the lowest (less than 5%). The highest methane conversion of 51% occurred at a residence time of 18.8 s with a flow rate of 39.4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s (5 ft{sup 3}/h) and a specific energy of 13,000 J/l using niobium and platinum coated stainless steel tubes as cathodes. Under these conditions, the First Law efficiency for the system was 8%. Under similar reaction conditions, methane conversions were {approx}50% higher with niobium and platinum coated stainless steel cathodes than with a stainless steel cathode.

Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Ji-Jun Zhang; Guibing Zhao; Robyn J. Alcanzare; Linna Wang; Ovid A. Plumb

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage  

SciTech Connect

Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part III: Inhomogeneous Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

P. U. Lamalle

23

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

NON-THERMAL PLASMA PROCESSING AND CHEMICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... has been deposited a nickel grid that serves ... is supplied by a sinusoidal power supply whose ... Figure 2. Simplified block diagram of Silent Discharge ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

25

Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

Thomas, S.E.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

Non thermal emission in clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I briefly review our current knowledge of the non thermal emission from galaxy clusters and discuss future prospect with Simbol-X. Simbol-X will map the hard X-ray emission in clusters, determine its origin and disentangle the thermal and non-thermal components. Correlated with radio observations, the observation of the non-thermal X-ray emission, when confirmed, will allow to map both the magnetic field and the relativistic electron properties, key information to understand the origin and acceleration of relativistic particles in clusters and its impact on cluster evolution.

Arnaud, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fluorine Abatement: Non-thermal Plasma for the Destruction ...  

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy. Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; ...

28

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington...

29

Non-Thermal Continuum toward SGRB2(N-LMH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of continuum antenna temperatures observed in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) spectrometer bandpasses is presented for observations toward SgrB2(N-LMH). Since 2004, we have identified four new prebiotic molecules toward this source by means of rotational transitions between low energy levels; concurrently, we have observed significant continuum in the GBT spectrometer bandpasses centered at 85 different frequencies in the range of 1 to 48 GHz. The continuum heavily influences the molecular spectral features since we have observed far more absorption lines than emission lines for each of these new molecular species. Hence, it is important to understand the nature, distribution, and intensity of the underlying continuum in the GBT bandpasses for the purposes of radiative transfer, i.e. the means by which reliable molecular abundances are estimated. We find that the GBT spectrometer bandpass continuum is consistent with optically-thin, non thermal (synchrotron) emission with a flux density spectral index of -0.7 and a Gaussian source size of ~143" at 1 GHz that decreases with increasing frequency as nu^(-0.52). Some support for this model is provided by high frequency Very Large Array (VLA) observations of SgrB2.

J. M. Hollis; P. R. Jewell; Anthony J. Remijan; F. J. Lovas

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Kinematics Around The Non-Thermal Superbubble In Ic 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

les, we find a typical expansion velocity of 50 to 70 km s -1 . Using a distance of 661 kpc (Sakai et al. 1999) and a diameter of 41.5 ## inferred from Yang & Skillman (1993), we calculate a radius of 66 pc for the superbubble. Adopting a density of 1.1 atoms cm -3 (Yang & Skillman 1993), the mass swept out by the superbubble is 4.8710 37 g (2.4510 4 solar masses). Instituto de Astronoma, UNAM, Apdo Postal 70-264, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F., Mexico (almudena,margarit @astroscu.unam.mx). Fig. 1. A close-up of the region of the non-thermal superbubble in H# with the Yang & Skillman, (1993) isocontours of the 49-cm flux superposed. This image was formed by summing up the velocity channels containing emission from IC 10. The heliocentric velocity of this galaxy is -344 km s -1 (de Vaucouleurs et al. 1991). With these values, the kinetic energy obtained is 6.09 to 11.9 erg. Supposing that 20% of a supernova's thermal energy is converted into kinetic energy and th

William Henney; Jos Franco; Marco Martos; Miriam Pea; A. Bullejos; M. Rosado

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

32

Non-thermal X-ray Emission: An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass deposition rates are inferred from X-ray fluxes, our finding opens the possibility of significantly reducing cooling rates.

Ian G. McCarthy; Michael J. West; Gary A. Welch

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Non-thermal radio emission from OB stars: an observer's view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some early-type stars are detectable radio emitters; their spectra can present both thermal and non-thermal contributions. Here I review the public radio data on OB stars, focusing on the non-thermal sources. The analysis of the statistical results gives rise to many open questions that are expected to be addressed, at least in part, with the upgrades of current radio telescopes and the upcoming new generation instruments.

Benaglia, Paula

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal and non-thermal emission in the Cygnus X region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio continuum observations detect non-thermal synchrotron and thermal bremsstrahlung radiation. Separation of the two different emission components is crucial to study the properties of diffuse interstellar medium. The Cygnus X region is one of the most complex areas in the radio sky which contains a number of massive stars and HII regions on the diffuse thermal and non-thermal background. More supernova remnants are expected to be discovered. We aim to develop a method which can properly separate the non-thermal and thermal radio continuum emission and apply it to the Cygnus X region. The result can be used to study the properties of different emission components and search for new supernova remnants in the complex. Multi-frequency radio continuum data from large-scale surveys are used to develop a new component separation method. Spectral analysis is done pixel by pixel for the non-thermal synchrotron emission with a realistic spectral index distribution and a fixed spectral index of beta = -2.1 for the t...

Xu, W F; Han, J L; Liu, F S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Destruction of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation and an electrical power worth $ 46 to destroy 1 kg of TCA at such operating conditions. 16 #12 air streams were passed and effects of various operational parameters on the destruction removal effluent indicated a decrease in the amount of CO generated with increasing RH with low CO/CO2 ratio of 1

Cal, Mark P.

36

SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electrostatic solitary structures in presence of non-thermal electrons and a warm electron beam on the auroral field lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed by satellites in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere. These ESWs are found to be having both positive and negative electrostatic potentials. Using the Sagdeeev psuedo-potential technique, arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves/double layers are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-thermally distributed hot electrons, fluid cold electrons, a warm electron beam, and ions. The inertia of the warm electrons, and not the beam speed, is essential for the existence of positive potential solitary structures. Existence domains for positive as well as negative potential electrostatic solitons/double layers are obtained. For the typical auroral region parameters, the electric field amplitude of the negative potential solitons is found to be in the range {approx}(3-30) mV/m and {approx}(5-80) mV/m for the positive potential solitons. For the negative potential solitons/double layers, the amplitudes are higher when their widths are smaller. On the other hand, the amplitude of the positive potential structures increase with their widths.

Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Pillay, S. R. [School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed, increasing the time available for experiments. For example, near Tg, on a typical laboratory time scale (e.g. {approx}1000 s), a water molecule moves less than a molecular distance. For this reason, nanoscale films help to probe the behavior and reactions of supercooled liquid at these low temperatures. ASW films can be used for investigating the non-thermal reactions relevant to radiolysis. In this account we will present a survey of our research on the thermal and non thermal properties of ASW using this approach.

Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

SUZAKU/WAM AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF NON-THERMAL ELECTRONS IN SOLAR MICROFLARES  

SciTech Connect

We report on hard X-ray spectroscopy of solar microflares observed by the Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM), on board the Suzaku satellite, and by RHESSI. WAM transient data provide wide energy band (50 keV-5 MeV) spectra over a large field of view ({approx}2{pi} sr) with a time resolution of 1 s. WAM is attractive as a hard X-ray solar flare monitor due to its large effective area ({approx}800 cm{sup 2} at 100 keV, {approx}13 times larger than that of RHESSI). In particular, this makes it possible to search for high energy emission in microflares that is well below the RHESSI background. The WAM solar flare list contains six GOES B-class microflares that were simultaneously observed by RHESSI between the launch of Suzaku in 2005 July and 2010 March. At 100 keV, the detected WAM fluxes are more than {approx}20 times below the typical RHESSI instrumental background count rates. The RHESSI and WAM non-thermal spectra are in good agreement with a single power law with photon spectral indices between 3.3 and 4.5. In a second step, we also searched the RHESSI microflare list for events that should be detectable by WAM, assuming that the non-thermal power-law emission seen by RHESSI extends to >50 keV. From the 12 detectable events between 2005 July and 2007 February, 11 were indeed seen by WAM. This shows that microflares, similar to regular flares, can accelerate electrons to energies up to at least 100 keV.

Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Krucker, Saem; Lin, Robert P. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: s.ishikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Non thermal emission from clusters of galaxies: the importance of a joint LOFAR/Simbol-X view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources ("halos" and "relics") related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this non-thermal cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the non-thermal emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the non-thermal cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.

Ferrari, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dynamic load balancing in a concurrent plasma PIC code on the JPL/Caltech Mark III hypercube  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic load balancing has been implemented in a concurrent one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code using a method which adds very little overhead to the parallel code. In PIC codes, the orbits of many interacting plasma electrons and ions are followed as an initial value problem as the particles move in electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the particle motions. The code was implemented using the GCPIC algorithm in which the particles are divided among processors by partitioning the spatial domain of the simulation. The problem is load-balanced by partitioning the spatial domain so that each partition has approximately the same number of particles. During the simulation, the partitions are dynamically recreated as the spatial distribution of the particles changes in order to maintain processor load balance.

Liewer, P.C.; Leaver, E.W. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Decyk, V.K.; Dawson, J.M. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions  

SciTech Connect

This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Non-Thermal X-ray Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical study of the non-thermal X-ray emission of 27 young rotation powered pulsars (RPPs) and 24 pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by using the Chandra and the XMM-Newton observations, which with the high spatial resolutions enable us to spatially resolve pulsars from their surrounding PWNe. We obtain the X-ray luminosities and spectra separately for RPPs and PWNe, and then investigate their distribution and relation to each other as well as the relation with the pulsar rotational parameters. In the pair-correlation analysis we find that: (1) the X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosities of both pulsar and PWN (L_{psr} and L_{pwn}) display a strong correlation with pulsar spin down power Edot and characteristic age, and the scalings resulting from a simple linear fit to the data are L_{psr} \\propto Edot^{0.92 \\pm 0.04} and L_{pwn} \\propto Edot^{1.45 \\pm 0.08} (68% confidence level), respectively, however, both the fits are not statistically acceptable; (2) L_{psr} also shows a possible weak correlation with pulsar period P and period derivative Pdot, whereas L_{pwn} manifests a similar weak correlation with Pdot only; (3) The PWN photon index Gamma_{pwn} is positively correlated with L_{pwn} and L_{pwn}/Edot. We also found that the PWN X-ray luminosity is typically 1 to 10 times larger than that from the underlying pulsar, and the PWN photon indices span a range of ~1.5 to ~2. The statistic study of PWN spectral properties supports the particle wind model in which the X-ray emitting electrons are accelerated by the termination shock of the wind.

Xiang-Hua Li; Fang-Jun Lu; Zhuo Li

2007-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

No-thermal plasma processing of VOCs and NO{sub x} at LLNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past few years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive research program on the application of non-thermal plasmas for air pollution control and abatement. This program combines an extensive modeling effort with an experimental facility and test program. We believe that there are two major issues to be addressed in order to apply non-thermal plasma processing to air pollution control; these are electrical energy consumption and byproduct identification. The thrust of our work has been to understand the scalability of the non-thermal process by focusing on the energy efficiency of the non-thermal process and to identify the byproducts to ensure that effluent gases from a non-thermal processor are benign. We have compared different types of electrical discharge reactors both theoretically and experimentally. Our interests in the application of non-thermal plasmas vary from the destruction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to NO{sub x} reduction for mobile applications. This paper will discuss the processing of both NO{sub x} and VOCs by non-thermal plasmas at LLNL.

Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hawking Non-thermal and Thermal Radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter Black Hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The massive particles tunneling method has been used to investigate the Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter (SAdS) black hole. Considering the spacetime background to be dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has been derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Using the conservation laws of energy and angular momentum we have showed that the non-thermal and purely thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The result obtained for SAdS black hole is also in accordance with Parikh and Wilczek\\rq s opinion and gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of SAdS black hole.

Rahman, M Atiqur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

Matthew B. Loomis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Prepr. Pap.-Am. Chem. Soc., Div. Fuel Chem. 2004, 49 (2), xxxx NON-THERMAL PLASMA CATALYTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbons can be carried out in a number of ways: steam reforming, thermo-catalytic reforming, partial

50

NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Non-thermal X-ray and Gamma-ray Emission from the Colliding Wind Binary WR140  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WR140 is the archetype long-period colliding wind binary (CWB) system, and is well known for dramatic variations in its synchrotron emission during its 7.9-yr, highly eccentric orbit. This emission is thought to arise from relativistic electrons accelerated at the global shocks bounding the wind-collision region (WCR). The presence of non-thermal electrons and ions should also give rise to X-ray and gamma-ray emission from several separate mechanisms, including inverse-Compton cooling, relativistic bremsstrahlung, and pion decay. We describe new calculations of this emission and make some preliminary predictions for the new generation of gamma-ray observatories. We determine that WR140 will likely require several Megaseconds of observation before detection with INTEGRAL, but should be a reasonably strong source for GLAST.

J. M. Pittard; S. M. Dougherty

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cosmological evolution of the cosmological plasma with interpartial scalar interaction. III. Model with the attraction of the like scalar charged particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of the relativistic kinetic theory the mathematical model of cosmological plasmas with an attraction of the like charged scalar particles is formulated. It is shown, that cosmological the model, based on a classical scalar field with an attraction, is unsatisfactory, that leads to necessity of attraction of phantom models of a scalar field for systems with an attraction.

Yu. G. Ignat'ev

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work sponsored by DOE and SCAQMD Noxtech is developing a cost effective and reliable PAC system for mobile applications. The goal of the program is to develop a suitable catalyst with the ability to remove high levels of NOx at reasonable space velocities. This new catalyst will then be used to scale the technology to treat exhaust from 80Hp engine and eventually to demonstrate the technology on 200 and 400 Hp engine applications. Using the 2004 EPA proposed regulation as a standard, it is clear in order for PAC system to be commercially viable it needs to remove NOX by 70% or better. It is further assumed from past experience that 30,000 HR-1 space velocities are necessary to ensure a good compact design.

Bhatt, B.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

SECTION III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University ...powering the 21 st century economy... West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Final Report 29 June 2009 2 of 142 Disclaimer This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the West Virginia

55

Full-wave Simulations of LH Wave Propagation in Toroidal Plasma with non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The generation of energetic tails in the electron distribution function is intrinsic to lower-hybrid (LH) heating and current drive in weakly collisional magnetically confined plasma. The effects of these deformations on the RF deposition profile have previously been examined within the ray approximation. Recently, the calculation of full-wave propagation of LH waves in a thermal plasma has been accomplished using an adaptation of the TORIC code. Here, initial results are presented from TORIC simulations of LH propagation in a toroidal plasma with non-thermal electrons. The required efficient computation of the hot plasma dielectric tensor is accomplished using a technique previously demonstrated in full-wave simulations of ICRF propagation in plasma with non-thermal ions.

E.J. Valeo, C.K. Phillips, P.T. Bonoli, J.C. Wright, M. Brambilla, and the RF SciDAC Team

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fate of SO{sub 2} During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} to achieve efficient reduction of NO{sub x} and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO{sub 2} is also active in converting SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without oxidizing SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO{sub 2}.

Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Plasma heating in the very early and decay phases of solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) on September 20, 2002 and March 17, 2002, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in non-thermal electron beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light-curves. We showed that energy delivered by non-thermal electrons was fully sufficient to fulfil the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad-hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by non-thermal electrons.

Falewicz, R; Rudawy, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sulfur tolerance of selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO2 to achieve efficient reduction of NOx and particulates in diesel exhaust. These technologies include the use of selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons, NOx adsorption, and continuously regenerated particulate trapping. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO2 is also active in converting SO2 to SO3 . The SO3 leads t o increase in particulates and/or poison active sites on the catalyst. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO2 in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO2 without oxidizing SO2 to SO3 .

Penetrante, B; Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Atmospheric Pressure Low Current Plasma for Syngas Production from Alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure low current arc discharge between graphite electrodes with conical geometry in liquid ethanol/water mixture was investigated. Syngas production was demonstrated over large experimental conditions. In this paper we focus on discharge aspects. It is shown from pictures that the behavior of low current arc discharge with consumable electrodes represents non-stationary plasma. The energetic properties of plasmas can be used to carry out many applications, particularly in discharge based systems. Recently, research interest focuses on the Non Thermal Plasma (NTP) treatment of hydrocarbons, alcohol, or biomass aimed to improve the yield of synthetic gas (syngas: H2+CO) production at low cost [1, 4]. Experiments were performed on a plasma reactor consisting of two graphite electrodes with conical shape

Ahmed Khacef; Khadija Arabi; Olivier Aubry; Jean Marie Cormier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nicholas Camillone III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanometer-Thick Covalently-Bound Organic Overlayers" N. Camillone III, T. Pak, K. Adib, K.A. Khan, and R.M. Osgood, Jr. J. Phys. Chem. B, 110, 11334 (2006). Full Publications List...

64

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most and promote H2O and CO2 production. Keywords: Plasma reformer, syngas, diesel fuel reforming, NOx trap. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

MATERIALS PROCESSING FUNDAMENTALS: III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

8:30 am. THERMAL PLASMA ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOR INFILTRATION: Patrick R. Taylor, Banqiu Wu, Edgar E. Vidal, University of Idaho, Department of...

66

Levitated Dipole Experiment MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Shaping Control) Hot Electron Plasma (500,000,000 °K) Vessel Levitation Coil Charging Coil Floating Coil current-carrying conductor to investigate convective- cell and field-error control with weak toroidal between edge plasma and a hot plasma core, (iii) the possible elimination of drift-wave turbulence

67

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Volume III, Issue 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

69

Spectrum of Solar Type I Continuum Noise Storm in the 50- 80 MHz band, and Plasma characteristics in the associated source region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuum observations of a solar noise storm in the frequency range of 50-80 MHz observed with the Gauribidanur radio spectrograph during 2000 September, 26 & 27, are presented here. The radio spectral index of the noise storm continuum in the band 50- 80 MHz is found to be ? 3.65 during the above period. The Noise Storm continuum radiation is explained as a consequence of the non-thermal, plasma emission mechanism. The beam-density of suprathermal electrons is estimated for the coronal plasma near the source region of storm radiation. Supplementary evidence for the density-estimate is provided by way of analysing the imaging data from the SXT on-board the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the LASCO, MDI, and EIT on board the SoHO spacecraft. Subject headings: Sun: radio radiation radiation mechanisms: non-thermal

G. A. Shanmugha Sundaram; K. R. Subramanian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plasma Aftertreatment for Simultaneous Control of NOx and Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NO{sub x} converter. The soluble organic fraction (SOF) of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The NO{sub 2} can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. This paper examines the energy density required for oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons and the fate of NO{sub 2} during the oxidation of the particulate carbon. The energy density required for complete oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons is shown to be unacceptably large. The reaction of NO{sub 2} with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. These results suggest that the use of a catalyst in combination with the plasma will be required to efficiently reduce the NO{sub x} and oxidize the SOF hydrocarbons.

Penetrante, B.M.; Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Pitz, W.J.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Plasma Kinetics in the Ethanol/Water/Air Mixture in "Tornado" Type Electrical Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a new modification of the "tornado" type electrical discharge. Numerical modeling clarifies the nature of the non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of nonequilibrium plasma-chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

Levko, D; Chernyak, V; Olszewski, S; Nedybaliuk, O

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

LEAN NO{sub X} REDUCTION BY PLASMA ASSISTED CATA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The widespread use of light duty diesel engines in the United States would naturally lead to a large reduction of fuel consumption, due to their generally higher efficiency. By extension, savings in fuel consumption would decrease the total CO2 emitted from mobile sources. Although this is a desirable goal, at present a major stumbling block to increased diesel engine use is the difficulty in reducing noxious exhaust components, mainly NOx and particulates, to acceptable levels. We are studying the possibility of reducing NOx emissions through the combination of non-thermal plasma with appropriate catalysts. The broad outline of how this technique works has been worked out both experimentally and theoretically.1-3 The presently accepted model is that a non-thermal plasma in the presence of water, oxygen and hydrocarbon will efficiently convert NO to NO2, while only partially oxidizing the hydrocarbon present. Some catalysts will reduce NO2 (but not necessarily NO) i n the presence of excess oxygen if the proper hydrocarbon is present. In this paper we report results using non-thermal plasma in conjunction with a commonly available zeolite catalyst, NaY, to treat synthetic diesel exhaust. We focus on details of the heterogeneous chemistry on NaY by comparing the thermal and plasma driven chemistry. EXPERIMENT Details of our experiment have been published elsewhere, so only a brief summary is included here.4 Synthetic exhaust gas was created by blending gases from cylinders of known composition using mass flow controllers. Besides NO, the exhaust mixture included CO, CO2, propylene, water, oxygen and nitrogen. A typical mixture contained 6% oxygen, 2% water, and, unless otherwise noted, a 3:1 ratio of propylene to NOx. This corresponds to a 9:1 ratio on a C1 basis. CO and CO2 were sometimes included, but we found that their presence did not materially affect our results. For nitrogen balance experiments we omitted CO and CO2 and replaced the nitrogen bath gas with helium.

Tonkyn, Russell

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electron acceleration during three-dimensional relaxation of an electron beam-return current plasma system in a magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of acceleration during non-linear electron-beam relaxation in magnetized plasma in the case of electron transport in solar flares. The evolution of electron distribution functions is computed using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell electromagnetic code. Analytical estimations under simplified assumptions are made to provide comparisons. We show that, during the non-linear evolution of the beam-plasma system, the accelerated electron population appears. We found that, although the electron beam loses its energy efficiently to the thermal plasma, a noticeable part of the electron population is accelerated. For model cases with initially monoenergetic beams in uniform plasma, we found that the amount of energy in the accelerated electrons above the injected beam-electron energy varies depending the plasma conditions and could be around 10-30% of the initial beam energy. This type of acceleration could be important for the interpretation of non-thermal electron populations in solar f...

Karlicky, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Processing Materials for Properties III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 20, 2008 ... PLEASE NOTE: The PMP-III Conference originally scheduled for December 2008 in Thailand was cancelled by TMS and the co-sponsoring...

75

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,- -.-=* ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January 1987 to obtain information that might assist'in the iden- tification of the source or sources of elevated concentrations of thorium and radium discovered on properties in the vicinity of the Bendix Plant described in the ORNL letter of December 22, 1986, to

76

Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III III Wind Farm Klondike III III Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser PG&E/PSE/EWEB/BPA Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

Laser-fluorescence measurements of hydrogen and metal densities in the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general overview of the Doublet III laser-spectroscopy program is presented. This program includes tokamak diagnostic experiments and laboratory development work. Measurements of titanium and deuterium in Doublet III are presented along with recent laboratory results. Sputtering of the vacuum walls by energetic charge-exchange neutrals from the plasma center appears to be responsible for the observed Ti impurities in Doublet III. Resonance-fluorescence scattering from deuterium atoms near the plasma center has been observed using a broadband dye laser and a narrow-band detector. The feasibility of determining ion temperatures using this technique is discussed. Using the measured deuterium densities we have calculated a local-electron particle-confinement time. Laboratory measurements of carbon and oxygen densities using two-photon laser excitation and of FeI speed distributions (temperatures) using a laser double-pulse excitation technique are shown to be applicable to the tokamak conditions of Doublet III.

Muller, C.H. III; Eames, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Plasma valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Sharma, Sushil (Hinsdale, IL); Noonan, John (Naperville, IL); Rotela, Elbio (Clarendon Hills, IL); Khounsary, Ali (Hinsdale, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

PLASMA ENERGIZATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

Baker, W.R.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Barnes County ND Coordinates 47.135175°, -97.935219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.135175,"lon":-97.935219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Shiloh III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh III Facility Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Montezuma Hills Coordinates 38.1550771°, -121.7336226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1550771,"lon":-121.7336226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco III Minco III Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco III Facility Minco III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Minco OK Coordinates 35.35444115°, -98.13928127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.35444115,"lon":-98.13928127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

Plasma Nitrocarburizing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...heat pollution Reduced processing times Reduced energy consumption Reduced treatment gas consumption Industrial plasma nitrocarburizing processing modules contain: Vacuum furnace Vacuum system Gas supply with gas mixing and pressure control system Electric power supply unit Microprocessor control unit...

85

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: III: YBCO Conductor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: Session III: YBCO Conductor Development. Sponsored by: Jt: EMPMD/SMD Superconducting Materials...

86

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta III Alta III Facility Alta III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

87

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Studies of plasma transport  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the charge-coupled device camera and other plasma diagnostic equipment used to measure plasma density and other plasma properties. (LSP)

Malmberg, J.H.; O' Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.

1991-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

89

PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wroclaw, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland); Siarkowski, M., E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: ms@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

ICP dry etching of III-V nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN, AlN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was investigated in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of dc bias, and ICP power. The etch rates were generally quite low, as is common for III-nitrides in CH{sub 4} based chemistries. The etch rates increased with increasing dc bias. At low rf power (150 W), the etch rates increased with increasing ICP power, while at 350 W rf power, a peak was found between 500 and 750 W ICP power. The etched surfaces were found to be smooth, while selectivities of etch were {le} 6 for InN over GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN under all conditions.

Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Extraction of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) from citrate medium by high molecular weight amines  

SciTech Connect

High molecular weight amines have been used for the extraction of citrate complexes of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III). The effect of different variables on extraction has been studied. The citrate species extracted in the organic phase have been proposed as ((RNH/sub 3//sup +/)/sub 3/) (M(Cit)/sub 2/)/sup 3 -/.

Jain, A.; Singh, O.V.; Tandon, S.N.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Potentiometric studies on mixed ligand complexes of La (III), Pr (III), and Nd (III) with nitrilotriacetic acid and mercapto acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to investigate the systems MAL (where M = La (III), Pr (III), or Nd (III), A = NTA, and L = TGA or TMEA) in order to observe the contribution of pi-interaction in the M-S bond.

Tandon, J.P.; Rana, H.S.; Sharma, M.K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session III: Processing, Microstructure and Properties. Sponsored by: MSD Flow & Fracture and Phase...

95

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

96

Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.

Penetrante, B

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

98

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts TRUPACT-III Quick Facts Please see below for TRUPACT-III fact sheet. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts More Documents & Publications EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement...

99

Feasibility of plasma aftertreatment for simultaneous control of NOx and particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NOx converter. Particulate trapping in a plasma reactor can be accomplished by electrostatic precipitation. The soluble organic fraction of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the hydrocarbon-enhanced oxidation of NO to NO2 . The NO2 can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. The oxidation of the carbon fraction by NO2 can lead to reduction of NOx or backconversion of NO2 to NO. This paper examines the hydrocarbon and electrical energy density requirements in a plasma for maximum NOx conversion in both heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engine exhaust. The energy density required for complete oxidation of hydrocarbons is also examined and shown to be much greater than that required for maximum NOx conversion. The reaction of NO2 with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO2 to NO. These results suggest that the combination of the plasma with a catalyst will be required to reduce the NOx and oxidize the hydrocarbons. The plasma reactor can be operated occasionally in the arc mode to thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates.

Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Penetrante, B; Pitz, W J; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

The calculation of satellite line structures in highly stripped plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recently developed high-resolution x-ray spectrographs have made it possible to measure satellite structures from various plasma sources with great detail. These lines are weak optically thin lines caused by the decay of dielectronic states and generally accompany the resonance lines of H-like and He-like ions. The Los Alamos atomic physics and kinetics codes provide a unique capability for calculating the position and intensities of such lines. These programs have been used to interpret such highly resolved spectral measurements from pulsed power devices and laser produced plasmas. Some of these experiments were performed at the LANL Bright Source and Trident laser facilities. The satellite structures are compared with calculations to diagnose temperatures and densities. The effect of non-thermal electron distributions of electrons on calculated spectra was also considered. Collaborations with Russian scientists have added tremendous value to this research die to their vast experience in x-ray spectroscopy.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Kilcrease, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond  

SciTech Connect

An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Decameter Type III-Like Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

V. N. Melnik; A. A. Konovalenko; B. P. Rutkevych; H. O. Rucker; V. V. Dorovskyy; E. P. Abranin; A. Lecacheux; A. I. Brazhenko; A. A. Stanislavskyy

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute; Javier LLorca,...

104

PMP-III 2008: Travel - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PMP-III: Travel. For Thailand and Bangkok travel information, visit the Tourism Authority of Thailand. AIRORT TRANSPORTATION. Public metered taxi is the...

105

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

106

SNAP-III--THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR ENVIRONMENTAL TEST. VOLUME III  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests on four thermoelectric generators (two each of two different configurations) of the Snap III type to both the J.P.L. and the L.M.S.D. specifications for shock, vibration. and acceleration test are reported. The simulated levels were based on the anticipated environments of the Vega (J.P.L.) and WS117L (L.M.S.D.) systems. All four generators exhibited the same characteristic behavior pattern throughout the vibration portion of the test prograna, showing a d-c ripple in the generator output only in the Y place. This behavior of the generator is attributed to the oscillatory change in internal resistance resulting from vibratory elastic deformation of the thermoelectric elements. This produces a transient in the electrical output with a resultant reduction in generator efficiency. The maximum reduction in efficiency was noted in the 700 cps region. A resonance on the generator shell at 1845 cps was noted, but generator electrical output and efficiency were not affected. Upon discontinuance of the induced vibration, the generators returned to normal operating conditions. While undergoing shock test, a d-c transient was noted at the time of impact, resulting in a slight decrease in effi ciency. The generators immediately returned to their normal operating efficiency. In the acceleration portion of the test no d-c transient was evident in any of the three planes, therefore the generator efficiency remained constant. Steady state conditions were re-established at the start of each new test phase (i.e., changing planes of excitation, changing from shock to vibration, etc.). Thus, any variation from pretest efficiency was attributed to the external load resistance becoming umnatched due to the change in internal resistance. The important result is that complete generator recovery was consistent in all cases and normal operation continued The generator, shell, internal structure and pressure, and the hot and cold junction temperature were not affected during the test. As a result of this test program, it was concluded that the Snap III thermoelectric generator will operate reliably in the enviromnents associated with the Vega and WS117L vehicles. (auth)

Gross, L.W.; Schramm, E.J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

John Hale III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hale III John Hale III About Us John Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small disadvantaged, 8(a), women-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, and Historically Underutilized Business Zone businesses. He

110

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Washoe, Nevada Coordinates 40.5608387°, -119.6035495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5608387,"lon":-119.6035495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

112

Plasma sweeper. [Patents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

1982-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Absence of Plasma in "Spark Plasma Sintering"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigations on the spark plasma sintering/synthesisinvestigations on the spark plasma sintering/synthesisLichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials

Hulbert, Dustin M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Plasma diagnostics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of superheated and electrically charged gases known as plasmas. PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and...

116

Plasma processes in non-ideal plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-ideal plasma equation of state, radiative cross-sections and energy exchange coefficients are described in a tutorial overview.

More, R.M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Plasma Astrophysics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which gives rise to astrophysical events that include auroras, solar flares and geomagnetic storms. The process occurs when the magnetic field lines in plasmas break and...

118

Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop April 15, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One (Photo by Elle Starkman PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL postdoctoral fellow...

119

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings...

120

Waverly III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waverly III Wind Farm Waverly III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly III Wind Farm Facility Waverly III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Waverly Light & Power Developer Waverly Light & Power Energy Purchaser Waverly Light & Power Location Waverly IA Coordinates 42.7241°, -92.4786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7241,"lon":-92.4786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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121

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (a) III (a) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (a) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

124

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenrock III Wind Farm Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenrock III Wind Farm Facility Glenrock III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser EnXco Location Converse WY Coordinates 43.0347917°, -105.8439737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0347917,"lon":-105.8439737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Spectrum of Solar Type I Continuum Noise Storm in the 50 - 80 MHz band, and Plasma characteristics in the associated source region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuum observations of a solar noise storm in the frequency range of 50 - 80 MHz observed with the Gauribidanur radio spectrograph during 2000 September, 26 & 27, are presented here. The radio spectral index of the noise storm continuum in the band 50 - 80 MHz is found to be ~3.65 during the above period. The Noise Storm continuum radiation is explained as a consequence of the non-thermal, plasma emission mechanism. The beam-density of suprathermal electrons is estimated for the coronal plasma near the source region of storm radiation. Supplementary evidence for the density-estimate is provided by way of analysing the imaging data from the SXT on-board the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the LASCO, MDI, and EIT on board the SoHO spacecraft.

G. A. Shanmugha Sundaram; K. R. Subramanian

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Spectrum of Solar Type I Continuum Noise Storm in the 50 - 80 MHz band, and Plasma characteristics in the associated source region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuum observations of a solar noise storm in the frequency range of 50 - 80 MHz observed with the Gauribidanur radio spectrograph during 2000 September, 26 & 27, are presented here. The radio spectral index of the noise storm continuum in the band 50 - 80 MHz is found to be ~3.65 during the above period. The Noise Storm continuum radiation is explained as a consequence of the non-thermal, plasma emission mechanism. The beam-density of suprathermal electrons is estimated for the coronal plasma near the source region of storm radiation. Supplementary evidence for the density-estimate is provided by way of analysing the imaging data from the SXT on-board the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the LASCO, MDI, and EIT on board the SoHO spacecraft.

Sundaram, G A S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Plasma Kinetic Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic and Kinetic Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

128

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INLs Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

129

Model of detached plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Recently a tokamak plasma was observed in TFTR that was not limited by a limiter or a divertor. A model is proposed to explain this equilibrium, which is called a detached plasma. The model consists of (1) the core plasma where ohmic heating power is lost by anomalous heat conduction and (2) the shell plasma where the heat from the core plasma is radiated away by the atomic processes of impurity ions. A simple scaling law is proposed to test the validity of this model.

Yoshikawa, S.; Chance, M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mirror plasma apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma.

Moir, Ralph W. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Charge exchange measurements on the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two passive charge exchange analyzers were installed on the Doublet III tokamak. Both were of the E parallel B type, permitting H-D discrimination by mass. Deuterons with energies up to about 90 keV could be observed at the highest spectrometer magnetic fields available. Beam injection energy on Doublet III was typically 75 keV. One of the analyzers could scan across the beam injection angle of approximately 27/sup 0/ at the magnetic axis, while the other analyzer observed parallel neutral flux across nearly the entire cross section from about 10 cm inside the limiter to tangency radii of about 85 cm, intersecting the centerpost. Beam injection was angled toward the direction of positive plasma current and co-going particles were generally observed by both analyzers. When neutral beam power was increased in steps, generally the observed fast neutral flux did not increase proportionally at higher power levels. In addition, the parallel analyzer in a few cases showed evidence for a fast particle loss at a single energy, with the distribution function being filled in from higher and lower energies. Flux bursts were observed in synchronism with limiter H/sub ..cap alpha../ spikes at the low energy range of the parallel analyzer. The perpendicular analyzer, observing fast particles near their injected pitch angle, detected bursts at all energies, with especially pronounced correlation with H/sub ..cap alpha../ activity at high energies. When fishbone activity was seen magnetically, simultaneous bursts were often, but not always, observed on the perpendicular analyzer, but were never seen on the parallel instrument.

Lohr, J.; Armentrout, C.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Cost Considerations III: Cost Considerations Moderator: Dana Christensen Panelists: Phil Macey Paul Torcellini Rich von Luhrte NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Road to Net Zero Dana Christensen Deputy Laboratory Director Science & Technology RSF Workshop July 27-28, 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Managing Costs Paul Torcellini, PhD, PE Group Manager, Advanced Commercial Buildings Research Group Innovation for Our Energy Future 4 I II III IV Value Added 5 * Owner made tough decisions up-front * Set budget * Sought maximum value for that budget

133

Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kotzebue Wind Project III Kotzebue Wind Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.83716°, -162.556955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.83716,"lon":-162.556955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

134

Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pomeroy III Wind Farm Pomeroy III Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pocahontas County IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoney Corners III Stoney Corners III Facility Stoney Corners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209°, -85.275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.209,"lon":-85.275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Crystal Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Crystal Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Hancock/Winnebago Counties IA Coordinates 43.304401°, -93.824029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.304401,"lon":-93.824029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

138

III-Nitride Semiconductors for Photovoltaic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a band-structure method that includes bandgap correction, we study the chemical trends of the bandgap variation in III-V semiconductors and predict that the bandgap for InN is 0.85 0.1 eV. This result suggests that InN and its III-nitride alloys are suitable for photovoltaic applications. The unusually small bandgap for InN is explained in terms of the atomic energies and the bandgap deformation potentials. The electronic and structural properties of the nitrides and their alloys are also provided.

Wei, S. H.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

Chen Naihwa; Ip, Wing-Huen [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Innes, Davina, E-mail: d949001@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

What is a plasma?  

SciTech Connect

This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

142

Study of Methane Reforming in Warm Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of natural gas in remote locations necessitates on-site conversion of methane into liquid fuels or high value products. The first step in forming high value products is the production of ethylene and acetylene. Non-thermal plasmas, due to their unique nonequilibrium characteristics, offer advantages over traditional methods of methane reforming. Different kinds of non-thermal plasmas are being investigated for methane reforming. Parameters of these processes like flow rate, discharge size, temperature and other variables determine efficiency of conversion. An efficient process is identified by a high yield and low specific energy of production for the desired product. A study of previous work reveals that higher energy density systems are more efficient for methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons as compared to low energy density systems. Some of the best results were found to be in the regime of warm discharges. Thermal equilibrium studies indicate that higher yields of ethylene are possible with an optimal control of reaction kinetics and fast quenching. With this idea, two different glow discharge reactor systems are designed and constructed for investigation of methane reforming. A counter flow micro plasma discharge system was used to investigate the trends of methane reforming products and the control parameters were optimized to get best possible ethylene yields while minimizing its specific energy. Later a magnetic glow discharge system is used and better results are obtained. Energy costs lower than thermal equilibrium calculations were achieved with magnetic glow discharge systems for both ethylene and acetylene. Yields are obtained from measurements of product concentrations using gas chromatography and power measurements are done using oscilloscope. Energy balance and mass balances are performed for product measurement accuracy and carbon deposition calculations. Carbon deposition is minimized through control of the temperature and residence time conditions in magnetic glow discharges. Ethylene production is observed to have lower specific energies at higher powers and lower flow rates in both reactors. An ethylene selectivity of 40 percent is achieved at an energy cost of 458MJ/Kg and an input energy cost of 5 MJ/Kg of methane.

Parimi, Sreekar

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport in tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Dissertationtransport model for edge plasma . . . . . . 6.1 Anomalous

Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

PlasmaMethane Reformation  

INL thermal plasma methane reformation process produces hydrogen and elemental carbon from natural gas and other hydrocarbons, such as natural gas or ...

146

Plasma-Quench  

INL has developed a thermal plasma quench to cool the heat generated from rapid chemical reactions, preventing adverse reactions or decompositions to ...

147

Physics of Complex Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Physics of complex plasmas is a wide and varied field. In the context of this PhD thesis I present the major results from my research (more)

Stterlin, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Spark Plasma Sintering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 21, 2010 ... Coupled Electro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Conventional (SPS) and Free Pressureless (FPSPS) Spark-Plasma Sintering: Eugene...

149

Plasma-Borohydride  

INLs Plasma-Borohydride process produces borohydride from sodium borate which is capable of forming a chemical hydride for a storage medium of hydrogen.

150

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 000521 & 000519...

151

Plasma technology directory  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Triggered plasma opening switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Triggered plasma opening switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

Mendel, C.W.

1986-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Plasma-based accelerator structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle Beam Dynamics in. a Hollow Plasma Channel 3.1Structure of the Hollow Plasma Channel . . . . 2.2.1 ChannelLimit . . 5.2.6 Laser-Plasma Instabilities . . . 5.3

Schroeder, C.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

Chang, C.C.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Plasma opening switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM); Mendel, Jr., Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mergers and Non-Thermal Processes in Clusters of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clusters of galaxies generally form by the gravitational merger of smaller clusters and groups. Major cluster mergers are the most energetic events in the Universe since the Big Bang. The basic properties of cluster mergers and their effects will be discussed. Mergers drive shocks in the intracluster gas, and these shocks heat the intracluster gas, and should also accelerate nonthermal relativistic particles. Mergers also produce distinctive features in the X-ray images of clusters, including "cold fronts" and cool trails. Chandra and XMM/Newton observations of the X-ray signatures of mergers will be discussed. X-ray observations of shocks and cold fronts can be used to determine the geometry and kinematics of the merger. As a result of particle acceleration in shocks and turbulent acceleration following mergers, clusters of galaxies should contain very large populations of relativistic electrons and ions. Observations and models for the radio, extreme ultraviolet, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emission from nonthermal particles accelerated in these shocks will also be described.

Craig L. Sarazin

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Understanding Non-thermal Microwave Effects in Materials Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Difference between Life and Death of Bacterium against Microwave Power under ... Sintering and Plastic Deformation of Ceramics under Pulsed Electric Current.

159

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

160

Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

Ghomi, Hamid [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Campus of Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shukla, Padma Kant [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b) b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

162

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apollo Energy III LLC Apollo Energy III LLC Place Delaware, Delaware Product The company owns and operates a landfill gas to liquiefied natural gas production facility. Coordinates 39.145271°, -75.418762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.145271,"lon":-75.418762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Andes, and E. Hudson, Plasma Processes and Polymers 6,J. P. Booth, and G. Cunge, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 5,and B. M. Alexandrovich, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 1,

Titus, Monica Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Plasma control and utilization  

SciTech Connect

A plasma is confined and heated by a microwave field resonant in a cavity excited in a combination of the TE and TM modes while responding to the resonant frequency of the cavity as the plasma dimensions change to maintain operation at resonance. The microwave field is elliptically or circularly polarized as to prevent the electromagnetic confining field from going to zero. A high Q chamber having superconductive walls is employed to minimize wall losses while providing for extraction of thermonuclear energy produced by fusion of nuclei in the plasma.

Ensley, Donald L. (Danville, CA)

1976-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

BOUNDARY EFFECTS IN ROTATING-PLASMA EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The problem of current continuity and viscous drag at the boundaries in rotating-plasma experiments is discussed. A hypothetical model having a steady state with axial symmetry is emphasized; it is shown that the discharge impedance derived from this model does not agree with many observations. The Homopolar III'' experiment is described in which the flux surfaces were strongly convex and parallel to the toroidal-shaped electrodes. In this way friction at the insulators was reduced. But the structure of the discharge deviated drastically from axial symmetry near the outer surface. Several studies led to the conclusion that the flow pattern probably involved secondary flows. A detailed analysis of this structure was not possible. It was also found that the rotational speed could not be raised above a few cm/ mu sec because the insulators failed in spite of the special design of the experiment. 28 references. (auth)

Kunkel, W.B.; Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, A.; Halbach, K.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

169

Fizeau plasma interferometer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a technique by which the sensitivity of plasma interferometers can be increased. Stabilization and fractional fringe measurement techniques have improved to the point where additional optical sensitivity could be useful. (MOW)

Frank, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Plasma Screen Floating Mount  

Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have invented a new mounting system for flat panel video technology. The plasma screen floating mount is a mounting system proven to eliminate vibration and dampen shock for mobile uses of ...

171

Induction plasma tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

Hull, D.E.

1982-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Induction plasma tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

Hull, Donald E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Plasma-based accelerator structures  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

Schroeder, Carl B.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Plasma Formation, Measurement and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beauty found in looking at plasmas in the world inspires future generations of engineers and scientists While factory walls hide them from sight industrial plasmas are no less ubiquitous Cover-photo: Another day filled with plasma, 26 December 1996. Multiexposure photograph of the midnight sun in Antarctica. Courtesy of Dr. Darryn A. Schneider, PhD in plasma physics. 1

Albert R. Ellingboe; Miles M. Turner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electrostatics of moving plasma  

SciTech Connect

The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

Ignatov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oscillations in quasineutral plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to describe the limit, as the vacuum electric permittivity goes to zero, of a plasma physics system, deduced from the Vlasov-Poisson system for special initial data (distribution functions which are analytic in the space variable, with compact support in velocity), a limit also called {open_quotes}quasineutral regime{close_quotes} of the plasma, and the related oscillations of the electric field, with high frequency in time. 20 refs.

Grenier, E. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications.

178

Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later Operable Unit III documents and Operable Units I and II post-Record of Decision documents are located in the Information Repository. Complete copies of the records are located at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503, and at the Monticello Field Office, 1665 S. Main Street,

179

Plasma jet ignition device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Plasma cleaning for waste minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although plasma cleaning is a recognized substitute for solvent cleaning in removing organic contaminants, some universal problems in plasma cleaning processes prevent wider use of plasma techniques. Lack of understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of the process, unreliable endpoint detection techniques, and slow process times make plasma cleaning processes less than desirable. Our approach to address these plasma cleaning problems is described. A comparison of plasma cleaning rates of oxygen and oxygen/sulfur hexafluoride gases shows that fluorine-containing plasmas can enhance etch rates by 400% over oxygen alone. A discussion of various endpoint indication techniques is discussed and compared for application suitability. Work toward a plasma cleaning database is discussed. In addition to the global problems of plasma cleaning, an experiment where the specific mixed-waste problem of removal of machine oils from radioactive scrap metal is discussed.

Ward, P.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

Hazeltine, R.D.

1998-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

183

Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III - Permitting and Initial Development III - Permitting and Initial Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase III: Permitting and Initial Development GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

184

Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Revise TRUPACT-III Management Language * Revise Procedure Reference for the Bolting Station in Table...

185

Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

Tjandra, Meiliana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SunShot Initiative: Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions...

187

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

188

Perturbations in a plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The perturbations of a homogeneous non-relativistic two-component plasma are studied in the Coulomb gauge. Starting from the solution found [2] of the equations of electromagnetic self consistency in a plasma [1], we add small perturbations to all quantities involved, and we enter the perturbed quantities in the equations, keeping only the first order terms in the perturbations. Because the unperturbed quantities are solutions of the equations, they cancel each other, and we are left with a set of 12 linear equations for the 12 perturbations (unknown quantities). Then we solve this set of linearized equations, in the approximation of small ratio of the masses of electrons over those of ions, and under the assumption that the plasma remains homogeneous.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Furth Plasma Physics Libary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Hours Online Access Directions Contacts Hours Online Access Directions QuickFind Main Catalog Databases PPPL Publications & Reports/PPLcat Plasma Physics E-Journals clear Click arrows to scroll for more clear Plasma Physics Colloquia The Global Carbon Cycle and Earth's Climate - January 15, 2014 Addressing Big Data Challenges in Simulation-based Science - January 22, 2014 "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge?: The History of the Institute for Advanced Study - January 29, 2014 PM-S-1 PDF PM-S-2 PDF PM-S-3 PDF PM-S-4 PDF PM-S-5 PDF PM-S-6 PDF See All Library History Intro 950 1960-1970 1980 1990 2000 Quick Order Article Express Borrow Direct Interlibrary Loan PPL Book Request More Resources and Services Search & Find Articles & Databases - Plasma Physics, Physics, Engineering & Technology,

190

N-polar III-nitride quantum well light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen-polar III-nitride heterostructures present unexplored advantages over Ga(metal)-polar crystals for optoelectronic devices. This work reports N-polar III-nitride quantum-well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy that integrate polarization-induced p-type doping by compositional grading from GaN to AlGaN along N-face. The graded AlGaN layer simultaneously acts as an electron blocking layer while facilitating smooth injection of holes into the active region, while the built-in electric field in the barriers improves carrier injection into quantum wells. The enhanced doping, carrier injection, and light extraction indicate that N-polar structures have the potential to exceed the performance of metal-polar ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

Verma, Jai; Simon, John; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kosel, Thomas; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER PlasmaTurbulenceCSChang.png Tokamak turbulence showing inward-propagating streamers from normalized...

192

A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Sputtering with a Plasma Lens", December 7, 2009 (V. M. Khoroshikh, "Motion of plasma streams from a vacuumarc in a long, straight plasma optics system," Sov. J.

Anders, Andre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quark-Gluon Plasma Thermalization and Plasma Instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk, I review the important role played by plasma instabilities in the thermalization of quark-gluon plasmas at very high energy. [Conference talk presented at Strong and Electroweak Mattter 2004, Helsinki, Finland, June 16--19.

Peter Arnold

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

A plasma source for system for microwave plasma experiments (SYMPLE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system "SYMPLE" is being developed at our laboratory to investigate the interaction of high power microwave and plasma. A brief account on the development of a plasma source that satisfies the prerequisites required for SYMPLE is discussed.

V. P. Anitha; Renu Bahl; Priyavandna J. Rathod; Jayesh Raval; Y. C. Saxena

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic properties related to fossil energy conversion and carbon dioxide decomposition. Non-thermal plasma is an ionized gas comprised of a mixture of charged particles (electrons, ions), active chemical radicals (O 3 , O, OH), and highly excited species that are known to accelerate reforming reactions in

197

Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 3.0 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2A 2.6 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2B c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout disposed to date Not Applicable 1.4 x 10 4 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L

198

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

199

Notices III. Summary of Public Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32 Federal Register 32 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 246 / Friday, December 21, 2012 / Notices III. Summary of Public Comments Received and Agency Response to Comments During the public comment period provided, EPA received no comments in response to the September 26, 2012 Federal Register notice announcing the Agency's receipt of the requests for voluntary cancellation and termination of all uses of products listed in Table 1 of Unit II. IV. Cancellation Order Pursuant to FIFRA section 6(f), EPA hereby approves the requested cancellation and termination of all uses of halofenozide registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. Accordingly, the Agency hereby orders that the product registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. are canceled and all uses of halofenozide are terminated. The

200

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

202

Thermal plasma processing of materials  

SciTech Connect

Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Particle energization in 3D magnetic reconnection of relativistic pair plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present large scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations to examine particle energization in magnetic reconnection of relativistic electron-positron (pair) plasmas. The initial configuration is set up as a relativistic Harris equilibrium without a guide field. These simulations are large enough to accommodate a sufficient number of tearing and kink modes. Contrary to the non-relativistic limit, the linear tearing instability is faster than the linear kink instability, at least in our specific parameters. We find that the magnetic energy dissipation is first facilitated by the tearing instability and followed by the secondary kink instability. Particles are mostly energized inside the magnetic islands during the tearing stage due to the spatially varying electric fields produced by the outflows from reconnection. Secondary kink instability leads to additional particle acceleration. Accelerated particles are, however, observed to be thermalized quickly. The large amplitude of the vertical magnetic field resulting from the tearing modes by the secondary kink modes further help thermalizing the non-thermal particles generated from the secondary kink instability. Implications of these results for astrophysics are briefly discussed.

Liu Wei; Yin Lin; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Liang, Edison P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Li Hui

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chapter 18. Plasma Electrodynamics and Applications Plasma Electrodynamics and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the electrodynamics of waves in plasmas, with phenomena relevant to controlled fusion energy generation in high transformation of a cold-plasma extraordinary (X) wave to a kinetic electron-Bernstein wave (EBW and current drive in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Section 3, in particular, describes the analysis

205

Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kA, 140 s long, with B = 3 T. Fig. 3. Photograph of plasmaindicating plasma rotation near the axis (cathode ring 2 cmcoupling efficiency," Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, pp. 072701-7,

Anders, Andre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Burning Plasma Support Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Plasma Support Research Program on Alcator C-Mod Presented by: Stephen M. Wolfe Alcator C-Mod Five Year Proposal Review MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center Cambridge, MA May...

207

Fusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Despite the cold war, which raged for another 30 years, controlled fusion research became a modelFusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, John Webster - editor, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1999) #12;Controlled Fusion For half a century

Greenwald, Martin

208

Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic Wave Theory / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

D. Van Eester; E. Lerche

209

Magnetoacoustic solitons in quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in collisionless homogenous, magnetized quantum plasma is studied. Two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic model (QMHD) is employed and reductive perturbation method is used to derive Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation for magnetoacoustic waves. The effects of plasma density and magnetic field intensity are investigated on magnetoacoustic solitary structures in quantum plasma. The numerical results are also presented, which are applicable to explain some aspects of the propagation of nonlinear magnetoacosutic wave in dense astrophysical plasma situations.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM), PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Build Your Own Pentium III PC, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Build your own Pentium III PC and save a bundle!Why pay big bucks for a Pentium III system when legendary build-it-yourself guru Aubrey Pilgrim can help you construct one at home for a fraction of dealer prices? In Build Your Own Pentium ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

III-Nitride LEDs with photonic crystal structures.  

SciTech Connect

Electrical operation of III-Nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic crystal structures is demonstrated. Employing photonic crystal structures in III-Nitride LEDs is a method to increase light extraction efficiency and directionality. The photonic crystal is a triangular lattice formed by dry etching into the III-Nitride LED. A range of lattice constants is considered (a {approx} 270-340nm). The III-Nitride LED layers include a tunnel junction providing good lateral current spreading without a semi-absorbing metal current spreader as is typically done in conventional III-Nitride LEDs. These photonic crystal III-Nitride LED structures are unique because they allow for carrier recombination and light generation proximal to the photonic crystal (light extraction area) yet displaced from the absorbing metal contact. The photonic crystal Bragg scatters what would have otherwise been guided modes out of the LED, increasing the extraction efficiency. The far-field light radiation patterns are heavily modified compared to the typical III-Nitride LED's Lambertian output. The photonic crystal affects the light propagation out of the LED surface, and the radiation pattern changes with lattice size. LEDs with photonic crystals are compared to similar III-Nitride LEDs without the photonic crystal in terms of extraction, directionality, and emission spectra.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Sigalas, M. M. (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA); Epler, J. E. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Krames, M. R. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Li, D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Shagam, M. (Boston University, Boston, MA); Gardner, N. F. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Wierer, Jonathan J. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Properties of diverted plasmas with magnetically expanded flux surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical elongated 1.3:1 elliptical plasmas in which the outermost flux surfaces are magnetically expanded and diverted by external coils into the lower half of the Doublet III vacuum vessel are described. Approximately 5 cm of the nominal 45 cm plasma minor radius is diverted to the lower chamber. The diverted flux is expanded by more than a factor of ten before reaching the vessel wall. Photographic measurements show diffused hydrogen recycling light in the lower half of the vessel, with greatly reduced recycling at the normal limiters, and no evidence of localized particle flow to the vessel wall. A significant amount (approx. 50%) of the ohmic power is radiated in the expanded boundary region. Comparison of similar low density plasmas (approx. 2 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/) with and without the expanded boundary shows that (1) the expanded boundary reduces the influx of nickel and oxygen impurities by an order of magnitude, (2) the boundary also reduces the influx of injected argon and helium by a similar factor, and (3) the concentration of argon in a non-diverted plasma is reduced by a factor of 10 when the expanded boundary is turned on. The central radiated power falls by an order of magnitude, to less than 0.01 W/cm/sup 3/. Similarly, Z/sub eff/(0) drops from 3.2 to 2.1.

Ali Mahdavi, M.; Ohyabu, N.; Baker, D.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

High-temperature plasma physics  

SciTech Connect

Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

Furth, H.P.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Burning Plasma Developments Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Developments Dale Meade Presented to VLT Program Advisory Committee UCLA December 4 and Burning Plasma Issues · NSO PAC Activities First Meeting July 20-21, 2001 at GA Action Items and Status Second Meeting January 17-18, 2001 at MIT Agenda items · FuSAC Recommendation on a burning plasma

216

Controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas Kinetic Study of Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma flow physics in magnetic nozzles must be clearly understood for optimal design of plasma propulsion devices. Toward that end, in this thesis we: i) perform an extensive literature survey of magnetic nozzle physics, ii) assess the validity of magnetohydrodynamics for studying magnetic nozzle physics, and iii) illustrate the effects of the Hall term in simple flows as well as in magnetic nozzle configurations through numerical experiments with the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM). The crucial steps necessary for thrust generation in magnetic nozzles are energy conversion, plasma detachment, and momentum transfer. These three physical phenomena must be understood to optimize magnetic nozzle design. The operating dimensionless parameter ranges of six prominent experiments are considered and the corresponding mechanisms are discussed. An order of magnitude analysis of the governing equations reveal: i) most magnetic nozzles under consideration operate at the edge of the continuum regime rendering continuum-based description and computation valid; ii) in the context of MHD framework, the generalized Ohms law must be used to capture all of the relevant physics. This work also continues the development of the Magneto Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM) computational tool. Validation of the solver is performed in shock-tube and Hartmann channel flows in the Hall physics regime. Comparison with theory and available data is made whenever possible. Novel numerical experiments of magnetic nozzle plasma jets in the Hall regime are performed, confirming the theoretically predicted azimuthal rotation of the plasma jet due to Hall physics. The primary conclusion from this work is that the addition of the Hall effect generates helical structures in magnetic nozzle plasma flows. Preliminary results are encouraging for future magnetic nozzle studies and further challenges are identified.

Ebersohn, Frans 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Instabilities and pattern formation in lowtemperature plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the plasma region is approximately 20cm. (Produced by the Plasma Research Laboratory, Dublin City University

219

applications of sensors and modeling to materials processing: iii - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... based sensor is being developed for remote metrology of plasma facing material surfaces in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER ).

220

High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

Clarke, John F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Plasma beat-wave accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

Noble, R.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Experimental Plasma Research project summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Experimental plasma research project summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report contans descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Measurements and Instrumentation; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Closed inductively coupled plasma cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

227

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

228

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

229

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU`s) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU's) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/.s.

Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

1976-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gravitational lensing in plasma: Relativistic images at homogeneous plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the influence of plasma presence on relativistic images formed by Schwarzschild black hole lensing. When a gravitating body is surrounded by a plasma, the lensing angle depends on a frequency of the electromagnetic wave due to refraction properties, and the dispersion properties of the light propagation in gravitational field in plasma. The last effect leads to difference, even in uniform plasma, of gravitational deflection angle in plasma from vacuum case. This angle depends on the photon frequency, what resembles the properties of the refractive prism spectrometer. Here we consider the case of a strong deflection angle for the light, traveling near the Schwarzschild black hole, surrounded by a uniform plasma. Asymptotic formulae are obtained for the case of a very large deflection angle, exceeding $2\\pi$. We apply these formulae for calculation of position and magnification of relativistic images in a homogeneous plasma, which are formed by the photons performing one or several revolutions around the central object. We conclude that the presence of the uniform plasma increases the angular size of relativistic rings or the angular separation of point images from the gravitating center. The presence of the uniform plasma increases also a magnification of relativistic images. The angular separation and the magnification become significantly larger than in the vacuum case, when the photon frequency goes to a plasma frequency.

Oleg Yu. Tsupko; Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Group III-selenides: new silicon compatible semiconducting materials for phase change memory applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project investigates a series of III-Selenide materials (III xSey), where III=Al, Ga and In, through study of the interacting chemical, kinetic and structural constraints (more)

Lu, Chih-Yuan, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

237

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plasma immersion surface modification with metal ion plasma  

SciTech Connect

We describe here a novel technique for surface modification in which metal plasma is employed and by which various blends of plasma deposition and ion implantation can be obtained. The new technique is a variation of the plasma immersion technique described by Conrad and co-workers. When a substrate is immersed in a metal plasma, the plasma that condenses on the substrate remains there as a film, and when the substrate is then implanted, qualitatively different processes can follow, including' conventional' high energy ion implantation, recoil implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam assisted deposition, and metallic thin film and multilayer fabrication with or without species mixing. Multiple metal plasma guns can be used with different metal ion species, films can be bonded to the substrate through ion beam mixing at the interface, and multilayer structures can be tailored with graded or abrupt interfaces. We have fabricated several different kinds of modified surface layers in this way. 22 refs., 4 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Godechot, X. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA) Societe Anonyme d'Etudes et Realisations Nucleaires (SODERN), 94 - Limeil-Brevannes (France))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Manka, C. [Space Plasma Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-9 (excl. 7) for the three thermal energy bands, which eachfor den- sity, thermal energy, & line ratio: propagated fromin the thermal and non-thermal energy ranges (contours at

Caspi, Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

MHD description of plasma: handbook of plasma physics  

SciTech Connect

The basic sets of MHD equations for the description of a plasma in various limits are derived and their usefulness and limits of validity are discussed. These limits are: the one fluid collisional plasma, the two fluid collisional plasma, the Chew-Goldberger Low formulation of the guiding center limit of a collisionless plasma and the double-adiabatic limit. Conservation relations are derived from these sets and the mathematics of the concept of flux freezing is given. An example is given illustrating the differences between guiding center theory and double adiabatic theory.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil  

SciTech Connect

A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

Furth Plasma Physics Library | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

247

COLLOQUIUM: Excitement at the Plasma Boundary" | Princeton Plasma...  

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Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

248

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas | Princeton Plasma...  

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249

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA Regulations, the last version appeared in the Federal Register of Friday, December 21,1984 (49 FR 49754). Note: The specfic contact information is outdated and should not be used for consultation or outreach. Appendix I - Federal and Federal-State Agency NEPA Contacts Appendix II - Federal and Federal- State Agencies With Jurisdiction by Law or Special Expertise on Environmental Quality Issues Appendix III - Federal and Federal-State Agency Offices for

250

Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (EUI) Wind Farm III (EUI) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Energy Unlimited Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157583013418°, -115.63876390457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157583013418,"lon":-115.63876390457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices  

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III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV cell-and then worked with industry to develop the industry-standard GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge) technology. III-V multijunction cells, which address both space and terrestrial power needs, have achieved the highest energy conversion efficiencies of all PV cells, with the current record exceeding 40%.

253

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin- phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility General Information Name GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility Facility GEM Resources III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 3300 East Evan Hewes Highway Location Holtville, California Zip 92250 Coordinates 32.776035405529°, -115.26321172714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.776035405529,"lon":-115.26321172714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Creek III Wind Farm Panther Creek III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek III Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location TX Coordinates 31.9685988°, -99.9018131° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9685988,"lon":-99.9018131,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs....

257

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Weatherization program in Region III: a management study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Weatherization Program, which uses Federal funds and job training program employees to weatherize the homes of low-income homeowners, was examined in the five states of Federal Region III (Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia).

Baldwin, F.D.; Kinney, L.F.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates Speaker(s): Connie Chang-Hasnain Date: February 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location:...

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261

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Facility Pyron (Roscoe III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Near Roscoe TX Coordinates 32.354161°, -100.344825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.354161,"lon":-100.344825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II & III II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.839104°, -162.556894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.839104,"lon":-162.556894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

263

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and

264

Possible fusion reactor. [Movable plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor.

Yoshikawa, S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bumper wall for plasma device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

Coultas, Thomas A. (Hinsdale, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Method for generating surface plasma  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating a discharge plasma which covers a surface of a body in a gas at pressures from 0.01 Torr to atmospheric pressure, by applying a radio frequency power with frequencies between approximately 1 MHz and 10 GHz across a plurality of paired insulated conductors on the surface. At these frequencies, an arc-less, non-filamentary plasma can be generated to affect the drag characteristics of vehicles moving through the gas. The plasma can also be used as a source in plasma reactors for chemical reaction operations.

Miller, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Ben P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." From left, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and Rich Hawryluk. Princeton University Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box...

268

Institute for Plasma Research - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VISIT THE JOM COVER GALLERY. BACK TO RESULTS. SEARCH AGAIN. Institute for Plasma Research. Division - FCIPT, B-15-17/P, GIDC, Electronics zone,...

269

Tours | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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270

CRADA | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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271

Directory | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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272

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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273

WFO | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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274

Education | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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275

Engineering | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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276

Communications | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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277

STEM | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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278

Weather | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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279

History | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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280

ITER | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

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281

About | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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282

Newsletters | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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283

Tokamaks | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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284

Purpose | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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285

How Spherical Plasma Crystals Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlation buildup and the formation dynamics of the shell structure in a spherically confined one-component plasma are studied. Using Langevin dynamics simulations the relaxation processes and characteristic time scales and their dependence on the pair interaction and dissipation in the plasma are investigated. While in systems with Coulomb interaction (e.g., trapped ions) in a harmonic confinement shell formation starts at the plasma edge and proceeds inward, this trend is significantly weakened for dusty plasmas with Yukawa interaction. With a suitable change of the confinement conditions the crystallization scenario can be externally controlled.

Kaehlert, H.; Bonitz, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts Universitaet zu Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Lithium | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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287

Stellarators | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

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288

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Tokamaks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tokamaks A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container. en Multinational achievement: PPPL collaborates...

289

SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NOX IN OXYGEN RICH ENVIRONMENTS WITH PLASMA-ASSISTED CATALYSIS: CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND MECHANISTIC STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ''lean-burn'' vehicle engines remains a challenge. In recent years, there have been a number of reports that show that a plasma device combined with a catalyst can reduce as high as 90% or more of NOx in simulated diesel and other ''lean-burn'' exhaust. In the case of propylene containing simulated diesel exhaust, the beneficial role of a plasma treatment is now thought to be due to oxidation of NO to NO2, and the formation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons that are more active for the catalytic reduction of NO2 than propylene. Thus, the overall system can be most usefully described as hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) enhanced by 'reforming' the exhaust with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) device. For plasma-enhanced catalysis, both zeolite- and alumina-based materials have shown high activity, albeit in somewhat different temperature ranges, when preceded by an NTP reactor. This paper will briefly describe our research efforts aimed at optimizing the catalyst materials for NTP-catalysis devices based, in part, on our continuing studies of the NTP- and catalytic-reaction mechanisms. Various alkali- and alkaline earth-cation-exchanged Y zeolites have been prepared, their material properties characterized, and they have been tested as catalytic materials for NOx reduction in laboratory NTP-catalysis reactors. Interestingly, NO2 formed in the plasma and not subsequently removed over these catalysts, will back-convert to NO, albeit to varying extents depending upon the nature of the cation. Besides this comparative reactivity, we will also discuss selected synthesis strategies for enhancing the performance of these zeolite-based catalyst materials. A particularly important result from our mechanistic studies is the observation that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, acetaldehyde has been found to be especially effective in the thermal reduction of both NO and NO2 over Ba- and Na-Y zeolite catalysts.

Peden, C; Barlow, S; Hoard, J; Kwak, J; *Balmer-Millar, M; *Panov, A; Schmieg, S; Szanyi, J; Tonkyn, R

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain acceleratingthat use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma- based

Geddes, Cameron G.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Plasma wave propagation with a plasma density gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma waves with the plasma diffusion velocity u{sub n} due to a plasma density gradient are described in a positive column plasma. The ion wave is generated by the perturbation of the operating frequency 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and it propagates with the group velocity u{sub g{approx}}c{sub s}{sup 2}/u{sub n{approx}}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}) m/s, where c{sub s} is the acoustic velocity in a fine tube fluorescent lamp, while the electron wave cannot be generated with a turbulence of low frequency less than the electron oscillation frequency {omega}{sub pe}. The propagation of the lighting signal observed in long tube fluorescent lamps is well understood with the propagation of ion waves occurring along the plasma density gradient.

Cho, Guangsup; Choi, Eun-Ha; Uhm, Han Sup [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Nowon Wallgye, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yongliang, Xiong [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inert atomic gas plasma 20,33 ), and thermal conduction andplasma Ratio of displacement to conductionplasmas focusing on heating contribution from thermal heat conduction

Titus, Monica Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ~0.4 to ~0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for gamma-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 1E-8 pb to be probed.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; K. Lyons; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; R. Taylor; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Plasma digital density determining device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

Sprott, Julien C. (Madison, WI); Lovell, Thomas W. (Madison, WI); Holly, Donald J. (Madison, WI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Experimental Plasma Research. Project summaries  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth in a series of Project Summary books going back to 1976. They are issued approximately every two years and provide a short description of each project supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of the Division of Applied Plasma Physics in the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE).

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Steady state compact toroidal plasma production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

Turner, W.C.

1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Current Drive in Recombining Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Current drive in recombining plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the influence of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero ''residual'' current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Plasma treatment advantages for textiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The textile industry is searching for innovative production techniques to improve the product quality, as well as society requires new finishing techniques working in environmental respect. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Such systems are now existing and the use of plasma physics in industrial problems is rapidly increasing. On textile surfaces, three main effects can be obtained depending on the treatment conditions: the cleaning effect, the increase of microroughness (anti-pilling finishing of wool) and the production of radicals to obtain hydrophilic surfaces. Plasma polymerisation, that is the deposition of solid polymeric materials with desired properties on textile substrates, is under development. The advantage of such plasma treatments is that the modification turns out to ...

Sparavigna, Amelia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rpwa rpwa Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

305

Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines.

LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Study at Ambient and High Pressure Diane E. Cabelli, James F. Wishart, Jerzy Holcman, Martin Meier, and Rudi van Eldik J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5131-5136 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction between OH radicals and [CuII(P2O7)2(H2O) 2]6- results in the formation of a Cu(III) complex. No reaction is observed with N3· or Br2·-, whereas SO4·- initiates the same steps as seen with ·OH. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves a ligand interchange or H · atom abstraction process. The Cu(III) complex undergoes a rapid first-order reaction, probably loss of a P2O74- chelate, followed by addition of OH- (pKOH ~ 10) to yield a Cu(III) complex that is predominantly hydroxylated

308

Separation of actinide(III) from lanthanide(III) by thermo-sensitive gel co-polymerized with TPPEN derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) was examined by the thermal-swing extraction technique using a thermo-sensitive gel, poly-N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPA) co-polymerized with a TPEN derivative, N,N,N',N'- tetrakis(4-propenyl-oxy-2-pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN). The separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) was observed in the swollen state of gel (5 deg. C) and the separation factor of Am(III) was evaluated as about 18 at pH 5.2. More than 90% of Am(III) extracted into the gel was released by the volume phase transition of gel from the swollen state (5 deg. C) to the shrunken one (40 deg. C). The repetition test for the thermal swing extraction of a soft metal ion, Cd(II), which was used as a substitute of Am(III), was carried out and the extraction and release of Cd(II) were repeated three times stably under the thermal-swing operation between 5 deg. C and 40 deg. C. The radiation effect of gel on the extraction of Am and Eu was tested by the irradiation of {gamma}-ray (10 kGy) and the long-term adsorption of {alpha}-emitter ({sup 244}Cm). The TPPEN-NIPA gel sustained no damage by these radiation tests. These results suggest that the thermal-swing extraction technique is applicable to the MA partitioning process indispensable for the establishment of P and T technology. (authors)

Takeshita, Kenji; Fugate, Glenn [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsumura, Tatsuro [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaragi, 319-1195 (Japan); Nakano, Yoshio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan); Mori, Atsunori; Fukuoka, Sachio [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Westinghouse Plasma Gasification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Projects by Principal Investigator Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Westinghouse Plasma Gasification Computer Model Project Summary Full Title: Plasma...

310

Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Lab Science Education Laboratory Overview Gallery: (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by DC Glow Discharges for Undergraduate Laboratories) (Photo by Atmospheric Plasma Laboratory) (Photo by 3D Printing Laboratory) (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by Plasma Speaker with 200 Hz input) (Photo by Dusty Plasma Laboratory) The Science Education Laboratory is a fusion (pun intended) of research between education and plasma science. This unique facility includes a teaching laboratory/classroom, two research labs, and student offices/storage/prep room. The research performed in the Science Education Laboratory is currently centered upon dusty plasmas, plasma speakers, remote control of plasmas for educational purposes, atmospheric plasmas and

311

Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different types of plasma torches including a high power steam plasma torch and .... Recovery of Palladium and Rhodium from Spent Automobile Catalysts by...

312

Introduction to Plasma Physics Greg Hammett  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displays Radiation Processing: Water purification, Plant growth Switches: Electric Power, Pulsed power propulsion: plasma thrusters, fusion powered propulsion Flat-Panel Displays: Field-emitter arrays, Plasma

Hammett, Greg

313

Computational and Experimental Investigations into Aerospace Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Investigations into two different fields of plasma research are presented here. These include the study of ion engine performance and the use of plasma discharges (more)

Bennett, William Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Grand Ridge III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser AEP-Appalachian Power Location La Salle County IL Coordinates 41.15496°, -88.750234° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.15496,"lon":-88.750234,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

SEGS III Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Solar Power Plant III Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS III Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 35.021632311687°, -117.56598472595° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.021632311687,"lon":-117.56598472595,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Klondike III I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III I Wind Farm Klondike III I Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

320

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be leveraged by more than $2.2 billion in private capital cost share as part of the third round of the Department's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The selections demonstrate technologies that: make progress toward a target CO2 capture efficiency of 90 percent;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Foote Creek Rim III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWestM&N Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Carbon County WY Coordinates 41.643488°, -106.198876° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.643488,"lon":-106.198876,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners III Wind Farm Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Interferometric measurements of plasma density in high-. beta. plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The coupled-cavity laser interferometer technique is particularly applicable to the measurement of pulsed plasma densities. This technique is based on the fact that if a small fraction of a gas laser's output radiation is reflected into the laser with an external mirror, the intensity of the laser output is modulated. These amplitude or intensity modulations are produced by changes in the laser gain. A rotating corner mirror or an oscillating mirror can be used to produce a continuous feedback modulation of the interferometer which produces a continuous background fringe pattern. The presence of plasma in the outer cavity causes an additional change which results in a phase shift of the regular period of the background fringe pattern. The integral of the plasma density along the line of sight can be evaluated by comparison of the time history of the fringes obtained with and without plasma.

Quinn, W.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinios 60510 (United States); Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Lee Honored for Work in Plasma Simulations | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Plasma Simulations By Patti Wieser September 13, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Wei-li Lee (Photo by Elle Starkman PPPL Office of Communications) Wei-li Lee...

326

Resonant Excitation of Plasma Wakefields  

SciTech Connect

We describe characteristics of the bunch train and plasma source used in a resonant plasma wakefield experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. The bunch train has the proper correlated spread to unambiguously observe the expected energy gain by the witness bunch at resonance. The plasma density in the capillary discharge is sufficiently high to reach the resonance with the typical bunch train spacing of this experiment. It is also uniform over more than 3/4 of the 2 cm-long capillary.

Muggli, P.; Allen, B. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

Koenig, H.R.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Dynamic modeling of plasma-vapor interactions during plasma disruptions  

SciTech Connect

Intense deposition of energy in short times on fusion reactor components during a plasma disruption may cause severe surface erosion due to ablation of these components. The exact amount of the eroded material is very important to the reactor design and its lifetime. During the plasma deposition, the vaporized wall material will interact with the incoming plasma particles and may shield the rest of the wall from damage. The vapor shielding may then prolong the lifetime of these components and increase the reactor duty cycle. To correctly evaluate the impact of vapor shielding effect a comprehensive model is developed. In this model the dynamic slowing down of the plasma particles, both ions and electrons, with the eroded wall material is established. Different interaction processes between the plasma particles and the ablated material is included. The generated photons radiation source and the transport of this radiation through the vapor to the wall is modeled. Recent experimental data on disruptions is analyzed and compared with model predictions. Vapor shielding may be effective in reducing the overall erosion rate for certain plasma disruption parameters and conditions.

Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Absorption spectrophotometric characterization of Sm(II), Sm(III), and Sm(II/III) bromides and Sm(III) oxybromide in the solid state  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption spectra obtained from SmBr/sub 3/, SmBr/sub 2/, and Sm0Br were used in identifying the samarium species in several mixed-valence Sm(II/III) compounds produced by H/sub 2/ reduction of SmBr/sub 3/. The nature of the absorption of Sm0Br made it possible to detect even traces of Sm0Br in the Sm bromides.

Wood, A.B.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Haschke, J.M.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fusion/Plasma Physics materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FusionPlasma Physics materials 71958-00 Large Chart 107 150 cm 17. 71958-01 Package of 30 Three-hole-punched Notebook Charts, chart size 43 28 cm, folded size 22 28 cm...

331

Mobile inductively coupled plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Quark-gluon plasma paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

Dariusz Miskowiec

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

Fowler, T. Kenneth (Walnut Creek, CA)

1978-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - STEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used throughout the week, including a plasma globe and a half-coated fluorescent light bulb, and they have the rare opportunity to apply for a 2,000 grant for additional lab...

335

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

class"field-item even">

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a key contributor to ITER, a huge international fusion facility...

337

The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect

1.5D particle-in-cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic (EM) emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: (i) Initially, waves at a few {omega}{sub ce}/{gamma} are excited, mode converted and emitted at Almost-Equal-To {omega}{sub pe} (ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to the respective component of the kinetic energy of the beam; (iii) The frequency of the escaping EM emission is independent of the injection angle; (iv) A stronger background density gradient causes earlier emission; (v) The beam electron distribution function in phase space shows harmonic oscillation in the perpendicular components at the relativistic gyrofrequency; (vi) The requirement for cyclotron maser emission, ({partial_derivative}f/{partial_derivative}v{sub Up-Tack })>0, is fulfilled; (vii) The degree of linear polarization of the emission is strongly dependent on the beam injection angle; (viii) The generated electromagnetic emission is left-hand elliptically polarized as the pitch angle tends to 90 Degree-Sign ; and (ix) The generated electromagnetic energy is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy.

Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Visualization and Diagnostics of Thermal Plasma Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow visualization is a key tool for the study of thermal plasma flows. Because of their high temperature and associated self emission, standard and high speed photography is commonly used for flow and temperature field visualization. Tracer techniques ... Keywords: d.c. plasma jet, enthalpy probe techniques, induction plasma, laser strobe, photographic techniques, schlieren, thermal plasma flows

M. I. Boulos

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Neoclassical Transport Properties of Tokamak Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport Theory / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

B. Weyssow

340

Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Transport in tokamakAnomalous radial transport model for edge plasma . . . . . .Anomalous transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Plasma Control Requirements and Concepts For ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Section: Plasma Control Issues for Tokamaks / Instrumentation Control and Data Handling

J. Wesley,* H.-W. Bartels; D. Boucher; A. Costley; L. De Kock; Yu. Gribov; M. Huguet; G. Janeschitz; P.-L. Mondino; V. Mukhovatov; A. Portone; M. Sugihara; I. Yonekawa

342

MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFE Burning Plasmas and Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) Bick Hooper LLNL Presentation power requires: · A burning plasma experiment · An advancing portfolio of ICCs · Plasma physics unified Improved Configurations Magnetic Configurations Knowledge Base Burning Plasma Phys. & Tech. Knowledge Base

343

Flavors in an expanding plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the effect of an expanding plasma on probe matter by determining time-dependent D7 embeddings in the holographic dual of an expanding viscous plasma. We calculate the chiral condensate and meson spectra including contributions of viscosity. The chiral condensate essentially confirms the expectation from the static black hole. For the meson spectra we propose a scheme that is in agreement with the adiabatic approximation. New contributions arise for the vector mesons at the order of the viscosity terms.

Johannes Groe; Romuald A. Janik; Piotr Surwka

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Plasma chemistry in wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

Wise, J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Facility East Winds (formerly Altech III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Nichimen America Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

348

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

349

Lithography scaling issues associated with III-V MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we investigate fabrication issues associated with scaling down the gate length and source drain contact separation of a III-V MOSFET. We used high resolution electron-beam lithography and lift-off for gate and ohmic contact patterning to ... Keywords: E-beam, GaAs, Lift-off, MOSFET, PMMA, Resist thickness variation

O. Ignatova; S. Thoms; W. Jansen; D. S. Macintyre; I. Thayne

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

351

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

352

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Facility Sweetwater Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Catamount Developer DKRW/Babcock & Brown/Catamount Energy Purchaser CPS Energy/Austin Energy Location Sweetwater TX Coordinates 32.368084°, -100.333722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.368084,"lon":-100.333722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Fusion Basics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Basics What is Plasma? Plasma is a state of matter along with solids, liquids and gases. It consists of a partially-ionized gas, containing ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. So what does that mean? In a plasma, some electrons are freed from their atoms, allowing current and electricity to flow. In fact, one of the few naturally-occurring plasmas found here on Earth is lightning! Can you think of other plasmas? Fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury plasma. Stars, such as the sun are hot balls of plasma. Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis Fusion reactors, like NSTX, use plasma to fuse atoms to make energy. Plasma displays use small cells of plasma to illuminate images. What is Fusion? Light atoms like hydrogen (one proton and one neutron) can fuse together so

354

Radiation Transport in Takamak Edge Plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmas in edge regions of tokamaks can be very optically thick to hydrogen lines. Strong line radiation introduces a non-local coupling between different regions of the plasma and can significantly affect the ionization and energy balance. These effects can be very important, but they are not included in current edge plasma simulations. We report here on progress in self-consistently including the effects of a magnetic field, line radiation and plasma transport in modeling tokamak edge plasmas.

Scott, H; Adams, M

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Stopping power of weakly unstable plasmas  

SciTech Connect

An expression for the additional contribution to the stopping power of a weakly unstable plasma due to the modification of the beam--plasma collision operator by the presence of the unstable modes is derived and evaluated for a plasma with a flowing hot-electron tail, i.e., a bump-on-tail instability. It is found that the unstable plasma oscillations do not substantially alter the screening of the beam--plasma interaction.

Perez, J.D.; Payne, G.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics, without any new assumptions. The calculations are only more exact than those usually found in the literature. When photons penetrate a cold and dense electron plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, through Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and through Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But when the plasma is very hot and has low density, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift, which is an interaction with the electron plasma. The energy loss of a photon per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photons energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. This energy loss (plasma redshift of the photons) consists of very small quanta, which are absorbed by the plasma and cause a significant heating. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the solar corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains

Ari Brynjolfsson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of type III secretion gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is particularly problematic in the healthcare setting where it is a frequent cause of pneumonia, bloodstream, and urinary tract infections. An important determinant of P. aeruginosa virulence is a type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS-dependent intoxication is a complex process that minimally requires binding of P. aeruginosa to host cells, injection of the cytotoxic effector proteins through the host cell plasma membrane, and induction of T3SS gene expression. The latter process, referred to as contact-dependent expression, involves a well-characterized regulatory cascade that activates T3SS gene expression in response to host cell contact. Although host cell contact is a primary activating signal for T3SS gene expression, the involvement of multiple membrane-bound regulatory systems indicates that additional environmental signals also play a role in controlling expression of the T3SS. These regulatory systems coordinate T3SS gene expression with many other cellular activities including motility, mucoidy, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. The signals to which the organism responds are poorly understood but many seem to be coupled to the metabolic state of the cell and integrated within a master circuit that assimilates informational signals from endogenous and exogenous sources. Herein we review

Manisha R. Diaz; Jessica M. King; Timothy L. Yahr; Jrgen Heesemann; Max Von; Matthew C. Wolfgang; Timothy L. Yahr; Department Of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous ammonium thiocyanate by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate and related compounds  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior and separation factors of Am(III) and Eu(III) from low acid ammonium thiocyanate solutions were studied using dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and related compounds. It was found that very dilute (<0.1 M) solutions of ammonium thiocyanate were sufficient to allow quantitative extraction of Am(III) with DHDECMP. Significant differences between DHDECMP and dibutylbutylphosphonate (DB(BP)) in the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from thiocyanate were found and indicate chelation is occurring with DHDECMP, unlike the situation in the low acid lithium nitrate system. Infrared spectroscopy of the extracted complexes of La(III) and extraction studies with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP), dihexyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDIBCMP), and di-(2-ethylbutyl)-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DEBDECMP) confirm that chelation occurs with thiocyanate complexes of Am(III) and Eu(III). Separation factors, ..cap alpha.., for Am(III) and Eu(III) were the lowest with DB(BP) (..cap alpha.. = 5.84) and the highest with DHDIBCMP (..cap alpha.. = 10.8).

Muscatello, A.C.; Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Esarey and M. Pillo?, Phys. Plasmas 2, 1432 (1995). 13 B. A.and E. Esarey, Phys. Plasmas 14 T. Katsouleas, Phys. Rev. APegoraro, and I. V. Pogorelsky, Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 259 16

Rittershofer, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Parametric instabilities and plasma heating in an inhomogeneous plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experimental studies of plasma heating due to microwave irradiation of the magnetically confined plasma column in the Princeton L-3 device is presented. X-band (10.4 GHz) microwave power, both in the ordinary and the extraordinary modes of propagation, is used in these experiments. Plasma heating is observed to occur simultaneously with the occurrence of parametric decay instabilities. The mode structure of the pump wave and the decay ion wave dispersion has been measured with high frequency probes. Detailed measurements of electron heating rates are presented and compared with collisional heating rates. In addition, production of suprathermal electrons and ions is also observed and measured. A comparison is made with recent laser-pellet interaction experiments. (auth)

Porkolab, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Schmitt, J.P.M.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RecQ helicase stimulates both DNA catenation and changes in DNA topology by topoisomerase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Activity of RecQ Helicase and Topo III 28. DiGate,2003 Printed in U.S.A. RecQ Helicase Stimulates Both DNA95616 Together, RecQ helicase and topoisomerase III (Topo

Harmon, Frank G; Brockman, Joel P; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Constricted glow discharge plasma source  

SciTech Connect

A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

Geddes, Cameron G.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. R. Griem, Principles of Plasma Spectroscopy ?Cambridge,Beke?, Principles of Laser Plasmas ?Wiley-Interscience, NewIn the early stage of plasma evolution, the electron

Harilal, S S; O'Shay, B; Tillack, M S; Mathew, M V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Oak Creek Energy Systems Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Oak Creek Energy Systems Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oak Creek Energy Systems Developer Oak Creek Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility McNeilus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner G. McNeilus Developer G. McNeilus Energy Purchaser Dairyland Power /Alliant Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.673251°, -92.665436° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.673251,"lon":-92.665436,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

375

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

376

Top of Iowa III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Top of Iowa III Wind Farm Facility Top of Iowa III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Madison Gas & Electric Developer Midwest Renewable Energy Projects Energy Purchaser Madison Gas & Electric Location Worth County IA Coordinates 43.361088°, -93.294282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.361088,"lon":-93.294282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Ridgetop Energy Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.1317°, -118.451° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1317,"lon":-118.451,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

III-V/Silicon Lattice-Matched Tandem Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. To accomplish this, we have developed techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.; McMahon, W.; Romero, M.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Norman, A.; Duda, A.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

SciTech Connect: plasma  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plasma Find plasma Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

383

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Electronic structure of BAs and boride III-V alloys  

SciTech Connect

Boron arsenide, the typically ignored member of the Group-III--V arsenide series BAs-AlAs-GaAs-InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its {Gamma} conduction-band minimum is p-like ({Gamma}{sub 15}), not s-like ({Gamma}{sub 1c}), it has an X{sub 1c}-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong s--s repulsion in BAs relative to most other Group-III--V compounds. We find unexpected valence-band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence-band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAs-GaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small ({approx}3.5 eV) and composition-independent band-gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap; (ii) boron ''semilocalized'' states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaN-GaAs alloys); and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies that are smaller than in GaN-GaAs alloys. The unique features of boride Group-III--V alloys offer new opportunities in band-gap engineering.

Hart, Gus L. W.; Zunger, Alex

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electronic structure of BAs and boride IIIV alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron arsenide, the typically-ignored member of the IIIV arsenide series BAsAlAsGaAs InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its ? conduction band minimum is p-like (?15), not s-like (?1c), it has an X1c-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong ss repulsion in BAs relative to most other IIIV compounds. We find unexpected valence band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAsGaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small (?3.5 eV) and composition-independent band gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap (ii) boron semi-localized states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaNGaAs alloys), and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies which are smaller than in GaNGaAs alloys. The unique features of boride IIIV alloys offer new opportunities in band gap engineering. I.

Gus L. W. Hart; Alex Zunger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lamar Wind Energy Project III Lamar Wind Energy Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project III Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Arkansas River Power Authority Developer Arkansas River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Arkansas River Power Authority Location Prowers County CO Coordinates 38.0326°, -102.532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0326,"lon":-102.532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT---III TRUPACT---III Q uick F acts Cask: TRUPACT---III Manufacturer: ABW Certification: U.S. N uclear R egulatory C ommission C ertificate N umber 9 305 General D escription: A r ectangular c ontainer u sed t o t ransport t ransuranic w aste i n a S tandard L arge B ox 2 (SLB2) b y h ighway t rucks. T he p ackaging i s s ingle---contained a nd c omprised o f i nner and o uter s tainless s teel p lates a nd p olyurethane f oam t o p rotect a gainst p otential punctures a nd f ire d anger. A n o verpack c over i s d esigned t o p rotect t he c losure l id. Package T ype: B Gross W eight: Package ( maximum a llowable l oaded w ith c ontents): 55,116 l bs. Expected w eight: 49,000 l bs. Approximate E mpty P ackage: 43,630 l bs. Maximum P ayload W eight: 11,486 l bs. Overall D imensions: Outer w idth o f c ontainer: 8.2 f eet Height

388

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Specific DNA cleavage mediated by [SalenMn(III)][sup +  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of [SalenMn(III)][sup +] and a terminal oxidant affords efficient and specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in regions rich in A:T base pairs. Metal complexes of the tetradentate chelating ligands Salen (Salen = N,N[prime]-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) have been part of the inorganic chemistry literature for several decades. The cationic manganese(III) complex [SalenMn(III)][sup +] (1) is an efficient catalyst for the epoxidation of olefins with terminal oxidants such as iodosylbenzene. 1 also catalyzes oxidative C-H bond activation. The flat, crescent shape of 1, its aromatic and cationic nature, and its ability to catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation are features shared in whole or in part by metal complexes which bind to DNA and cleave it via oxidative processes. These similarities prompted the authors to evaluate the DNA-cleaving properties of 1, and they now report that 1 mediates specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in a reaction requiring a terminal oxidant. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Gravert, D.J.; Griffin, J.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Microsoft PowerPoint - APS49_ped-ident_071114_iii.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Physical Society, Orlando, 12-16112007 1 Dimensionless pedestal identity plasmas Dimensionless pedestal identity plasmas on Alcator C on Alcator C - - Mod and JET Mod...

394

A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering  

SciTech Connect

A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Rotation generation and transport in tokamak plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma toroidal rotation is a factor important for plasma stability and transport, but it is still a fairly poorly understood area of physics. This thesis focuses on three aspects of rotation: momentum transport, Ohmic ...

Podpaly, Yuri Anatoly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reviews of plasma physics. Vol. 10  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: nonlinear dynamics of rarefied plasmas and ionospheric aerodynamics; cyclotron instability of the earth radiation belts; dynamic nonlinear electromagnetic phenomena in plasmas; and dynamics of the Z pinch.

Leontovich, M.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Plasma heating by an rf electric field  

SciTech Connect

In an analysis of the excitation of plasma waves by an electromagnetic wave at a frequency near the plasma frequency, the decay instabilities of first and second orders are taken into account. (AIP)

Musher, S.L.; Rubenchik, A.M.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with flux ropes. Magnetic field lines (red, green tubes), plasma current (arrows) and the QSL experiment two magnetic flux ropes are generated from adjacent pulsed current channels in a background-separatrix layer (QSL), a narrow region between the flux ropes. Field lines on either side of the QSL have closely

Shyy, Wei

400

Neutral transport in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution procedure for the neutral transport equation in plasma slab geometry is developed. Half-angle scalar fluxes, currents and averaged cross sections are introduced to provide a convenient and simple method of calculating the neutral energy distribution as an adjunct to the neutral density calculation. A forward-backward sweep numerical solution procedure, which avoids matrix inversion, is outlined.

Stacey, W.M. Jr.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gatan Solarus Advanced Plasma System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solarus Advanced Plasma System expands this process to a new level. ... electronics and software; which when integrated allows more control and .... Ar, Ni, or Ar/O2 at 60psi (4.1bar) required for operation of pneumatic valve. Power.

402

Hydrodynamics of the cascading plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cascading gauge theory of Klebanov et.al realizes a soluble example of gauge/string correspondence in a non-conformal setting. Such a gauge theory has a strong coupling scale Lambda, below which it confines with a chiral symmetry breaking. A holographic description of a strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma is represented by a black brane solution of type IIB supergravity on a conifold with fluxes. A characteristic parameter controlling the high temperature expansion of such plasma is 1/ln(T/Lambda). In this paper we study the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of the cascading gauge theory plasma to order 1/ln(T/Lambda)^4. We find that the bulk viscosity satisfies the bound conjectured in arXiv:0708.3459. We comment on difficulties of computing the transport coefficients to all orders in T/Lambda. Previously, it was shown that a cascading gauge theory plasma undergoes a first-order deconfinement transition with unbroken chiral symmetry at T_c=0.6141111(3) Lambda. We show here that a deconfined chirally symmetric phase becomes perturbatively unstable at T_u=0.8749(0) T_c. Near the unstable point the specific heat diverges as c_V ~ |1-T_u/T|^(-1/2).

Alex Buchel

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microwave-generated plasma thruster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A concept for high power density and efficiency plasma thruster based on electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) is described. Initial estimates are made of the parameters, leading to a conceptual design. An effort for detail physics design and proof-of-principal tests is also proposed. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hooper, E.B.

1991-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

Ballou, Nathan E. (West Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

Ballou, N.E.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Plasma physics aspects of ETF/INTOR  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve their principle technical objectives, the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and the International Tokomak Reactor (INTOR) will require an ignited (or near ignited) plasma, sustained for pulse lengths of at least 100 secs at a high enough plasma pressure to provide a neutron wall loading of at least 1.3 MW/m/sup 2/. The ignited plasma will have to be substantially free of impurities. Our current understanding of major plasma physics characters is summarized.

Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.R.; Schmidt, J.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Miller, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

Motley, R.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Building Assessment and Energy Coordinator | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities Environment, Safety & Health Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Jobs Building Assessment and Energy Coordinator Department:...

409

Methane Conversion by Plasma Assisted Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Helge Egsgaard2 1Optics and Plasma Research Department 2Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory

410

The Coupling of Electromagnetic Power to Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating and Current Drive / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

R. Koch

411

Active molecular plasma in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The propagation of electromagnetic oscillations in an active molecules plasma in a constant external magnetic field is investigated. (AIP)

Kovtun, V.P.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy Innovation Portal on ...

413

Tribological Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites ... Abstract Scope, Plasma sprayed Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) coating is most commonly used in cylindrical liners,...

414

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy Measurement in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

In the E-167 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment, electrons with an initial energy of 42GeV are accelerated in a meter-scale lithium plasma. Particles are leaving plasma with a large energy spread. To determine the spectrum of the accelerated particles, a two-plane spectrometer has been set up.

Ischebeck, R

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Plasma confinement. [Physics for magnetic geometries  

SciTech Connect

The physics of plasma confinement by a magnetic field is developed from the basic properties of plasmas through the theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport in toroidal and open-ended configurations. The close relationship between the theory of plasma confinement and Hamiltonian mechanics is emphasized, and the modern view of macroscopic instabilities as three-dimensional equilibria is given.

Boozer, A.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Master Thesis: Fusion Plasma Thermal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master Thesis: Fusion Plasma Thermal Transport Radial and Poloidal Profile Modeling Martin Olesen-axis localised ion cyclotron resonance heating source. 2. Cold pulse shock induction at the plasma edge via laser wave propagation from heat modulation and the fast propagation of a cold pulse, at the same plasma

418

Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxvlle, TN)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

Motley, Robert W. (Princeton, NJ); Glanz, James (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun  

SciTech Connect

The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

Hartman, Charles W. (Alamo, CA); Shearer, James W. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Plasma position dynamics of ISX tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position have been developed. Neglecting second and higher order effects, oscillatory high frequency solution is obtained, and an approximated low frequency plasma motion dynamics transfer function is derived. This function allows a manageable study of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position stability and practical syntheses of the associated plasma position feedback control systems. One of the major parameters governing plasma equilibrium position stability of a tokamak is shown to be the vacuum vessel eddy current delay time constant.

Burenko, O.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

MPD streaming plasma source for MFTF  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of Magneto-plasma-dynamic (MPD) arcs as a source of warm, streaming plasma for start-up and for the suppression of instabilities is discussed. The plasma source emits a high particle flux (1000-5000 amp) of well directed ions having kinetic energy in the 10-100 eV range. The construction details of an MPD plasma source are given and a sequence of proposed tests are presented. The tests are designed to demonstrate the large flux and good gas utilization of the source as well as investigate the behavior of the streaming plasma in a high magnetic field environment.

Poulsen, P.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT. SNAP III THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP-III thermoelectric generator procedures power from the decay heat of 2100 curies of Po/sup 210/. This generator is to be used as a source of auxiliary power in a terrestrial satellite. For purposes of analysis, the satellite system postulated is launched from the Pacific Missile Bange into a 275- statute mile polar orbit with an orbital lifetime of about 1 year. Po/sup 210/ is an alpha emitter having a half life of 138 days and alpha and gamma decay energies of 5.3 and 0.8 mev, respectively. It is a natural component of the earth's crust, as a member of the uranium disintegration series. Sampling of polonium in the biosphere was conducted specifically for this program to determine background radiation levels. Since the fuel is primarily an alpha emitter, there is no direct radiation problem. An analysis was performed to determine the ability of the fuel container to withstand the various thermal, mechanical, and chemical forces imposed upon the generator by vehicle failures. Where theoretical analysis was impossible and experimental evidence was desired, capsules and generators were tested under simulated missile-failure conditions, Thus, the safety limits of SNAP-III in a satellite application were defined. SNAP-III is designed to be aerothermodynamically consumed on reentry into the earth's atmosphere so that the polonium will be dispersed as aerosols in the upper stratosphere. Since heating rates will be lower for aborts occurring prior to orbiting, 65 abort cases have been considered to define the general consequences of vehicle failures. The spatial and temporal relations of vehicle aborts are summarized in cartographic and tabular form. (auth)

Hagis, W.; Dix, G.P.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Nestell, James E. [MPR Associates Inc.; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Sham, Sam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(IV) with Arsenazo III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric procedure was developed for determining U(IV) in the presence of U(VI) by forming a colored complex with Arsenazo III in 4M HCl. The results compare satisfactorily with U(IV) determinations by ceric titration. Total uranium can be determined after reduction of U(VI) with metallic zinc. The concentration range for the absorbance cell solution is 0 to 2 ..mu..g U(IV)/mL. Other tetravalent ions, such as thorium, zirconium, hafnium, plutonium, and neptunium, will interfere.

Baumann, E.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Low voltage operation of plasma focus  

SciTech Connect

Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 {mu}F capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Das, R.; Deb, P.; Prabahar, T.; Das, B. K.; Adhikary, B.; Shyam, A. [Energetics and Electromagnetics Division, Facility for Electromagnetic Systems, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Visakhapatanam, A.P. 530012 (India)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams  

SciTech Connect

The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented.

Kahn,S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Robert Kaita | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kaita Kaita Principal Research Physicist, P.I., LTX Robert (Bob) Kaita is the head of plasma diagnostic operations and acting head of boundary physics operations for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Kaita is also a co-principal investigator of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX). He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a recipient of the Kaul Foundation Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research. He has supervised the research of many students in the PPPL Program in Plasma Physics in the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. Interests Neutral beam and radiofrequency plasma heating Plasma diagnostics Plasma-surface interactions Solid and liquid plasma-facing components Contact Information Phone: 609-243-3275

433

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Steady state compact toroidal plasma production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Plasma Propagation Through Porous Dielectric Sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThe propagation of plasmas through porous materials is one extreme example of a packed-bed reactor. Mechanisms for atmospheric-pressure plasmas flowing through porous dielectric films are computationally investigated. Images of this plasma flow are discussed. Index TermsPhotoionization, plasma functionalization. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE plasmas (APPs) in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configurations are widely used for remediation of toxic gases. One such configuration is a packed-bed reactor where the plasma flows along the surface of high-dielectric-constant (?) beads where electric fields are intensified by the gradient in ? [1]. Typical DBD plasmas operate in air at atmospheric pressure at a few to tens of kilohertz, having electrode separations of a few millimeters to a centimeter. One extreme example of a packed-bed DBD reactor

Mingmei Wang; John E. Foster; Mark J. Kushner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DYNAMIC SCREENING IN SOLAR PLASMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the hot, dense plasma of solar and stellar interiors, Coulomb potentials are screened, resulting in increased nuclear reaction rates. Although Salpeter's approximation for static screening is widely accepted and used in stellar modeling, the question of screening in nuclear reactions has been revisited. In particular, the issue of dynamic effects has been raised by Shaviv and Shaviv who apply the techniques of molecular dynamics to the conditions in the Sun's core in order to numerically determine the effect of screening. By directly calculating the motion of ions and electrons due to Coulomb interactions, the simulations are used to compute the effect of screening without the mean field assumption inherent in Salpeter's approximation. In this paper, we reproduce their numerical analysis of the screening energy in the plasma of the solar core and conclude that the effects of dynamic screening are relevant and should be included when stellar nuclear reaction rates are computed.

Mao, Dan; Daeppen, Werner [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mussack, Katie [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mussack@ast.cam.ac.uk

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - ITER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iter ITER is a large international iter ITER is a large international fusion experiment aimed at demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy.ITER (Latin for "the way") will play a critical role advancing the worldwide availability of energy from fusion - the power source of the sun and the stars.To produce practical amounts of fusion power on earth, heavy forms of hydrogen are joined together at high temperature with an accompanying production of heat energy. The fuel must be held at a temperature of over 100 million degrees Celsius. At these high temperatures, the electrons are detached from the nuclei of the atoms, in a state of matter called plasma. en New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma in fusion experiments

438

Perspectives on Geospace Plasma Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a large variety of fascinating and instructive aspects to examining the coupling of mass and energy from the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere. Past research has suggested that magnetic reconnection (in a fluid sense) on the day-side magnetopause plays the key role in controlling the energy coupling. However, both linear and nonlinear coupling processes involving kinetic effects have been suggested through various types of innovative data analysis. Analysis and modeling results have also indicated a prominent role for multi-scale processes of plasma coupling. Examples include evidence of control by solar wind turbulence in the coupling sequence and localized (finite gyroradius) effects in dayside plasma transport. In this paper we describe several solar wind-magnetosphere coupling scenarios. We particularly emphasize the study of solar wind driving of magnetospheric substorm, and related geomagnetic disturbances.

Baker, Daniel N. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303-7814 (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

Galleries | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Research Education Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Organization Contact Us Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Galleries Subscribe to RSS - Galleries 2013 Young Women's Conference 2013 Young Women's Conference63 images 2013 Plasma Camp 2013 Plasma Camp7 images 2013 Science on Saturday Lecture Series 2013 Science on Saturday Lecture Series7 images 2013 Summer's End Poster Session 2013 Summer's End Poster Session19 images 2013 Science Bowl 2013 Science Bowl12 images 2013 Pathways to Science Summit 2013 Pathways to Science Summit17 images 2012-2013 PathSci Kick-Off Event

440

Dynamic screening in solar plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the hot, dense plasma of solar and stellar interiors, Coulomb potentials are screened, resulting in increased nuclear reaction rates. Although Salpeter's approximation for static screening is widely accepted and used in stellar modeling, the question of screening in nuclear reactions has been revisited. In particular the issue of dynamic effects has been raised by Shaviv and Shaviv who apply the techniques of molecular dynamics to the conditions in the Sun's core in order to numerically determine the effect of screening. By directly calculating the motion of ions and electrons due to Coulomb interactions, the simulations are used to compute the effect of screening without the mean-field assumption inherent in Salpeter's approximation. In this paper we reproduce their numerical analysis of the screening energy in the plasma of the solar core and conclude that the effects of dynamic screening are relevant and should be included when stellar nuclear reaction rates are computed.

Mao, Dan; Dppen, Werner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plasma conductivity at finite coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

Hassanain, Babiker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Plasma conductivity at finite coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

Babiker Hassanain; Martin Schvellinger

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics. When photons penetrate a cold and dense plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But in sparse hot plasma, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift. The energy loss per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photon's energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains the solar redshifts, the redshifts of the galactic corona, the cosmological redshifts, the cosmic microwave background, and the X-ray background. The plasma redshift explains the observed magnitude-redshift relation for supernovae SNe Ia without the big bang, dark matter, or dark energy. There is no cosmic time dilation. The universe is not expanding. The plasma redshift, when compared with experiments, shows that the photons' classical gravitational redshifts are reversed as the photons move from the Sun to the Earth. This is a quantum mechanical effect. As seen from the Earth, a repulsion force acts on the photons. This means that there is no need for Einstein's Lambda term. The universe is quasi-static, infinite, and everlasting.

Ari Brynjolfsson

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Search for Untriggered GRB Afterglows with ROTSE-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for untriggered gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment-III (ROTSE-III) telescope array. This search covers observations from September 2003 to March 2005. We have an effective coverage of 1.74 deg^2 yr for rapidly fading transients that remain brighter than ~ 17.5 magnitude for more than 30 minutes. This search is the first large area survey to be able to detect typical untriggered GRB afterglows. Our background rate is very low and purely astrophysical. We have found 4 previously unknown cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 1 new flare star. We have not detected any candidate afterglow events or other unidentified transients. We can place an upper limit on the rate of fading optical transients with quiescent counterparts dimmer than ~ 20th magnitude at a rate of less than 1.9 deg^-2 yr-1 with 95% confidence. This places limits on the optical characteristics of off-axis (orphan) GRB afterglows. As a byproduct of this search, we have an effective ~ 52 deg^2 yr of coverage for very slowly decaying transients, such as CVs. This implies an overall rate of outbursts from high galactic latitude CVs of 0.1 deg^2 yr^-1.

E. S. Rykoff; F. Aharonian; C. W. Akerlof; K. Alatalo; M. C. B. Ashley; T. Guver; D. Horns; R. L. Kehoe; U. Kiziloglu; T. A. McKay; M. Ozel; A. Phillips; R. M. Quimby; B. E. Schaefer; D. A. Smith; H. F. Swan; W. T. Vestrand; J. C. Wheeler; J. Wren; S. A. Yost

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts  

SciTech Connect

A beam of super-thermal, hot electrons was injected into maxwellian plasma with a density gradient along a magnetic field line. 1.5D particle-in-cell simulations were carried out which established that the EM emission is produced by the perpendicular component of the beam injection momentum. The beam has a positive slope in the distribution function in perpendicular momentum phase space, which is the characteristic feature of a cyclotron maser. The cyclotron maser in the overdense plasma generates emission at the electron cyclotron frequency. The frequencies of generated waves were too low to propagate away from the injection region, hence the wavelet transform shows a pulsating wave generation and decay process. The intensity pulsation frequency is twice the relativistic cyclotron frequency. Eventually, a stable wave packet formed and could mode couple on the density gradient to reach frequencies of the order of the plasma frequency that allowed for propagation. The emitted wave is likely to be a z-mode wave. The total electromagnetic energy generated is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy. The proposed mechanism is of relevance to solar type III radio bursts, as well as other situations, when the injected electron beam has a non-zero perpendicular momentum, e.g., magnetron.

Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

The He II Fowler lines and the O III and N III Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new measure of reddening (E$_{(B-V)}$$\\sim$0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the $\\ion{He}{ii}$ Fowler (n$\\to$3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of n$_H$ from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-$\\alpha$ line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative $\\ion{O}{iii}$ intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new $\\ion{O}{iii}$ Bowen lines near $\\lambda$ 2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the $\\ion{N}{iii}$ $\\lambda$ 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d $^2D_{5/2}$ and 3d $^2D_{3/2}$ levels of $\\ion{N}{iii}$. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and $\\ion{N}{iii}$ near $\\lambda$ 374 and show that the observed $\\ion{N}{iii}$ line ratios and intensities can be explained in terms of line fluorescence by the three resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ at $\\lambda$$\\lambda$ 374.432, 374.162 and 374.073 under optically thick conditions.

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Synthesis and Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted N4-Tetradentate Ligands for Implementation in An(III)/Ln(III) Separations  

SciTech Connect

The previous literature demonstrates that donor atoms softer than oxygen are effective for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) from trivalent actinides (An(III)) (Nash, K.L., in: Gschneider, K.A. Jr., et al. (eds.) Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, vol. 18-Lanthanides/Actinides Chemistry, pp. 197-238. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1994). It has also been shown that ligands that 'restrict' their donor groups in a favorable geometry, appropriate to the steric demands of the cation, have an increased binding affinity. A series of tetradentate nitrogen containing ligands have been synthesized with increased steric 'limits'. The pK a values for these ligands have been determined using potentiometric titration methods and the formation of the colored copper(II) complex has been used as a method to determine ligand partitioning between the organic and aqueous phases. The results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted amine ligands are encouraging, but the results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted diimines indicate that these ligands are unsuitable for implementation in a solvent extraction system due to hydrolysis.

Mark D. Ogden; G. Patrick Meier; Kenneth L. Nash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

2002 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Keynote Presentation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

His personal research interests include conduction mechanisms in ceramic ... biomimetic formation of new materials, non-thermal plasma emission control, and ...

450

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test.of Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain. DECOVALEX III, Taskmodeling of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. DECOVALEX

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers has invented the first vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technology yielding III-V photovoltaics. The photovoltaics ...

453

Analise Matematica III Cursos de Matematica e Engenharia Electrotecnica, Mecanica e Fsica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An??alise Matem??atica III 1 o ? Teste Cursos de Matem??atica e Engenharia Electrot??ecnica, Mec??anica

Matos, João Palhoto

454

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schrder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

455

G Subject: Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-74 References: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012,...

456

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed  

SciTech Connect

A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

Perkins, Jr., Francis W. (Princeton, NJ); Chiu, Shiu-Chu (San Diego, CA); Parks, Paul (San Diego, CA); Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Nonabelian plasma instabilities in Bjorken expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma instabilities are parametrically the dominant nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. In recent years the time evolution of the corresponding collective colour fields has been studied in stationary anisotropic situations. Here I report on recent numerical results on the time evolution of the most unstable modes in a longitudinally expanding plasma as they grow from small rapidity fluctuations to amplitudes where non-Abelian self-interactions become important.

Anton Rebhan

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Plasma heat pump and heat engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

Avinash, K. [Centre for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Quantum Electrodynamical Effects in Dusty Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new nonlinear electromagnetic wave mode in a magnetized dusty plasma is predicted. Its existence depends on the interaction of an intense circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with a dusty plasma, where quantum electrodynamical photon-photon scattering is taken into account. Specifically, we consider a dusty electron-positron-ion plasma, and show that the propagation of the new mode is admitted. It could be of significance for the physics of supernova remnants and in neutron star formation.

M. Marklund; L. Stenflo; P. K. Shukla; G. Brodin

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

Plasma torch with liquid metal electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to eliminate the negative effect of erosion processes on electrodes in arc plasma generators, a new scheme of arc discharge was proposed in which the surface of a molten metal acts as electrodes. A plasma reactor was designed on the basis of this concept. The electrophysical characteristics of such a discharge in steam and air as plasma gases were studied. Experiments on destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and steam coal gasification were performed.

Predtechenskii, M.R.; Tukhto, O.M. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Plasma vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles. 4 figs.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Dighe, S.V.; Gass, W.R.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Plasma vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles.

McLaughlin, David F. (Oakmont, PA); Dighe, Shyam V. (North Huntingdon, PA); Gass, William R. (Plum Boro, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Transport Coefficients of Gluon Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport coefficients of gluon plasma are calculated for a SU(3) pure gauge model by lattice QCD simulations on $16^3 \\times 8$ and $24^3 \\times 8$ lattices. Simulations are carried out at a slightly above the deconfinement transition temperature $T_c$, where a new state of matter is currently being pursued in RHIC experiments. Our results show that the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy is less than one and the bulk viscosity is consistent with zero in the region, $1.4 \\leq T/T_c \\leq 1.8 $.

Atsushi Nakamura; Sunao Sakai

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

Holographic plasma and anyonic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use alternative quantisation of the $D3/D5$ system to explore properties of a strongly coupled charged plasma and strongly coupled anyonic fluids. The $S$-transform of the $D3/D5$ system is used as a model for charged matter interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the large coupling regime, and we compute the dispersion relationship of the propagating electromagnetic modes as the density and temperature are changed. A more general $SL(2,\\mathbb{Z})$ transformation gives a strongly interacting anyonic fluid, and we study its transport properties as we change the statistics of the anyons and the background magnetic field.

Daniel K. Brattan; Gilad Lifschytz

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

469

Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 42.099444444444°, -113.38222222222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.099444444444,"lon":-113.38222222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

471

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

472

KT Monograph Section D5 Pottery Data - Level III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#7;1#7;#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;Libation arm#7;#7;#7;#7;2#7;28#7;34#7;#7;4#7;#7;Trefoil rim#7;#7;2#7;#7;9#7;4#7;9#7;2#7;1#7;#7;Pilgrim flask#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;#7;2#7;#7;Spindle bottle#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7... overhanging rim 2 1 1 Libation arm 2 28 34 4 Trefoil rim 2 9 4 9 2 1 Pilgrim flask 1 2 Spindle bottle 1 1 Table D5:1 - Sherd counts for Level III by phase. These figures are taken from the following units: 1376, 1417, 1421, 1428, 1428, 1436, 4001, 4004, 4010...

Hansen, C; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

473

Cellulose hydrolysis in evolving substrate morphologies III: Timescale analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis Hydrolysis in Evolving Substrate Morphologies III: Time-Scale Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Computational Systems Biology Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 11 December 2009; revision received 4 May 2010; accepted 10 May 2010 Published online 1 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22814 ABSTRACT: We present a time-scale analysis for the enzy- matic hydrolysis of solid cellulosic substrates,

474

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous Waste Bureau Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.nmenv.state.nm.us  DAVE MARTIN Secretary RAJ SOLOMON, P.E. Deputy Secretary CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED January 21, 2011 Edward Ziemianski, Acting Manager Farok Sharif, President Carlsbad Field Office Washington TRU Solutions LLC Department of Energy P.O. Box 2078 P.O. Box 3100 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-5608 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs. Ziemianski and Sharif: On September 20, 2010, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received a

475

CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i5W 95.5 L' i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

476

Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

477

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, ASME, 2012, Reference.

D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect

The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

Kevin G. DeWall

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

On the geometry of plasma reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is presented the concept of controled nuclear synthesis in top of cone formed by rotational dynamic flow of low-temperature plasma.

I. V. Bayak

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

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