Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Applications of Non Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is now being developed for use in ... a lot of clinical applications of non-thermal plasma have been tested and the results show promising potential for Plasma Medicine. In...

S. Kalghatgi; D. Dobrynin; G. Fridman…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automotive industry optics biomedical technology environmental technology Plasma Technology Quote from: Pla-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

3

Ceramics in non-thermal plasma discharge for hydrogen generation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent interest in hydrogen as an energy source has resulted in development of new technologies such as non-thermal plasma processing of natural gas. We report… (more)

Vintila, Ramona Roxana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treatment [56]. Non-thermal plasma devices, specifically...generated at atmospheric pressure in...58]. DBD plasma characteristics...distance [58]. Non-thermal DBD plasma...effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on bacteria...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Dental Applications of Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a summary of selected recent research efforts devoted to the use of low-temperature (or non-thermal) atmospheric-pressure plasmas in various dental applications. Areas of application ... fun...

WeiDong Zhu; Kurt Becker; Jie Pan; Jue Zhang; Jing Fang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was...2 con...

F. Ouni; A. Khacef; J. M. Cormier

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Application of Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control: Toluene removal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Application of Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control for these technologies. As an alternative to conventional VOCs abatement techniques, atmospheric non-thermal plasma (NTP rue d'Issoudun, BP 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 02, France. Keywords: Non thermal Plasma, Catalysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Replacement of silencer Slide serial no 23 ME2132 - DDO Non Thermal Plasma Unit Small scale - 110th Size l Procurement and Manufacture 110th Scale Plasma...

10

MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

V.K. Mathur

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Non-thermal plasma enhanced heavy oil upgrading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A process was proposed for upgrading heavy oil using non-thermal plasma technology in a conventional thermal cracking system under atmospheric pressure. Results from a comparison of the reactivity of a N2, H2 and CH4 plasma showed that the plasma can increase the trap oil yield significantly. The trap oil yield increased by ?9% when the N2 plasma was applied and showed a further increase of ?19% when the H2 or CH4 plasma was applied. A detailed study on the H2 plasma-enhanced upgrading process was carried out and the results showed that the trap oil yields of the plasma-on runs can be 8–33% higher than those of the plasma-off runs, depending on experimental conditions. Compared with the plasma-off runs, trap oil from the plasma-on runs had a higher (H/C)atomic but less heteroatoms (S and N). Over-balanced hydrogen in the products from plasma-on runs revealed the H2 plasma reactivity, which was further demonstrated by an increase in the substitution and condensation indices of trap oil from the plasma-on runs. Although thermal cracking was mainly involved whether the plasma was applied or not, the electrical field for generating the plasma and the generated plasma may assist with hydrocarbon bond cleavage. This was shown by the increased trap oil yield with the N2 plasma and the hydrogen and carbon residue distribution. Compared with the feedstock, more aromatic and ?-hydrogen (HA and H?, respectively) and less ?- and ?-hydrogen (H? and H?, respectively) were present in the residues, which agrees with the bond dissociation energy data. Similarly, the amounts of saturated (Cs) and alkyl (Cp) carbons in the residues were significantly lower than those in the feedstock while the amount of aromatic carbons (Ca) in the residues was higher than the feedstock. The changes in hydrogen and carbon distribution were more significant for the plasma-on runs. This implies that mainly side chain losses and bridged bond breakage are involved in the processes. This was demonstrated further by the molecular weight distribution. In general, the molecular weight of the residues was lower than that of the feedstock, especially for residues from the plasma-on runs. However, compared with the feedstock, the residues contained less saturated, aromatic and resin fractions but more asphaltene and toluene insoluble fractions. This implies that intra-molecular condensation was more significant than inter-molecular condensation, especially in the plasma-on runs. This should be attributed to the higher stabilization ability of the H2 plasma for fragments or radicals and gas (plasma) flow by which the fragments or radicals are separated rapidly.

Haigang Hao; Bao S. Wu; Jianli Yang; Qiang Guo; Yong Yang; Yong W. Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Design, Construction and Characterization of AC Atmospheric Pressure Air Non-thermal Plasma Jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and construction of non-thermal plasma jet device which was built in plasma phys. Dept., NRC, AEA, Egypt with a plasma application group. This design will be useful to initiate ...

K. M. Ahmed; T. M. Allam; H. A. El-sayed; H. M. Soliman…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of the biological effects of a non-thermal plasma on Saccharomyses cerevisiae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cellular and the molecular responses of eukaryotic yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure are analyzed. A plasma device with a dielectric barrier discharge is ... in ...

Gyungsoon Park; Ku Y. Baik; Jung G. Kim…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Gaseous phase benzene decomposition by non-thermal plasma coupled with nano titania catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synergistic effect of atmospheric non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge and nano ... degradation was visible by added photocatalyst in the plasma reactor. When concentration of benzene was ...

T. Zhu M. Sc.; J. Li Ph.D.; Y. Q. Jin…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Chemistry of Methane Remediation by a Non?thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The destruction of methane by a non?thermal plasma in atmospheric pressure gas streams of nitrogen with variable ... determined by on?line FTIR spectroscopy and the plasma chemistry is interpreted using kinetic m...

Kirsty J. Pringle; J. Christopher Whitehead…

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Non-thermal Plasma Processing for Dilute VOCs Decomposition Combined with the Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma process combined with the new catalyst for...2...) named as the carbon balance. For better carbon balance, SED of the electric discharge is more than 90 J/L which is pretty...

Tetsuji Oda; Hikaru Kuramochi; Ryo Ono

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Experimental Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons in non-thermal plasma, namely dielectric barrier discharge and corona discharge, has been investigated experimentally at atmospheric pressure....

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Augmented survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae within biofilms: exposure to atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacteria embedded within biofilms present a challenge to surface decontamination by conventional means. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma processes have emerged as a promising approach to overcoming this pr...

L. Xu; Y. Tu; Y. Yu; M. Tan; J. Li; H. Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown sig...

Kevin M. Keener; J. L. Jensen…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas as a novel candidate for preventive therapy of melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the increased ultraviolet radiation, the incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide more than that of any other cancer. In this study, the effects of irradiation of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas

Yasuhiro Omata; Machiko Iida; Ichiro Yajima…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical ... current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A ... the PPSG is a formatio...

Yuri Akishev; N. Trushkin; M. Grushin…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Induction of cell growth arrest by atmospheric non-thermal plasma in colorectal cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules, resulting in a mixture of energy particles, including electrons and ions. Recent progress in the understanding of non-thermal atmospheric plasma has led to applications in biomedicine. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved in plasma-induced cell growth arrest are unclear. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of non-thermal atmospheric plasma treatment for cancer therapy and examined the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-proliferative properties and cell death in human colorectal cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma induced cell growth arrest and induced apoptosis. In addition, plasma reduced cell migration and invasion activities. As a result, we found that plasma treatment to the cells increases ?-catenin phosphorylation, suggesting that ?-catenin degradation plays a role at least in part in plasma-induced anti-proliferative activity. Therefore, non-thermal atmospheric plasma constitutes a new biologic tool with the potential for therapeutic applications that modulate cell signaling and function.

Chul-Ho Kim; Jae Hoon Bahn; Seong-Ho Lee; Gye-Yeop Kim; Seung-Ik Jun; Keunho Lee; Seung Joon Baek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Use of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA e-mail: carlos.i.calle@nasa.gov Abstract: Atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APGD) plasmas have been proposed for sterilizing spacecraft surfaces prior

Schuerger, Andrew C.

25

Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (?2 mm thick, ?10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; M. Sky Driver; Anthony N. Caruso; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Application of non-thermal atmospheric pressure ac plasmas to the carbon dioxide reforming of methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane conversions of 11.9%, yields of hydrogen as high as 23.3% and energy yields of 1.0 mol H2/kWh have been achieved from CO2 reforming of CH4 in non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma reactors with Pt coat...

Stephanie L. Brock; Tomoko Shimojo; Steven L. Suib…

27

Study of non-thermal plasma jet with dielectric barrier configuration in nitrogen and argon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is advantageous in generating non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure as it avoids transition to thermal arc and dispenses with costly vacuum system. It has found useful applications in treating heat-sensitive materials such as plastics and living tissue. In this work the discharge formed between the Pyrex glass layer and the ground electrode is extruded through a nozzle to form the non-thermal plasma jet. The DBD characteristics were investigated in terms of charge transferred and mean power dissipated per cycle when operated in nitrogen and argon at various flow rates and applied voltages. These characteristics were then correlated to the dimension of the plasma jet. The mean power dissipated in the DBD was below 7 W giving an efficiency of 17 %. The length of the plasma jet was greatly limited to below 1 cm due to the configuration of the DBD system and nozzle.

O. H. Chin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

RETRACTED ARTICLE: Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat ... study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melano...

Rachel Sensenig; Sameer Kalghatgi; Ekaterina Cerchar…

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-?m-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min)/input power (5–15 W). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen's banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; Vladimir Dusevich; Yi Liu; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Antimicrobial effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma as a novel root canal disinfectant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aimed to investigate effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on an Enterococcus faecalis biofilm within the canals of extracted human teeth. A significant decrease in the number of CFU?s was observed after 2 min cold plasma treatment with an average kill rate of 99.999%. MTT assay showed a significant reduction in the viability of bacteria with a reduction rate of 98.939%. XTT assay showed a reduction of bacterial metabolic activity by 99.7%. Both 2 min cold plasma and 6% NaOCl greatly reduced the viability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis bacteria, but there is no significant difference between them.

Mariam Habib; Timothy L. Hottel; Liang Hong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Measurement of Reactive Hydroxyl Radical Species Inside the Biosolutions During Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Bombardment onto the Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet could generate various kinds of radicals ... The electron temperature and ion density for this non-thermal plasma jet have been measured to be about...13 cm?3 in this e...

Yong Hee Kim; Young June Hong; Ku Youn Baik…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Differential sensitivity of lymphocyte subpopulations to non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas can possibly be used for several applications in particular in medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to living tissues and cells, e.g., to induce apoptosis and growth arrest in tumour cells or to improve wound healing. However, detailed investigations of plasma–cell interactions are strongly needed. It is not yet clear whether plasmas will be useful in stimulating immune cells to change their behaviour or function. Therefore, this study focused on the influence of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on cell surface molecules of rat spleen mononuclear cells (MNC) as first important step to gain insight into plasma–immune cells interactions. Rat spleen MNC were treated with plasma by surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air or argon. Lymphocyte subpopulations and expression of L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? expression on T-cells were analysed by flow cytometry 1–48 h after plasma treatment. Plasma changed the ratio of T- and B-cells in favour of B-cells. Of the T-cells the helper T-cells were reduced while cytotoxic T-cells were less affected. L-selectin expressing T-cells were significantly reduced already 1 h after plasma treatment and that of ICAM-1+ and LFA-1?+T-cells only after 4 h. These effects were time dependent and less dramatic when using DBD/argon plasma. In conclusion, different lymphocyte subpopulations show different sensitivity to plasma. Adhesion molecules as L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? are down regulated by plasma. Whether these results can be used to modify lymphocyte homing or to activate MNC for different applications remains to be clarified.

Beate Haertel; Frauke Volkmann; Thomas von Woedtke; Ulrike Lindequist

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite...Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acid...

Qing Song Yu; H. Li; A. C. Ritts; B. Yang…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Generation of non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in hetero-phase media of air with water aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations on non-thermal plasma generation using of high-voltage discharge in hetero-phase media of airflow at atmospheric pressure with liquid aerosol are presented in...B. subti...

Yu. S. Akishev; G. I. Aponin; M. E. Grushin…

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: Improved resin adhesive penetration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Methods Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-?m spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and restorative materials.

Ying Zhang; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

UBIQUITOUS NON-THERMALS IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v{sub 2}(K{sub e} )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v{sub 2} {identical_to} w(15/8K{sub e} ){sup 1/4} will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally K{sub e} (s) {<=} 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of K{sub e} along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The non-thermal regime K{sub e} > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

Scudder, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 54420 (United States); Karimabadi, H., E-mail: jack-scudder@uiowa.edu [SciberQuest, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chemical filters by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas for reactive fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasmas in electrode configurations are designed in this study and investigated at atmospheric pressure for generation of reactive fields. A combination of insulated wire electrodes and bare metal wire electrodes makes it possible to obtain a filter-like assembly of microplasmas, even in ambient air or in aqueous solutions. Oxidation and reduction fields are obtained by controlling the gas supply of hydrogen, oxygen, and water vapor, and these fields benefit various functional processes such as recycling CO2, decomposing organic molecules, and increasing the work function on metal surfaces.

Osamu Sakai; Tadasuke Morita; Yoshihiko Ueda; Noriaki Sano; Kunihide Tachibana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed the advantageous plasma catalyst coupling effect on the lowering of the catalyst activation temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Application of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma to chlorination of hardly soluble materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chlorination reaction in which hardly soluble materials are chemically converted into soluble chlorides by atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) and the effect of the plasma-irradiation conditions on the chlorination reaction were investigated. The CeO2 specimens, which have the same crystallographic structure (CaF2 type, cubic) and valence fluctuation behavior as ThO2, were used to simulate hardly soluble nuclear materials. \\{CCl4\\} and He mixed gas were used as the plasma discharge. The emission and electrical properties of APNTP and dissolution behaviors of chloride generated by plasma irradiation were evaluated. The results of the emission spectroscopic analysis and electrical property measurements showed that chlorine and carbon were generated from the decomposition of \\{CCl4\\} caused by the excited atmospheric components and He. Moreover, the production of CeCl3 from CeO2 and a logarithmic progression of the chlorination reaction were indicated with increasing plasma-irradiation time.

Toru Kitagaki; Tatsuya Suzuki; Toshitaka Kaneshiki; Masao Nomura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, non-thermal parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir; Baraz, Rasoul [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Acetaldehyde removal using an atmospheric non-thermal plasma combined with a packed bed: Role of the adsorption process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work is an attempt in order to help towards understanding the influence of the adsorption process on the removal of a VOC (acetaldehyde, CH3CHO) using cyclic non thermal plasma (NTP) combined with a packed-bed of a catalyst support, ?-Al2O3. In the first part, the results obtained by placing the saturated alumina pellets inside the plasma discharge zone are discussed, in terms of acetaldehyde removal, CO and CO2 production. In the second part, adsorption of CH3CHO, CO, CO2 and O3 was carried out, from single and multicomponent mixtures of the different compounds. The results showed that (i) the adsorption capacities followed the order CH 3 CHO ? ? ? CO 2 ? > ? CO ; (ii) O3 was decomposed on the alumina surface; (iii) CO oxidation occurred on the surface when O3 was present. In the third part, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to follow the alumina surface during acetaldehyde adsorption. DRIFTS measurements demonstrated that besides the bands of molecularly adsorbed acetaldehyde, several absorptions appeared on the spectra showing the intermediate surface transformation of acetaldehyde already at 300 K. Finally, the relationship between the adsorption results and the NTP combined with a packed-bed process is discussed.

C. Klett; X. Duten; S. Tieng; S. Touchard; P. Jestin; K. Hassouni; A. Vega-González

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of Plasma Deposition Using Low-Power/Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Promoting Adhesion of Composite Resin to Enamel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This study investigated the effect of monomer deposition through a low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) on adhesion of resin ... stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. The

Geum-Jun Han; Jae-Hoon Kim; Sung-No Chung…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on attachment of osteoblast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the high success rate of dental implant surgery, the failures are still being reported and investigation have been undergone to improve attachment of osteoblast on the surface of implant material. With increasing interest in non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), the effects of it on the cellular mechanisms have been previously reported. Hence in this experiment, effects of NTAPPJ on osteoblast for improved attachment and possible application in dental implant surgery were investigated. Mouse osteoblast cells of MC3T3-E1 were first directly treated with NTAPPJ with air for various durations. Also to investigate the effects by culture media, culture media were separately treated with NTAPPJ for the same durations. Cell attachments were then assessed following 4 and 24 h of cell culture using Water Soluble Tetrazolium salt (WST) assay and confirmed by automated cell counter and examining under confocal laser microscope. The results showed that there was significantly improved osteoblast attachment with relatively short duration of NTAPPJ treatment. Also results indicated that NTAPPJ possibly improved osteoblast attachment through interactions with proteins in culture media that in turn interacted with cells. Hence the application of NTAPPJ on osteoblast improves cellular attachment and would be useful tool for dental implant surgery.

Jae-Sung Kwon; Yong Hee Kim; Eun Ha Choi; Kyoung-Nam Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Novel AC and DC Non-Thermal Plasma Sources for Cold Surface Treatment of Polymer Films and Fabrics at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of non-thermal plasma sources at atmospheric pressure based on multi-pin DC (direct ... ofdischarges mentioned and output energy characteristics of new plasma sources as well as data on after-...

Yuri Akishev; Michail Grushin; Anatoly Napartovich…

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive indexn in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that the temperature profile specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core the FWHM and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics e.g. the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organizedplasma studied here. Instead it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

J. Schäfer; R. Foest; S. Reuter; T. Kewitz; J. Šperka; K.-D. Weltmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Estimation of point of zero charge for activated carbon treated with atmospheric pressure non-thermal oxygen plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial activated carbon was treated with a non-thermal oxygen plasma under atmospheric pressure using three types of reactors: a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) parallel-plate reactor; an atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma jet reactor and a DBD coaxial type reactor. The samples treated with the plasma were characterized by the pH value at the point of zero charge. An estimation of the adsorption properties of samples for copper ions in aqueous solution was also carried out in order to explain the effect of pH value on the adsorption results.

Satoshi Kodama; Hidetoshi Sekiguchi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Bactericidal effect of various non-thermal plasma agents and the influence of experimental conditions in microbial inactivation: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Microbial inactivation using non-thermal gas discharge at atmospheric pressure has become a subject of significant research effort in the recent years. In this paper, we reviewed the different viewpoints proposed by various researchers, and discussed the reasons for arriving at these conclusions. We summarized some general rules, and offered a proposal to study the reasons behind their conclusions by building mathematical model for prediction of principle factors. The future prospects for the application of plasma are outlined.

Jian Guo; Kang Huang; Jianping Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Eradication of marine biofilms by atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: A potential approach to control biofouling?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although the antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas, including its capacity to eradicate microbial biofilms, has been gaining an ever increasing interest for different medical applications, its potential utilisation in the control of biofouling and biodeterioration has, to date, received no attention. In this study, the ability of atmospheric pressure plasma to eradicate biofilms of four biofouling bacterial species, frequently encountered in marine environments, was investigated. Biofilms were grown on both polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces before being exposed to the plasma source. Viability and biomass of biofilms were evaluated using colony count method and differential Live/Dead fluorescence staining followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Rapid and complete eradication of all biofilms under study was achieved after plasma exposures ranging from 60 to 120 s. Confocal microscopy examination showed that plasma treatment has mediated not only cell killing but also varying degrees of physical removal of biofilms. Further investigation and tailored development of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma sources for this particular application could provide an additional powerful and effective weapon in the current anti-biofouling armamentarium.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Influence of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on cellular structures and processes in human keratinocytes (HaCaT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background The use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in dermatology to improve the healing of chronic wounds is a promising application. The antimicrobial properties of physical plasma offer on the one hand the killing of bacteria, which are often a problem in chronic wounds. On the other hand, plasma can activate cells which are involved in the wound closure. Objective To guarantee a safe application it is essential to understand basic interactions between physical plasma and human skin cells. Methods In our study, human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) were directly plasma treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma source and effects on viability, DNA, cell cycle, intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis were observed. Results A treatment time-dependent loss of recovered adherent HaCaT cells after 24 h and a linear increase of DNA damage were observed, which was no longer evident 24 h after plasma stimulation, except for long treatment times. An accumulation of HaCaT cells in G2/M phase and a decrease in the G1 phase was caused by DBD plasma. The increasing formation of intracellular ROS is also attributed to plasma treatment. In contrast to other studies we did not find clear evidences for apoptosis in adherent HaCaT cells. A culture medium exchange subsequently after plasma treatment weakened the observed effects. Conclusion DBD plasma treatment resulted in oxidative stress in human keratinocytes which is related to deficient cell performance.

Susanne Blackert; Beate Haertel; Kristian Wende; Thomas von Woedtke; Ulrike Lindequist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Atmospheric Pollutant Removal by Non?Thermal Plasmas: Basic Data Needs for Understanding and Optimization of the Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since fifteen years an increasing interest has been devoted to removal of atmospheric pollutant by non?thermal plasmas achieved using e?beams or pulsed discharges for the nitrous oxides the so?called de?NOx process or for Volatils Organic Compounds the so?called de?VOC process. However the physical and chemical mechanisms involved are not easy to understand: molecules or gas mixtures are quite complex and the transient plasma created by the type of discharge often used dielectric barrier or corona ones is non homogeneous in space. In this paper is discussed some data needs for understanding of the NO?removal process and the destruction of some selected VOC molecules TCE and TCA by pulsed discharge plasmas. Some experimental studies performed to get insight into the discharge plasma kinetic involved in the pollutant removal are presented in particular about the hydroxyl radical OH which play an important role in this kinetic.

S. Pasquiers; M. Cormier; O. Motret

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/?-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/?-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/?-TCP scaffolds.

Yu-Ri Choi; Jae-Sung Kwon; Doo-Hoon Song; Eun Ha Choi; Yong-Keun Lee; Kyoung-Nam Kim; Kwang-Mahn Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Organic pollutants abatement and biodecontamination of brewery effluents by a non-thermal quenched plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A preliminary study was carried out to investigate possible decontamination of the waste waters from a Cameroonian brewery by using a non-thermal atmospheric plasma. Samples of waste waters collected during periods of intense activity of production were first analysed for organoleptic, physical–chemical and organic parameters, and then exposed to a humid air electric discharge at ambient temperature and pressure. The resultant pollution abatement and germicidal effects are both ascribed to strong oxidising effects of OH and NO radicals formed in the plasma. The BOD removal efficiency of the process with brewery industrial wastewaters under BOD concentration of 385 and 1018 mg l?1 were 74% and 98% respectively. The alkaline wastewaters are rapidly neutralised due to the pH lowering effects of the plasma treatment.

A. Doubla; S. Laminsi; S. Nzali; E. Njoyim; J. Kamsu-Kom; J.-L. Brisset

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma: Screening for gentle process conditions and antibacterial efficiency on perishable fresh produce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fresh fruits and vegetables, destined to be eaten raw or minimally processed only, harbor the risk of conveying pathogenic microorganisms. Factors such as weather conditions, which favor survival or growth of microorganisms, and improper handling during cultivation or in the postharvest chain, can contribute to outbreaks of food-borne illness. Application of chemical sanitizers or physical treatments often shows a limited efficiency or does not meet consumer acceptance. Availability of gentle and effective techniques for disinfection of fresh produce, therefore, is highly desirable. Non-thermal gas plasma (NTP) treatment is a promising novel technique to reduce the microbial load on fresh fruits and vegetables. However, knowledge on practical applicability of NTP for fresh fruits and vegetables is very limited. In this study, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) was used to elucidate suitable process parameters for application of an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet (kINPen 09, INP Greifswald, Germany) on corn salad, a perishable leafy green. Keeping a distance of 17 mm to the plasma-jet, corn salad leaves could be treated for up to 60 s at a fixed power (8 W) and 5 L min? 1 of argon mixed with 0.1% oxygen. Surface temperature on leaves did never exceed 35.2 °C. Antibacterial tests were performed on corn salad, cucumber, apple, and tomato and achieved an inactivation of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli DSM 1116 of 4.1 ± 1.2, 4.7 ± 0.4, 4.7 ± 0, and 3.3 ± 0.9 log units, respectively, after 60 s treatment time. Additional tests with a dielectric barrier discharge plasma and indirect plasma treatment within a remote exposure reactor, fed by a microwave induced plasma torch, did not result in equivalent levels of quality retention as observed using the plasma-jet. Industrial relevance Development of gentle non-thermal disinfection methods aims to provide the industry with new tools to actively improve the microbial status of fresh produce beyond the preventive benefits of good hygiene practices and the limited efficacy of post-harvest washing. The presented study shows how cold plasma can be applied to heat-sensitive lettuce leaves without detrimental effects to product quality. The additional microbiological tests offer insights into the antibacterial capacity of cold plasma on different produce surfaces. The results contribute to prompt the development of appropriate large-scale plasma sources to establish a new plasma-based sanitation technique for fresh fruits and vegetables, which should also be implementable into running process lines.

Matthias Baier; Mandy Görgen; Jörg Ehlbeck; Dietrich Knorr; Werner B. Herppich; Oliver Schlüter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Heating and Non-thermal Particle Acceleration in Relativistic, Transverse Magnetosonic Shock Waves in Proton-Electron-Positron Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of 1D particle-in-cell simulations of ultrarelativistic shock waves in proton-electron-positron plasmas. We consider magnetized shock waves, in which the upstream medium carries a large scale magnetic field, directed transverse to the flow. Relativistic cyclotron instability of each species as the incoming particles encounter the increasing magnetic field within the shock front provides the basic plasma heating mechanism. The most significant new results come from simulations with mass ratio $m_p/m_\\pm = 100$. We show that if the protons provide a sufficiently large fraction of the upstream flow energy density (including particle kinetic energy and Poynting flux), a substantial fraction of the shock heating goes into the formation of suprathermal power-law spectra of pairs. Cyclotron absorption by the pairs of the high harmonic ion cyclotron waves, emitted by the protons, provides the non-thermal acceleration mechanism. As the proton fraction increases, the non-thermal efficiency increases and the pairs' power-law spectra harden. We suggest that the varying power law spectra observed in synchrotron sources powered by magnetized winds and jets might reflect the correlation of the proton to pair content enforced by the underlying electrodynamics of these sources' outflows, and that the observed correlation between the X-ray spectra of rotation powered pulsars with the X-ray spectra of their nebulae might reflect the same correlation.

Elena Amato; Jonathan Arons

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Interactions of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with Solid and Liquid Food Systems: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma processes combine several advantages such as non- ... science and technology dealing with the application of plasma processes on solid and liquid foodstuff. Starting wi...

Björn Surowsky; Oliver Schlüter; Dietrich Knorr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassaspores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomicDNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

Gyungsoon Park; Young H. Ryu; Young J. Hong; Eun H. Choi; Han S. Uhm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Simulation of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma Discharges for Surface Decontamination Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are conducted to characterize atmospheric pressure plasma discharges for surface decontamination applications. A self ... dimensional hybrid model is developed to simulate the atmospheric pr...

T. Farouk; B. Farouk; A. Gutsol; A. Fridman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002deerhughes1.pdf More Documents &...

62

Time dependent evolution of RF-generated non-thermal particle distributions in fusion plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe fully self-consistent time-dependent simulations of radio frequency (RF) generated ion distributions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and RF-generated electron distributions in the lower hybrid range of frequencies using combined Fokker–Planck and full wave electromagnetic field solvers. In each regime, the non-thermal particle distributions have been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to compare with diagnostic measurements from experiment, thus providing validation of the simulation capability. The computational intensive simulations require multiple full wave code runs that iterate with a Fokker–Planck code. We will discuss advanced algorithms that have been implemented to accelerate both the massively parallel full wave simulations as well as the iteration with the distribution code. A vector extrapolation method (Sidi A 2008 Comput. Math. Appl. 56) that permits Jacobian-free acceleration of the traditional fixed point iteration technique is used to reduce the number of iterations needed between the distribution and wave codes to converge to self-consistency. The computational burden of the parallel full wave codes has been reduced by using a more efficient two level parallel decomposition that improves the strong scaling of the codes and reduces the communication overhead.

J C Wright; A Bader; L A Berry; P T Bonoli; R W Harvey; E F Jaeger; J-P Lee; A Schmidt; E D'Azevedo; I Faust; C K Phillips; E Valeo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species rotational temperature vibrational temperature and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N2(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N2(C-B 0-0) and N2(B-X 0-0) as well as measured current the electron density which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission reaches a maximum value of 5.6?×?1020/m3.

Dezhi Xiao; Cheng Cheng; Jie Shen; Yan Lan; Hongbing Xie; Xingsheng Shu; Jiangang Li; Paul K. Chu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Surface Modification of Smectite Clay Induced by Non-thermal Gliding Arc Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smectite clay from Sabga (west-Cameroon) was treated in aqueous suspension by gliding arc plasma to modify its surface properties. The evolution of the modifications was followed with the exposure time and pos...

Antoine Tiya Djowe; Samuel Laminsi…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jets on enzyme solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to study the wide scope of structural information of biomolecules in the presence of biocompatible cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (CAPJ), we used circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence experi...

Pankaj Attri; Pannuru Venkatesu; Nagendra Kaushik…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Interactions between Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Ex-vivo Dermal Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cold atmospheric plasma (CAPs) is the fourth state of matter, which means that it is an ionized gas, obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure when energy is supplied to a gas. Its composition is complex, involving chemical (gas's molecules, free radicals, ions and electrons) and physical (Ultra-violet radiation and electric field) components. It has been successfully used in the industry for the processing of materials and the recent discovery of its efficacy in sterilization of microorganisms has trigged a large quantity of research in the biomedical field. The expectations of good that the \\{CAPs\\} may bring to medical treatments are high and therefore this study analyzes the effects caused by cold atmospheric pressure plasma in ex-vivo dermal fibroblasts. For that, fibroblast cell culture was obtained from ex-vivo human skin and treated with different conditions of CAPs, such as treatment type (direct or indirect). This work aimed to determine if ex-vivo human fibroblasts remain viable after these treatments. For that, we counted the number of cells right after the experiments and compared it with the control, which did not receive any kind of plasma. For further results we also counted the number of viable cells 3 and 5 days after the application. The fibroblasts were treated with 85W plasma, from 30 seconds up to 60 seconds. Our findings show that \\{CAPs\\} obtained from Argon gas can be applied to in-house human fibroblasts culture directly and indirectly without altering the cells’ viability. It does not cause apoptosis in all of the cells treated nor does it exacerbate its proliferation. Further studies need to be done in order to analyze if it alters the cells’ functionality.

Bruno Bellotti Lopes; Maria Beatriz de Paula Leite Kraft; Jussara Rehder; Fabiana Regina Xavier Batista; Maria Beatriz Puzzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effect of a non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure, plasma brush on conversion of model self-etch adhesive formulations compared to conventional photo-polymerization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To determine the effectiveness and efficiency of non-thermal, atmospheric plasmas for inducing polymerization of model dental self-etch adhesives. Methods The monomer mixtures used were bis-[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), with mass ratios of 70/30, 50/50 and 30/70. Water was added to the above formulations: 10–30 wt%. These monomer/water mixtures were treated steadily for 40 s under a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 32 to 35 °C. For comparison, photo-initiators were added to the above formulations for photo-polymerization studies, which were light-cured for 40 s. The degree of conversion (DC) of both the plasma- and light-cured samples was measured using FTIR spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflectance attachment. Results The non-thermal plasma brush was effective in inducing polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. The presence of water did not negatively affect the DC of plasma-cured samples. Indeed, DC values slightly increased, with increasing water content in adhesives: from 58.3% to 68.7% when the water content increased from 10% to 30% in the adhesives with a 50/50 (2MP/HEMA) mass ratio. Conversion values of the plasma-cured groups were higher than those of light-cured samples with the same mass ratio and water content. Spectral differences between the plasma- and light-cured groups indicate subtle structural distinctions in the resultant polymer networks. Significance This research if the first to demonstrate that the non-thermal plasma brush induces polymerization of model adhesives under clinical settings by direct/indirect energy transfer. This device shows promise for polymerization of dental composite restorations having enhanced properties and performance.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; Xiaomei Yao; Hao Li; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet that are critical for biomedical applications have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18?W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%–0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A 2 ? + ( ? = 0 1 ) ? X 2 ? ( ? ? = 0 ) at 308?nm and A 2 ? + ( ? = 0 1 ) ? X 2 ? ( ? ? = 1 ) at 287?nm O I transitions 3p5P?3s5S0 at 777.41?nm and 3p3P?3s3S0 at 844.6?nm N2(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C 3 ? u ? ? B 3 ? g ? in the range of 300–450?nm and N2 +(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B 2 ? u + ? X 2 ? g + ( ? ? = 0 ) at 391.4?nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified including the He I transitions 3p3P0?2s3S at 388.8?nm 3p1P0? 2s1S at 501.6?nm 3d3D?2p3P0 at 587.6?nm 3d1D?2p1P0 at 667.8?nm 3s3S1?2p3P0 at 706.5?nm 3s1S0?2p1P0 at 728.1?nm and H? transition 2p-3d at 656.3?nm. Using a spectral fitting method the OH radicals at 306–312?nm the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that in the entire active plasma region the gas temperature remains at 310?±?25?K and 340?±?25?K and it increases to 320?±?25?K and 360?±?25?K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture respectively. Additionally the vibrational temperatures range from 2200?±?100?K and 2500?±?100?K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cellular activity at SLA-treated titanium surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium (Ti) is a primary material used for dental implants, and the sandblasted, large-grit, and acid-etched (SLA) surface treatment is commonly used on titanium to promote early osseointegration. Despite their benefits, SLA-treated Ti surfaces are disadvantaged by their hydrophobic property, and much research has been performed to address this problem. In current study, we hypothesized the effects of a nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) treatment on SLA-treated Ti would increase hydrophilicity and cellular activity. Samples with and without the NTAPPJ treatment were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope, optical surface roughness system, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope, and water contact angle measuring system. MC3T3-E1 cells (murine osteoblastic cell line) attachments and proliferations were examined by the MTT and BrdU colorimetry assay. Cell immunofluorescent microscopic images were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscope for a morphological analysis. This study found that the nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment on SLA-treated Ti significantly increased the hydrophilicity and MC3T3-E1 cell attachments and proliferations. Hence, it was concluded that an additional procedure of nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment just prior to implantation of SLA-treated Ti into oral defect sites could improve the success of dental implant surgery.

Eun-Jung Lee; Jae-Sung Kwon; Soo-Hyuk Uhm; Doo-Hoon Song; Yong Hee Kim; Eun Ha Choi; Kyoung-Nam Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy Stark broadening and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 1020/m3 which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron–proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States) [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 (United States); Navarro, Roberto [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

On the performance and mechanisms of toluene removal by FeOx/SBA-15-assisted non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract FeOx/SBA-15 catalysts were prepared via impregnation and utilized for toluene removal in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Toluene removal was investigated in the environment of various mixed N2/O2 plasmas, showing that toluene removal efficiency and \\{COx\\} selectivity were greatly increased by FeOx/SBA-15 and that the organic intermediates were greatly reduced by catalysts. In pure N2 plasma, the bulk oxygen in the catalyst was involved in the toluene oxidation, and the 3%FeOx/SBA-15 catalyst showed the optimal toluene oxidation activity. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD), showing that toluene oxidation was closely related to the highly dispersed nature of iron on the SBA-15 surface, the reduction temperature of Fe2+ and the oxygen adsorption ability of the catalyst. The pathways of toluene decomposition in the combination of FeOx/SBA-15 with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) system were proposed based on the identified intermediates.

Meijuan Lu; Rong Huang; Junliang Wu; Mingli Fu; Limin Chen; Daiqi Ye

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Alexander Fridman · Microdischarge Interaction and Structuring in Dielectric Barrier Discharges · Kinetics of Blood Coagulation in Plasma · Surface Wound wire Area of DBD plasma region: ~104cm2 #12;7 Microdischarge Patterning (2D) R22 R23 R24 R26 R27 R28

Kaganovich, Igor

74

E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and B. cereus Bacteria Sterilization Using Afterglow of Non-Thermal Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed and employed a new geometrical structure of dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure for bacterial broad spectrum sterilization. We utilized a plasma source having an AC power supply at.....

Farshad Sohbatzadeh; Abasalt Hosseinzadeh Colagar…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Localized DLC etching by a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet in ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using a versatile atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were etched in ambient air. We observed that the DLC films are etched at a nominal rate of around 60 nm/min in the treated area (230 ?m in diameter) during a 20-min exposure. The etching rate increased after the initial 10-min exposure. During this period, the flat DLC surface was structurally modified to produce carbon nanostructures with a density of ~ 2.4 × 1011 cm? 2. With this increase in surface area, the etching rate increased. After 20 min, the DLC film had a circular pattern etched into it down to the substrate where silicon nanostructures were observed with sizes varying from 10 nm to 1 ?m. The initial carbon nanostructure formation is believed to involve selective removal of the sp2-bonded carbon domains. The carbon etching results from the formation of reactive oxygen species in the plasma.

Jun-Seok Oh; Yoshiaki Kakuta; Yuki Yasuoka; Hiroshi Furuta; Akimitsu Hatta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vaporization of bulk metals into single-digit nanoparticles by non-thermal plasma filaments in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A compact, inexpensive and simple dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) design is presented with related electro-thermal properties for the production of metal nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation and growth mechanisms are depicted from size distributions and chemical analyses of particles collected just after the 70 kHz DBD in nitrogen. At first, it is confirmed that the initial local vapor flux is produced from the spots of interaction between plasma filaments and different metal electrodes (Au, Ag, and Cu). Amorphous and crystalline pure metal primary nanoparticles with diameters below 5 nm are then produced by physical nucleation in expanding vapors jets. Finally, some small agglomerates with diameters still below 5 nm are also formed by ballistic agglomeration of a fraction of these primary particles. This happens at the end of the vapor jet expansion, as well as after the production during the transit between subsequent filaments in the DBD. The first local agglomeration step can be limited at reduced energy per filament by lowering the initial vapor flux in smaller gaps, while the second growth step depends on the transit time in the DBD. Hence, such “low” energy plasma filaments (up to a few tens of µJ) lower the initial vapor flux to control the agglomeration. DBD were thus successfully tested for the production of tailored nanoparticles with tunable size, controlled morphology of spherical agglomerates and the same composition as the metal electrode. The production per unit energy (mol J?1) is related to both plasma and material properties. Besides, neglecting vapor and nanoparticles losses, the mass production rate (g s?1) depends on the input power related to the product of the energy controlling the production per filament times the number of filaments per second, for any given material. This non-thermal plasma process presents great potentialities for nano-technologies since it is performed at atmospheric pressure and can be used to reach size-dependent properties of nano-materials, without any gaseous precursor or solvent.

J.-P. Borra; N. Jidenko; J. Hou; A. Weber

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar Plasma Spectroscopy: Achievements and Future Challenges 13-15 September 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensities of Si III lines in the transition region? 15:00 - 15:15 Jaroslav Dudik The effect of non-thermal Watanabe Iron Line Diagnostics of Non-Equilibrium Plasma in Solar and Laboratory Plasmas 17:00 - 17 for non-thermal electron excitation of coronal ions 09:20 - 09:40 Brian Fawcett Some foundations

Cambridge, University of

78

The eco-friendly surface modification of textiles for deep digital textile printing by in-line atmospheric non-thermal plasma treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated the potential application of an atmospheric plasma (AP) treatment as a pre-treatment for digital textile printing (DTP) of polyester (PET) fabrics and cotton, in order to determine its via...

Youngmi Park; Kang Koo

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Non-thermal radio astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This presentation starts with Karl Jansky’s discovery of cosmic radio emission in 1933 and notes the striking similarities to Hess’s discovery of cosmic-rays in 1912. At first it was assumed that this radio emission was thermal but in 1939 Grote Reber discovered that it was stronger at longer wavelengths, requiring a non-thermal emission process. These discoveries had a revolutionary impact on astronomy and radio astronomy was born. The interpretation of this non-thermal radiation as synchrotron emission from high energy particles in the interstellar medium did not occur until the late 1940s but then it provided the link between radio astronomy and cosmic-ray research. Ginzburg, in particular, saw that cosmic-ray astrophysics was now possible using radio waves to trace sources of cosmic-rays. We discuss the discovery of extragalactic active galactic nuclei leading to the discovery of quasars and the first evidence for black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. We summarise the present status and future of some of the main radio telescopes used to image the non-thermal emission from external galaxies. Finally, we include a short description of the use of radio signals for the direct detection of cosmic-rays and UHE neutrinos.

R.D. Ekers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induces apoptosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Involvement of DNA-damage-triggering sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in physics have made possible the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP induces death of various cancer cell types, thus offering a promising alternative treatment, the mechanism of its therapeutic effect is little understood. In this study, we report for the first time that NTP led to apoptotic cell death in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interestingly, NTP induced a sub-G1 arrest in p53 wild-type OSCCs, but not in p53-mutated OSCCs. In addition, NTP increased the expression levels of ATM, p53 (Ser 15, 20 and 46), p21, and cyclin D1. A comet assay, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry of ?H2AX suggested that NTP-induced apoptosis and sub-G1 arrest were associated with DNA damage and the ATM/p53 signaling pathway in SCC25 cells. Moreover, ATM knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effect of NTP on cell death, sub-G1 arrest and related signals. Taken together, these results indicate that NTP induced apoptotic cell death in p53 wild-type \\{OSCCs\\} through a novel mechanism involving DNA damage and triggering of sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP in OSCC.

Jae Won Chang; Sung Un Kang; Yoo Seob Shin; Kang Il Kim; Seong Jin Seo; Sang Sik Yang; Jong-Soo Lee; Eunpyo Moon; Seung Jae Baek; Keunho Lee; Chul-Ho Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of a floating electrode on an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal arc discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of the atmospheric non-thermal ac arc air plasmas produced by a plasma generator with a floating electrode are investigated. The measurements show that with the help of the surface dielectric barrier discharges between the main electrodes and the floating electrode the ignition voltage of the non-thermal arc discharges can be reduced significantly and an arc discharge mode can be stabilized at high gas flow rates. The measuredtemperatures of the non-thermal arcs are at the level of 2000–3000 K under different operating conditions.

Zhi-Bin Wang; Guo-Xu Chen; Zhe Wang; Nan Ge; He-Ping Li; Cheng-Yu Bao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

Thomas, S.E.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same m...

Saint-Hilaire, P; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Benz, Arnold O.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non-thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non- thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration to the reforming of Diesel fuel with Diesel engine exhaust gas using a non-thermal plasma torch for NOx trap Diesel fuel reforming with hal-00617141,version1-17May2013 Author manuscript, published in "Energy

Boyer, Edmond

86

Peroxynitrite: A Re-examination of the Chemical Properties of Non-thermal Discharges Burning in Air Over Aqueous Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main compounds of non-thermal plasmas generated by a discharge in humid air at atmospheric pressure are re-examined to explain the twin chemical properties of discharges over aqueous waste solutions, i.e. ...

Jean-Louis Brisset; Eugen Hnatiuc

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Electron Plasma Oscillations Associated with Type III Radio Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interactions of the plasma oscillations with...propagat-ing electron plasma oscillations. Radia-tion...frequencies (5 1 Mhz) the harmonic radiation...Since the electron plasma oscillations )N...about 10 mv m-1 or larger are required to explain...and the solid black area inyears of measurements...

DONALD A. GURNETT; ROGER R. ANDERSON

1976-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electron Plasma Oscillations Associated with Type III Radio Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the radiation 178 kHz ( 8%) _ at the...propagat-ing electron plasma oscillations. Radia-tion...and the har--kHz % monic has been...frequencies (5 1 Mhz) the harmonic radiation...Since the electron plasma oscillations )N PLASMA 56.2 kHz ( 8%) are local...

DONALD A. GURNETT; ROGER R. ANDERSON

1976-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma Sterilization against Spores and Other Microorganisms of Clinical Interest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sources for microbial...Bactericidal effects of non-thermal argon plasma in...bacterial cells by air plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Int...permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma. New J. Phys...

Tobias G. Klämpfl; Georg Isbary; Tetsuji Shimizu; Yang-Fang Li; Julia L. Zimmermann; Wilhelm Stolz; Jürgen Schlegel; Gregor E. Morfill; Hans-Ulrich Schmidt

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Multiple Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO to CO2 on Reduced TiO2(110). Multiple Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO to CO2 on Reduced TiO2(110)....

91

Determination of Non-thermal Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 Å and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s–1 in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfvén wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Aaron J. Coyner; Joseph M. Davila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency f{sub p} and near its harmonic 2f{sub p} by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) {proportional_to} (t - t{sub 0}){sup -{alpha}}, where {alpha} can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r {sup -2}, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index {alpha} varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have {alpha} {<=} 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) {proportional_to} (r - r{sub 0}){sup -{beta}}, with minimum, mean, and median {beta} = 2{alpha} of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Warmuth, A.; Mann, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, D 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Gorgutsa, R. V.; Fomichev, V. V. [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Non-Thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Msolar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M=3. We find that about 15 percent of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p~2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift a...

Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On plasma parameters of a self-organized plasma jet at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Electron temperature and electron concentration in the active zone of a miniaturized radio frequency (RF) non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in argon have been determined using... ...

J. Schäfer; F. Sigeneger; R. Foest; D. Loffhagen…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk will focus on the achievements of the Drexel Plasma Institute in direct application of plasmasMichigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Plasma Medicine: Mechanisms of Direct Non-Thermal Plasma Interaction with Living Tissue Prof. Alexander Fridman Drexel University

Shyy, Wei

97

Simbol-X capability of detecting the non-thermal emission of stellar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, non-thermal emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare non-thermal emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the non-thermal emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. non-thermal relation, derived for solar flares, holds.

C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-Frequency Conductivity of a Plasma in Quasi-Equilibrium. III. Study of a Two-Temperature Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A general expression for the high-frequency conductivity of a homogeneous, isotropic plasma is obtained. The derivation is based on the use of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy and therefore includes all effects due to the high-frequency field and the collective interactions up to first order in the plasma parameter. As an application of the general result, a two-temperature plasma with the electron temperature exceeding the ion temperature is studied in detail. It is found that when the ratio of the electron temperature to the ion temperature exceeds 100, there is an enhancement in the resistivity resulting from the excitation of incoherent ion waves.

E. H. Klevans and C. -S. Wu

1966-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oscillation. When the non-dimensional...discharge (DBD) plasma actuators in air at atmospheric conditions. 2...corrected for any thermal influence of the plasma based on temperature...2007Airflow control by non-thermal plasma actuatorsJ. Phys...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Oscillating Magnetic Trap and Non-Thermal Emission from Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......connected with the electron thermal conductivity and ion viscosity...1, ed. Galeev A. A., Sudan R. N. (North-Holland Physics...Oscillating Magnetic Trap and Non-Thermal Emission from Solar Flares...scattering of trapped non-thermal electrons (Aschwanden et al......

Yuri Tsap; Yulia Kopylova; Tatiana Goldvarg; Alexander Stepanov

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

102

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge ... The input electric power is expressed in terms of the percentage of Qfuel·LHVfuel, and is noted as %LHV. ... for electricity prodn. ...

Guillaume Petitpas; José Gonzalez-Aguilar; Adeline Darmon; Laurent Fulcheri

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Indirect estimation of energy disposition by non-thermal electrons in solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The broad-band EUV and microwave fluxes correlate strongly with hard X-ray fluxes in the impulsive phase of a solar flare. This note presents numerical aids for the estimation of the non-thermal electron fluxe...

H. S. Hudson; R. C. Canfield; S. R. Kane

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

An Invariable Point in the Energy Spectra of Non-Thermal Electrons of Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power-law energy spectra of non-thermal electrons for each 1.024 second have been drawn together during the flare. For some flares, it is discovered that the energy spectra taken at different times present...

W.Q. Gan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Deposition of Plasma Polymer Films by an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is a proven ... . The application of non-thermal low pressure plasmas containing organic compounds for thin film deposition by plasma polymerization is well known1.... Th...

Rüdiger Foest; Florian Sigeneger; Martin Schmidt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Alfvén wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. III. Theory for experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas is governed by the nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfvén waves. Here, we present the theoretical considerations behind the design of the first laboratory measurement of an Alfvén wave collision, the fundamental interaction underlying Alfvénic turbulence. By interacting a relatively large-amplitude, low-frequency Alfvén wave with a counterpropagating, smaller-amplitude, higher-frequency Alfvén wave, the experiment accomplishes the secular nonlinear transfer of energy to a propagating daughter Alfvén wave. The predicted properties of the nonlinearly generated daughter Alfvén wave are outlined, providing a suite of tests that can be used to confirm the successful measurement of the nonlinear interaction between counterpropagating Alfvén waves in the laboratory.

Howes, G. G.; Nielson, K. D.; Schroeder, J. W. R.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Drake, D. J. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia 31698 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia 31698 (United States); Carter, T. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Atmospheric Pressure Humid Argon DBD Plasma for the Application of Sterilization -Measurement and Simulation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pressure Humid Argon DBD Plasma for the Application of Sterilization - Measurement, sterilization I. INTRODUCTION Non-thermal plasma technology at atmospheric pressure using oxygen of atmospheric pressure non-thermal argon plasma produced by a variety of techniques has recently begun

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Damages of Biological Components in Bacteria and Bacteriophages Exposed to Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanism of inactivation of bio-particles exposed to dielectric barrier discharge, DBD, has been studied using E. coli and bacteriophages. States of different biological components were monitored during the cour...

Akira Mizuno; Hachiro Yasuda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Modeling Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons ... dielectric barrier discharges has been investigated theoretically at atmospheric pressure. Preliminary modeling of the results is...2...hy...

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Destruction of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stringent emission standards for 188 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) that are associated with approximately render some of the control technologies ineffective for certain pollutant concentrations. In view concept of application of gas-phase oxidation processes that can destroy air pollutants

Cal, Mark P.

111

The effect of plasma polymer coating using atmospheric-pressure glow discharge on the shear bond strength of composite resin to ceramic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If plasma technology can come out of the vacuum chamber and plasma can be extruded through a small pencil- ... we designed a small pencil-type non-thermal atmospheric-pressure glow discharge plasma torch. The pur...

Byeong-Hoon Cho; Geum-Jun Han; Kyu-Hwan Oh; Sung-No Chung…

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Antimicrobial Treatment of Heat Sensitive Products by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technological potential of non-thermal plasmas for the antimicrobial treatment of heat sensitive ... within the last years the realization of industrial plasma-based decontamination or sterilization technolog...

R. Brandenburg; U. Krohmann; M. Stieber…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Numerical Study of a Propagating Non-Thermal Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the non-thermal microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the non-thermal electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Computational Diagnostic Tool for Understanding Plasma Sterilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and healthcare. Atmospheric, non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma poses certain advantages Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma, more specifically, the Atmospheric Pressure DBD plasma (APDBD). DBDs have1 A Computational Diagnostic Tool for Understanding Plasma Sterilization Navya Mastanaiah 1 & Chin

Roy, Subrata

117

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

118

RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.

Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heavy quark three-body collisional energy loss in quark-gluon plasma... III-1 C. M. Ko and Wei Liu Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy ion...

120

Non-Thermal Production of Wino Dark Matter via the Decay of Long-Lived Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider supersymmetric models in which the neutral Wino is the lightest superparticle (LSP), and study the possibility that non-thermally produced Wino plays the role of dark matter. The thermal relic density of Wino is smaller than the present mass density of dark matter if wino mass is smaller than 2.9 TeV; however, even with smaller Wino mass, Wino can be the dominant component of dark matter if it is non-thermally produced by the decay of an exotic particle. In order to study such a possibility in detail, we perform a precise calculation of the present mass density of Wino produced by the exotic-particle decay, taking account of the following effects: (i) coannihilation among charged and neutral Winos, and (ii) Sommerfeld effect on the pair annihilation cross section of Winos. We consider several well-motivated cases where the exotic particle corresponds to cosmological moduli fields, gravitino, or axino, and discuss the implication of the Wino LSP for these cases.

Takeo Moroi; Minoru Nagai; Masahiro Takimoto

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Simulating cosmic rays in clusters of galaxies – III. Non-thermal scaling relations and comparison to observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Orlandini 2007a,b; Rossetti Molendi 2007). Observational efforts, such as the future hard X-ray missions NuSTAR and Simbol-X, have to be undertaken to unambiguously detect the spectral and spatial characteristics of the hard X-ray excess emission......

Christoph Pfrommer

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Generalized Elastic Model: thermal vs non-thermal initial conditions. Universal scaling, roughening, ageing and ergodicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study correlation properties of the generalized elastic model which accounts for the dynamics of polymers, membranes, surfaces and fluctuating interfaces, among others. We develop a theoretical framework which leads to the emergence of universal scaling laws for systems starting from thermal (equilibrium) or non-thermal (non-equilibrium) initial conditions. Our analysis incorporates and broadens previous results such as observables' double scaling regimes, (super)roughening and anomalous diffusion, and furnishes a new scaling behavior for correlation functions at small times (long distances). We discuss ageing and ergodic properties of the generalized elastic model in non-equilibrium conditions, providing a comparison with the situation occurring in continuous time random walk. Our analysis also allows to assess which observable is able to distinguish whether the system is in or far from equilibrium conditions in an experimental set-up.

Taloni, Alessandro; Klafter, Joseph; 10.1209/0295-5075/97/30001

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Non Thermal Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: the Importance of a Joint LOFAR/Simbol-X View  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources ('halos' and 'relics') related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this non-thermal cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the non-thermal emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the non-thermal cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.

Ferrari, C. [UNSA, CNRS UMR 6202 Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

125

Plasma Polymerization in an Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in a Flowing Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) has ... ozone generation by Siemens 1857. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges are of considerable interest because...1, 2.... The DBD...

Rüdiger Foest; Martin Schmidt; Jürgen F. Behnke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gas-confined barrier discharges: a simplified model for plasma dynamics in flame environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we evaluate the dynamics of non-thermal plasmas developing in extremely non-homogeneous environments. We present the gas-confined barrier discharge (GBD) concept and justify its importance as a first step to ...

Guerra-Garcia, Carmen

127

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Kurabashira, Kamitakaracho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets have rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense clumps. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interaction...

Bosch-Ramon, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: 'What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?' Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction.

Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non?thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non?thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non?thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators including bacteria sterilization cell apoptosis and blood coagulation among others. The mechanisms of the plasma?biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: “What plasma?generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?” Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma?biomaterial interaction

Yukinori Sakiyama; David B. Graves

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Sand 1, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Acero, Fabio [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, CC 72, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Tian Wenwu [National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Zhiyuan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Horns, Dieter [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kosack, Karl [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Komin, Nukri [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparative Analysis of Non-thermal Emissions and Study of Electron Transport in a Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-thermal emissions in a solar flare occurring on 2003 May 29 by using RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) and Nobeyama microwave observations. This flare shows several typical behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions: time delay of microwave peaks relative to HXR peaks, loop-top microwave and footpoint HXR sources, and a harder electron energy distribution inferred from the microwave spectrum than from the HXR spectrum. In addition, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher-energy ($\\gsim 100$ keV) HXRs is similar to that of the microwaves, and is delayed from that of the lower-energy ($\\lsim 100$ keV) HXRs. We interpret these observations in terms of an electron transport model called {\\TPP}. We numerically solved the spatially-homogeneous {\\FP} equation to determine electron evolution in energy and pitch-angle space. By comparing the behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions predicted by the model with the observations, we discuss the pitch-angle distribution of the electrons injected into the flare site. We found that the observed spectral variations can qualitatively be explained if the injected electrons have a pitch-angle distribution concentrated perpendicular to the magnetic field lines rather than isotropic distribution.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama; N. Mitani

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

Matthew B. Loomis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powerspan has conducted pilot scale testing of a multi-pollutant control technology at FirstEnergy's Burger Power Plant under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology, Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO), simultaneously removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and mercury (Hg) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Powerspan's ECO{reg_sign} pilot test program focused on optimization of Hg removal in a 1-MWe slipstream pilot while maintaining greater than 90% removal of NO{sub x} and 98% removal of SO{sub 2}. This Final Technical Report discusses pilot operations, installation and maintenance of the Hg SCEMS instrumentation, and performance results including component and overall removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM and Hg from the flue gas and removal of captured Hg from the co-product fertilizer stream.

Christopher R. McLaron

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of plasma in normal atmospheric air when the applied...6). The plasma generator was set to 18.6 kV...with 1 ml of sterile water. After brief incubation...species from normal atmospheric air (24). Here...McCullers. 2009. Use of atmospheric non-thermal plasma...

Erik Kvam; Brian Davis; Frank Mondello; Allen L. Garner

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fusion Power Demonstration III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

Lee, J.D. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

ccsd-00001265(version1):10Mar2004 Applied Physics A (2004) accepted Silicon clusters produced by femtosecond laser ablation: Non-thermal emission and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by femtosecond laser ablation: Non-thermal emission and gas-phase condensation Alexander V. Bulgakov Institute mechanisms of cluster formation (Coulomb explosion, gas-phase condensation, phase explosion) are discussed sampled parallel to the plume axis by a 500 V repeller pulse at a time delay td in respect to the laser

Boyer, Edmond

143

A Clarification on the invariable point in the power-law energy spectra of non-thermal electrons of solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The invariable point of non-thermal electrons was proposed two years ago, based on analyzing the two intense gamma-ray line flares observed with the X2 detector on GRS/SMM. Due to too strong hard X-ray flux in...

W.Q. Gan; J. Chang; T. Ma

144

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be ...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Perri, M; Pittori, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Towards a Better Understanding of the GRB Phenomenon: a New Model for GRB Prompt Emission and its effects on the New Non-Thermal L$_\\mathrm{i}^\\mathrm{NT}$-E$_\\mathrm{peak,i}^\\mathrm{rest,NT}$ relation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reanalyze the prompt emission of two of the brightest Fermi GRBs (080916C and 090926A) with a new model composed of 3 components: (i) a thermal-like component--approximated with a black body (BB)--interpreted as the jet photosphere emission of a magnetized relativistic outflow, (ii) a non-thermal component--approximated with a Band function--interpreted as synchrotron radiation in an optically thin region above the photosphere either from internal shocks or magnetic field dissipation, and (iii) an extra power law (PL) extending from low to high energies likely of inverse Compton origin, even though it remains challenging. Through fine-time spectroscopy down to the 100 ms time scale, we follow the smooth evolution of the various components. From this analysis the Band function is globally the most intense component, although the additional PL can overpower the others in sharp time structures. The Band function and the BB component are the most intense at early times and globally fade across the burst durati...

Guiriec, S; Daigne, F; Zhang, B; Hascoet, R; Nemmen, R; Thompson, D; Bhat, N; Gehrels, N; Gonzalez, M; Kaneko, Y; McEnery, J; Mochkovitch, R; Racusin, J; Ryde, F; Sacahui, J; Unsal, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be identified and removed using a multi frequency approach, provided that a sufficiently deep all sky X-ray survey will be available. We further show that Blazars are a major constituent of all high-E extragalactic backgrounds. Their contribution is 11-12% at X-ray frequencies and possibly 100% in the 0.5-50 MeV band. At E>100 MeV, the Blazar collective emission, obtained extrapolating their integrated micro-wave flux to the gamma-ray band using the SED of EGRET detected sources, over-predicts the extragalactic background by a large factor, implying that Blazars not only dominate the gamma-ray sky but also that their average duty cycle at these frequencies must be rather low. We also find that Blazars of the HBL type may produce a significant amount of flux at TeV energies.

P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco; E. Cavazzuti; M. Perri; C. Pittori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

3D MHD modelling of the glidarc behaviour of a low current high voltage DC plasma torch Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terms of: global behaviour, arc length, mean voltage and glidarc frequency. 1. Introduction The non-thermal on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of atmospheric pressure direct current (DC) plasma torch operating at low current3D MHD modelling of the glidarc behaviour of a low current ­ high voltage DC plasma torch Journal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

Study of Methane Reforming in Warm Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of natural gas in remote locations necessitates on-site conversion of methane into liquid fuels or high value products. The first step in forming high value products is the production of ethylene and acetylene. Non-thermal plasmas, due...

Parimi, Sreekar

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal behavior of bovine serum albumin after exposure to barrier discharge helium plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jets at atmospheric pressure are useful tools nowadays in plasma medicine. Various applications are tested such as cauterization coagulation wound healing natural and artificial surfaces decontamination and sterilization. In order to know more about the effects of gas plasma on biological supramolecules we exposed proteinpowders to a barrier discharge helium plasma jet. Then spectroscopic investigations were carried out in order to obtain information on protein secondary tertiary and quaternary structures. We obtained a reduction of the protein alpha-helix content after the plasma exposure and a different behavior for both thermal denaturation/renaturation kinetics and thermal aggregation process.

R. Jijie; V. Pohoata; I. Topala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SECTION III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University ...powering the 21 st century economy... West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Final Report 29 June 2009 2 of 142 Disclaimer This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the West Virginia

151

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

J. B. Titus, E. D. Mezonlin, and J. A. Johnson III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas J. B. Titus, E. D. Mezonlin, and J. A. Johnson III Citation: Physics of Plasmas (1994-present) 21, 062511 (2014); doi: 10.1063...

153

Non-Thermal X-ray Emission from the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopic analysis of two X-ray observations (with a total integration time of 73280 seconds) made of the luminous northwestern rim complex of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. G266.2-1.2 is a member of a class of Galactic SNRs which feature X-ray spectra dominated by non-thermal emission: in the cases of these SNRs, the emission is believed to have a synchrotron origin and studies of the X-ray spectra of these SNRs can lend insights into how SNRs accelerate cosmic-ray particles. The Chandra observations have clearly revealed fine structure in this rim complex and the spectra of these features are dominated by non-thermal emission. We have measured the length scales of the upstream structures at eight positions along the rim and derive lengths of 0.02-0.08 pc (assuming a distance of 750 pc to G266.2-1.2). We have also extracted spectra from seven regions in the rim complex and fit these spectra wit...

Pannuti, Thomas G; Filipovic, Miroslav D; De Horta, Ain; Stupar, Milorad; Agrawal, Rashika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Impulsive energy release and non-thermal emission in a confined M4.0 flare triggered by rapidly evolving magnetic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of non-thermal emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index ($\\delta$) $\\sim$3. Another non-thermal peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structure in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and oute...

Kushwaha, Upendra; cho, Kyung-suk; Veronig, Astrid; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Mathew, S K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Doublet III neutral beam power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of TiO2 Nanorods by Gliding Arc Discharge Processing at Atmospheric Pressure for Photocatalytic Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study explores a new method of synthesis of TiO2 nano-particles in an aqueous medium from TiCl3 precursor by non-thermal plasma in humid air as feeding gas obtained at atmospheric pressure. The precur...

E. Acayanka; A. Tiya Djowe; S. Laminsi…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at ? 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at ? 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 ?L of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 M? water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the field addressed species transformation during sample pre-treatment. Such transformations occur due to sample acidification and may take place during transport and possibly storage prior to analysis. Thus, electrodeposition in the field is more reflective of Cr species concentration at the environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) at the time of sampling. It also opens up the possibility for shipping to the lab portable assemblies with Cr species on them rather than shipping large volumes of sample to the lab, thus also reducing shipping, handling and storage costs.

Hamid R. Badiei; Jennifer McEnaney; Vassili Karanassios

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Micro-structured electrode arrays: Plasma based sterilization and coating over a wide pressure range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays consist of an interlocked comb-like electrode system with micron gap widths. These arrays are capable of generating large area uniform glow discharges up to atmospheric pressure. In order to ignite discharges at atmospheric pressure, this approach using the Paschen similarity law (pd=constant) is established beneath dielectric barrier arrays and plasma jets. The generated electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges apply only moderate radiofrequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) voltages. The electric parameters of the non-thermal plasma system are characterized by a special probe and the generated excited species of the plasma are observed by optical emission spectroscopy.

C. Schrader; P. Sichler; L. Baars-Hibbe; N. Lucas; A. Schenk; S. Draeger; K.-H. Gericke; S. Büttgenbach

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plasma turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

APPLICATION DIVISION III & PSYCHOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION DIVISION III & PSYCHOLOGY Shared Overhead Funds Name: Date: Project Title: Amount and Psychology are intended to provide new and continuing faculty with special help to bring research

Aalberts, Daniel P.

162

Microwave Plasma Sources for Gas Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing the non-thermal plasmas for processing of gases are presented. The main part of the paper concerns the microwave plasma sources (MPSs) for environmental protection applications. A few types of the MPSs, i.e. waveguide-based surface wave sustained MPS, coaxial-line-based and waveguide-based nozzle-type MPSs, waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS and MPS for microdischarges are presented. Also, results of the laboratory experiments on the plasma processing of several highly-concentrated (up to several tens percent) volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including Freon-type refrigerants, in the moderate (200-400 W) waveguide-based nozzle-type MPS (2.45 GHz) are presented. The results showed that the microwave discharge plasma fully decomposed the VOCs at relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of VOCs decomposition reached 1000 g/kWh. This suggests that the microwave discharge plasma can be a useful tool for environmental protection applications. In this paper also results of the use of the waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS to methane reforming into hydrogen are presented.

Mizeraczyk, J. [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Department of Marine Electronics, Gdynia Martime University, Morska 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland); Jasinski, M.; Dors, M.; Zakrzewski, Z. [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

LoCuSS: A COMPARISON OF CLUSTER MASS MEASUREMENTS FROM XMM-NEWTON AND SUBARU-TESTING DEVIATION FROM HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-THERMAL PRESSURE SUPPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare X-ray hydrostatic and weak-lensing mass estimates for a sample of 12 clusters that have been observed with both XMM-Newton and Subaru. At an over-density of DELTA = 500, we obtain 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.01 +- 0.07 for the whole sample. We also divided the sample into undisturbed and disturbed sub-samples based on quantitative X-ray morphologies using asymmetry and fluctuation parameters, obtaining 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.09 +- 0.06 and -0.06 +- 0.12 for the undisturbed and disturbed clusters, respectively. In addition to non-thermal pressure support, there may be a competing effect associated with adiabatic compression and/or shock heating which leads to overestimate of X-ray hydrostatic masses for disturbed clusters, for example, in the famous merging cluster A1914. Despite the modest statistical significance of the mass discrepancy, on average, in the undisturbed clusters, we detect a clear trend of improving agreement between M {sup X} and M {sup WL} as a function of increasing over-density, M{sup X}/M{sup WL}=(0.908+-0.004)+(0.187+-0.010){center_dot} log{sub 10}(DELTA/500). We also examine the gas mass fractions, f{sub gas} = M {sup gas}/M {sup WL}, finding that they are an increasing function of cluster radius, with no dependence on dynamical state, in agreement with predictions from numerical simulations. Overall, our results demonstrate that XMM-Newton and Subaru are a powerful combination for calibrating systematic uncertainties in cluster mass measurements.

Zhang, Yu-Ying [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Okabe, Nobuhiro [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Smith, Graham P.; Sanderson, Alastair J. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B152TT (United Kingdom); Piffaretti, Rocco [CEA, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Valdarnini, Riccardo [SISSA/ISAS, via Beirut 4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Evrard, August E. [Department of Physics and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mazzotta, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Marrone, Daniel P., E-mail: yyzhang@astro.uni-bonn.d [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

Minnesota, University of

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - axisymmetric rotating plasmas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a high- quasi-axisymmetric stellarator B275 Figure 1. Plasma... Figure 3. Rotational transform profile of configuration C82. Figure ... Source: Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad -...

166

Large scale simulations of solar type III radio bursts: flux density, drift rate, duration and bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-thermal electrons accelerated in the solar corona can produce intense coherent radio emission, known as solar type III radio bursts. This intense radio emission is often observed from hundreds of MHz in the corona down to the tens of kHz range in interplanetary space. It involves a chain of physical processes from the generation of Langmuir waves to nonlinear processes of wave-wave interaction. We develop a self-consistent model to calculate radio emission from a non-thermal electron population over large frequency range, including the effects of electron transport, Langmuir wave-electron interaction, the evolution of Langmuir waves due to non-linear wave-wave interactions, Langmuir wave conversion into electromagnetic emission, and finally escape of the electromagnetic waves. For the first time we simulate escaping radio emission over a broad frequency range from 500~MHz down to a few MHz and infer key properties of the radio emission observed: the onset (starting) frequency, {identification as fundament...

Ratcliffe, H; Reid, H A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Review of Solar Type III Radio Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar type III radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool in the understanding of solar accelerated electron beams. They are a signature of propagating beams of nonthermal electrons in the solar atmosphere and the solar system. Consequently, they provide information on electron acceleration and transport, and the conditions of the background ambient plasma they travel through. We review the observational properties of type III bursts with an emphasis on recent results and how each property can help identify attributes of electron beams and the ambient background plasma. We also review some of the theoretical aspects of type III radio bursts and cover a number of numerical efforts that simulate electron beam transport through the solar corona and the heliosphere.

Reid, Hamish A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ethics Center Annual Report III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Ethics Center Annual Report III 2012-2013 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY #12;#12;TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY August 31, 2013 Prepared by the TTU Ethics Center Annual Report III 2012-2013 #12;1 AnnualReportIII|8 proposed a university ethics center to provide the campus with ethics education resources. Since its

Rock, Chris

169

Presentation III 1 Designing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Presentation III 1 Designing and Implementing Effective Monitoring - Element I (Handbook; Chapter to identified problems in the water body. Ultimate goal is to protect and restore water bodies for their intended uses. Presentation III 4 The goal is to restore and protect water bodies Presentation III 5 1

170

Plasma Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of light years can emerge from the frenetic motion of plasmas. A team of Lawrence Livermore researchers has discovered that supersonic counter-streaming (directed at each...

171

Volume III, Issue 11  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

172

Electrical studies and plasma characterization of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated at low frequency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-temperature high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in medical and biological applications. Much work has been devoted to study these applications while comparatively fewer studies appear to be directed to the discharge itself. In this work in order to better understand the kind of electrical discharge and the plasma states existing in those devices a study of the electrical characteristics of a typical plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure using either air or argon is reported. It is found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristics are consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge with a highly collisional cathode sheet. The only exception is the case of argon at the smallest electrode separation studied around 1?mm in which case the discharge is better modeled as either a non-thermal arc or a high-pressure glow. Also variations of the electrical behavior at different gas flow rates are interpreted consistently with the arc model in terms of the development of fluid turbulence in the external jet.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Plasma jets and plasma bullets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]–[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up to 1990 with only 31 papers per year on average, and a total of some 1300 papers, precedes a considerable growth of some 35–50% in research activity every five years, over the last 20 years or so. As shown in the table, the annual dissemination of the field is more than 1600 papers and the total number of papers is in excess of 20000. This upwards trajectory is typical of a strong and growing subject area in physical science, with considerable capacity in both fundamental science and applications. PeriodNumber of papersPapers per annum 1948–1990130031 1991–19952279456 1996–20003447689 2001–20054571914 2006–201066401328 2011 1658 In many of the dense plasma jets discussed above, strong physical forces generated by the plasma are often desired and this favours plasma generation at elevated gas pressure, including atmospheric pressure, which favours a high level of gas ionization. Historically it has been challenging to reduce and control the strong physical forces in high-pressure plasmas for applications where these are unwanted, for example, surface modification of polymeric sheets [5]. Indeed, there is a real need for a vast range of material processing applications at temperatures below 100oC (or below 400 K) and this favours atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained far from thermal equilibrium with the dissipated electrical energy largely used not in heat generation but in unleashing non-equilibrium chemical reactions. The long-standing difficulty of effectively controlling the level of gas ionization at atmospheric pressure was overcome by the technological breakthrough of achieving atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in the late 1980s [6]. A related challenge stemming from high collisionality of atmospheric-pressure plasmas (v >> ?0) means that large-area plasmas sustained between parallel-plate electrodes are very susceptible to strong plasma instabilities when molecular gases are introduced for processing applications. This led to an effective technological solution in the early to late 1990s of confining atmospheric plasmas in a small v

M G Kong; B N Ganguly; R F Hicks

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electron velocity distribution instability in magnetized plasma wakes and artificial electron mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wake behind a large object (such as the moon) moving rapidly through a plasma (such as the solar wind) contains a region of depleted density, into which the plasma expands along the magnetic field, transverse to the flow. It is shown here that (in addition to any ion instability) a bump-on-tail which is unstable appears on the electrons' parallel velocity distribution function because of the convective non-conservation of parallel energy. It arises regardless of any non-thermal features on the external electron velocity distribution. The detailed electron distribution function throughout the wake is calculated by integration along orbits; and the substantial energy level of resulting electron plasma (Langmuir) turbulence is evaluated quasilinearly. It peaks near the wake axis. If the mass of the electrons is artificially enhanced, for example in order to make numerical simulation feasible, then much more unstable electron distributions arise; but these are caused by the unphysical mass ratio.

Hutchinson, I H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Minor ion heating in spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves: Thermal and non-thermal motions associated with perpendicular heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minor ion (such as He{sup 2+}) heating via nonresonant interaction with spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves (LPAWs and CPAWs hereafter) is studied. The obtained analytic solutions are in good agreement with the simulation results, indicating that newborn ions are heated by low-frequency Alfvén waves with finite amplitude in low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. The analytic solutions also reproduce the preferential heating of heavy ions in the solar wind. In the presence of parallel propagating Alfvén waves, turbulence-induced particle motion is clearly observed in the wave (magnetic field) polarized directions. After the waves diminish, the newborn ions are heated, which is caused by the phase difference (randomization) between ions due to their different parallel thermal motions. The heating is dominant in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The perpendicular heating, ?=(T{sub i?}{sup R}?T{sub i0?}{sup R})/T{sub i0?}{sup R} (where T{sub i0?}{sup R} and T{sub i?}{sup R} are the perpendicular temperature of species i before and after genuine heating, respectively), in the spectrum of CPAWs is a factor of two stronger than that of LPAWs. Moreover, we also study the effect of field-aligned differential flow speed of species i relative to H{sup +}, ?v{sub ip}=(v{sub i}?v{sub p})·B/|B| (where v{sub i} and v{sub p} denote vector velocities of the H{sup +} and species i, respectively), on the perpendicular heating. It reveals that large drift speed, v{sub d}=?v{sub ip}, has an effect on reducing the efficiency of perpendicular heating, which is consistent with observations.

Dong, Chuanfei, E-mail: dcfy@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

On invisible plasma content in radio-loud AGNs: The case of TeV blazar Markarian 421  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invisible plasma content in blazar jets such as protons and/or thermal electron-positron ($e^{\\pm}$) pairs is explored through combined arguments of dynamical and radiative processes. By comparing physical quantities required by the internal shock model with those obtained through the observed broadband spectra for Mrk 421, we obtain that the ratio of the Lorentz factors of a pair of cold shells resides in about $2\\sim 20$, which implies that the shocks are at most mildly relativistic. Using the obtained Lorentz factors, the total mass density $\\rho$ in the shocked shells is investigated. The upper limit of $\\rho$ is obtained from the condition that thermal bremsstrahlung emission should not exceed the observed $\\gamma$-ray luminosity, whilst the lower limit is constrained from the condition that the energy density of non-thermal electrons is smaller than that of the total plasma. Then we find $\\rho$ is $10^2$-$10^3$ times heavier than that of non-thermal electrons for pure $e^{\\pm}$ pairs, while $10^2$-$10^6$ times heavier for pure electron-proton ($e/p$) content, implying the existence of a large amount of invisible plasma. The origin of the continuous blazar sequence is shortly discussed and we speculate that the total mass density and/or the blending ratio of $e^{\\pm}$ pairs and $e/p$ plasma could be new key quantities for the origin of the sequence.

M. Kino; F. Takahara

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing (backing, mechanical pumps) Rotary vane Sorption Rotary lobe Scroll ScrewSorption, Rotary lobe, Scroll Phy250-1, 2011, NanoFab16 #12;IIIIII--A. Roughing: Rotary Vane PumpA. Roughing: Rotary Vane Pump (Gas

Liu, Kai

180

Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III III Wind Farm Klondike III III Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser PG&E/PSE/EWEB/BPA Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,- -.-=* ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January 1987 to obtain information that might assist'in the iden- tification of the source or sources of elevated concentrations of thorium and radium discovered on properties in the vicinity of the Bendix Plant described in the ORNL letter of December 22, 1986, to

182

ARIES-III divertor engineering design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}. The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed.

Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States); Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Herring, J.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valenti, M.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Plasma Dynamics Lab.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evidence for a new path to the self-sustainment of thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we provide the first explanation for observations made in 1997 on the Joint European Torus of unexpected ion heating with fusion-born alpha particles occurring over time scales much shorter than those theoretically foreseen. We demonstrate that non-thermal alpha particles above a critical concentration stabilize ion-drift-wave turbulence, therefore significantly reducing one of the main energy loss channels for thermal ions. As such ion heating occurs over times scales much shorter than those classically predicted, this mechanism opens new prospects on additional paths for the self-sustainment of thermonuclear fusion reactions in magnetically confined plasmas.

D. Testa; M. Albergante

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wroclaw, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland); Siarkowski, M., E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: ms@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Barnes County ND Coordinates 47.135175°, -97.935219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.135175,"lon":-97.935219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

186

Category III Dixon Recreation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Category III Dixon Recreation Center BB or VB court $39 RB/Squash court $29 Multipurpose Room $39 for any rental that is cancelled with less than seven days notice Department of Recreational Sports

Escher, Christine

187

Shiloh III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh III Facility Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Montezuma Hills Coordinates 38.1550771°, -121.7336226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1550771,"lon":-121.7336226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco III Minco III Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco III Facility Minco III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Minco OK Coordinates 35.35444115°, -98.13928127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.35444115,"lon":-98.13928127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Photopumping of a C iii ultraviolet laser by Mn vi line radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiple-pass gain is reported at 2177 and 2163 A? in C iii ions in a vacuum-arc discharge, pumped by Mn vi line radiation from a laser-produced Mn plasma. These Be-like uv lasers pumped by resonant photoexcitation are prototypes for soft x-ray lasers in higher-Z, isoelectronic analogs.

Niansheng Qi and Mahadevan Krishnan

1987-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

Preliminary operating experience with the Doublet III neutral-beam injector system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Neutral Injector beamlines have not been mounted on the Doublet III tokamak and preliminary plasma heating experiments are being started. The first beamline underwent a brief testing period on a target tank to verify that the basic design features worked. More extensive pre-operational tests are now in progress and significant results are presented.

Colleraine, A.P.; Beal, J.W.; Fasolo, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III. ... Copyright © 1970 American Chemical Society ...

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta III Alta III Facility Alta III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

A Theory of the Turbulent Electric Field Fluctuations in Electron Plasmas. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Salzburg (Sept...model with a constant energy input at long wavelengths. 18 T...ko/k" 1 !!!III Energy input Energy drain Fig. 2." Spectral...Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Salzburg (Sept......

Takao Tsuda

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

PUBLISHED VERSION Statistical Characterization and Classification of Edge-Localized Plasma Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in reactor-scale magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. ELMs offer a rich and diverse experimental the identification and selection of a large representative data set, the development and use of a reliable ELM analysis, we distinguish between type I and type III ELMs in a set of plasmas from the Joint European Torus

195

Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100?G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ? 6.2?G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1?G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ? 2 × 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} ? 2?eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50?and?600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute Gwahangno 113, Yu-seong-gu, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop like flares observed in X- ray are analysed under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on February 20th, 2002 and June 2nd, 2002, respectively. Using a 1D hydrodynamic code for both flares the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops, thus spatial distributions of the X-ray non-thermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges which were compared with the observed ones. The best compatibility of the model with the observations was obtained for the June 2nd, 2002 event in both the 0.5-4 A GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV and 50- 100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range ...

Falewicz, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Transition Region Emission and Energy Input to Thermal Plasma During the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy released in a solar flare is partitioned between thermal and non-thermal particle energy and lost to thermal conduction and radiation over a broad range of wavelengths. It is difficult to determine the conductive losses and the energy radiated at transition region temperatures during the impulsive phases of flares. We use UVCS measurements of O VI photons produced by 5 flares and subsequently scattered by O VI ions in the corona to determine the 5.0 thermal energy and the conductive losses deduced from RHESSI and GOES X-ray data using areas from RHESSI images to estimate the loop volumes, cross-sectional areas and scale lengths. The transition region luminosities during the impulsive phase exceed the X-ray luminosities for the first few minutes, but they are smaller than the rates of increase of thermal energy unless the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas is ~ 0.01. The estimated conductive losses from the hot gas are too large to be balanced by radiative losses or heating of evaporated plasma, and we conclude that the area of the flare magnetic flux tubes is much smaller than the effective area measured by RHESSI during this phase of the flares. For the 2002 July 23 flare, the energy deposited by non-thermal particles exceeds the X-ray and UV energy losses and the rate of increase of the thermal energy.

J. C. Raymond; G. Holman; A. Ciaravella; A. Panasyuk; Y. -K. Ko; J. Kohl

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

Properties of Nonneutral Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe an apparatus for producing a magnetized column of nonneutral electron plasma which is many Debye lengths in radius. The plasma exhibits the linear and nonlinear electron-wave effects observed in neutralized plasmas.

J. H. Malmberg and J. S. deGrassie

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Multistage extraction separation of Am(III) and Cm(III) in planet centrifuges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Countercurrent chromatography (CCC), a support-free partition chromatography, allows realization of multistep extraction separations in specially designed planet centrifuges. Highly efficient Am(III)/Cm(III) s...

T. A. Maryutina; M. N. Litvina; D. A. Malikov; B. Ya. Spivakov…

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

ROTATION OF THE K3 II-III GIANT STAR {alpha} HYDRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental spectroscopic determination of projected rotation rates of slowly rotating stars is challenging because the rotational broadening of the spectral lines is often comparable to, or smaller than, the broadening from other sources, most notably macroturbulence. Fourier techniques have the advantage over direct profile matching when the observed profiles are complete, but when the profiles are severely blended, the Fourier analysis is compromised. A process of modeling partial profiles for determining the rotation rate for stars having blended spectral lines is investigated and applied to the evolved star {alpha} Hya (K3 II-III). Projected rotation higher than 5 km s{sup -1} can be definitively ruled out for this star. Not all lines are equally good, depending on the amount of blending and also depending on the strength of the line, as the balance between the thermal and non-thermal components changes. A modest ambiguity arises between macroturbulence and rotational broadening, but a careful look at the differences between the observations and the models allows one to measure the rotation with acceptable precision. The result for {alpha} Hya is v sin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}.

Gray, David F., E-mail: dfgray@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Neutron macromolecular crystallography with LADI-III  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LADI-III instrument for measuring neutron macromolecular crystallography diffraction data is described. The data collection of type-III perdeuterated antifreeze protein is given as an example.

Blakeley, M.P.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

A DECADE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE NANCAY RADIOHELIOGRAPH 1998-2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a statistical survey of almost 10,000 radio type III bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions that could be attributed to a 6 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle-averaged distribution (dN/ds) Almost-Equal-To 14 {nu}{sup -3.3} s {sup -4} arcmin{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and that source fluxes closely follow a solar-cycle-averaged (dN/ds {sub {nu}}) Almost-Equal-To 0.34 {nu}{sup -2.9} S {sup -1.7} {sub {nu}} sfu{sup -1} day{sup -1} distribution (when {nu} is in GHz, s in arcminutes, and S {sub {nu}} in sfu). Fitting a barometric density profile yields a temperature of 0.6 MK, while a solar wind-like ({proportional_to}h {sup -2}) density profile yields a density of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at an altitude of 1 R{sub S} , assuming harmonic emission. Finally, we found that the solar-cycle-averaged radiated type III energy could be similar in magnitude to that radiated by nanoflares via non-thermal bremsstrahlung processes, and we hint at the possibility that escaping electron beams might carry as much energy away from the corona as is introduced into it by accelerated nanoflare electrons.

Saint-Hilaire, P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A., E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Expression of the MHC Class III Genes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biosynthesis of the MHC class III products; for example...C2-producing cells is greater in freshly isolated macrophages...to expression of the class III MHC gene products...biosynthesis of the MHC class III products; for example...C2-producing cells is greater in freshly isolated macrophages...

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nathaniel J Fisch | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

His professional interests include: plasma physics with applications to nuclear fusion, astrophysics, plasma-based pulse compression, plasma thrusters, plasma...

206

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

207

Communication through plasma sheaths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E. [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2, Kosygin Str., Moscow, 119334 (Russian Federation); Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53, Leninsky Prosp., GSP-1 Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2, Kosygin Str., Moscow, 119334 (Russian Federation) and Waves and Solitons LLC, 918 W. Windsong Dr., Phoenix, Arizona 85045 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport in tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Numerical simulations of tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . .of blobs in tokamak edge plasmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma fundamentals 3 1. Quasineutrality and Debye length 2. Plasma frequency and acoustic velocity 3. Larmor radius; magnetic buckets Cross section data 21 PART A3: PLASMA SOURCES I IV. Introduction to plasma sources 25 1

Chen, Francis F.

210

III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

isobaric spin T) (the analogue state) imbedded in a background of states with different iso- 7 baric spin T<. Robson has investigated the effects of external mixing in * * * .....

211

Theoretical & Computational Plasma Physicist | Princeton Plasma...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Requisition Number: 1400777 PPPLTheory Department has an opening at the rank of Research Physicist in theoretical and computational plasma physics in the area of...

212

Plasma Astrophysics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Astrophysics One of the most common but least understood phenomena in the universe is an explosive process called magnetic reconnection. PPPL's Magnetic Reconnection...

213

Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science sponsored the week-long event with additional support from the Max Planck-Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, whose members include PPPL and the Princeton...

214

Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic “Four-Ray Star” pattern.

Bulanov, Sergei V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan) [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)] [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Complex-plasma boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the boundary between a normal plasma of ions and electrons, and an adjacent complex plasma of ions, electrons, and microparticles, as found in innumerable examples in nature. Here we show that the matching between the two plasmas involve electrostatic double layers. These double layers explain the sharp boundaries observed in the laboratory and in astrophysics. A modified theory is derived for the double layers that form at the discontinuity between two different complex plasmas and at the point of contact of three complex plasmas. The theory is applied to the first measurements from the Plasma Kristall Experiment (PKE) Nefedov Laboratory in the International Space Station.

B. M. Annaratone; S. A. Khrapak; P. Bryant; G. E. Morfill; H. Rothermel; H. M. Thomas; M. Zuzic; V. E. Fortov; V. I. Molotkov; A. P. Nefedov; S. Krikalev; Yu. P. Semenov

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfven waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfven and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfven wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k{sub Up-Tack }) lying in the range d{sub e}{sup -1}-6d{sub e}{sup -1}, d{sub e} being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k{sub Up-Tack }. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k{sub ||}). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k{sub Up-Tack }) = |E{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })/|B{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })| Much-Less-Than V{sub A} for k{sub Up-Tack }d{sub e} < 0.5, where V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticoagulant medication requiring Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry, McMaster University Collection: Chemistry 96 Bio-Medical Applications of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Summary: Bio-Medical Applications of Non-Thermal...

218

Collisionless relaxation in beam-plasma systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports the results from the theoretical investigations, both numerical and analytical, of collisionless relaxation phenomena in beam-plasma systems. Many results of this work can also be applied to other lossless systems of plasma physics, beam physics and astrophysics. Different aspects of the physics of collisionless relaxation and its modeling are addressed. A new theoretical framework, named Coupled Moment Equations (CME), is derived and used in numerical and analytical studies of the relaxation of second order moments such as beam size and emittance oscillations. This technique extends the well-known envelope equation formalism, and it can be applied to general systems with nonlinear forces. It is based on a systematic moment expansion of the Vlasov equation. In contrast to the envelope equation, which is derived assuming constant rms beam emittance, the CME model allows the emittance to vary through coupling to higher order moments. The CME model is implemented in slab geometry in the absence of return currents. The CME simulation yields rms beam sizes, velocity spreads and emittances that are in good agreement with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a wide range of system parameters. The mechanism of relaxation is also considered within the framework of the CME system. It is discovered that the rapid relaxation or beam size oscillations can be attributed to a resonant coupling between different modes of the system. A simple analytical estimate of the relaxation time is developed. The final state of the system reached after the relaxation is complete is investigated. New and accurate analytical results for the second order moments in the phase-mixed state are obtained. Unlike previous results, these connect the final values of the second order moments with the initial beam mismatch. These analytical estimates are in good agreement with the CME model and PIC simulations. Predictions for the final density and temperature are developed that show main important features of the spatial dependence of the profiles. Different aspect of the final coarse-grained state such as its non-thermal nature, the appearance of 'hot' regions on the periphery and the core-halo character of the density are investigated.

Backhaus, Ekaterina Yu.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Plasma window characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters of an arc Ar plasma discharge used as a plasma window with a discharge current of {approx}50 A and a voltage of {approx}58 V are presented. It is shown that this arc discharge allows one to decrease the pressure at the low pressure end of the plasma window almost 380 times using relatively low pumping at the low pressure end of the plasma window. Calculations of the plasma parameters and their spatial distribution using a simple wall-stabilized arc model showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimentally obtained data. It is shown that a significant decrease in gas flow through the plasma window occurs due to the increase in plasma viscosity. An improvement of the plasma window ignition and some of its design aspects are described as well.

Krasik, Ya. E.; Gleizer, S.; Gurovich, V.; Kronhaus, I.; Hershcovitch, A.; Nozar, P.; Taliani, C. [Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, 40 129 Bologna (Italy)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chromium(III)-doped pillared clays (PILC's)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chromium(III)-doped pillared clays (PILC's) ... First, calcined Al-PILC was dispersed into an aqueous solution of sodium or ammonium ions. ...

K. A. Carrado; S. L. Suib; N. D. Skoularikis; R. W. Coughlin

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Space Plasma Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...W.D., BEAM-PLASMA DISCHARGE - BUILDUP...DURING ELECTRON BEAM-PLASMA INTERACTIONS, GEOPHYSICAL...ELECTRON-BEAM IN THE ATMOSPHERE, PLANETARY AND SPACE...1980 ). Space plasma physics: electron...regula' occurred at large pitch angles. Note...in quite different areas. (i) There is...

KLAUS WILHELM; WOLFGANG STÜDEMANN; WILLIBALD RIEDLER

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Space Plasma Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...po-tential, the local plasma potential mea-sured...Wave instabilities. The plasma wave activity is measured...analyzer (0.1 to 11.4 MHz) in a time-sharing...direct measure of the plasma frequencyfp (Eq. 1...cm3) = 0.0121fp2 (kHz) (2) Here fc is the...

C. BEGHIN; J. P. LEBRETON; B. N. MAEHLUM; J. TROIM; P. INGSOY; J. L. M?CHAU

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermionic energy conversion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the history, application options, and ideal basic performance of the thermionic energy converter are outlined. The basic plasma types associated with various modes of converter operation are described, with emphasis on identification and semi-quantitative characterization of the dominant physical processes and utility of each plasma type. The frontier plasma science issues in thermionic converter applications are briefly summarized.

Rasor, N.S. (Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Micro-structured electrode arrays: atmospheric pressure plasma processes and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow to generate large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode dimensions in the micro-range realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques are small enough to generate sufficiently high electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges applying only moderate radio frequency (13.56 MHz) voltages (80–390 V in Ne, He, Ar and N2). The non-thermal plasma system is characterized by a special probe measuring the electric parameters. Possible industrial applications of the MSE arrays are plasma chemistry (e.g. waste gas decomposition) and surface modification of materials. Using an MSE based micro-reactor the abatement of the greenhouse gas CF4 was performed with decomposition rates of over 90% at a pressure of 100 mbar in He and N2. The decomposition of waste gases in the plasma was monitored online with quadrupole mass spectrometry. At atmospheric pressure in He the abatement rate of CF4 is still over 70%. Other applications realized in our lab are thin film deposition of diamond-like carbon layers and SiO2 layers on various substrates and sterilization of food packaging materials.

L. Baars-Hibbe; P. Sichler; C. Schrader; C. Geßner; K.-H. Gericke; S. Büttgenbach

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

226

Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharge. The atmospheric plasma is generated between theatmospheric dielectric barrier discharge. 6.2 Introduction Low temperature plasmas

Titus, Monica Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

229

John Hale III | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

John Hale III John Hale III About Us John Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small disadvantaged, 8(a), women-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, and Historically Underutilized Business Zone businesses. He

230

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Washoe, Nevada Coordinates 40.5608387°, -119.6035495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5608387,"lon":-119.6035495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Plasma Camp | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Camp December 12, 2013 Due to unforeseen budget cuts, this program has been cancelled for 2014. We are very sorry we cannot offer the program and apologize for the late...

232

Triton burnup in plasma focus plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pure deuterium plasma discharge from plasma focus breeds 1.01 MeV tritons via the D(d p)T fusion branch which has the same cross section as the D(d n)3He (E n =2.45 MeV) fusion branch. Tritons are trapped in and collide with the background deuterium plasma producing 14.1 MeV neutrons via the D(t n)4He reaction. The paper presents published in preliminary form as well as unpublished experimental data and theoretical studies of the neutron yield ratio R=Y n (14.1 MeV)/Y n (2.45 MeV). The experimental data were obtained from 1 MJ Frascati plasma focus operated at W=490 kJ with pure deuterium plasma (in the early 1980s). Neutrons were monitored using the nuclear activation method and nuclear emulsions. The present theoretical analysis of the experimental data is based on an exact adaptation of the binary encounter theory developed by Gryzinski. It is found that the experimentally defined value 1?10?3plasma domains of very high density (n?1021 cm?3) high temperature (kT?1 keV) and short trapping time (t 0?20 ns). These domains are known as efficient traps of MeV ions but are not the main source of D(d n)3He fusion.

Jan S. Brzosko; Jan R. Brzosko Jr.; Benjamin V. Robouch; Luigi Ingrosso

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

One-loop photon-photon scattering in a thermal, deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a deconfining thermal SU(2) Yang-Mills plasma we discuss the role of (anti)calorons in introducing non-thermal behavior effectively described in terms of Planck's quantum of action $\\hbar$. This non-thermality cancels exactly between the ground-state estimate and its free quasiparticle excitations. Kinematic constraints in 4-vertex scattering and the counting of radial loop variables versus the number of independent constraints on them are re-visited. Next, we consider thermal 2$\\rightarrow$ 2 one-loop scattering of the modes remaining massless upon the (anti)caloron induced adjoint Higgs mechanism (thermal ground state after spatial coarse graining). Starting with stringent analytical arguments, we are able to exclude the contribution to photon-photon scattering from diagrams containing at least one three-vertex and, in a next step, a vast majority of all possible configurations involving two four-vertices. By numerical analysis we show that the remaining contribution of the overall S channel is severely suppressed compared to that of the T and U channels, meaning that the creation of a pair of massive vector modes by a pair of photons and vice versa practically does not occur in the Yang-Mills plasma. For the T and U channels the domain of loop integration represents less than $10^{-7}$ times the volume of the unconstrained integration region. The thus introduced photon-photon correlation should affect the Cosmic Microwave Background's polarisation at low redshift. An adaption of the here-developed methods to the analysis of irreducible bubble diagrams could prove the conjecture of hep-th/0609033 on the termination of the loop expansion of thermodynamical quantities at a finite irreducible order.

Niko Krasowski; Ralf Hofmann

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala Department plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having

Kushner, Mark

235

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors Xudong ``Peter'' Xu PFCs , gases which have large global warming potentials, are widely used in plasma processing, the effluents from plasma tools using these gases typically have large mole fractions of PFCs. The use of plasma

Kushner, Mark

236

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments M. Ulrickson Presented · Introduction to Burning Plasmas · Plasma Materials Interaction Phenomena · Materials Issues · Summary #12;MAU 4 ­ Resistance to neutron damage #12;MAU 5 11/15/2001 The FIRE Burning Plasma Device · A compact high field

237

Plasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition) Nanofabrication The workshop will focus on the fundamentals of plasma etching and deposition. Lectures will include an introduction to vacuum technology, the basics of plasma and plasma reactors and an overview of mechanisms

Martin, Jan M.L.

238

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site, Vol III - August 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August 2001 August 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site This report...

240

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices were prepared by the Council on Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out...

242

Plasma Adiabatic Lapse Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient ??? and difference in average ionization states Z2-Z1. Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

Peter Amendt; Claudio Bellei; Scott Wilks

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Michigan Institute Plasma Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Neutral Atom Imaging of the Terrestrial re- search includes ion heating in the solar corona, electric double layers, magne- tosphere neutral

Shyy, Wei

244

Applications of Atmospheric Plasmas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Surface modification techniques using plasmas have generally been completed in a low pressure environment due to Pd (pressure x gap distance) considerations influencing the behavior… (more)

Oldham, Christopher John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Plasma Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide In the past, there has been interest in synthesis of certain chemicals in plasma. One chemical that has been synthesized in a plasma on an...

247

Investigation of Plasma Facing Components in Plasma Focus Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both aspects of the plasma–wall interactions, counter effect of plasma and materials, have been considered in our experiments. The AEOI plasma focus, Dena, has Filippov-type electrodes. The...

M. V. Roshan; A. R. Babazadeh; S. M. Sadat Kiai; H. Habibi…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (a) III (a) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (a) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenrock III Wind Farm Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenrock III Wind Farm Facility Glenrock III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser EnXco Location Converse WY Coordinates 43.0347917°, -105.8439737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0347917,"lon":-105.8439737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Waverly III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waverly III Wind Farm Waverly III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly III Wind Farm Facility Waverly III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Waverly Light & Power Developer Waverly Light & Power Energy Purchaser Waverly Light & Power Location Waverly IA Coordinates 42.7241°, -92.4786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7241,"lon":-92.4786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

Smith III, Julius Orion

254

PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

Berk, Herbert L.

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fundamentals of Plasma Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of Plasma Physics James D. Callen University of Wisconsin, Madison June 28, 2006 #12;PREFACE Plasma physics is a relatively new branch of physics that became a mature science over the last half of the 20th century. It builds on the fundamental areas of classical physics: mechanics

Callen, James D.

256

Diamagnetism of rotating plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Triggered plasma opening switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heliumlike titanium spectra produced by electron-cyclotron-heated tokamak plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the heliumlike titanium emission lines produced during electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) of Doublet III tokamak plasmas. The spectra observed during ECH at a level of 1 MW show considerable departure from those of ohmically heated plasmas. Theoretical analysis of line intensities shows that the ECH plasma is in disequilibrium with a net state of ionization and relatively little recombination. A departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution is inferred. Electron temperatures deduced from ratios of dielectronic recombination lines to the resonance line (i.e., d13/w, k/w, and j/w) are in significant disagreement with temperatures measured by the Thomson scattering system.

P. Lee; A. J. Lieber; R. P. Chase; A. K. Pradhan

1985-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence ... These observations are consistent with the known solubility of oxidized As species in water. ... Remote H plasma exposure was effective for removing halogens and hydrocarbons from the surfaces of both nitrides at 450 °C, but was not efficient for oxide removal. ...

Sabrina L. Peczonczyk; Jhindan Mukherjee; Azhar I. Carim; Stephen Maldonado

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

ITER | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pioneering plasma physicist whose contributions to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) ranged from seminal advances in fusion energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Stellarators | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in stellarators By John Greenwald Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics...

262

Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensities for pure Ar plasmas focus on the dominant 104.8emitted from pure A r plasmas focus on the intensities ofdissertation work focuses on plasma and wafer diagnostics as

Titus, Monica Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

The air plasma spraying  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The air plasma spraying is characterized by using of a compressed air as a plasma forming gas. Here is shown the application of benefits of the present technology compared with other spraying process. The creation of the present process was possible due to a reliable plasma torch and certain condition of heating and deposition of powder materials on a work. Plasma torch develops a power up to 50 kW and can work during 14 hours without replacement of a cathode and during 25 hours as for an anode what is acceptable for industrial application. When spraying of coatings a minimum waste of alloying elements is attained with slight increase of oxygen in coating which is comparable with argon plasma spraying in the open. In certain cases the air plasma spraying allows to obtain more perfect coatings and at high performance. The present method finds large application at restoration and strengthening of machine parts, at forming of components etc. The air plasma spraying provides high quality coatings at low cost of components.

Valery S. Klubnikin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

Chen Naihwa; Ip, Wing-Huen [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Innes, Davina, E-mail: d949001@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Stirring Unmagnetized Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept for spinning unmagnetized plasma is demonstrated experimentally. Plasma is confined by an axisymmetric multicusp magnetic field and biased cathodes are used to drive currents and impart a torque in the magnetized edge. Measurements show that flow viscously couples momentum from the magnetized edge (where the plasma viscosity is small) into the unmagnetized core (where the viscosity is large) and that the core rotates as a solid body. To be effective, collisional viscosity must overcome the ion-neutral drag due to charge-exchange collisions.

C. Collins; N. Katz; J. Wallace; J. Jara-Almonte; I. Reese; E. Zweibel; C. B. Forest

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Plasma-Current Multipole Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of the plasma-current multipole configuration have been demonstrated experimentally.

T. Ohkawa and H. G. Voorhies

1969-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Basic concepts in plasma accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plasma accelerators. Plasma accelerators are ideal...2. Relativistic plasma wave acceleration The...electric field at the focus of high-power short-pulse...Diffraction limits the depth of focus to the Rayleigh length...stimulated Brillouin and plasma modulational instabilities...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Michigan Institute for Plasma Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Program in Plasma Physics and Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. He also serves as Associate Director for Academic Affairs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. DrMichigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Seminar Compressing Waves in Plasma

Shyy, Wei

270

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

271

Plasma Magnetic Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

29 June 1987 research-article Plasma Magnetic Insulation B. B. Kadomtsev Theoretically the strong magnetic field of a tokamak should confine electrons and ions in a high-temperature...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simulation of Fusion Plasmas  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

Chris Holland

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoney Corners III Stoney Corners III Facility Stoney Corners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209°, -85.275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.209,"lon":-85.275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

274

Crystal Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Crystal Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Hancock/Winnebago Counties IA Coordinates 43.304401°, -93.824029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.304401,"lon":-93.824029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

III: Cost Considerations III: Cost Considerations Moderator: Dana Christensen Panelists: Phil Macey Paul Torcellini Rich von Luhrte NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Road to Net Zero Dana Christensen Deputy Laboratory Director Science & Technology RSF Workshop July 27-28, 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Managing Costs Paul Torcellini, PhD, PE Group Manager, Advanced Commercial Buildings Research Group Innovation for Our Energy Future 4 I II III IV Value Added 5 * Owner made tough decisions up-front * Set budget * Sought maximum value for that budget

276

Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kotzebue Wind Project III Kotzebue Wind Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.83716°, -162.556955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.83716,"lon":-162.556955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pomeroy III Wind Farm Pomeroy III Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pocahontas County IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Electrostatics of moving plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

Ignatov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications.

280

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energetic Electron Transport In An Inhomogeneous Plasma Medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the work carried out at IPR on energetic electron transport through an inhomogeneous plasma medium is presented in this article. A Generalized Electron Magnetohydrodynamic (G-EMHD) fluid model has been developed and employed for such studies. Novel observations such as (i) the trapping of electron current pulse structure in a high density plasma region, (ii) the formation of sharp magnetic field shock structures at the inhomogeneous plasma density layer (iii) and intense energy dissipation at the shock layer even in the collisionless limit are reported. The intense energy dissipation of the electron current pulse at the shock layer provides a mechanism whereby highly energetic electrons which are essentially collision-less can also successfully deposit their energy in a local region of the plasma. This is specially attractive as it opens up the possibility of heating a localized region of an overdense plasma (where lasers cannot penetrate) by highly energetic collision-less electrons. A direct application of this mechanism to Fast Ignition (FT) experiments is discussed.

Das, Amita [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Operable Unit III Area of Concern 32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, AOC 32 Building 452 Freon-11 Plume Remediation System Project Work Plan and Design Report Table Modeling Results E Sample Results for New Building 452 Groundwater Monitoring Wells #12;1 OU III, AOC 32 Building 96 area (AOC 26B). In accord ance with BN L's Groundwater Contin

283

PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES Professors: AALBERTS, S. BOLTON*, K. JONES a laser work? What is a black hole? What are the fundamental building blocks of the universe? Physics majors and Astrophysics majors study these and related questions to understand the physical world around

Aalberts, Daniel P.

284

Inductively Coupled Plasma and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Etching of InGaAlP Compound Semiconductor System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current and future generations of sophisticated compound semiconductor devices require the ability for submicron scale patterning. The situation is being complicated since some of the new devices are based on a wider diversity of materials to be etched. Conventional IUE (Reactive Ion Etching) has been prevalent across the industry so far, but has limitations for materials with high bond strengths or multiple elements. IrI this paper, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma), for the etching of ternary compound semiconductors (InGaP, AIInP, AlGaP) which are employed for electronic devices like heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), and photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. High density plasma sources, opeiating at lower pressure, are expected to meet target goals determined in terms of etch rate, surface morphology, surface stoichiometry, selectivity, etc. The etching mechanisms, which are described in this paper, can also be applied to other III-V (GaAs-based, InP-based) as well as III-Nitride since the InGaAIP system shares many of the same properties.

Abernathy, C.R.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Time of Neutron Production on Z?Pinch and Plasma Focus Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present the results obtained on the plasma focus PF?1000 in IPPLM Warsaw and on the z?pinch S?300 in RRC Kurchatov Institute in Moscow using a deuterium load. On the PF?1000 plasma?focus device with deuterium filling gas the energy of neutrons and time of their generation are determined by time?of?flight method from seven scintillation detectors positioned in the axial direction. The neutron signals (total yield ?1011 neutrons per shot) correlate with hard x?rays and their maximum occur ?150–200 ns after the pinch phase. The initial portion of neutron pulse has beam?target origin with downstream energies up to 2.8–3.2 MeV and the final portion of neutrons has isotropic distribution of energies in the range of 2.2–2.7 MeV. The z?pinch experiments were performed on the S?300 generator with the load formed from a deuterated CD2 fibre in the axis of a tungsten wire array. The energy of neutrons and time of their generation are determined by time?of?flight method from 5 scintillation detectors positioned in the axial and side?on direction. The neutrons with total yield up to 3×109 per shot are produced in the energy range of 1.8–3.2 MeV at 10–30 ns after the pinch phase represented by dip in the current waveform peak of the voltage and minimum of the pinch diameter. The distribution of neutron velocities is random within the total solid angle. The neutrons in both devices are produced by a non?thermal mechanism with deuterons accelerated to the energies above 100 keV partially in anode?cathode direction and partially with almost isotropic distribution of velocities at the time of the plasma expansion i.e. after the pinch phase.

P. Kubes; J. Kravarik; D. Klir; M. Scholz; M. Paduch; K. Tomaszewski; I. Ivanova?Stanik; B. Bienkowska; L. Karpinski; M. Sadowski; H. Schmidt; Y. L. Bakshaev; P. I. Blinov; A. S. Chernenko; M. I. Ivanov; E. D. Kazakov; A. V. Korelsky; E. V. Kravchenko; V. D. Korolev; A. Y. Shashkov; G. I. Ustroev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

287

Sorption von Ln(III)/An(III) und U(VI) an Tonmineralen und natürlichen Tongesteinen.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this thesis sorption of An(III)/(VI) is studied onto monomineralic clays and natural claystones by batch and spectroscopic studies and model calculations, in order to… (more)

Hartmann, Eva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ODT’s OTIA III Bridge Program: Three Years of Environmental Stewardship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 2007. OTIA III Bridge Delivery Program. Monthlyfor ODOT’s OTIA III State Bridge Delivery Program: Manyimpacts. The OTIA III State Bridge Delivery Program (the

Richards, Shelley D.; Ryan, Bill

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Furth Plasma Physics Libary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contacts Hours Online Access Directions Contacts Hours Online Access Directions QuickFind Main Catalog Databases PPPL Publications & Reports/PPLcat Plasma Physics E-Journals clear Click arrows to scroll for more clear Plasma Physics Colloquia The Global Carbon Cycle and Earth's Climate - January 15, 2014 Addressing Big Data Challenges in Simulation-based Science - January 22, 2014 "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge?: The History of the Institute for Advanced Study - January 29, 2014 PM-S-1 PDF PM-S-2 PDF PM-S-3 PDF PM-S-4 PDF PM-S-5 PDF PM-S-6 PDF See All Library History Intro 950 1960-1970 1980 1990 2000 Quick Order Article Express Borrow Direct Interlibrary Loan PPL Book Request More Resources and Services Search & Find Articles & Databases - Plasma Physics, Physics, Engineering & Technology,

290

COLLOQUIUM: Excitement at the Plasma Boundary" | Princeton Plasma...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Presentation: WC16JAN2013RGoldston.pdf We now know how to heat plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, and even how to confine the resulting hot plasmas to produce immense...

291

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

292

Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of high-velocity shock waves in an axial magnetic field generated by single-turn coils connected in parallel to a condenser bank is investigated. Time-resolved photographs show that the plasma behind the shock front is driven away from the tube walls by the magnetic pressure. This compression heats the ionized gas and maintains a high shock velocity during the transit of the front through the coil. The compressed plasma appears to be stable and undergoes radial oscillations that follow the current oscillations. The interpretation and significance of these observations in controlled thermonuclear fusion research are discussed.

A. C. Kolb

1958-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reflectivity of nonideal plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New results on optical reflectance measurements of shock-compressed dense xenon plasma at wavelengths ? = 532 nm and ? = 694 nm are reported. The investigations have been performed for nonideal plasma (? = 0.87–2.0) at densities ? = 0.27–3.84 g cm?3 and pressures P = 1.6–17 GPa. The obtained high optical reflectance values are characteristic of a metallic fluid and are evidence for a conducting state in the shocked xenon. Reflectance measurements at different wavelengths provide information about the density profile of the shock wave front.

Yu Zaporoghets; V Mintsev; V Gryaznov; V Fortov; H Reinholz; T Raitza; G Röpke

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DUST-PLASMA INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

Dr. M. Rosenberg

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

A newly developed chromium(III) gel technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing of a recently developed chromium(III) (Cr(III)) gel technology is reported. The gels can be used in conjunction with a number of oilfield treatments. The single-fluid acrylamide-polymer/Cr(III)-carboxylate aqueous gels are formed by crosslinking acrylamide polymer with a Cr(III)-carboxylate-complex crosslinking agent. Representative gel compositions and associated gel properties are discussed.

Sydansk, R.D. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (USA). Research Div.)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

297

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic...

298

Recent results for plasma antennas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. They can transmit, receive, and reflect radio waves just as well as metal antennas. In addition, plasma generated noise does not appear to be a problem.

Alexeff, Igor; Anderson, Ted; Farshi, Esmaeil; Karnam, Naresh; Pulasani, Nanditha Reddy [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gas lens laser produced plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gas lens is used to focus a megawatt ruby laser beam on to a target to create a plasma. By using focal plane photographs and Faraday cup plasma diagnostics, the focusing ability of a...

Notcutt, Mark; Waltham, J A; Michaelis, M M; Cunningham, P F; Cazalet, R S

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apollo Energy III LLC Apollo Energy III LLC Place Delaware, Delaware Product The company owns and operates a landfill gas to liquiefied natural gas production facility. Coordinates 39.145271°, -75.418762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.145271,"lon":-75.418762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b) b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Green–Naghdi fluid with non-thermal equilibrium effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1989a , b ). However, Green- Naghdi (1996) point...modify the theory of Green- Naghdi (1996) to...incorporate the suspension and solvent thermal characteristics...ethylene glycol as the solvent, and CuO or Al2O3 as...coefficient H and the Green-Naghdi extra viscosity...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Green–Naghdi fluid with non-thermal equilibrium effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...appendices to Bleustein- Green (1967) and Green- Rivlin (1964), they...expression for the kinetic energy of a system of particles...on the fluid theory of Green- Naghdi (1996), their...procedure leads to a kinetic energy that can be equated to...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens ... (22) Plasma II is more effective than Plasma I with the ability to develop homogeneous plasmas and eliminate boundary-layer air effects. ...

Sudheer Jinka; Uday Turaga; Vinitkumar Singh; Rachel L. Behrens; Cenk Gumeci; Carol Korzeniewski; Todd Anderson; Rory Wolf; Seshadri Ramkumar

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.....................................................................................3 1.1 Plasma Focusing ......................................................................3 1

307

Directory | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Procurement...

308

Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Despite the cold war, which raged for another 30 years, controlled fusion research became a modelFusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, John Webster - editor, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1999) #12;Controlled Fusion For half a century

Greenwald, Martin

310

Solar Flare Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 1981 research-article Solar Flare Plasmas A. H. Gabriel The solar flare is discussed in terms of its three phases: energy storage, energy release, and dissipation...made by the N.A.S.A. Solar Maximum Mission satellite...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency ? through the strongly coupled plasma of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang–Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most ...

Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir

312

Reprint from "PLASMA PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY VIENNA, 1983 Link: http://charles.karney.info/biblio/white83.html #12;CONFINEMENTIN. ALBERT, C.F.F. KARNEY Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United motion. Of course a stochastic field has no such coordinates, but the systems of interest for confinement

Karney, Charles

313

Beat Heating of a Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If two laser beams have a difference frequency nearly equal to the plasma frequency, nonlinear interaction resonantly excites longitudinal plasma oscillations. These then induce transitions to other transverse modes. Nonlinear damping of the longitudinal mode heats the plasma. The process is optimized by having parallel beams, equal laser intensities, and damping equal to the frequency mismatch.

Bruce I. Cohen; Allan N. Kaufman; Kenneth M. Watson

1972-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Turbulent Plasmas in Astrophysics of turbulent fluc- tuations in the solar wind. While magnetohydrodynamics remains the appro- priate theory the labora- tory, to study naturally turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and in more distant

Shyy, Wei

315

Plasma Physics John F. Kennedy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v v v v v Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory N 278 95 1 95 18 NEW YORK John F. Kennedy Int Campus/ Sayre Drive Sign PPPLSayre Dr. Location: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory James Forrestal Campus U.S. Route #1 North at Sayre Drive Plainsboro, NJ 08536 Mailing Address: Princeton Plasma Physics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

316

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic properties related to fossil energy conversion and carbon dioxide decomposition. Non-thermal plasma is an ionized gas comprised of a mixture of charged particles (electrons, ions), active chemical radicals (O 3 , O, OH), and highly excited species that are known to accelerate reforming reactions in

317

Fuel-optimal Earth-Mars trajectories using low-thrust exhaust-modulated plasma propulsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relerence frames Lx', y', r'I are different for the Earth and Mars references. The substitutions for the second-order derivatives required in the 27 differential equations are given by 2 VIM ISI CCS M + RM RM RM (2. 64) V V sin AM + RM cosltlM ( RM.... Characteristics of the Plasma Propulsion. . Equations of Motion. III NECESSARY CONDITIONS OF OPTIMALITY?. . . 14 15 16 30 Optimal Control Theory. Necessary Conditions of a Fuel-Optimal Earth-Mars Trajectory with Low-Thrust Plasma Propulsion...

Nah, Ren Sang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Transport processes in space plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project represents a comprehensive research effort to study plasma and field transport processes relevant for solar-terrestrial interaction, involving the solar wind and imbedded magnetic field and plasma structures, the bow shock of the Earth`s magnetosphere and associated waves, the Earth`s magnetopause with imbedded flux rope structures and their connection with the Earth, plasma flow in the Earth`s magnetotail, and ionospheric beam/wave interactions. The focus of the work was on the interaction between plasma and magnetic and electric fields in the regions where different plasma populations exist adjacent to or superposed on each other. These are the regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, important for plasma and energy transport and rapid energy releases. The research addressed questions about how this interaction takes place, what waves, instabilities, and particle/field interactions are involved, how the penetration of plasma and energy through characteristic boundaries takes place, and how the characteristic properties of the plasmas and fields of the different populations influence each other on different spatial and temporal scales. These topics were investigated through combining efforts in the analysis of plasma and field data obtained through space missions with theory and computer simulations of the plasma behavior.

Birn, J.; Elphic, R.C.; Feldman, W.C. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... períodos más importantes en la historia del teatro. Algunos de sus rasgos esenciales fueron el uso de un lenguaje popular, satírico, e irónico, la introducción de personajes de las clases bajas, tales como esclavos y sirvientes, y la irreverencia a las...

Jaraba-Pardo, E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DEVELOPMENT OF WATER JET PLASMA MIRROR FOR STAGING OF LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAGING OF LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS ? Dmitriy Panasenko,Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs) is necessary in4]. INTRODUCTION Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs) have now

Panasenko, Dmitriy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Soft Plasma Polymerization of Gas State Precursors from an Atmospheric Pressure Corona Plasma Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soft Plasma Polymerization of Gas State Precursors from an Atmospheric Pressure Corona Plasma Discharge ... Application of nonequilibrium plasmas in organic chemistry ...

P. Anthony F. Herbert; Liam O’Neill; Justyna Jaroszy?ska-Woli?ska

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

PLASMA HEATING IN A POST ERUPTION CURRENT SHEET: A CASE STUDY BASED ON ULTRAVIOLET, SOFT, AND HARD X-RAY DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Off-limb observations of the solar corona after coronal mass ejections (CMEs) often show strong, compact, and persistent UV sources behind the eruption. They are primarily observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument in the 'hot' [Fe XVIII] ?974 line and are usually interpreted as a signature of plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet (CS). Nevertheless, the physical process itself and the altitude of the main energy release are currently not fully understood. In this work, we study the evolution of plasma heating after the CME of 2004 July 28 by comparing UV spectra acquired by UVCS with soft and hard X-ray (SXR, HXR) images of the post-flare loops taken by GOES/SXI and RHESSI. The X-ray data show a long-lasting extended source that is rising upward, toward the high-temperature source detected by UVCS. UVCS data show the presence of significant non-thermal broadening in the CS (a signature of turbulent motions) and a strong density gradient across the CS region. The thermal energy released in the HXR source is on the order of ?10{sup 32} erg, a factor ?2-5 larger than the energy required to explain the high-temperature plasma sampled by UVCS. Nevertheless, the very different time evolutions of SXR and HXR sources compared with the UV emission suggest that reconnection occurring above the post-eruption arcades is not directly responsible for the high-temperature plasma sampled higher up by UVCS. We conclude that an additional plasma heating mechanism (such as turbulent reconnection) in the CS is likely required.

Susino, R.; Bemporad, A. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Krucker, Säm, E-mail: sur@oact.inaf.it, E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

325

Furth Plasma Physics Library | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in support of PPPL's research in the fields of plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion. For more information about the library and its services visit the library website...

326

Towards Plasma Surgery: Plasma Treatment of Living Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical biological and technical background for high?precision plasma surgery is prepared in a multi?disciplinary team. The aim of the research is to achieve controlled removal of diseased cells and bacteria without harming the healthy rest of the tissue. For this purpose a small cold flexible and non?toxic plasma is developed (the plasma needle) and tested on cultured cells and bacterial samples. The needle is an atmospheric discharge induced by a radio?frequency voltage applied to a metal pin. This plasma operates at room temperature in the milliwatt power regime; it poses no risk of thermal or electrical damage to living tissues. Several beneficial responses of living cells to plasma treatment have been already identified. Plasma does not cause accidental cell death (necrosis) which leads to inflammation and tissue damage. Instead it allows to detach cells from each other and from the scaffold and thus to remove them in a non?destructive way. Moreover plasma is capable of bacterial inactivation. I parallel we have determined the electrical and optical properties of the plasma and found a method of precise positioning of the plasma needle with respect to the treated tissue.

E. Stoffels; I. E. Kieft; R. E. J. Sladek; D. W. Slaaf; E. P. van der Laan; P. Jimenez?Moreno; M. Steinbuch

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Towards Plasma Surgery: Plasma Treatment of Living Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical, biological and technical background for high-precision plasma surgery is prepared in a multi-disciplinary team. The aim of the research is to achieve controlled removal of diseased cells and bacteria without harming the healthy rest of the tissue. For this purpose, a small, cold, flexible and non-toxic plasma is developed (the plasma needle) and tested on cultured cells and bacterial samples. The needle is an atmospheric discharge induced by a radio-frequency voltage applied to a metal pin. This plasma operates at room temperature, in the milliwatt power regime; it poses no risk of thermal or electrical damage to living tissues. Several beneficial responses of living cells to plasma treatment have been already identified. Plasma does not cause accidental cell death (necrosis), which leads to inflammation and tissue damage. Instead, it allows to detach cells from each other and from the scaffold, and thus to remove them in a non-destructive way. Moreover, plasma is capable of bacterial inactivation. I parallel, we have determined the electrical and optical properties of the plasma and found a method of precise positioning of the plasma needle with respect to the treated tissue.

Stoffels, E.; Kieft, I.E.; Sladek, R.E.J.; Slaaf, D.W.; Laan, E.P. van der; Jimenez-Moreno, P.; Steinbuch, M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later Operable Unit III documents and Operable Units I and II post-Record of Decision documents are located in the Information Repository. Complete copies of the records are located at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503, and at the Monticello Field Office, 1665 S. Main Street,

329

Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III - Permitting and Initial Development III - Permitting and Initial Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase III: Permitting and Initial Development GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

330

Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, , . . . . Handlers' Marks . Questions for Further Research BIBLIOGRAPHY . 70 . . 70 . . . 71 . . 74 . . 83 APPENDIX I: CATALOGUE OF LH/LM III VASES WITH INCISED MARKS . . 98 APPENDIX II: INCISED MARKS ON LH/LM III COARSE WARES . APPENDS III: CATALOGUE... (1935). Hankey, Acts CypruslCrete Hankey, V. "Crete, Cyprus and the south-eastern Mediterranean, 1400-1200 B. C. , " in Acts CypruslCrete, 144-57. Hankey, BSA 62 (1967) Haskell, (fc. ). KAD H Kalopsidha Kanta, LM III Hankey, V. "Mycenaean Pottery...

Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

coating. DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used...

332

RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

333

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical...

334

Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High resolution electron microscopic studies on ferrosilite III  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) studies on ferrosilite (Fs) III confirmed the periodicity nine (p=9) of the tetrahedral chains in this silicate. Various chain periodicit...

M. Czank; B. Simons

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composites using atmospheric plasma treatment. J. Appl.of polymer surfaces: atmospheric plasma versus vacuum plasmaA. Morgan, The effect of atmospheric plasma treatment on the

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Conductivity of a Warm Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory for obtaining the conductivity of a uniform plasma as a function of frequency and temperature is presented and compared with a number of recent treatments.

Lyman Mower

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Organization | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety & Health Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers Human Resources Environment, Safety...

339

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

As..." This fast-camera image shows plasma during magnetic reconnection, with magnetic field lines rendered in white based on measurements made during the experiment. The...

340

Engineering | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

developing an advanced power switch Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are assisting General Electric Co. in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Purpose | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Our goal is to support as many projects as possible. As a DOE National Laboratory, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory maintains an experienced staff of scientists,...

342

Tours | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contract Documents Speakers Bureau Tours Virtual Tour Tours Tour Arrangements at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Come see first-hand the exciting world of fusion...

343

STEM | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

glimpse at the cutting edge research taking place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory when the Laboratory, which already offers tours to...

344

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation of microturbulence in a tokamak fusion device. (Credit: Chad Jones and Kwan-Liu Ma, University of California, Davis; Stephane Ethier, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

345

Education | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Education Science Education Welcome to the Science Education Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where we combine the lab's core research activities with...

346

Education | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

glimpse at the cutting edge research taking place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory when the Laboratory, which already offers tours to...

347

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

collaborators push for energy solutions By Catherine Shen Stewart Prager, director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, gives the opening talk Nov. 14 at the third annual...

348

Inner magnetosphere plasma densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radio plasma imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite performs radio sounding in the magnetosphere, transmitting coded signals stepping through the frequency range of interest and receiving the returned echoes. The measurements provide the echo amplitude as a function of frequency and echo delay time on a so-called plasmagram. A newly developed algorithm inverts THE echo traces on a plasmagram to electron density spatial distributions. Based on these observed density distributions, an empirical model is constructed to describe the two-dimensional density distribution in the inner magnetosphere.

Reinisch, B W

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Voltage distribution over capacitively coupled plasma electrode for atmospheric-pressure plasma generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is used to generate large-area plasma, the standing wave effect becomes significant, ... which results in the hindering of the uniform plasma process such as in a plasma etc...

Mitsutoshi Shuto; Fukumi Tomino; Hiromasa Ohmi…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Vienna), Vol. III, pp. 229-239. 7. Grad, H. (1974) in Proceedings of Conference on Theoretical Controlled Thermonuclear Research (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), p. 31. 8. Grad, H', Hu, P. N. & Stevens, D. C. (1974) Bull...

H. Grad; P. N. Hu; D. C. Stevens

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of Microwave Propagation In Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Microwave Propagation In Plasma Elaine Chung Advisor: Dr. John Rodgers #12;Plasma OverviewPlasma Overview · Plasma ­ ionized gas htt[p://www.noaa.gov http://www.photoeverywhere.co.uk http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/ #12;Experimental Plasma · Formed by collisional excitation of gas in an electric field Electrode Non

Anlage, Steven

352

Continuum flow sampling mass spectrometer for elemental analysis with an inductively coupled plasma ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sampling of ions from an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma for mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a supersonic nozzle and skimmer is shown to follow similar behavior found for neutral beam studies and for ion extraction from other plasmas and flames. In particular, highest ion beam intensity is found if the skimmer tip is close to the Mach disk and at a calculated skimming Knudsen number close to the recommended value of 1. Our ICP-MS instrument with an off-axis detector and conventional cylindrical electrostatic ion focusing in the transition flow regime gives intense count rates of 1 to 5 MHz per mg L/sup -1/ of analyte superimposed on a background of 1 to 10 kHz. The dependence of count rates for metal oxide and doubly charged ions on ICP operating parameters, and sampling interface configuration are discussed for this instrument. A simple method is described for the approximate measurement of the ion energy distribution in ICP-MS. The average ion kinetic energy, kinetic energy spread, and maximum kinetic energy are evaluated from a plot of ion signal as a function of retarding voltage applied to the quadrupole mass analyzer. The effects of plasma operating parameters on ion signals and energies are described. In particular, kinetic energy is a sensitive function of aerosol gas flow rate. This behavior is attributed to a non-thermal, possibly electrical, interaction between the plasma and the sampling interface, which is induced by the presence of the axial channel in the ICP. The interference on the ionization of cobalt by five salts, NaCl, MgCl/sub 2/, NH/sub 4/I, NH/sub 4/Br and NH/sub 4/Cl, in an ICP is first considered theoretically and subsequently the theoretical trends are established experimentally by ICP-MS. The interference trends are found to be in the order of the most easily ionized element in the matrix salt, i.e., Na > Mg > I > Br > Cl.

Olivares, J.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Plasma probe characteristics in low density hydrogen pulsed plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probe theories are only applicable in the regime where the probe's perturbation of the plasma can be neglected. However, it is not always possible to know, a priori, that a particular probe theory can be successfully applied, especially in low density plasmas. This is especially difficult in the case of transient, low density plasmas. Here, we applied probe diagnostics in combination with a 2D particle-in-cell model, to an experiment with a pulsed low density hydrogen plasma. The calculations took into account the full chamber geometry, including the plasma probe as an electrode in the chamber. It was found that the simulations reproduce the time evolution of the probe IV characteristics with good accuracy. The disagreement between the simulated and probe measured plasma density is attributed to the limited applicability of probe theory to measurements of low density pulsed plasmas. Indeed, in the case studied here, probe measurements would lead to a large overestimate of the plasma density. In contrast, the ...

Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Zotovich, A I; Zyryanov, S M; Lopaev, D V; Bijkerk, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Magnetized dusty plasmas: the next frontier for complex plasma research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of magnetic fields in dusty (complex) plasma experiments. It first provides a description of the conditions necessary for a dusty plasma to become fully magnetized. The paper then briefly reviews a series of experimental studies that illustrate how magnetic fields are applied to dusty plasmas—from experiments that use magnetic fields to control the background plasma to those that have strong enough magnetic fields to directly modify the confinement and dynamics of the charged microparticles. The paper will then discuss the newest experiment that is currently under development at Auburn University, the magnetized dusty plasma experiment device. The paper concludes with a discussion of important outstanding physics and technical issues that will define the next generation of experiments.

E Thomas Jr; R L Merlino; M Rosenberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Institute of Physics Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Zemun (Serbia); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Notices III. Summary of Public Comments  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

32 Federal Register 32 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 246 / Friday, December 21, 2012 / Notices III. Summary of Public Comments Received and Agency Response to Comments During the public comment period provided, EPA received no comments in response to the September 26, 2012 Federal Register notice announcing the Agency's receipt of the requests for voluntary cancellation and termination of all uses of products listed in Table 1 of Unit II. IV. Cancellation Order Pursuant to FIFRA section 6(f), EPA hereby approves the requested cancellation and termination of all uses of halofenozide registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. Accordingly, the Agency hereby orders that the product registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. are canceled and all uses of halofenozide are terminated. The

357

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

358

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

359

Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 3.0 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2A 2.6 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2B c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout disposed to date Not Applicable 1.4 x 10 4 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L

360

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SPEAR III: A brighter source at SSRL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By replacing the magnets and vacuum chamber for the 3 GeV SPEAR II storage ring, the natural emittance of the machine can be reduced from 130 to 18 nm-rad and the stored current can be raised from 100 to 200 mA with a 50 h lifetime. This configuration increases focused photon flux for insertion device beamlines by an order of magnitude and the photon brightness for future undulators would exceed 10{sup 18} at 5 keV. Due to a higher critical energy, the photon flux in the 20 keV range for bending magnet beamlines increases by more than two orders of magnitude. We present preliminary SPEAR III design study results and plans to implement the facility upgrade with minimal downtime for SSRL users.

Hettel, R.; Boyce, R.; Brennan, S. [and others

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

A dusty plasma device for producing extended, steady state, magnetized, dusty plasma columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dusty plasma device for producing extended, steady state, magnetized, dusty plasma columns Wenjun with an existing Q machine, to produce extended, steady state, magnetized plasma columns. The dusty plasma device (DPD) is to be used for the investigation of waves in dusty plasmas and of other plasma/dust aspects

Merlino, Robert L.

364

Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

First Plasma Wave Observations at Uranus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electrons. Various other plasma waves were also observed...plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive...BRIDGE, H.S., PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR URANUS...FROM URANUS AT 0.5 MHZ, ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; F. L. SCARF; R. L. POYNTER

1986-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...Argon-supported inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric pressures are excellent...HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY OF A 1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric...INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...STUDIES OF A RADIO-FREQUENCY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Steady state compact toroidal plasma production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

Turner, W.C.

1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

PPPL Open House | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 1, 2013, 9:00am to 4:00pm Open House at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL Open House Hot Plasma, Cool Science: Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Open House on June 1 Mark...

370

Plasma physics: The fusion upstarts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fusion reactor capable of generating an excess of energy from a sustained burn of its plasma fuel. But it looks set to cost as much as US$50 billion — ... light elements, add heat to strip the electrons from the nuclei and form an ionized plasma, then compress that ...

M. Mitchell Waldrop

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

Plasma Rotation during Spheromak Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe Doppler shifts of a CIII impurity line in a spheromak plasma showing toroidal rotation during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration but not during the equilibrium or decay phase. The evolution of the velocity fields is consistent with the estimated rate of cross-helicity decay given the viscosity and resistivity of the plasma.

T. Peyser and G. C. Goldenbaum

1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

372

Plasma theory and simulation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

Birdsall, C.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Chromium(III)-Ettringite Formation and its Thermal Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Attempts have been made to replace aluminium(III) by chromium(III) in the ettringite structure because of practical importance of a...6[Cr(OH)6]2(SO4)3?26H2O formation and its thermal stability are reported.

K. Wieczorek-Ciurowa; K. Fela; A. J. Kozak

374

L6: Memory Hierarchy Optimization III, Bandwidth Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/9/10 1 L6: Memory Hierarchy Optimization III, Bandwidth Optimization CS6963 Administrative · Next! ­ cs6963s10-teach@list.eng.utah.edu · Please use for questions to Protonu and me CS6963 2 L6:Memory CUDA installed 3 L6:MemoryHierarchyIII CS6963 Overview · Complete discussion of data placement

Hall, Mary W.

375

Synthesis and structural characterization of new dithiocarbamate complexes from Sb(III) and Bi(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty new antimony and bismuth dithiocarbamate complexes which employed ten different type of amines have been successfully synthesized. The synthesized complexes with metal to dithiocarbamate ratio at 1:3. Elemental analysis of the complexes gave the general formula of MCl[S{sub 2}CNR’R”]{sub 2} where M = Sb(III), Bi(III); R’ = methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec-butyl, benzyl; R” = ethanol, methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl. The complexes were analysed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of five-coordinated antimony (III) complex have been determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on SbCl[S{sub 2}CN(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 2} adopted a triclinic system with a space group P1 with a = 10.0141(8) Å, b = 10.1394(7) Å, c = 11.8665(9) Å, ? = 67.960°, ? =87.616°, ? = 80.172°.

Jamaluddin, Nur Amirah; Baba, Ibrahim [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Current Drive in Recombining Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

First gamma-ray bursts imprinting population III progenitor structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important goals in modern cosmology is to understand how the first stars formed at the end of the dark ages. The first stars so-called Population III (Pop III) are predicted to have been predominantly very massive. Provided such very massive stars would produce a collapsar and relativistic jets the burst of high-energy photons like gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) could be observable. In this study we investigate the possibility of shock propagation through a massive envelope calculated using the density structure of Pop III star in analytic way. In addition we perform the numerical simulations of relativistic jet propagation in the Pop III.1 and Pop III.2 stars.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lab Lab Science Education Laboratory Overview Gallery: (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by DC Glow Discharges for Undergraduate Laboratories) (Photo by Atmospheric Plasma Laboratory) (Photo by 3D Printing Laboratory) (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by Plasma Speaker with 200 Hz input) (Photo by Dusty Plasma Laboratory) The Science Education Laboratory is a fusion (pun intended) of research between education and plasma science. This unique facility includes a teaching laboratory/classroom, two research labs, and student offices/storage/prep room. The research performed in the Science Education Laboratory is currently centered upon dusty plasmas, plasma speakers, remote control of plasmas for educational purposes, atmospheric plasmas and

382

Igor Kaganovich | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

He is involved in research in many areas of plasma physics with applications to nuclear fusion (heavy ion fusion), gas discharge modeling, and plasma processing. Dr. Kaganovich...

383

Microwave plasma conversion of volatile organic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MHz; Gerling Laboratory) and a resonant plasma tuner (ASTEX) were used to generate an argon/steam- based plasma at one atmosphere

Ko, Y; Yang, G S; Chang, DPY; Kennedy, Ian M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High-Frequency Electrostatic Plasma Instabilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of the stability properties of a plasma under the influence of an external electric field oscillating near the plasma frequency is presented.

J. P. Freidberg and B. M. Marder

1971-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Magnetic reconnection | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"reconnection") refers to the breaking and reconnecting of oppositely directed magnetic field lines in a plasma. In the process, magnetic field energy is converted to plasma...

387

Critical Kinetic Plasma Processes In Relativistic Astrophysics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Plasma astrophysics deals with collective plasma processes in astrophysical scenarios. As observational astronomy pushes towards unprecedented resolutions in space and time, the focus of theoretical… (more)

Jaroschek, Claus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Plasma immersion ion implantation on polymers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this thesis is to achieve plasma based surface modification of polymers. Highly ionized carbon plasma was generated from a filtered cathodic arc… (more)

Sze, Jia Yin.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of phenomena both in laboratory plasmas, like those magnetically confined in thermonuclear fusion exper- iments 1, and in several natural plasma systems, like for example...

390

International collaborations | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in stellarators By John Greenwald Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics...

391

Procurement Division Introduction | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Procurement Division Introduction The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is operated by Princeton University under...

392

Press Releases Archive | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics in Germany have devised a new method for minimizing turbulence in bumpy donut-shaped...

393

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rpwa rpwa Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

394

Equilibrium Analysis of EC-Sustained and RF-Sustained ST Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma current start-up and formation of the ST configuration without the use of the central solenoid is a critical issue in ST research. In the TST-2 spherical tokamak (R = 0.38 m, a = 0.25 m), sustainment of an ECRF (2.45 GHz) produced ST plasma by low frequency (21 MHz) RF power alone was demonstrated. Since direct RF current drive can be ruled out, this result implies that the ST configuration is sustained entirely by pressure-driven currents. The Grad-Shafranov equilibrium was generalized to take into account the open field line region with finite plasma current and pressure (truncated equilibrium). In addition to the precessional current of trapped particles, Pfirsch-Schlueter current flowing along the open field line (and partially returning through the vacuum vessel) contributes to the toroidal plasma current. Three phases of plasma start-up are analyzed: (i) the current formation phase, (ii) the current jump phase, and (iii) the current sustainment phase. In the current formation phase, the plasma current is formed and increases slowly, roughly proportional to the stored energy. Closed flux surfaces do not exist and the current density profile is peaked on the outboard side. Once the plasma current increases beyond a critical value (approximately equal to the level necessary to satisfy the major radial force balance), the plasma current increases rapidly (current jump). Closed flux surfaces appear not at the beginning, but at the end of the current jump. In the sustainment phase, plasma has a high poloidal beta, {beta}{sub p} O(1). The equilibrium is characterized by the hollowness of the current density profile, which also determines the fraction of the plasma current inside the last closed flux surface. The plasma equilibrium does not differ greatly between EC-sustained and RF-sustained plasmas. However, RF-sustained plasmas are more turbulent, with larger fluctuation levels over a wide frequency band (0-20 kHz), and in many cases MHD activity in the 5-10 kHz frequency band increases rapidly and terminates the discharge.

Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Watanabe, O.; An, B. I.; Hayashi, H.; Hanashima, K.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kakuda, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kurashina, H.; Matsuzawa, H.; Oosako, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Wakatsuki, T.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Influence of high voltage atmospheric cold plasma process parameters and role of relative humidity on inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores inside a sealed package  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground Non-thermal plasma has received much attention for elimination of microbial contamination from a range of surfaces. Aim This study aimed to determine the effect of a range of dielectric barrier discharge high voltage atmospheric cold plasma (HVACP) parameters for inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores inside a sealed package. Methods A sterile polystyrene Petri dish containing B. atrophaeus spore strip (spore population 2.3 × 106/strip i.e. 6.36 log10/strip) was placed in a sealed polypropylene container and was subjected to HVACP treatment. The HVACP discharge was generated between two aluminium plate electrodes using a high voltage of 70 kVRMS. The effects of process parameters, including treatment time, mode of exposure (direct/indirect), and working gas types, were evaluated. The influence of relative humidity on HVACP inactivation efficacy was also assessed. The inactivation efficacy was evaluated using colony counts. Optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) was used to assess gas composition following HVACP exposure. Findings A strong effect of process parameters on inactivation was observed. Direct plasma exposure for 60 s resulted in ?6 log10 cycle reduction of spores in all gas types tested. However, indirect exposure for 60 s resulted in either 2.1 or 6.3 log10 cycle reduction of spores depending on gas types used for HVACP generation. The relative humidity (RH) was a critical factor in bacterial spore inactivation by HVACP, where a major role of plasma-generated species other than ozone was noted. Direct and indirect HVACP exposure for 60 s at 70% RH recorded 6.3 and 5.7 log10 cycle reduction of spores, respectively. Conclusion In summary, a strong influence of process parameters on spore inactivation was noted. Rapid in-package HVACP inactivation of bacterial spores within 30–60 s demonstrates the promising potential application for reduction of spores on medical devices and heat-sensitive materials.

S. Patil; T. Moiseev; N.N. Misra; P.J. Cullen; J.P. Mosnier; K.M. Keener; P. Bourke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY MISCONDUCT Approved. GENERAL These procedures implement the Board of Regents Policy on Misconduct in Scholarly Work (November 30, 1989). All references to the "University" in these procedures mean the University of Maryland

Shapiro, Benjamin

397

Plasma Nanoscience: from Nano-Solids in Plasmas to Nano-Plasmas in Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique plasma-specific features and physical phenomena in the organization of nanoscale solid-state systems in a broad range of elemental composition, structure, and dimensionality are critically reviewed. These effects lead to the possibility to localize and control energy and matter at nanoscales and to produce self-organized nano-solids with highly unusual and superior properties. A unifying conceptual framework based on the control of production, transport, and self-organization of precursor species is introduced and a variety of plasma-specific non-equilibrium and kinetics-driven phenomena across the many temporal and spatial scales is explained. When the plasma is localized to micrometer and nanometer dimensions, new emergent phenomena arise. The examples range from semiconducting quantum dots and nanowires, chirality control of single-walled carbon nanotubes, ultra-fine manipulation of graphenes, nano-diamond, and organic matter, to nano-plasma effects and nano-plasmas of different states of matter...

Ostrikov, K; Meyyappan, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma focusing and plasma accel- eration, but further beam compression is not required. The resulting

Wurtele, Jonathan

399

ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavy

Gilson, Erik

400

Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Lédé

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Helium corona-assisted air discharge Nan Jiang, Lei Gao, Ailing Ji, and Zexian Caoa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge of vacuum. In order to reduce the expense associated with vacuum systems, many atmospheric non- thermal profit the application of non-thermal plasmas. Inspired by our own research on gas discharges, espe

Zexian, Cao

403

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the presence of non-thermal species. Non-Maxwellian ion popu- lations can arise from neutral beam injection Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations by R.J. Dumont, C.K. Phillips, and D: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;ICRF wave propagation and absorption in plasmas with non-thermal

404

Microbial Reduction of Structural Fe(III) in Illite and Goethite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Fe(III) in Illite and Goethite. Microbial Reduction of Structural Fe(III) in Illite and Goethite. Abstract: Microbial Reduction of Structural Fe(III) in Illite and...

405

Dense Plasma in Z-pinches and the Plasma Focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...experiments in controlled thermonuclear fusion research were Z-pinches...field pinch. But, at fusion temperatures and with...scaling law, but the thermonuclear origin of the neutrons...Z-pinch to attain dense fusion plasmas which might...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Plasma Grooving System Using Atmospheric Pressure Surface Discharge Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To fabricate narrow front contact grooves on a single crystalline silicon solar cell, we carried out etching of a silicon nitride film on a silicon substrate using the surface discharge plasma operated at atmospheric

Toshiyuki Hamada; Tatsuya Sakoda; Masahisa Otsubo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinios 60510 (United States); Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Experimental Study of Plasma Materials' Interaction in Plasma Focus “Dena”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that plasma material interaction in fusion devices is a critical issue that affects the overall machine performance. The process of material selection with a low degradation effect on the ...

M. V. Roshan; M. Mahmoodi Darian

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

410

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

411

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

412

Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an atmospheric-pressure arc plasma are described from the viewpoint of continuorts radiation tlieory of the atmospheric arc plasma column is very sensitive to the electron density in the near infrared frequency rangeB ) Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc

Eagar, Thomas W.

413

Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

Post, Richard F

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-isobutylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bi s-l, 3-dimethylbu tyl ammoni- umpentabromobi smutha (III) Bis-4-p1coliniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis-cyclohexylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bis-piperidiniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis...103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 6x103 Tri, s-methyl ammoni um- hexabromobismuthate (III) 355 7. 5x103 7, 2x103 7 ~ 5xl03 7, 6x103 7. 5x103 20 TABLE III CONTINUED Tris-dimethylammonium- hexabromobismuthate (III) Tris...

Osborne, James Ferrell

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

418

Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors....

419

MIT Lincoln Laboratory Plasma and Ions-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

them anions · Fire, lightning, fluorescent lamps, and the Sun and stars all contain plasma ­ In fact include fluorescent lamps, neon signs, plasma globes, plasma TVs ­ They easily form at room temperature lightning carbon arc nuclear blast #12;MIT Lincoln LaboratoryPlasma and Ions-4 A. Siegel 5/12/07 How Does

Wurtman, Richard

420

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in-troduced into plasmas as aerosols gener-ated...injected into the plasma has been achieved...sample, the sampling area being defined by...transported to the plasma by the same argon...impossible to attain in non-ICP plasma systems...along with the thermal expansion thrust...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nonlinear Mixing of Electromagnetic Waves in Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nc, where ne is the plasma density and n, is...regions X(3) ofa plasma can be orders of magnitude larger than those for other...Conclusions The beat-wave plasma interaction is an important...rapidly growing research area in plasma physics and...

V. STEFAN; B. I. COHEN; C. JOSHI

1989-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

TWO DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER SIMULATION OF PLASMA IMMERSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Barroso and M. Ueda Associated Laboratory of Plasma - LAP National Institute for Space Research - INPE #12

423

Tool kit for space plasma physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Tool kit for space plasma physics Most of the Universe is made of plasma. And yet, plasmas atoms and/or molecules. The plasma is the next state: the fourth, reached by furnishing enough energy. But (generally) such is not the case in the thin atmospheric layer of the small planet Earth, where human beings

Demoulin, Pascal

424

Nonlinear Dynamics of Electron Cyclotron Heated Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasmas that are generated and sustained by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been studies experimentally and...

G. E. Guest

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

H IGHLIGHTS PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H IGHLIGHTS PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fiscal Year 1996 #12; This publication highlights activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for fiscal support, see the PPPL fiscal year 1996 Annual Report. About PPPL Established in 1951, the Princeton Plasma

426

Plasma Radiation by Rough Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent observation of a peak of scattered radiation at the plasma frequency from thin metal foils irradiated with light can be explained in terms of a small amount of surface roughness of the foils.

Edward A. Stern

1967-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Plasma transport near material boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

Singer, C.E.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Primary tabs View High Resolution(active tab) Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions inside fusion plasmas Click on an image below to view...

429

Quark-gluon plasma paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

Dariusz Miskowiec

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Newsletters | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the second issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). We are pleased to provide this news of our...

432

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." PPPL engineer Han Zhang shows off a plasma ball to a few of the 400 young women who attended PPPL's Young Women's Conference...

433

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL researchers present cutting edge results at APS Plasma Physics Conference Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select...

434

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as she tries out the Van de Graaff generator at PPPL's Communiversity booth. Clarisse Regnault, 4, right, and sister Charlotte, 8, of Princeton, focus on playing with a plasma ball...

435

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Students try out PPPL plasma physics experiment that can be accessed from anywhere in the world Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the...

436

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Primary tabs View High Resolution(active tab) Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics Click on an image below to view the high resolution...

437

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL receives 4.3 million to increase understanding of the role that plasma plays in synthesizing nanoparticles Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then...

438

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Stewart Prager, director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, gives the opening talk Nov. 14 at the third annual...

439

Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Transport equations in tokamak plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tokamak plasma transport equations are usually obtained by flux surface averaging the collisional Braginskii equations. However, tokamak plasmas are not in collisional regimes. Also, ad hoc terms are added for neoclassical effects on the parallel Ohm's law, fluctuation-induced transport, heating, current-drive and flow sources and sinks, small magnetic field nonaxisymmetries, magnetic field transients, etc. A set of self-consistent second order in gyroradius fluid-moment-based transport equations for nearly axisymmetric tokamak plasmas has been developed using a kinetic-based approach. The derivation uses neoclassical-based parallel viscous force closures, and includes all the effects noted above. Plasma processes on successive time scales and constraints they impose are considered sequentially: compressional Alfven waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium, ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along field lines, incompressible flows within a flux surface), and collisions (electrons, parallel Ohm's law; ions, damping of poloidal flow). Radial particle fluxes are driven by the many second order in gyroradius toroidal angular torques on a plasma species: seven ambipolar collision-based ones (classical, neoclassical, etc.) and eight nonambipolar ones (fluctuation-induced, polarization flows from toroidal rotation transients, etc.). The plasma toroidal rotation equation results from setting to zero the net radial current induced by the nonambipolar fluxes. The radial particle flux consists of the collision-based intrinsically ambipolar fluxes plus the nonambipolar fluxes evaluated at the ambipolarity-enforcing toroidal plasma rotation (radial electric field). The energy transport equations do not involve an ambipolar constraint and hence are more directly obtained. The 'mean field' effects of microturbulence on the parallel Ohm's law, poloidal ion flow, particle fluxes, and toroidal momentum and energy transport are all included self-consistently. The final comprehensive equations describe radial transport of plasma toroidal rotation, and poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, as well as the usual particle and energy transport.

Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermodynamics of a dusty plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, we develop the thermodynamics of a dusty plasma and give an equation of state for two cases: (a) when the dust forms a stationary background and the charge on the grain does not vary and (b) when the dust charge fluctuates either due to the fluctuations in the electron and ion number densities or due to the dust density variation. Application of the results to the various space plasma situations has been indicated.

B. P. Pandey

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electrostatic interaction in dusty plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two modifications of the standard description of electrostatic interaction in a dusty plasma are emphasized. First, the Coulomb-type potential profile is not applicable at very short distances around a dust grain, due to the polarization of the charge on the grain, i.e., the image charge effect, and, second, at larger distances, the standard Debye-Hückel potential screening is modified due to nonlinear corrections in the expanded Boltzmann distribution for plasma particles.

J. Vranješ; M. Y. Tanaka; B. P. Pandey; M. Kono

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Computational simulation of plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The movement and shaping of the plasma sheet in a plasma focus is modeled by means of finite elements. The sheet is represented by conical segments carrying mass internal energy and momentum. The Lorentz force accelerates each element in its normal direction which leads to the continuous reshaping of the sheet. Tracking techniques should be applied to the nodes between the elements in order to avoid numerical instabilities. The results are compared against experimental data showing good agreement.

G. Correa-Reina; F. Casanova; M. Vénere; C. Moreno; H. Bruzzone; A. Clausse

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 35, NO. 3, JUNE 2007 693 Atmospheric Plasma Actuators for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 35, NO. 3, JUNE 2007 693 Atmospheric Plasma Actuators- charges, flow control. I. INTRODUCTION PLASMA, operating in atmospheric pressure air conditions, holds atmospheric plasma that mainly consists of nitrogen/oxygen plasma components, which are coupled to an electric

Huang, Xun

445

Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas Natalia Y of capacitively coupled plasma reactors with a wafer-focus ring gap. The penetration of plasma generated species i.e., ions and radicals into the wafer-focus ring gap is discussed. We found that the penetration of plasma

Kushner, Mark

446

Fusion Basics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Basics What is Plasma? Plasma is a state of matter along with solids, liquids and gases. It consists of a partially-ionized gas, containing ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. So what does that mean? In a plasma, some electrons are freed from their atoms, allowing current and electricity to flow. In fact, one of the few naturally-occurring plasmas found here on Earth is lightning! Can you think of other plasmas? Fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury plasma. Stars, such as the sun are hot balls of plasma. Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis Fusion reactors, like NSTX, use plasma to fuse atoms to make energy. Plasma displays use small cells of plasma to illuminate images. What is Fusion? Light atoms like hydrogen (one proton and one neutron) can fuse together so

447

Radioluminescence of curium(III) in solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioluminescence of curium(III) under the action of the intrinsic ..cap alpha..-radiation was studied in aqueous, heavy water, and organic solutions. The luminescence maximum falls at lambda approx. 600 nm. The yield of radioluminescence G is proportional to the concentration (or electronic fraction) of curium, and for a 10/sup -2/ M aqueous solution of Cm(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, G approx. 5 x 10/sup -4/ quanta per 100 eV of absorbed energy. In dilute acids the yield of radioluminescence is the same as in neutral solution, but in concentrated acid it is substantially changed. In the presence of ligands (formate, acetate, citrate ions, and others), the yield of the radioluminescence of curium in aqueous solutions increases, which is associated with complex formation, leading to a decrease in the quenching of excited curium by water molecules. The intensification of the radioluminescence of curium in the presence of sodium paratungstate is especially great; it is suggested that in this case a significant role is played by energy transfer from the ligand to curium. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/NH/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/OH, Ce/sup (IV)/, and uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in various oxidation states have no great influence on the radioluminescence of curium. Its quenching by NpO/sub 2//sup +/ ions is somewhat greater than by other actinide ions and is associated with the formation of cation-cation complexes of NpO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with Cm/sup 3 +/. In heavy water and organic solutions, a substantial increase in the radioluminescence yield of curium is observed, which is in good agreement with the data on photoluminescence. The results obtained suggest that the radioluminescence of curium in solutions (in the absence of energy-donor ligands) is excited mainly directly, while the role of energy transfer to curium from the solvent or its radiolysis products is negligible.

Yusov, A.B.; Perminov, V.P.; Krot, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

CA Wang

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Plasma catalytic reforming of methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This article describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius), and a high degree of dissociation and a substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (40% H2, 17% CO2 and 33% N2, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2–3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H2 with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content (?1.5%) with power densities of ?30 kW (H2 HHV)/l of reactor, or ?10 m3/h H2 per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

L Bromberg; D.R Cohn; A Rabinovich; N Alexeev

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electric field divertor plasma pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electric field divertor plasma pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

Schaffer, M.J.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV cell-and then worked with industry to develop the industry-standard GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge) technology. III-V multijunction cells, which address both space and terrestrial power needs, have achieved the highest energy conversion efficiencies of all PV cells, with the current record exceeding 40%.

453

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin- phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility General Information Name GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility Facility GEM Resources III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 3300 East Evan Hewes Highway Location Holtville, California Zip 92250 Coordinates 32.776035405529°, -115.26321172714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.776035405529,"lon":-115.26321172714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Creek III Wind Farm Panther Creek III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek III Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location TX Coordinates 31.9685988°, -99.9018131° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9685988,"lon":-99.9018131,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA Regulations, the last version appeared in the Federal Register of Friday, December 21,1984 (49 FR 49754). Note: The specfic contact information is outdated and should not be used for consultation or outreach. Appendix I - Federal and Federal-State Agency NEPA Contacts Appendix II - Federal and Federal- State Agencies With Jurisdiction by Law or Special Expertise on Environmental Quality Issues Appendix III - Federal and Federal-State Agency Offices for

457

Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (EUI) Wind Farm III (EUI) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Energy Unlimited Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157583013418°, -115.63876390457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157583013418,"lon":-115.63876390457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Spontaneity and Equilibrium III: A History of Misinformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneity and Equilibrium III: A History of Misinformation ... Upper-Division Undergraduate; Graduate Education/Research; Chemical Engineering; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Misconceptions/Discrepant Events; Equilibrium; Nomenclature/Units/Symbols; Thermodynamics ...

Lionel M. Raff

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

Aalberts, Daniel P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Part III - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Modification No. 229 Attachment 1 Page 1 of 7 PART III - SECTION J APPENDIX G May 13, 2013 Modified by Modification No. A009, A015, A018, A019, A021, A027, M033, M041, M042,...

462

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Sandia National Laboratories: III-Nitride core-shell nanowire...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sector III-Nitride core-shell nanowire arrayed solar cells On April 27, 2012, in Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting In a new EFRC-supported...

464

Index of substances for Volume III/27I4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume I4 'Inosilicates' of Volume 27 'Magnetic properties of non-metallic inorganic compounds based on transition elements' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III Condensed Matter. It co...

W. Polzin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

Smith III, Julius Orion

466

EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

467

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Facility Pyron (Roscoe III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Near Roscoe TX Coordinates 32.354161°, -100.344825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.354161,"lon":-100.344825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

468

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II & III II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.839104°, -162.556894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.839104,"lon":-162.556894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

5 - Surface Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter summarizes the advantages of the surface wave (SW) plasma sources. It includes a summary of the wave and plasma properties of SW sustained plasma columns, review of the essential parts composing a SW plasma source; describes a family of efficient SW launchers for such plasma sources, dwells on three typical experimental arrangements and a brief summary recalling the advantages of SW plasma sources. Surface wave discharges have the advantage of the broadest operating conditions in terms of frequency, tube dimensions and shape, and gas pressure. For example they can be utilized over both the RF (radiofrequency) and microwave domains, which permits one to optimize given processes as a function of frequency (generally through changes in the electron energy distribution function). A further advantage of SW plasmas is that they are the best modeled HF plasmas. This provides insight into HF discharges in general since, to a first approximation, the local plasma properties of SW discharges are the same as in all RF and microwave discharges under given discharge conditions, and for a given HF power density deposited in the plasma. Compared to other RF and microwave plasma sources, SW discharges are undoubtedly the most flexible ones. They also are efficient discharges since very little HF power is lost in the impedance matching circuit. Finally, a major future avenue for these discharges is their operation as magnetized plasmas. As a first approach to presenting surface wave (SW) plasma sources, let us consider their distinctive features with respect to the other plasma sources described in the book:o1. The discharge can be sustained far away from the active zone of the field applicator. This is because the electric field supporting the discharge is provided by a wave that carries away the power from the applicator. It is an electromagnetic surface wave whose sole guiding structure is the plasma column that it sustains and the dielectric tube enclosing it [1]–[3]. This is, thus, a non-cumbersome method for producing long plasma columns; plasma columns up to 6 meters in length have been achieved in our laboratory while launching the wave with a field applicator that surrounded the discharge tube over a few centimeters in length only. [4][5] 2. The range of the applied field frequency f=?/2? is the broadest of all kinds of high frequency (HF) sustained plasma sources. We have succeeded in realizing HF power transfer to the discharge efficiently from approximately 10 \\{MHz\\} to 10 \\{GHz\\} [6] and, with impaired coupling efficiency, down to 200 kHz [7]. This frequency range includes radiofrequencies (RF) and the lower part of the microwave frequency spectrum; we use the term high frequencies to designate RF as well as microwave frequencies. An interesting aspect of this frequency flexibility is the possibility of acting on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to optimize a given plasma process [8]. 3. The gas pressure range is extremely large. On the one hand, one can operate SW discharges in the sub-mtorr range under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions, [9] while, on the other hand, it is possible to sustain a stable plasma of a few millimeters diameter at pressures at least a few times atmospheric pressure [10]. 4. The range of plasma, density, n, is very large. At reduced pressure and with f in the few \\{MHz\\} range, n, can be as low as 108 cm?3, [7] while at atmospheric pressure it can exceed 1015 cm?3[10] A related parameter is the degree of ionization ?i, i.e. the plasma density relative to the initial neutral atom concentration. Under ECR conditions, for example with f=2.45 \\{GHz\\} where n can reach up to a few 1012 cm?3, ?i ranges approximately from 0.1–10%, whereas in the above-mentioned atmospheric pressure case, it is smaller than 10?4. The higher n, the higher the rate of plasma processes depending on ions or on neutral particles (e.g., atoms, radicals) when the latter are obtained through electron collisions [8]. Large ?i values favor the existence of

Michel Moisan; Joëlle Margot; Zenon Zakrzewski

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

193 nm PR does not roughen. However, roughness increasesto either smooth or further roughen features. Plasma-inducedshow 193 nm PR does not roughen with VUV- only exposures. A

Titus, Monica Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of electron heating on a 6.4 GHz ECR ion source 3.114 GHz Advanced Electron Cyclotron Source-Upgraded (AECR-U).spectra in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas,”

Noland, Jonathan David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and

474

Volume III, Chapter 15 Red-eyed Vireo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Chapter 15 Red-eyed Vireo #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 14.0 RED-EYED VIREO (VIREO OLIVACEUS ........................................................................................................... 15-11 #12;RED-EYED VIREO III, 15-1 May 2004 15.0 Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 15.1 Introduction by many other species. The red-eyed vireo (Vireo olivaceus) is strongly associated with riparian and wet

475

Polymorphous Transformations of Nanometric Iron(III) Oxide: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of its polymorphism, iron(III) oxide (ferric oxide, Fe2O3) is one of the most interesting and potentially useful phases of the iron oxides. ... Structural and magnetic properties, methods of synthesis, and applications of seven Fe(III) oxide polymorphs, including rare beta, epsilon, amorphous, and high-pressure forms, are reviewed. ... Films of ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by oxidizing Fe films rapidly in air. ...

Libor Machala; Ji?í Tu?ek; Radek Zbo?il

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Characteristics of plasma properties in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed plasma thrusters are electric space propulsion devices which create a highly transient plasma bulk in a short-time arc discharge that is expelled to create thrust. The transitional character and the dependency on the discharge properties are yet to be elucidated. In this study, optical emission spectroscopy and Mach-Zehnder interferometry are applied to investigate the plasma properties in variation of time, space, and discharge energy. Electron temperature, electron density, and Knudsen numbers are derived for the plasma bulk and discussed. Temperatures were found to be in the order of 1.7 to 3.1 eV, whereas electron densities showed maximum values of more than 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Both values showed strong dependency on the discharge voltage and were typically higher closer to the electrodes. Capacitance and time showed less influence. Knudsen numbers were derived to be in the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, thus, indicating a continuum flow behavior in the main plasma bulk.

Schoenherr, Tony; Nees, Frank; Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Herdrich, Georg [Institute of Space Systems (IRS), University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

[Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma]: Progress report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the study of plasma collection by obstacles in a tokamak edge plasma, the effect of anomalous transport have been examined using an extension of the 2D fluid code developed here previously (Appendices A and B). The origin of the anomalous transport is assumed to be a randomly fluctuating electric field such as would be caused by drift waves. As before, the magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and perpendicular to the obstacle, which is taken to be an infinite strip. In the absence of ambient plasma flow, the numerical results indicate that ion viscous heating is important near the tip of the obstacle, where there is a large velocity gradient in the flow. For typical plasma parameters, the maximum ion temperature near the tip is up to 85% higher than the ambient ion temperature. When there is a subsonic plasma flow past the obstacle, the numerical results indicate that, near the tip of the obstacle, the ions on the downstream side are hotter than those on the upstream side. Furthermore, the ion density is higher on the upstream side. A detailed report of this work has been prepared and will be submitted as part of the Annual Progress Report. Recently, the 2D parallel electrostatic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code described in reference (9) (Appendix B) has been upgraded to a 2D fully electromagnetic PIC code. This code has been successfully tested on the JPL/Caltech Mark III Hypercube concurrent computers and can be used to simulate interactions of electromagnetic waves with a magnetized plasma. It is currently applied to investigate the decay of large amplitude Alfven waves, such as those observed in the solar wind. Large amplitude Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, are predicted to decay into obliquely propagating daughter waves and standing magnetosonic waves. Results from the simulations will be compared with theoretical predictions.

Not Available

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Dynamics of the structure of the plasma current sheath in a plasma focus discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study is aimed at investigating the fine structure of the plasma current sheath (PCS) in the PF-3 plasma focus facility. The PCS dynamics in a deuterium...

V. I. Krauz; K. N. Mitrofanov; V. V. Myalton; V. P. Vinogradov…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Experimental studies of al corona plasma created within the PF-100 plasma focus facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on plasma focus (PF) current sheath interaction with a ... the PF electrode axis. A stable corona plasma was created around the wire which appeared...

M. Scholz; L. Karpinski; K. Tomaszewski; M. Paduch…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii non-thermal plasma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

Hogan, Mark

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

482

154th National American Chemical Society Meeting Chicago, III. Sept. 10 to 15, 1967  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

154th National American Chemical Society Meeting Chicago, III. ... Copyright © 1967 American Chemical Society ...

1967-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

Geddes, Cameron G.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam EnergyStaging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way ofcompact laser-plasma accelerators to generate particle

Panasenko, Dmitriy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vapor deposition in the atmospheric glow plasma [100, 101].years, plasma processing at atmospheric and near-atmosphericHigh (near atmospheric) pressure microwave plasma sources

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vapor deposition in the atmospheric glow plasma [100, 101].High (near atmospheric) pressure microwave plasma sources7. Large area plasma at atmospheric or near-atmospheric

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Ferroelectric plasma thruster for microspacecraft propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a technology in microthruster design: the ferroelectric plasma thruster (FEPT). The FEPT utilizes an applied rf electric field to create plasma on the surface of a ferroelectric dielectric. Acceleration of ions from this plasma provides thrust. Advantages of the FEPT include emission of both electrons and ions leading to self-neutralization, creation of plasma, and acceleration of ions with a single power supply, and application of thrust in a short amount of time. We present the concept of the thruster, operational physics, as well as experimental results demonstrating plasma creation and ion acceleration. These results along with plasma spectroscopy allow us to calculate thruster parameters.

Kemp, Mark A.; Kovaleski, Scott D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Plasma Production via Field Ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

490

Nonlinear dynamics and plasma transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report details work done on a program in nonlinear dynamical aspects of plasma turbulence and transport funded by DOE since 1989. This program has been in cooperation with laboratories in theUSSR [now Russia and the Confederation of Independent States (CIS)]. The purpose of this program has been: To promote the utilization of recent pathbreaking developments in nonlinear science in plasma turbulence and transport. To promote cooperative scientific investigations between the US and CIS in the related areas of nonlinear science and plasma turbulence and transport. In the work reported in our progress report, we have studied simple models which are motivated by observation on actual fusion devices. The models focus on the important physical processes without incorporating the complexity of the geometry of real devices. This allows for a deeper analysis and understanding of the system both analytically and numerically.

Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Finn, J.M.; Guzdar, P.N.; Hassam, A.B.; Sageev, R.Z.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Plasma catalytic reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Alexeev, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.