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Sample records for iii non-thermal plasma

  1. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and ...

  2. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust ...

  3. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  4. Single-Step Non-Thermal Plasma Synthesis of 3C-SiC Nanoparticles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Single-Step Non-Thermal Plasma Synthesis of 3C-SiC Nanoparticles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Single-Step Non-Thermal Plasma Synthesis of 3C-SiC Nanoparticles ...

  5. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2 2002_deer_hughes2.pdf (523.79 KB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4

  6. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exhaust particulates and NOx | Department of Energy thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Accentus 2003_deer_mcadams.pdf (445.66 KB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy -

  7. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002_deer_hughes1.pdf (1.06 MB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2

  8. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002_deer_hughes3.pdf (620.67 KB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2

  9. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 4 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002_deer_hughes4.pdf (330.26 KB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3

  10. Feasibility analysis report for hybrid non-thermal plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1998-01-15

    The purpose of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Examples of NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel-engine powered electrical generators. Examples of VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint-stripping, and parts cleaning. Because pollutant-containing air-emission streams within the Department of Defense (DoD) frequently span a broad range of pollutant concentrations, flow rates, and gas conditions (e.g., temperature, humidity), a single type of NTP reactor is not expected to fit all types of emissions streams. Additionally, stand-alone NTP reactors may provide neither an adequate means of pollutant removal nor an acceptable economic solution. Therefore, hybrid systems (combinations of different NTP reactor types or architectures), which employ adsorbents and/or catalytic media are being examined by researchers in this field. This report is intended to provide a preliminary summary analysis of a few representative hybrid systems as a means of introducing the hybrid or staged-system concept.

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  12. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transient and Steady State Conditions | Department of Energy Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Delphi Corporation 2002_deer_bonadies.pdf (430.62 KB) More Documents & Publications A Parametric Study of the Effect of Temperature and Hydrocarbon Species on the Product Distribution from a

  13. Comparison of non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-01-11

    Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in atmospheric-pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Recent laboratory-scale experiments show that the electron beam method is remarkably more energy efficient than competing non-thermal plasma techniques based on pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge plasma. Preliminary cost analysis based on these data also show that the electron beam method may be cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  14. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  15. Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, Louis A.; Ferreri, Vincent; Kim, Yongho

    2009-04-21

    The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

  16. UBIQUITOUS NON-THERMALS IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.

    2013-06-10

    This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v{sub 2}(K{sub e} )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v{sub 2} {identical_to} w(15/8K{sub e} ){sup 1/4} will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally K{sub e} (s) {<=} 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of K{sub e} along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The non-thermal regime K{sub e} > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

  17. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  18. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslami, Esmaeil Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-15

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio σ, non-thermal parameters β and γ, electron to ion density ratio μ, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  19. First report on non-thermal plasma reactor scaling criteria and optimization models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.

    1998-01-13

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Example NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel engine powered electrical generators. Example VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint stripping, and parts cleaning. To design and build NTP reactors that are optimized for particular DoD applications, one must understand the basic decomposition chemistry of the target compound(s) and how the decomposition of a particular chemical species depends on the air emissions stream parameters and the reactor operating parameters. This report is intended to serve as an overview of the subject of reactor scaling and optimization and will discuss the basic decomposition chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) and two representative VOCs, trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride, and the connection between the basic plasma chemistry, the target species properties, and the reactor operating parameters (in particular, the operating plasma energy density). System architecture, that is how NTP reactors can be combined or ganged to achieve higher capacity, will also be briefly discussed.

  20. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  1. Non-thermal plasma exhaust aftertreatment: Are all plasmas the same?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Hanson, G.R.; Storey, J.M.; Raridon, R.J.; Armfield, J.S.; Bigelow, T.S.; Graves, R.L.

    1997-12-31

    The authors describe initial experiments employing 5.5 GHz pulsed microwave power, which should result in enhanced chemistry compared to present state-of-the-art plasma aftertreatments by; reducing plasma electric field shielding, increasing availability of atomic nitrogen, exploiting surface charging of dielectrics, avoiding (low field) threshold initiated discharges, and achieving a higher high energy tail on the electron distribution function. As an example, the authors decided to test for NO reduction in N{sub 2}. While this reaction is not a complete description of the exhaust issues by any means, they thought it would demonstrate the technology proposed.

  2. Dust-acoustic shock formation in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-01-15

    In this study, the nonlinear Burgers equation in the presence of the dust charge fluctuation is derived and the shock-like solution is determined. It is well known that in order to have a monotonic or oscillatory shock wave, a source of dissipation is needed. By using the experimental data reported in the laboratory observation of self-excited dust-acoustic shock waves [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 115002 (2009)], it is shown that dust charge fluctuation can be considered as a candidate for the source of dissipation needed for the dust-acoustic shock formation. By examining the effects of non-thermal ions on dust-acoustic shock's characteristics, a possible theoretical explanation for the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment is proposed.

  3. NOVEL COMPOSITE HYDROGEN-PERMEABLE MEMBRANES FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS FOR THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Ji-Jun Zhang; Guibing Zhao; Robyn J. Alcanzare; Linna Wang; Ovid A. Plumb

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Experiments involving methane conversion reactions were conducted with a preliminary pulsed corona discharge reactor design in order to test and improve the reactor and membrane designs using a non-toxic reactant. This report details the direct methane conversion experiments to produce hydrogen, acetylene, and higher hydrocarbons utilizing a co-axial cylinder (CAC) corona discharge reactor, pulsed with a thyratron switch. The reactor was designed to accommodate relatively high flow rates (655 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/s) representing a pilot scale easily converted to commercial scale. Parameters expected to influence methane conversion including pulse frequency, charge voltage, capacitance, residence time, and electrode material were investigated. Conversion, selectivity and energy consumption were measured or estimated. C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon products were analyzed with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). In order to obtain quantitative results, the complex sample spectra were de-convoluted via a linear least squares method. Methane conversion as high as 51% was achieved. The products are typically 50%-60% acetylene, 20% propane, 10% ethane and ethylene, and 5% propylene. First Law thermodynamic energy efficiencies for the system (electrical and reactor) were estimated to range from 38% to 6%, with the highest efficiencies occurring at short residence time and low power input (low specific energy) where conversion is the lowest (less than 5%). The highest methane conversion of 51% occurred at a

  4. Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-05-15

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

  5. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aardahl, Christopher L.; Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou; Chanda, Ashok; Habeger, Craig F.; Koshkarian, Kent A.; Park, Paul W.

    2006-07-25

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  6. The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vias, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 ; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2014-01-15

    Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electronproton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

  7. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-01-21

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species, rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N{sub 2}(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N{sub 2}(C-B,0-0) and N{sub 2}(B-X,0-0) as well as measured current, the electron density, which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission, reaches a maximum value of 5.6??10{sup 20}/m{sup 3}.

  8. Economic assessment of proposed electric-discharge non-thermal plasma field-pilot demonstration units for NO{sub x} removal in jet-engine exhaust: White paper for SERDP Project CP-1038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Chang, J.S.; Urashima, Kuniko; Kim, S.J.; Miziolek, A.W.

    1999-01-05

    This project is currently evaluating non-thermal plasma (NTP) technologies for treating jet-engine exhaust arising from DoD test facilities. In the past, some economic analyses for NTP de-NO{sub x} have shown that it is not economical, compared to other techniques. The main reasons for this conclusion was that the previous analyses examined stand-alone, or less mature electrical-discharge reactors, or electron-beam based systems that incorporated both chemical additives and quite expensive electron accelerators. Also, in contrast to more recent developments, both the discharge and electron-beam techniques of the past did not extensively incorporate methods to increase the yields of active NO{sub x}-decomposing species. In an earlier White paper and a Project Report, the authors have analyzed the costs of more mature NTP systems incorporating chemical additives and new-concept NTP technologies for jet-engine emissions control and have shown lower exhaust-gas treatment costs for NTP systems compared to baseline standard de-NO{sub x} technologies like Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) combined with a wet scrubber or SCR combined with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). In this paper, the authors will examine their most-promising candidate NTP reactor systems for a field-pilot demonstration on jet-engine exhaust and discuss the economic analyses for these hybrid units, which show that the economics of the proposed candidate systems are more favorable than earlier NTP reactor economic-assessment conclusions for NO{sub x} removal.

  9. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  10. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III .. III A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANAL.OGUE STATES IN 41K AND 23 Na by George A lbert Keyworth II Department of Physics Duke University A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Duke University 1968 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANALOGUE STATES IN 41 K - AND 23 Na ,. by George Albert Keyworth II

  11. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  12. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, S., E-mail: pshishir@ipr.res.in; Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  13. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Hsiao, Mark C.; Wallman, P. Henrik; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    1998-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO.sub.x reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts.

  14. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1998-01-27

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  15. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J.; Moffat, H.K.

    1996-02-01

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  16. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  17. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. III. The free energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2009-04-15

    We explore further the classical quark-gluon plasma using methods from classical liquids. The partition function of an ensemble of SU(N{sub c}) colored charge spheres is constructed. We analyze it using a cumulant expansion (low density) and a loop expansion (high temperature) after resumming the Debye screening effects. The pertinent free energies are derived in both limits and compared with recent molecular dynamics results.

  18. Hydrodynamic simulation of non-thermal pressure profiles of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2014-09-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find that the non-thermal pressure fraction profile is universal across redshift when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe instead of the commonly used critical density. We also find that the non-thermal pressure is predominantly radial, and the gas velocity anisotropy profile exhibits strong universality when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe. However, we find that the non-thermal pressure fraction is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate of the galaxy cluster. We provide fitting formulae for the universal non-thermal pressure fraction and velocity anisotropy profiles of gas in galaxy clusters, which should be useful in modeling astrophysical uncertainties pertinent to using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  19. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ? 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ? 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  20. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  1. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Burgess, J.; Preece, Robert D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ryde, Felix; Axelsson, Magnus [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veres, Peter; Mszros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, P. N.; Pelassa, Veronique [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Iyyani, Shabnam [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Goldstein, Adam [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Paciesas, William S., E-mail: jmichaelburgess@gmail.com, E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, E-mail: npp@astro.psu.edu [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal ?-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E {sub p} and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E {sub p}?T {sup ?} which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index ? indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  2. SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

  3. An alternative to the plasma emission model: Particle-in-cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2011-05-15

    High-resolution (sub-Debye length grid size and 10 000 particle species per cell), 1.5D particle-in-cell, relativistic, fully electromagnetic simulations are used to model electromagnetic wave emission generation in the context of solar type III radio bursts. The model studies generation of electromagnetic waves by a super-thermal, hot beam of electrons injected into a plasma thread that contains uniform longitudinal magnetic field and a parabolic density gradient. In effect, a single magnetic line connecting Sun to Earth is considered, for which five cases are studied. (i) We find that the physical system without a beam is stable and only low amplitude level electromagnetic drift waves (noise) are excited. (ii) The beam injection direction is controlled by setting either longitudinal or oblique electron initial drift speed, i.e., by setting the beam pitch angle (the angle between the beam velocity vector and the direction of background magnetic field). In the case of zero pitch angle, i.e., when v-vector{sub b{center_dot}}E-vector{sub perpendicular}=0, the beam excites only electrostatic, standing waves, oscillating at local plasma frequency, in the beam injection spatial location, and only low level electromagnetic drift wave noise is also generated. (iii) In the case of oblique beam pitch angles, i.e., when v-vector{sub b{center_dot}}E-vector{sub perpendicular}=0, again electrostatic waves with same properties are excited. However, now the beam also generates the electromagnetic waves with the properties commensurate to type III radio bursts. The latter is evidenced by the wavelet analysis of transverse electric field component, which shows that as the beam moves to the regions of lower density and hence lower plasma frequency, frequency of the electromagnetic waves drops accordingly. (iv) When the density gradient is removed, an electron beam with an oblique pitch angle still generates the electromagnetic radiation. However, in the latter case no frequency

  4. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy quark three-body collisional energy loss in quark-gluon plasma...... III-1 C. M. Ko and Wei Liu Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy ion ...

  5. Preradiation studies for non-thermal Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B.; Mock, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing non-thermal radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of non-thermal radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.

  6. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  7. Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-01-17

    Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

  9. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement by circularly polarized electromagnetic field in toroidal geometry Vladimir A. Svidzinski University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA ͑Received 21 May 2007; accepted 2 July 2007; published online 31 October 2007͒ A novel plasma confinement concept based on plasma confinement by electromagnetic pressure of circularly polarized electromagnetic fields is proposed. Practical implementation of this

  10. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup 1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  11. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heating in reversed field pinches at the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency V. A. Svidzinski and S. C. Prager University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 14 November 2001; accepted 29 January 2002͒ The possibility of plasma heating in reversed field pinches ͑RFP͒ by radio-frequency ͑rf͒ waves at ␻Ϸ␻ ci is studied. A simple cylindrical RFP equilibrium which is symmetric in poloidal and axial directions is considered. RF fields are excited with given poloidal

  12. Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2003_deer_hoard.pdf (210.07 KB) More Documents & Publications Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates

  13. MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew B. Loomis

    2004-05-01

    This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

  14. MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher R. McLaron

    2004-12-01

    Powerspan has conducted pilot scale testing of a multi-pollutant control technology at FirstEnergy's Burger Power Plant under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology, Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO), simultaneously removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and mercury (Hg) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Powerspan's ECO{reg_sign} pilot test program focused on optimization of Hg removal in a 1-MWe slipstream pilot while maintaining greater than 90% removal of NO{sub x} and 98% removal of SO{sub 2}. This Final Technical Report discusses pilot operations, installation and maintenance of the Hg SCEMS instrumentation, and performance results including component and overall removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM and Hg from the flue gas and removal of captured Hg from the co-product fertilizer stream.

  15. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  16. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ? 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (? 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  17. Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2002_deer_hoard.pdf (481.22 KB) More Documents & Publications Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction A Parametric Study of the Effect of Temperature and Hydrocarbon Species on the Product Distribution from a Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor Development of NOx Adsorber System for Dodge Ram 2007 Heavy duty Pickup Truck

  18. Generation of atomic hydrogen during radio-frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy of III-V dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fotkatzikis, A.; Pinault, M.-A.; Freundlich, A.

    2004-09-27

    The interaction of a typical gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy (GSMBE) environment with a radio-frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source is investigated. In particular, a real-time in situ analysis of the evolution of the emission spectrum of an RF nitrogen plasma source, under high partial pressures of hydrogen ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr), is presented. Hydrogen, emanating from the decomposition of hydride precursors in GSMBE, results in the appearance of a sharp emission peak at the region of 656 nm in the plasma spectrum, suggesting the generation of atomic hydrogen species in the nitrogen plasma cavity. The intensity of this peak is used for a qualitative evaluation of this interaction and its evolution as a function of the RF nitrogen plasma source conditions is investigated.

  19. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  20. The extent of non-thermal particle acceleration in relativistic, electron-positron reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Greg; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    Reconnection is studied as an explanation for high-energy flares from the Crab Nebula. The production of synchrotron emission >100 MeV challenges classical models of acceleration. 3D simulation shows that reconnection, converting magnetic energy to kinetic energy, can accelerate beyond γrad. The power-law index and high-energy cutoff are important for understanding the radiation spectrum dN/dγ = f(γ) ∝ γ. α and cutoff were measured vs. L and σ, where L is system (simulation) size and σ is upstream magnetization (σ = B2/4πnmc2). α can affect the high-energy cutoff. In conclusion, for collisionless relativistic reconnection in electron-positron plasma, without guide field, nb/nd=0.1: (1) relativistic magnetic reconnection yields power-law particle spectra, (2) the power law index decreases as σ increases, approaching ≈1.2. (3) the power law is cut off at an energy related to acceleration within a single current layer, which is proportional to the current layer length (for small systems, that length is the system length, yielding γc2 ≈ 0.1 L/ρ0; for large systems, the layer length is limited by secondary tearing instability, yielding γc1 ≈ 4σ; the transition from small to large is around L/ρ0 = 40σ.). (4) although the large-system energy cutoff is proportional to the average energy per particle, it is significantly higher than the average energy per particle.

  1. Non-thermal effects on femtosecond laser ablation of polymers extracted from the oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of transparent polymers were examined using time-resolved reflectivity. When these polymers were irradiated by a pump pulse with fluence above the ablation threshold of 0.8–2.0 J/cm{sup 2}, we observed the oscillation of the reflectivity caused by the interference between the reflected probe pulses from the sample surface and the thin layer due to the non-thermal photomechanical effects of spallation. As the fluence of the pump pulse increased, the separation velocity of the thin layer increased from 6 km/s to the asymptotic value of 11 km/s. It is suggested that the velocities are determined by shock-wave velocities of the photo-excited layer.

  2. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  3. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University

  4. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J TOC i PART III List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J - List of Attachments Table of Contents Attachment No: Attachment: J.1 Appendix A - Advance Understandings on Human Resources J.2 Appendix B - Performance and Evaluation Measurement Plan J.3 Appendix C - Special Financial Institution Account Agreement J.4 Appendix D - Budget Program J.5 Appendix E - PPPL DOE (Lessee) Ingrants J.6 Appendix F - Contractor Resources, Commitments and

  5. Exhaust system with emissions storage device and plasma reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoard, John W.

    1998-01-01

    An exhaust system for a combustion system, comprising a storage device for collecting NO.sub.x, hydrocarbon, or particulate emissions, or mixture of these emissions, and a plasma reactor for destroying the collected emissions is described. After the emission is collected in by the storage device for a period of time, the emission is then destroyed in a non-thermal plasma generated by the plasma reactor. With respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust stream, the storage device must be located before the terminus of the plasma reactor, and it may be located wholly before, overlap with, or be contained within the plasma reactor.

  6. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatt, B.

    2000-08-20

    Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work

  7. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  8. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  9. Staff Accountant III | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    general ledger account balances. This includes conducting periodic internal report and balance sheet analysis reviews with the Manager of General Accounting and Payroll and the...

  10. THE LACK OF DIFFUSE, NON-THERMAL HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN THE COMA CLUSTER: THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE'S EYE VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Okajima, Takashi; Tueller, Jack; Finoguenov, Alexis; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Clarke, Tracy E.

    2011-02-01

    The Coma Cluster of galaxies hosts the brightest radio halo known and has therefore been the target of numerous searches for associated inverse Compton (IC) emission, particularly at hard X-ray energies where the IC signal must eventually dominate over thermal emission. The most recent search with the Suzaku Hard X-ray Detector failed to confirm previous IC detections with RXTE and BeppoSAX, instead setting an upper limit 2.5 times below their non-thermal flux. However, this discrepancy can be resolved if the IC emission is very extended, beyond the scale of the cluster radio halo. Using reconstructed sky images from the 58-month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey, the feasibility of such a solution is investigated. Building on Renaud et al., we test and implement a method for extracting the fluxes of extended sources, assuming specified spatial distributions. BAT spectra are jointly fit with an XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum derived from mosaic observations. We find no evidence for large-scale IC emission at the level expected from the previously detected non-thermal fluxes. For all non-thermal spatial distributions considered, which span the gamut of physically reasonable IC models, we determine upper limits for which the largest (most conservative) limit is {approx}<4.2 x 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (20-80 keV), which corresponds to a lower limit on the magnetic field B > 0.2 {mu} G. A nominal flux upper limit of <2.7 x 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, with corresponding B > 0.25 {mu} G, is derived for the most probable IC distribution given the size of the radio halo and likely magnetic field radial profile.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  12. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.

  13. Doublet III neutral beam power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

  14. WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Texas A&M University College Station, TX February 12-16, 2005 WCI-III Steering Committee Philippe Chomaz Francesca Gulminelli Joe Natowitz Sherry Yennello

  15. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. W. Zhang Thermal charm production in quark-gluon plasma at LHC......from strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma......

  16. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (? ? 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (? {sub T} ? 10{sup 3}-10{sup 2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup 1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at ? {sub T} ? 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; 3 < ? < 3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  17. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy...

  18. Fate of SO{sub 2} During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-10-25

    Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} to achieve efficient reduction of NO{sub x} and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO{sub 2} is also active in converting SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without oxidizing SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO{sub 2}.

  19. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers: Solid-State Lighting Science Center for Frontiers of ... III-Nitride Nanowires HomeEnergy ResearchEFRCsSolid-State Lighting Science EFRC...

  20. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the phase-space integral ...III-1 I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy The evaluation of V ud , experiment and theory ......

  1. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  2. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  3. A DETAILED STUDY OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY PROPERTIES AND INTERSTELLAR GAS TOWARD THE γ-RAY SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7–3946

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sano, H.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Sato, J.; Horachi, H.; Kuwahara, T.; Torii, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Inutsuka, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K.; Tanaka, T.; Inoue, T.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Yamazaki, R.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We have carried out a spectral analysis of the Suzaku X-ray data in the 0.4-12 keV range toward the shell-type very high-energy γ-ray supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7–3946. The aims of this analysis are to estimate detailed X-rays spectral properties at a high angular resolution up to 2 arcmin and to compare them with the interstellar gas. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal and used to calculate absorbing column density, photon index, and absorption-corrected X-ray flux. The photon index varies significantly from 2.1 to 2.9. It is shown that the X-ray intensity is well correlated with the photon index, especially in the west region, with a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The X-ray intensity tends to increase with the averaged interstellar gas density while the dispersion is relatively large. The hardest spectra, with photon indexes of less than 2.4, are found outside of the central 10 arcmin of the SNR, from the north to the southeast (∼430 arcmin{sup 2}) and from the southwest to the northwest (∼150 arcmin{sup 2}). The former region shows low interstellar gas density, while the latter shows high interstellar gas density. We present a discussion of possible scenarios that explain the distribution of the photon index and its relationship with the interstellar gas.

  4. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  5. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  6. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...III-1 A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, V.Z. Goldberg, G. Rogachev, E. Johnson, S. Brown, K. Kemper, A. Momotyuk, and B. Roeder The Trojan Horse Method: an Indirect Technique...

  7. Part III The President

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    III The President Executive Order 13653-Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 05, 2013 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717...

  8. LoCuSS: A COMPARISON OF CLUSTER MASS MEASUREMENTS FROM XMM-NEWTON AND SUBARU-TESTING DEVIATION FROM HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-THERMAL PRESSURE SUPPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Finoguenov, Alexis; Smith, Graham P.; Sanderson, Alastair J. R.; Piffaretti, Rocco; Valdarnini, Riccardo; Evrard, August E.; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2010-03-10

    We compare X-ray hydrostatic and weak-lensing mass estimates for a sample of 12 clusters that have been observed with both XMM-Newton and Subaru. At an over-density of DELTA = 500, we obtain 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.01 +- 0.07 for the whole sample. We also divided the sample into undisturbed and disturbed sub-samples based on quantitative X-ray morphologies using asymmetry and fluctuation parameters, obtaining 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.09 +- 0.06 and -0.06 +- 0.12 for the undisturbed and disturbed clusters, respectively. In addition to non-thermal pressure support, there may be a competing effect associated with adiabatic compression and/or shock heating which leads to overestimate of X-ray hydrostatic masses for disturbed clusters, for example, in the famous merging cluster A1914. Despite the modest statistical significance of the mass discrepancy, on average, in the undisturbed clusters, we detect a clear trend of improving agreement between M {sup X} and M {sup WL} as a function of increasing over-density, M{sup X}/M{sup WL}=(0.908+-0.004)+(0.187+-0.010){center_dot} log{sub 10}(DELTA/500). We also examine the gas mass fractions, f{sub gas} = M {sup gas}/M {sup WL}, finding that they are an increasing function of cluster radius, with no dependence on dynamical state, in agreement with predictions from numerical simulations. Overall, our results demonstrate that XMM-Newton and Subaru are a powerful combination for calibrating systematic uncertainties in cluster mass measurements.

  9. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  10. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  11. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  12. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plasma physics Plasma Physics Almost all of the observable matter in the universe is in the plasma state. Formed at high temperatures, plasmas consist of freely moving ions and free electrons. They are often called the "fourth state of matter" because their unique physical properties distinguish them from solids, liquids and gases. Plasma densities and temperatures vary widely, from the cold gases of interstellar space to the extraordinarily hot, dense cores of stars and inside a

  13. George F. Smoot III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George F. Smoot III About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit ⇒ Navigate Section About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit smoot 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) * Bibliography of Dr. Smoot's Works * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) The October 3, 2006 press conference at Berkeley Lab introducing its newest Nobel Prize winner, George Smoot, to a throng of visiting media is available for viewing online.

  14. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. Iii;.} An Ann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iii;.} An Ann otated Bibli ography of the Red - Coc kaded Woodpecker bv * Jerom e A. Jack son A Publi cati on of the Sava nnah River Plonl Notional En... ironmentol Research Pork PrOQ rom United Stales Dep ortment of Ene r gy An Annotated Bibliography of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker, Picoides borealis Jerome A. Jackson Department of Biological Sciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, Mississippi A Publication of the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park Prepared

  16. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  17. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M280 Attachment 1 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. DIRECTIVE NUMBER DATE DOE DIRECTIVE TITLE APPH Chapter X Revision 10 09/08/98 Accounting Practices & Procedures Handbook Chapter

  18. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  19. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  20. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldn, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  1. SPIDERS Phase III

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPIDERS Phase III John Bothof Burns & McDonnell Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a microgrid is "a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid [and can] connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island-mode." Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a

  2. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January

  3. SECTION III. NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III. NUCLEAR THEORY Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in 28Si and 208Pb A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonances in 28Si, 40Ca, 58Ni, and 116Sn by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance in 58Ni by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets,

  4. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  5. Modification of Doublet III to a large Dee facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, L.G.; Rawls, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Doublet III facility represents a unique opportunity to convert an existing device to a powerful test bed for FED design and operation issues. Such a conversion is made possible by virtue of the demountability of the devices toroidal field coils. Doublet III can be partially disassembled then reassembled with a large dee-shaped vacuum vessel and associated poloidal coils and structure. Doublet III presently possesses or is acquiring adequate auxiliary heating (14 MW of neutral beams and 2 MW of ECH), stored energy (3 GJ), and power conversion equipment (some added field shaping power equipment is required) to support large dee, reactor-level, plasma experiments. The only modifications required of the device are those directly caused by installing a larger vessel - the vessel itself (and its internal protection system); poloidal field coils that interfere with the larger vessel; and a support system for the new vessel and coils.

  6. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  7. Plasma accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  8. Plasma valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Sharma, Sushil; Noonan, John; Rotela, Elbio; Khounsary, Ali

    2003-01-01

    A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

  9. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  10. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  11. Electrical studies and plasma characterization of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated at low frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.

    2013-06-15

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in medical and biological applications. Much work has been devoted to study these applications while comparatively fewer studies appear to be directed to the discharge itself. In this work, in order to better understand the kind of electrical discharge and the plasma states existing in those devices, a study of the electrical characteristics of a typical plasma jet, operated at atmospheric pressure, using either air or argon, is reported. It is found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristics are consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, with a highly collisional cathode sheet. The only exception is the case of argon at the smallest electrode separation studied, around 1 mm in which case the discharge is better modeled as either a non-thermal arc or a high-pressure glow. Also, variations of the electrical behavior at different gas flow rates are interpreted, consistently with the arc model, in terms of the development of fluid turbulence in the external jet.

  12. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location...

  13. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Plasma Physics By leveraging plasma under extreme conditions, we concentrate on solving critical scientific challenges such as detecting smuggled nuclear materials, advancing weapons physics and generating fusion energy. Contact Us Group Leader Ray Leeper Email Deputy Group Leader Julie Canepa Email Group Office (505) 665-9145 Laser-generated neutrons Researchers at Los Alamos have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in

  14. Evidence of radicals created by plasma in bacteria in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chae Bok; Na, Young Ho; Hong, Tae-Eun; Choi, Eun Ha; Uhm, Han S.; Baik, Ku Youn E-mail: gckwon@kw.ac.kr; Kwon, Gichung E-mail: gckwon@kw.ac.kr

    2014-08-18

    Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) was introduced into a non-thermal plasma-jet (NTPJ) device to generate deuterium monoxide (OD) radicals at room temperature. Owing to the similar reactivity and low prevalence of deuterium in nature, OD radicals can be utilized to visualize the OH radical interactions with water and living cells. Escherichia coli in water were treated with OD radicals, and D atom incorporation into cells was visualized using time-of-flight SIMS and Nano-SIMS. The results show that D atoms from NTPJ reach the cytoplasm of E. coli in H{sub 2}O, indicating the usefulness of this OD-tracking method for the study of radical interactions with living cells.

  15. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  16. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  17. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email ...

  18. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  19. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Recap Workshop Information Program Schedule Registration List Announcement Letter Tentative Outline for Book Steering Committee Presentation Files (Power Point or PDF) Saturday (Morning, Afternoon) Sunday (Morning, Afternoon) Monday (Morning, Afternoon) Tuesday (Morning, Afternoon) Wednesday (Morning, Afternoon) Misc. Pictures

  20. The effect of initial conditions on the electromagnetic radiation generation in type III solar radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, H.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 052903 (2011)]. The numerical simulations were carried out using different density profiles and fast electron distribution functions. It is shown that electromagnetic L and R modes are excited by the transverse current, initially imposed on the system. In the course of the simulations, no further interaction of the electron beam with the background plasma could be observed.

  1. Plasma technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlitz, H.G.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes the uses of plasma technology for the thermal destruction of hazardous wastes such as PCBs, dioxins, hydrocarbons, military chemicals and biological materials; for metals recovery from steel making dusts. One advantage of the process is that destruction of wastes can be carried out on site. Systems in several countries use the excess thermal energy for district heating.

  2. Theoretical Plasma Physicist | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theoretical Plasma Physicist Department: Theory Supervisor(s): Amitava Bhattacharjee ... Department has an opening at the rank of Research Physicist in theoretical plasma physics. ...

  3. Self-Consistent Full-Wave/Fokker-Planck Calculations for Ion Cyclotron Heating in Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; D'Azevedo, E.; Harvey, R.W.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Dumont, R.J.; Smithe, D.N.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.

    2005-09-26

    Self-consistent solutions for the wave electric field and particle distribution function are calculated for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas. The all-orders wave solver AORSA is generalized to treat non-thermal velocity distributions arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave driven diffusion in velocity space. Quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the wave electric fields and used to calculate velocity distribution functions with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. Self-consistent results are obtained by iterating the full-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.

  4. Effect of nonthermality of electrons on the speed and shape of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a warm plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.

    2012-07-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a warm collisionless plasma with nonthermal electrons are investigated by a direct analysis of the field equations. The Sagdeev's potential is obtained in terms of ion acoustic speed by simply solving an algebraic equation. It is found that the amplitude and width of the ion-acoustic solitons as well as the parametric regime where the solitons can exist are sensitive to the population of energetic non-thermal electrons. The soliton and double layer solutions are obtained as a small amplitude approximation.

  5. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  6. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  7. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer...

  8. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for GRED III Phase II Citation Bernie Karl. 2010. GRED III Phase II. p....

  9. William A. Goddard III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    william a. goddard iii Principal Investigator Email: wag@wag.caltech.edu Dr. Goddard is a pioneer in developing methods for quantum mechanics (QM), force fields, molecular dynamics (MD), and Monte Carlo predictions on chemical and materials systems and is actively involved in applying these methods to ceramics, semiconductors, superconductors, thermoelectrics, metal alloys, polymers, proteins, nuclei acids, Pharma ligands, nanotechnology, and energetic materials. He uses QM methods to determine

  10. Thomas Francis Miller III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THOMAS FRANCIS MILLER III Principal Investigator Email: tfm@caltech.edu Dr. Miller's research group develops theoretical and computational methods to understand a variety of molecular processes, including enzyme catalysis, solar-energy conversion, dendrite formation in lithium batteries, and the dynamics of soft matter and biological systems. An important aspect of this challenge is that many systems exhibit dynamics that couple vastly different timescales and lengthscales. A primary goal of

  11. SUPPLEMENT III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION SCHEDULE FOR: ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office (As of January 19, 2016) THIRD SUPPLEMENT TO LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION ANNOUNCEMENT FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEES FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS Solicitation Number: DE-SOL- DE-SOL-0007791 OMB Control Number: 1910-5134; OMB Expiration Date 11/30/2016 Announcement Type: Supplemental Supplement Date: January 19, 2016 The above-referenced Loan Guarantee Solicitation

  12. Joel W. Ager III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w. ager iii Principal Investigator Email: jwager@lbl.gov Dr. Ager's research interests include the fundamental electronic and transport characteristics of photovoltaic materials, development of new photoanodes and photocathodes based on abundant elements for solar fuels production, and the development of new oxide- and sulfide-based transparent conductors. In JCAP, Dr. Ager is investigating interactions of carbon-based supports with CO2-reduction electrocatalysts. His group is studying

  13. Registration List - WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Registration List Sandro Barlini, INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Wolfgang Bauer, Michigan State Aldo Bonasera, Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN Alexander Botvina, Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow Kyrill Bugaev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Xavier Campi, LPTMS Abdou Chbihi, GANIL Philippe Chomaz, GANIL Marco Cinausero, INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Gianluca Colo', Dipartimento di Fisica Romualdo deSouza, Indiana University/IUCF Massimo Di Toro,

  14. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  16. John H. Hale III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    John H. Hale III About Us John H. Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John H. Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged

  17. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  18. Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  19. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PDF icon SBIRPhaseIII.pdf More Documents...

  20. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  1. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    82 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver

  2. The CHEMKIN-III COLLECTION

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    An integrated set of Fortran 77 codes, example problems in the form of unix scripts, and input data for use as a tool in modeling a variety of gas and multi phase chemical kinetics problems; included are equilibrium and sensitivity analysis programs, and modeling codes for a shock tube, premixed flame, gas/gas-surface/plasma flow in astirred reactor, gas/gas-surface plug flow, deposition on a rotating disk and in cylindrical or planar channels.

  3. Plasma 101 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma 101 10 Facts You Should Know About Plasma By Larry Bernard February 22, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) (Photo by Philippe Moussette for Nasa.gov) The Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) Gallery: NSTX interior NSTX interior W7-X plasma W7-X plasma The sun (Photo by nasa.gov) The sun It's the fourth state of matter: Solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Plasma is a super-heated gas, so hot that its electrons get out of the atom's orbit and

  4. A DECADE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE NANCAY RADIOHELIOGRAPH 1998-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saint-Hilaire, P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A., E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical survey of almost 10,000 radio type III bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions that could be attributed to a 6 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle-averaged distribution (dN/ds) Almost-Equal-To 14 {nu}{sup -3.3} s {sup -4} arcmin{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and that source fluxes closely follow a solar-cycle-averaged (dN/ds {sub {nu}}) Almost-Equal-To 0.34 {nu}{sup -2.9} S {sup -1.7} {sub {nu}} sfu{sup -1} day{sup -1} distribution (when {nu} is in GHz, s in arcminutes, and S {sub {nu}} in sfu). Fitting a barometric density profile yields a temperature of 0.6 MK, while a solar wind-like ({proportional_to}h {sup -2}) density profile yields a density of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at an altitude of 1 R{sub S} , assuming harmonic emission. Finally, we found that the solar-cycle-averaged radiated type III energy could be similar in magnitude to that radiated by nanoflares via non-thermal bremsstrahlung processes, and we hint at the possibility that escaping electron beams might carry as much energy away from the corona as is introduced into it by accelerated nanoflare electrons.

  5. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email John Kline (505) 667-7062 Email Thomson scattering is widely used to measure plasma temperature, density, and flow velocity in laser-produced plasmas at Trident, and is also used to detect plasma waves driven by unstable and nonlinear processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th

  6. Taming Plasma Fusion Snakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taming Plasma Fusion Snakes Taming Plasma Fusion Snakes Supercomputer simulations move fusion energy closer to reality January 24, 2014 Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov SugiSnakes_2.jpg Researchers have been able to see and measure plasma snakes - corkscrew-shaped concentrations of plasma density in the center of a fusion plasma -- for years. 3D nonlinear plasma simulations conducted at NERSC are providing new insights into the formation and stability of these structures. Image

  7. Modeling of imploded annular plasmas. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, R.E.; Guillory, J.U.

    1981-05-01

    This report treats three areas of advance during the 1980 effort: (I) improvements to the 1-D strongly-coupled plasma implosion and radiation code SPLAT and results of radiative yield studies using the code; (II) development of formalism for solving the field penetration/skin-depth problem in an inhomogeneous, time-varying imploding conductor in a plasma-loaded diode; (III) circuit equation and scaling of hard radiation in the presence of fully developed sausage instability (beading) of the assembled plasma. In addition, a short section (Chapter V) is devoted to work in progress: high-accuracy matrix inversion techniques and interpolators for solving the generalized Hertz vector equations used in II above, and for following CRE equations and diffusive behavior in general; and, beginning plans for modifying 1-D MHD codes, making them compatible with the field-diffusion and corona programs and with CRE radiation packages.

  8. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute Gwahangno 113, Yu-seong-gu, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100?G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ? 6.2?G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1?G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ? 2 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} ? 2?eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50?and?600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  9. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  10. Tritium Plasma Experiment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plasma Experiment and its role in PHENIX program Masashi Shimada, Chase Taylor Fusion ... ID Outline: 1. Motivation 2. Tritium Plasma Experiment 3. INLSTAR's role on US-Japan ...

  11. GRED III Phase II | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III Phase II GRED III Phase II Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: To gain a better understanding of the geothermal reservoir at Chena Hot Springs Resort in Alaska; Test and document the reliability of previous predictions as to the nature of the reservoir. egs_karl_gred_3_phase_2.pdf (601.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology

  12. Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue...

  13. J. B. Titus, E. D. Mezonlin, and J. A. Johnson III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas J. B. Titus, E. D. Mezonlin, and J. A. Johnson III Citation: Physics of Plasmas (1994-present) 21, 062511 (2014); doi: 10.1063/1.4883645 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4883645 View Table of Contents: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/21/6?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in Statistical analysis of variations in impurity ion heating at reconnection events

  14. Time-fractional KdV equation for plasma of two different temperature electrons and stationary ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Abulwafa, Essam M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, Abeer A.

    2011-09-15

    Using the time-fractional KdV equation, the nonlinear properties of small but finite amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves are studied in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma. This plasma consists of cold electrons fluid, non-thermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. Employing the reductive perturbation technique and the Euler-Lagrange equation, the time-fractional KdV equation is derived and it is solved using variational method. It is found that the time-fractional parameter significantly changes the soliton amplitude of the electron-acoustic solitary waves. The results are compared with the structures of the broadband electrostatic noise observed in the dayside auroral zone.

  15. Plasma sweeper. [Patents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1982-10-25

    A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  16. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  17. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  18. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  19. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  20. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM SBIR_Phase_III.pdf (228.04 KB) More Documents & Publications SBIR_Phase_III.pdf PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 Albany HTS Power Cable

  1. Plasma diagnostics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnostics Subscribe to RSS - Plasma diagnostics The tools used by researchers to assess the characteristics of superheated and electrically charged gases known as plasmas. PPPL intern creates software for snapshot of plasma in NSTX-U When most of today's college interns were still in kindergarten, Max Wallace was working for more than a decade as a programmer for various companies, founding a hackerspace in Charlotte, North Carolina, and writing code for start-ups in Silicon Valley. Read more

  2. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 ; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G.; Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 ; Kodama, Ryosuke; Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic Four-Ray Star pattern.

  3. 2013 Plasma Camp | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Camp View larger image View larger image View larger image View larger image View larger image View larger image View larger image

  4. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

  5. Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used with this technology. Below is a...

  6. Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes

  7. Jack R. Ferrell III | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jack R. Ferrell III Jack R. Ferrell III Research Engineer Jack.Ferrell@nrel.gov | 303-384-7777 Research Interests Jack Ferrell works in the Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development (R&D) group and manages tasks on analytical standardization for pyrolysis oil and on kinetic and hydrodynamic modeling of biomass-to-biofuels processes. Research interests include: Standardization of analytical techniques for the analysis of bio-oils Electrochemical upgrading of biomass-derived

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2015 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A...

  9. Plasma window characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Gleizer, S.; Gurovich, V.; Kronhaus, I.; Hershcovitch, A.; Nozar, P.; Taliani, C.

    2007-03-01

    Parameters of an arc Ar plasma discharge used as a plasma window with a discharge current of {approx}50 A and a voltage of {approx}58 V are presented. It is shown that this arc discharge allows one to decrease the pressure at the low pressure end of the plasma window almost 380 times using relatively low pumping at the low pressure end of the plasma window. Calculations of the plasma parameters and their spatial distribution using a simple wall-stabilized arc model showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimentally obtained data. It is shown that a significant decrease in gas flow through the plasma window occurs due to the increase in plasma viscosity. An improvement of the plasma window ignition and some of its design aspects are described as well.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2016 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A ...

  11. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) ...

  12. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike III II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  13. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project III Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  14. Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte...

  15. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan

    2012-12-15

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfven and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfven wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k{sub Up-Tack }) lying in the range d{sub e}{sup -1}-6d{sub e}{sup -1}, d{sub e} being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k{sub Up-Tack }. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k{sub ||}). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k{sub Up-Tack }) = |E{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })/|B{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })| Much-Less-Than V{sub A} for k{sub Up-Tack }d{sub e} < 0.5, where V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  16. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  17. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT CODES (TRUCON-III) Revision 2 July 2012 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP 10-3458, Revision 1 DOE/WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT CODES (TRUCON-III) Revision 2 July 2012 Approved by: [Signature on File] Date:_ 12 July 2012 _ J. R. Stroble, Director, Office of the National TRU Program DOE/WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2, July 2012 3 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information PO Box

  18. Mirror plasma apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma.

  19. Plasma physics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics Subscribe to RSS - Plasma physics The study of plasma, a partially-ionized gas that is electrically conductive and able to be confined within a magnetic field, and how it releases energy. Stewart Prager Stewart Prager is the sixth director of PPPL. He joined the Laboratory in 2009 after a long career at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. At Wisconsin, he led research on the "Madison Symmetric Torus" (MST) experiment and headed a center that studied plasmas in both the

  20. SBIR_Phase_III.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SBIR_Phase_III.pdf SBIR_Phase_III.pdf (228.04 KB) More Documents & Publications PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Albany HTS Power Cable

  1. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  2. Plasma Astrophysics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Astrophysics One of the most common but least understood phenomena in the universe is an explosive process called magnetic reconnection. PPPL's Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) studies this process, which gives rise to astrophysical events that include auroras, solar flares and geomagnetic storms. The process occurs when the magnetic field lines in plasmas break and violently reconnect. Generating and studying reconnection under controlled laboratory conditions can yield insights

  3. Basic Plasma Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Plasma Science Key Laboratory projects include the study of Hall thrusters that satellites and space probes use for propulsion. PPPL's Hall Thruster Experiment (HTX) strives to understand the physics of Hall thrusters and related systems that expel plasma as a propellant. Hall thrusters originated in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and research and development are carried out today in the United States, the European Union, Russia, Japan, Korea and China. PPPL research has expanded knowledge

  4. Plasma regenerated particulate trap and NO.sub.x reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A non-catalytic two-stage process for removal of NO.sub.x and particulates from engine exhaust comprises a first stage that plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, and a second stage, which preferably occurs simultaneously with the first stage, that converts NO.sub.2 and carbon soot particles to respective environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced while carbon soot from trapped particulates is simultaneously converted to CO.sub.2 when reacting with the NO.sub.2 (that converts to N.sub.2). For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a chamber where carbon-containing particulates are electrostatically trapped or filtered and a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. Volatile hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) from the trapped particulates are oxidized in the plasma and the remaining soot from the particulates reacts with the NO.sub.2 to convert NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, and the soot to CO.sub.2. The nitrogen exhaust components remain in the gas phase throughout the process, with no accompanying adsorption.

  5. Tritium Plasma Experiment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plasma Experiment and its role in PHENIX program Masashi Shimada, Chase Taylor Fusion Safety Program Idaho National Laboratory Rob Kolasinski Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore Tritium Focus Group meeting September 23-25, 2014 at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID Outline: 1. Motivation 2. Tritium Plasma Experiment 3. INL/STAR's role on US-Japan collaboration 4. Role of TPE in PHENIX project 5. TPE modification and development of plasma-driven permeation M.Shimada | Tritium Focus

  6. Calming Plasma's Stormy Seas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calming Fusion Energy's Stormy Seas Calming Plasma's Stormy Seas Simulations show how overcoming ion instabilities in hot plasma can boost a fusion reactor's energy output April 23, 2014 Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov ITERtokamak.jpg Interior view of the ITER tokamak reactor under construction in Cadarache, France. In a tokamak, turbulence caused by microinstabilities in the plasma can significantly impact energy confinement. Image: ITER Energy researchers continue to make

  7. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  9. UCLA program in theory and modeling of edge physics and plasma material interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.; Grossman, A.; Merriman, B.; Day, M.

    1992-01-01

    Our research activity in edge plasma modeling is directed towards understanding edge plasma behavior and towards innovative solutions for controlling the edge plasma as well as the design and operation of impurity control, particle exhaust. and plasma facing components. During the last nine months, substantial progress was made in many areas. The highlights are: (A) Development of a second-generation edge-plasma simulation code (Section II); (B) Development of models for gas-target divertors, including a 1[1/2]-D fluid model for plasma and Monte Carlo neutral-transport simulations (Section III); and (C) Utilization of the RF ponderomotive force and electrostatic biasing to distribute the heat load on a larger area of the divertor plate, and the development of analytical and numerical transport models that include both ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials.

  10. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  11. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  12. PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with plasma diagnostics, heating and fueling of plasmas, and general plasma experimental techniques. The theoretical scientists can assist with basic theory, and plasma...

  13. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  14. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C.

    2011-11-15

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  15. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  16. WorkOp-III:94 synopsis. Final-contribution mini plots and tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serduke, F.

    1995-06-01

    WorkOp-III:94 is the third in a series of Opacity Workshops. The developers of twenty-one codes participated. Thirty-eight plasmas were selected for their relevance to problems of interest or for the challenge they would pose to the models. Frequently-dependent absorption coefficients, mean opacities, ionization distributions and other detailed information were submitted, discussed and resubmitted. This synopsis contains a subset of the information presented at the workshop and in the considerably more extensive, forthcoming, final report. A quick overview of the mean opacities that were submitted can be obtained from the graphical-table plots of the Rosseland and Planck means for all the cases. In addition, for each or the 38 plasma cases, there is a single page of mini plots of all total absorption coefficients submitted plus tables of integral quantities such as mean opacities, chemical potential and average ionization stage.

  17. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge This is an invention allowing the production of rotation and countercurrent flow patterns in a plasma centrifuge using radiofrequency...

  18. A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge...

  19. Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma By John Greenwald June 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, the ...

  20. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  1. Plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  2. SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, C.C.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

  3. SHEET PLASMA DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henderson, O.A.

    1962-07-17

    An ion-electron plasma heating apparatus of the pinch tube class was developed wherein a plasma is formed by an intense arc discharge through a gas and is radially constricted by the magnetic field of the discharge. To avoid kink and interchange instabilities which can disrupt a conventional arc shortiy after it is formed, the apparatus is a pinch tube with a flat configuration for forming a sheet of plasma between two conductive plates disposed parallel and adjacent to the plasma sheet. Kink instabilities are suppressed by image currents induced in the conductive plates while the interchange instabilities are neutrally stable because of the flat plasma configuration wherein such instabilities may occur but do not dynamically increase in amplitude. (AEC)

  4. Reducing wall plasma expansion with gold foam irradiated by laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lu; Ding, Yongkun Jiang, Shaoen Yang, Jiamin; Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Lin, Zhiwei; Jing, Longfei; Li, Liling; Deng, Bo; Yuan, Zheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Guanghui; Tan, Xiulan; Li, Ping

    2015-11-15

    The experimental study on the expanding plasma movement of low-density gold foam (∼1% solid density) irradiated by a high power laser is reported in this paper. Experiments were conducted using the SG-III prototype laser. Compared to solid gold with 19.3 g/cc density, the velocities of X-ray emission fronts moving off the wall are much smaller for gold foam with 0.3 g/cc density. Theoretical analysis and MULTI 1D simulation results also show less plasma blow-off, and that the density contour movement velocities of gold foam are smaller than those of solid gold, agreeing with experimental results. These results indicate that foam walls have advantages in symmetry control and lowering plasma fill when used in ignition hohlraum.

  5. Purpose | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    range of U.S. colleges and universities in various areas of plasma science and technology. ... As a DOE National Laboratory, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory maintains an ...

  6. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    III VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US ... InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of ...

  8. Microsoft Word - SECARB Phase III CO2 sequestration Final EA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase III Early Test March 2009 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy SECARB Phase III Early Test National Energy ...

  9. Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ...

  10. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 PDF icon 000521 & ...

  11. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PDF icon sbirphase3pg3.pdf...

  12. M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities

  13. J. Taylor Childers III | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Taylor Childers III Assistant Physicist Education 2002 - 2007 University of Minnesota, PhD. in Physics 1998 - 2002 University of Kentucky, BS. in Physics Experience 2013 - present Assistant Physicist at Argonne National Lab, Chicago, IL, USA 2011 - 2013 Fellow at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland 2007 - 2011 Postdoctoral Researcher at Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Summary of Research I am an Assistant Physicist at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, USA. As a member of ATLAS, I am

  14. III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS For fiscal year 2010, no DOE programs have compliance requirements that are distinct from the general compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance (General Compliance Supplement). Therefore, audits of recipients and subrecipients with fiscal years ending in 2010 should be conducted in accordance with the compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance. For fiscal years subsequent to 2010, program-specific compliance

  15. Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-34 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 4-1 Chapter IV This chapter addresses the role of infrastructure in ensuring U.S. energy security in a global marketplace. It first describes the evolution of the concept of U.S. energy security in response to interconnected global energy markets. It then discusses the security

  16. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  17. Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later

  18. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates...

  19. Plasma control and utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ensley, Donald L.

    1976-12-28

    A plasma is confined and heated by a microwave field resonant in a cavity excited in a combination of the TE and TM modes while responding to the resonant frequency of the cavity as the plasma dimensions change to maintain operation at resonance. The microwave field is elliptically or circularly polarized as to prevent the electromagnetic confining field from going to zero. A high Q chamber having superconductive walls is employed to minimize wall losses while providing for extraction of thermonuclear energy produced by fusion of nuclei in the plasma.

  20. Bransen Plasma Asher

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bransen Plasma Asher An O2 RF plasma can be used at CAMD to strip one to five microns of resist from up to 6 four inch wafers at a time. The Bransen Asher is run at 600W at time, temperture, or manual control. Minor modification – The Bransen Plasma Asher reduced Nitrogen purge flow for the safe ashing of thin fragile membranes Features: 1500 W 13.56 MHz RF generator Thermal probe Automatic processing Capable of processing with up to three gases (only one installed) Capabilities: Reactive ion

  1. Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act (1.28 MB) More Documents & Publications American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000

  2. Furth Plasma Physics Library | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Education Organization Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library The Harold P. Furth Plasma Physics

  3. Plasma Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide In the past, there has been interest in synthesis of certain chemicals in plasma. One chemical that has been synthesized in a plasma on an experimental basis is hydrogen peroxide. This invention is directed at synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a plasma leading to a commercially feasible scale. No.: M-806 Inventor(s): Lewis D Meixler

  4. Plasma isotope separation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, M.W. ); Shepp, T.A. )

    1991-12-01

    Isotope separation has many important industrial, medical, and research applications. Large-scale processes have typically utilized complex cascade systems; for example, the gas centrifuge. Alternatively, high single-stage enrichment processes (as in the case of the calutron) are very energy intensive. Plasma-based methods being developed for the past 15 to 20 years have attempted to overcome these two drawbacks. In this review, six major types of isotope separation methods which involve plasma phenomena are discussed. These methods are: plasma centrifuge, AVLIS (atomic vapor laser isotope separation), ion wave, ICR (ion-cyclotron resonance), calutron, and gas discharge. The emphasis of this paper is to describe the plasma phenomena in these major categories. An attempt was made to include enough references so that more detailed study or evaluation of a particular method could readily be pursued. A brief discussion of isotope separation using mass balance concepts is also carried out.

  5. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  6. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  7. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  8. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  9. Plasma astrophysics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    astrophysics Subscribe to RSS - Plasma astrophysics A field of physics that is growing in interest worldwide that tackles such astrophysical phenomena as the source of violent space weather and the formation of stars. Stewart Prager Stewart Prager is the sixth director of PPPL. He joined the Laboratory in 2009 after a long career at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. At Wisconsin, he led research on the "Madison Symmetric Torus" (MST) experiment and headed a center that studied

  10. Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma By John Greenwald June 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, the principal investigator for research into the role of plasma in synthesizing nanoparticles, in PPPL's nanotechnology laboratory. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, the principal investigator for research into the role of plasma in synthesizing

  11. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  12. MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    UW-Madison > Physics Department > Plasma Physics Group > MST > MST Home UW Madison Madison Symmetric Torus MST Home MST HomeGraduate Student InformationLinksTourControl and Auxiliary SystemsPhysics TopicsDeviceResearch MissionMST People mst logo CPLA Home Directory Publications Links Internal University of Wisconsin Physics Department Research funding includes support from: Department of Energy National Science Foundation The Madison Symmetric Torus produces hot plasma for research

  13. Electrostatics of moving plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2013-07-15

    The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

  14. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  15. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports NSTX-U Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as

  16. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02

  17. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and

  18. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26

  19. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference III. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference III was held to review the status of transmission substation diagnostics by EPRI, as well as that of the universities, manufacturers, testing organizations, and other researchers. The papers presented were organized under three categories of diagnostics: Transformers, Miscellaneous Equipment, and Systems. A reception on the evening of the first day of the Conference provided an opportunity for the researchers, utilities and manufacturers to display their equipment for the attendees. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for articles from this conference.

  20. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell

  1. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00039 Revision 1 August 28, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 8,770 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location

  2. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00076 Revision 1 Posted Date: December 2, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,066 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  3. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2015-00014 Revision 1 Posted Date: May 29, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,894 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  4. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 1 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 722 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cells 5A and 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  5. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2016-00025 Revision 1 Post Date: May 27, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 744 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  6. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SRR-ESH-2016-00052 Revision 1 Post Date: August 26, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 11,143 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  7. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SRR-ESH-2016-00068 Revision 0 Post Date: August 26, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 11,610 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  8. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00052 Revision 1 Post Date: August 28, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,948 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  9. CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on

  10. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  11. Extraction Based on in situ Formation of Dithiocarbamate for Separation of Am(III) from Ln(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyashita, Sunao; Yanaga, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Suganuma, Hideo; Satoh, Isamu

    2007-07-01

    A new solvent extraction technique based on in situ extractant formation of dithiocarbamate derivatives was constructed for the purpose of separation of Am(III) from Ln(III). Ammonium salts of dithiocarbamate in this technique are formed during the extraction course by the reaction between secondary amines and carbon disulfide in organic phase. The effects of substituent of secondary amines against the behavior of in situ formation of dithiocarbamate and the distribution behaviors of Am(III) and Ln(III)(especially Eu(III)) into nitrobenzene phase using in situ formation of dithiocarbamate were investigated. It was revealed that amines containing substituent in {alpha} position of amine were not suited that for in situ extractant formation method. The values of separation factor of Am(III)/Eu(III) >10{sup 4} were obtained by the new method using five di-substituted amines/CS{sub 2}/nitrobenzene system. (authors)

  12. Non-Thermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 9 Publisher: ...

  13. Non-Thermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);Fusion Energy Sciences (FES);Laboratory Directed Research and ...

  14. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Michael Burgess, J. ; Preece, Robert D. 1 ; Ryde, Felix ; Axelsson, Magnus 2 ... E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, ...

  15. 2012 Plasma Camp | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Camp View larger image 12 PR 0724 008 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 011 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 012 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 014 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 021 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 027 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 028 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 030 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 031 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 032 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 033 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 036 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 038 F View larger image 12 PR 0724 043

  16. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIlwain, Michael E.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Golenko, Zsolt; Wittstein, Alan D.

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  17. UCLA program in theory and modeling of edge physics and plasma material interaction. Progress report, June 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.; Grossman, A.; Merriman, B.; Day, M.

    1992-12-31

    Our research activity in edge plasma modeling is directed towards understanding edge plasma behavior and towards innovative solutions for controlling the edge plasma as well as the design and operation of impurity control, particle exhaust. and plasma facing components. During the last nine months, substantial progress was made in many areas. The highlights are: (A) Development of a second-generation edge-plasma simulation code (Section II); (B) Development of models for gas-target divertors, including a 1{1/2}-D fluid model for plasma and Monte Carlo neutral-transport simulations (Section III); and (C) Utilization of the RF ponderomotive force and electrostatic biasing to distribute the heat load on a larger area of the divertor plate, and the development of analytical and numerical transport models that include both ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials.

  18. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  19. Fundamentals of plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forslund, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    With the increasing size and speed of modern computers, the incredibly complex nonlinear properties of plasmas in the laboratory and in space are being successfully explored in increasing depth. Of particular importance have been numerical simulation techniques involving finite size particles on a discrete mesh. After discussing the importance of this means of understanding a variety of nonlinear plasma phenomena, we describe the basic elements of particle-in-cell simulation and their limitations and advantages. The differencing techniques, stability and accuracy issues, data management and optimization issues are discussed by means of a simple example of a particle-in-cell code. Recent advances in simulation methods allowing large space and time scales to be treated with minimal sacrifice in physics are reviewed. Various examples of nonlinear processes successfully studied by plasma simulation will be given.

  20. Plasma Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  1. Igor Kaganovich | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interests include: beam-plasma interaction, high energy density plasmas, nanotechnology, atomic physics, and physics of partially ionized plasmas. He is involved in...

  2. Science on Tap - Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Plasmas Science on Tap - Plasmas WHEN: Apr 21, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science on tap Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each week. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk and is followed by a lively group discussion. Observing the stuff of stars (and

  3. Plasma diagnostic reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B.; Garrison, J.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Chou, A.E.; Baang, S.

    1996-02-26

    Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma diagnostic reflectometry have been undertaken as a collaborative research project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Plasma Diagnostics Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. Theoretical analyses have explored the basic principles of reflectometry to understand its limitations, to address specific gaps in the understanding of reflectometry measurements in laboratory experiments, and to explore extensions of reflectometry such as ultra-short-pulse reflectometry. The theory has supported basic laboratory reflectometry experiments where reflectometry measurements can be corroborated by independent diagnostic measurements.

  4. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  5. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  6. J. Plasma Physics:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics: page 1 of 18. c Cambridge University Press 2015 doi:10.1017/S0022377815000471 1 Prospects for observing the magnetorotational instability in the plasma Couette experiment K. Flanagan 1 †, M. Clark 1 , C. Collins 1,2 , C. M. Cooper 1 , I. V. Khalzov 1,3 , J. Wallace 1 and C. B. Forest 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA 3 National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow, 123182,

  7. Plasma gun array

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gun array A rotating conducting wall, according to theory, should stabilize a linear plasma column against certain magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Shown here is a view down the inside of such a wall, in the rotating wall machine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Along its 1-meter length, the 16-cm-diameter, glass- and copper-lined stainless-steel tube reflects the sixfold symmetry of the triangular array of seven plasma "guns" centered at the far end. To study the wall's

  8. Plasma density diagnostic for capillary-discharge based plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasma density diagnostic for capillary-discharge based plasma channels Authors: Daniels, J. 1 Search SciTech Connect for author "Daniels, J." Search SciTech Connect for...

  9. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  10. Device - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Device UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Device PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation A picture of PCX plasma. The LaB6 plasma source is heated to 1400ºC, emitting electrons that ionize gas. Rings of permanent magnets, covered in white insulating cloth, create a multidipole magnetic field to confine the plasma. Electrode

  11. Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPDX Home UW Madison Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment MPDX Home MPDX HomeDynamo TutorialDeviceMPDX People MPDX Webcam CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is for investigating self-generation of magnetic fields and related processes in a large, weakly magnetized, fast flowing, and hot (conducting) plasma. It is a major new,

  12. Title III of the Defense Production Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Title III of the Defense Production Act Title III of the Defense Production Act Matthew Seaford presentation on Title III of the Defense Production Act at the Industry Roundtable. 2_seaford_roundtable.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications A National Strategic Plan For Advanced Manufacturing Market Drivers for Biofuels Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Supplement to the President's Budget (February 2010)

  13. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  14. Multi-dipolar microwave plasmas and their application to negative ion production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bchu, S.; Bs, A.; Lacoste, A.; Aleiferis, S.; Ivanov, A. A. Jr.; Bacal, M.

    2013-10-15

    During the past decade multi-dipolar plasmas have been employed for various purposes such as surface treatments in biomedicine, physical and chemical vapour deposition for hydrogen storage, and applications in mechanical engineering. On the other hand, due to the design and operational mode of these plasma sources (i.e., strong permanent magnets for the electron cyclotron resonance coupling, low working pressure, and high electron density achieved) they are suitable for studying fundamental mechanisms involved in negative ion sources used in magnetically confined fusion and particle accelerators. Thus, this study presents an overview of fundamental results obtained with: (i) a single dipolar source, (ii) a network of seven dipolar plasma sources inserted into a magnetic multipolar chamber (Camembert III), and (iii) four dipolar sources housed in a smaller metallic cylinder (ROSAE III). Investigations with Langmuir probes of electron energy probability functions revealed the variation of the plasma properties versus the radial distance from the axis of a dipolar source in its mid plane and allowed the determination of the proportion between hot and cold electron populations in both chambers. These results are compared with the density of hydrogen negative ions, measured using the photodetachment technique. Electron energy probability functions obtained in these different configurations show the possibility of both hot and cold electron production. The former is a prerequisite for increasing the vibrational level of molecules and the dissociation degree and the latter for producing negative ions via dissociative attachment of the cold electrons or via surface production induced by H atoms.

  15. Electrtostatic Beam-Plasma Thruster | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrtostatic Beam-Plasma Thruster Electrostatic beam-plasma thruster utilizes beam of energetic electrons to generate the plasma from which ions are extracted and accelerated to generate the thrust. The accelerated ions are neutralized by the electrons from the beam. No.: M-894 Inventor(s): Yevgeny Raitses

  16. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology, Geochemistry, Hydrothermal Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  17. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy Applications March 20, ... Wang is a Challenge Leader in the Solid State Lighting Science Energy Frontier Research ...

  18. Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Authors: ...

  19. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The coyote universe III: simulation suite and ...

  20. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calvin O. Butts, III About Us Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III - President, State University of New York (SUNY) College at Old Westbury Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, is President of State University of New York, College at Old Westbury and Pastor of the renowned Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City. Regularly sought by leaders in politics, business, and the media for his insight and opinions, he has had a pervasive impact across his career on such wide-ranging issues as

  1. Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting You are ...

  2. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SDSS-III: Massive...

  3. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: ... agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the CEQ's regulations. ...

  4. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A screen in the W7-X control room shows four images of the first plasma. (Photo by Sam Lazerson). Celebrating the W7-X first plasma are from left to right: Sam Lazerson, Glen...

  5. Disclosures | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrei Khodak M-894 Electrtostatic Beam-Plasma Thruster Yevgeny Raitses M-893 ... M-890 Adjustable Portable Tensile Testing Machine Michael E Viola M-889 Multi-Stage Plasma ...

  6. Quest | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). We are pleased to provide this news of our strides in advancing research into fusion energy and plasma science-two topics of ...

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    archive Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory news feed en PPPL physicists simulate innovative method for starting up tokamaks without...

  8. Controlled zone microwave plasma system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripley, Edward B; Seals, Roland D; Morrell, Jonathan S

    2009-10-20

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  9. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma 101 10 Facts You Should Know About Plasma Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." The Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) NSTX interior W7-X plasma The sun

  10. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

  11. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) First Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-05

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) First Plasma experiment was implemented at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  12. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency Title: Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic ...

  13. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  14. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  15. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  16. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  17. Development of Thomson scattering system on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Tao; Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ding, Yongkun Yang, Dong; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Fang; Li, Ping; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-15

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic system, using a 263 nm laser as the probe beam, is designed and implemented on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The probe beam is provided by an additional beam line completed recently. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous measurements of both ion feature and red-shifted electron feature from plasmas in a high-temperature (≥2 keV) and high-density (≥10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}) regime. Delicate design is made to satisfy the requirements for successful detection of the electron feature. High-quality ion feature spectra have already been diagnosed via this system in recent experiments with gas-filled hohlraums.

  18. Transport processes in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birn, J.; Elphic, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project represents a comprehensive research effort to study plasma and field transport processes relevant for solar-terrestrial interaction, involving the solar wind and imbedded magnetic field and plasma structures, the bow shock of the Earth`s magnetosphere and associated waves, the Earth`s magnetopause with imbedded flux rope structures and their connection with the Earth, plasma flow in the Earth`s magnetotail, and ionospheric beam/wave interactions. The focus of the work was on the interaction between plasma and magnetic and electric fields in the regions where different plasma populations exist adjacent to or superposed on each other. These are the regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, important for plasma and energy transport and rapid energy releases. The research addressed questions about how this interaction takes place, what waves, instabilities, and particle/field interactions are involved, how the penetration of plasma and energy through characteristic boundaries takes place, and how the characteristic properties of the plasmas and fields of the different populations influence each other on different spatial and temporal scales. These topics were investigated through combining efforts in the analysis of plasma and field data obtained through space missions with theory and computer simulations of the plasma behavior.

  19. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  20. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  1. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  2. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  3. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  4. Device - Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Device UW Madison Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment Device MPDX HomeDynamo TutorialDeviceMPDX People MPDX Webcam CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is being constructed for investigating self-generation of magnetic fields and related processes in a large, weakly magnetized, fast flowing, and hot (conducting) plasma. When completed, a major new,

  5. Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interdisciplinary plasma theory workshop April 15, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL postdoctoral fellow Ammar Hakim, center, described his poster on unified methods for simulating plasmas to physicists Steve Cowley, left, director of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in the United Kingdom and a member of the PPPL Advisory Committee; and Frank Jenko of the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Germany. The

  6. Postdoctoral Research Fellow for Plasma Sciences | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Postdoctoral Research Fellow for Plasma Sciences Department: Research Supervisor(s): Hantao Ji Staff: RM 1 Requisition Number: 1600476 The Department of Astrophysical Science and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) of Princeton University invites applications for a postdoctoral physicist position for the plasma physics in the international cooperation program NPC (NINS-Princeton Collaboration) between the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) in Japan and Princeton

  7. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  8. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  9. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  10. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  11. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2015-03-24

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  13. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  14. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  15. On rapid plasma rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helander, P.

    2007-10-15

    The conditions under which rapid plasma rotation may occur in a general three-dimensional magnetic field with flux surfaces, such as that of a stellarator, are investigated. Rotation velocities comparable to the ion thermal speed are found to be attainable only in magnetic fields whose strength B depends on the arc length l along the field in approximately the same way for all field lines on each flux surface {psi}, i.e., B{approx_equal}f({psi},l). Moreover, it is shown that the rotation must be in the direction of the vector {nabla}{psi}x{nabla}B.

  16. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  17. Renormalization and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields.

  18. Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in the UK Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in tokamaks and RFP G Fiksel, Roger D Bengtson†, M Cekic, D Den Hartog, S C Prager, P Pribyl‡, J Sarff, C Sovinec, M R Stoneking, R J Taylor‡, P W Terry, G R Tynan‡ and A J Wootton† Department of Physics University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA Abstract. The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the edge plasma (r/a >

  19. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources Sci. Technol. 6 (1997) 492-498. Printed in the UK PII: S0963-0252(97)87196-4 Impurities, temperature and density in a miniature electrostatic plasma and current source D J Den Hartog†, D J Craig†, G Fiksel‡ and J S Sarff‡ † Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA ‡ Sterling Scientific, Inc., 1415 Rutledge Street, Madison, WI 53703, USA Received 23 October 1996, in final form 25 July 1997 Abstract. We have

  20. The Preparation of an Ultrastable Mesoporous Cr(III)-MOF via...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Kinetic labilization of the Fe(III)-O coordination bond in a mesoporous metal-organic framework, PCN-333-Fe(III), is realized by the reduction of Fe(III) by Cr(II). The ...

  1. Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications. Experimental Fusion Research Fusion powers the sun and stars. The process takes

  2. Directory | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directory Search by Name Search Reset The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory works with collaborators across the globe to develop fusion as an energy source for the world, and conducts research along the broad frontier of plasma science and technology. PPPL also nurtures the national research enterprise in these fields, and educates the next generation of plasma and fusion scientists. See our Org Chart PPPL Facts

  3. Bumper wall for plasma device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coultas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

  4. Brochures | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brochures Subscribe to RSS - Brochures The United States Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory works with collaborators across the globe to develop fusion as an energy source for the world, and conducts research along the broad frontier of plasma science and technology. Printed materials are free, accessible, and downloadable from this website. Image: Brochures Fusion On Earth Read more about Fusion On Earth PPPL Experts Fusion. Energy. Plasma. Physics. Tokamaks.

  5. Method for generating surface plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Ben P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-05-27

    A method for generating a discharge plasma which covers a surface of a body in a gas at pressures from 0.01 Torr to atmospheric pressure, by applying a radio frequency power with frequencies between approximately 1 MHz and 10 GHz across a plurality of paired insulated conductors on the surface. At these frequencies, an arc-less, non-filamentary plasma can be generated to affect the drag characteristics of vehicles moving through the gas. The plasma can also be used as a source in plasma reactors for chemical reaction operations.

  6. Plasma Boundary Colloquium.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excitement at the Plasma Boundary Rob Goldston (with help from many) Fusion Plasma Physics is as Easy as 1-2-3 3)Manage the heat outflux 2)Hold onto the heat & amplify it by fusion 1)Inject heat into plasma Inject Heat into Plasma We put 40 MW of neutral beams into TFTR. Heating was ~ classical, with some *AE's, fishbones, etc. ITER needs ~ 2x more heating. Projections pretty reliable with multiple types of heating systems planned. Mike Williams Hold onto the heat... Empirical scaling

  7. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  8. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  9. PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KINETICS; PHYSICS; PLASMA; PLASMA WAVES; PROCESSING; PROPULSION; SATELLITES; SHIELDING; SOLAR SYSTEM; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; UNIVERSE This introduction will define the plasma...

  10. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of a buried water pipeline to an existing solar evaporation pond for water treatment. ... the Abajo Mountains, U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site OU III ...

  11. EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

  12. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SL EJEK EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdminSupport) RETIREMENT ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 11 13.9% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 29 36.7%...

  13. Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A.1 A-4 A-3 Item 1 Description: Revise the language in Attachment A1, "Container Storage," Section A1-1c(1) "TRUPACT-III Management" to address manual bolt removal from the ...

  14. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  15. Proceedings of the Fermilab III Instabilities Workshop, held...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Proceedings of the Fermilab III Instabilities Workshop, held at Fermilab June 25-29, 1990 Authors: Peggs, Stephen ; Harvey, M. Publication Date: 1990-08-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  16. Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems STEVENS III,JOHN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STEVENS III,JOHN W.; BONN,RUSSELL H.; GINN,JERRY W.; GONZALEZ,SIGIFREDO; KERN,GREG 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; INTERCONNECTED POWER SYSTEMS;...

  17. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3+ (A), Cr(pic)3 (pic) 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-CrCl2(OH2)4+ ...

  18. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  19. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV

  20. Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs):

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary | Department of Energy III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Technical targets for CCMs in stationary applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_ccms_stat.pdf (93.65 KB) More Documents & Publications R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes

  1. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy Applications March 20, 2012 at 3pm/36-428 George T. Wang Advanced Materials Science, Sandia National Laboratories Wang001_000 Abstract: Nanowires based on the III nitride (AlGaInN) materials system have attracted attention as potential nanoscale building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films,

  2. III-V/Si Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers; Article No. 263904 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, ...

  3. GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report GRED Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review ...

  4. Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2014-04-15

    Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

  5. Spontaneous generation of rotation in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra Diaz, Felix

    2013-12-24

    Three different aspects of intrinsic rotation have been treated. i) A new, first principles model for intrinsic rotation [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has been implemented in the gyrokinetic code GS2. The results obtained with the code are consistent with several experimental observations, namely the rotation peaking observed after an L-H transition, the rotation reversal observed in Ohmic plasmas, and the change in rotation that follows Lower Hybrid wave injection. ii) The model in [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has several simplifying assumptions that seem to be satisfied in most tokamaks. To check the importance of these hypotheses, first principles equations that do not rely on these simplifying assumptions have been derived, and a version of these new equations has been implemented in GS2 as well. iii) A tokamak cross-section that drives large intrinsic rotation has been proposed for future large tokamaks. In large tokamaks, intrinsic rotation is expected to be very small unless some up-down asymmetry is introduced. The research conducted under this contract indicates that tilted ellipticity is the most efficient way to drive intrinsic rotation.

  6. Complexation of Curium(III) with DTPA at 10–70 °C: Comparison with Eu(III)–DTPA in Thermodynamics, Luminescence, and Coordination Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Martin, Leigh R.; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-02-16

    Separation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) from trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) is a challenging task because of their nearly identical chemical properties. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA), a key reagent used in the TALSPEAK process that effectively separates An(III) from Ln(III), is believed to play a critical role in the An(III)/Ln(III) separation. However, the underlying principles for the separation based on the difference in the complexation of DTPA with An(III) and Ln(III) remain unclear. In this work, the complexation of DTPA with Cm(III) at 10-70 ºC was investigated by spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, in conjunction with computational methods. The binding strength, the enthalpy of complexation, the coordination modes, and the luminescence properties are compared between the Cm(III)-DTPA and Eu(III)-DTPA systems. The experimental and computational data have demonstrated that the difference between Cm(III) and Eu(III) in the binding strength with DTPA can be attributed to the stronger covalence bonding between Cm(III) and the nitrogen donors of DTPA.

  7. Organization | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Organization Careers/ Human Resources Join Princeton's TALENT NETWORK to enhance your job search and the application

  8. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  9. Plasma theory and simulation research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

  10. Plasma digital density determining device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien C.; Lovell, Thomas W.; Holly, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

  11. plasma | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    plasma Los Alamos plasma research shows promise for future compact accelerators The team in front of Los Alamos' Trident Laser Target Chamber. Back, from left: Tom Shimada, Sha-Marie Reid, Adam Sefkow, Miguel Santiago, and Chris Hamilton. Front, from left: Russ Mortensen, Chengkun Huang, Sasi Palaniyappan, Juan Fernandez, Cort Gautier and Randy Johnson. A

  12. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  13. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  14. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, W.C.

    1983-05-17

    This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

  15. Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was built to study a fundamental plasma process in a controlled laboratory environment. A plasma is a hot, ionized gas that can be confined using a magnetic field. Plasmas are...

  16. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  17. Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PCX Home UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment PCX Home PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation The Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX). A magnet assembly consisting of 1.5 kG dipole magnets fastened to water cooled aluminum rings is dropped inside a vacuum vessel. Plasma is created with a LaB6 cathode heated and biased with respect

  18. Effect of secondary emission on the argon plasma afterglow with large dust density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Burmaka, G. P.; Stefanovi?, I.

    2015-02-15

    A zero-dimensional, space-averaged model for argon plasma afterglow with large dust density is developed. In the model, three groups of electrons in the plasma afterglow are assumed: (i) thermal electrons with Maxwellian distribution, (ii) energetic electrons generated by metastable-metastable collisions (metastable pooling), and (iii) secondary electrons generated at collisions of ions with the electrodes, which have sufficiently large negative voltages in the afterglow. The model calculates the time-dependencies for electron densities in plasma afterglow based on experimental decay times for metastable density and electrode bias. The effect of secondary emission on electron density in the afterglow is estimated by varying secondary emission yields. It is found that this effect is less important than metastable pooling. The case of dust-free plasma afterglow is considered also, and it is found that in the afterglow the effect of secondary emission may be more important than metastable pooling. The secondary emission may increase thermal electron density n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows on a few ten percentages. The calculated time dependencies for n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows describe well the experimental results.

  19. Elena Belova | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elena Belova Principal Research Physicist, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Elena V. Belova is a Principal Research Physicist at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory. Her...

  20. Hot Plasma Partial to Bootstrap Current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hot Plasma Partial to Bootstrap Current Hot Plasma Partial to Bootstrap Current New calculations shed light on self-generated current, which could help reduce fusion reactor costs ...

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing first part of heart of ... Engineers and technicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics ...

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Honors Three Researchers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Honors Three Researchers March 12, 2012 Tweet Widget ... received the Kaul Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research and Technology ...

  3. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Princeton Plasma Physics ...

  5. SciTech Connect: "solar plasma wind"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solar plasma wind" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "solar plasma wind" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic...

  6. Technical Reports - Disclaimer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Technical...

  7. Robert G Andre | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Andre Senior Computational Scientist Dr. Robert Andre is currently a member of the Computational Plasma Physics Group at the Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory (PPPL) where he...

  8. Charles A Gentile | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Gentile Engineering and Scientific Staff, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Contact Information Phone: 609-243-2139 Email: cgentile@pppl.gov Learn More Nanotechnology Plasma physics...

  9. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 sbir_phase3_pg3.pdf (227.38 KB) More Documents & Publications SBIR_Phase_III.pdf PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Albany HTS Power Cable

  10. The Absence of Plasma in"Spark Plasma Sintering"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, Dustin M.; Anders, Andre; Dudina, Dina V.; Andersson, Joakim; Jiang, Dongtao; Unuvar, Cosan; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Mukherjee, Amiya K.

    2008-04-10

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a remarkable method for synthesizing and consolidating a large variety of both novel and traditional materials. The process typically uses moderate uni-axial pressures (<100 MPa) in conjunction with a pulsing on-off DC current during operation. There are a number of mechanisms proposed to account for the enhanced sintering abilities of the SPS process. Of these mechanisms, the one most commonly put forth and the one that draws the most controversy involves the presence of momentary plasma generated between particles. This study employees three separate experimental methods in an attempt to determine the presence or absence of plasma during SPS. The methods employed include: in-situ atomic emission spectroscopy, direct visual observation and ultra-fast in-situ voltage measurements. It was found using these experimental techniques that no plasma is present during the SPS process. This result was confirmed using several different powders across a wide spectrum of SPS conditions.

  11. Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Noji, Ryosuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2007-03-15

    Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster (APPT) were investigated. APPTs are space propulsion options suitable for microspacecraft, and have recently attracted much attention because of their low electric power requirements and simple, compact propellant system. The plasma acceleration mechanism, however, has not been well understood. In the present work, emission spectroscopy, high speed photography, and magnetic field measurements are conducted inside the electrode channel of an APPT with rectangular geometry. The successive images of neutral particles and ions give us a comprehensive understanding of their behavior under electromagnetic acceleration. The magnetic field profile clarifies the location where the electromagnetic force takes effect. As a result, it is shown that high density, ablated neutral gas stays near the propellant surface, and only a fraction of the neutrals is converted into plasma and electromagnetically accelerated, leaving the residual neutrals behind.

  12. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2008, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Dr. Glen Wurden Los Alamos National Laboratory Presentation: PDF icon Free...

  13. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  14. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  15. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  16. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  17. Diagnostics - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Diagnostics UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Diagnostics PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Diagnostics A combination Langmuir/Mach probe is radially scanned approximately 2.5" above the bottom endcap set of magnet & electrode rings. Electron temperature and plasma density is measured using a

  18. Physics Topics - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Topics UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Physics Topics PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Accretion Accretion is a fundamental process in astrophysics by which virtually all astrophysical bodies are formed. Due to gravity, the interstellar gas and plasma collapses into rotating disks around the

  19. Plasma meets nano at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma meets nano at PPPL By John Greenwald February 13, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, right, with Washington University undergraduate Mitchell Eagles in the PPPL nanolaboratory. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Physicist Yevgeny Raitses, right, with Washington University undergraduate Mitchell Eagles in the PPPL nanolaboratory. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

  20. COLLOQUIUM: Handling Plasma Wall Interactions on ITER | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab June 8, 2015, 4:15pm to 6:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Handling Plasma Wall Interactions on ITER Dr. Richard Pitts ITER Although the ITER machine design is essentially complete, with almost all major systems into the procurement phase, there are many physics issues which remain open and require continued investigation during the machine construction years in preparation for both early operation and the high performance burning plasma phases. Boundary physics and the

  1. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvn waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvn waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvn waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  2. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldis, H

    2006-10-17

    High temperature hohlraums (HTH) are designed to reach high radiation temperatures by coupling a maximum amount of laser energy into a small target in a short time. These 400-800 {micro}m diameter gold cylinders rapidly fill with hot plasma during irradiation with multiple beams in 1ns laser pulses. The high-Z plasmas are dense, (electron density, n{sub e}/n{sub c} {approx} 0.1-0.4), hot (electron temperature, T{sub e} {approx} 10keV) and are bathed in a high-temperature radiation field (radiation temperature, T{sub rad} {approx} 300eV). Here n{sub c}, the critical density, equals 9 x 10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3}. The laser beams heating this plasma are intense ({approx} 10{sup 15} - 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The coupling of the laser to the plasma is a rich regime for Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) physics. The LPI mechanisms in this study include beam deflection and forward scattering. In order to understand the LPI mechanisms, the plasma parameters must be known. An L-band spectrometer is used to measure the and electron temperature. A ride-along experiment is to develop the x-radiation emitted by the thin back wall of the half-hohlraum into a thermal radiation source.

  3. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang

    2014-07-15

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.19 - 2004.09.05 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.02 - 2004.08.10 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.01 - 2004.09.29 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and testing of AIRS water vapor retrievals

  7. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  8. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  9. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image" or "Save Image As..." Carlos Paz-Soldan, left, and Raffi Nazikian at the DIII-D tokamak. Computer simulation of a cross-section of a DIII-D plasma responding to tiny...

  10. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Schematic of NSTX tokamak at PPPL with a cross-section showing perturbations of the plasma profiles caused by...

  11. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Left: DIII-D tokamak. Right: Cross-section of plasma in which lithium has turned the emitted light green....

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Nanotechnology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Adam Cohen has been named Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy in Washington D.C....

  13. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A screen shows multiple images of the first plasma in the W7-X control room. (Photo by Sam Lazerson) PPPL physicist Novimir Pablant and Andreas Langenberg, of the Max Planck...

  14. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur P. (Ames, IA); Jaselskis, Edward J. (Ames, IA)

    1999-03-30

    A system for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remote from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer.

  15. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1999-03-30

    A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rnard-named-communications-director-princeton-plasma-physics

  17. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  18. SURFACE CHEMKIN-III: A Fortran package for analyzing heterogeneous chemical kinetics at a solid-surface - gas-phase interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the SURFACE CHEMKIN-III package. Together with CHEMKIN-III, this software facilitates the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary heterogeneous and gas-phase chemical kinetics in the presence of a solid surface. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Surface Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of a user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Surface Subroutine Library, which is a collection of about seventy modular Fortran subroutines that may be called from a user`s application code to return information on chemical production rates and thermodynamic properties. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III includes many modifications to allow treatment of multi-fluid plasma systems, for example modeling the reactions of highly energetic ionic species with a surface. Optional rate expressions allow reaction rates to depend upon ion energy rather than a single thermodynamic temperature. In addition, subroutines treat temperature as an array, allowing an application code to define a different temperature for each species. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III allows use of real (non-integer) stoichiometric coefficients; the reaction order with respect to species concentrations can also be specified independent of the reaction`s stoichiometric coefficients. Several different reaction mechanisms can be specified in the Interpreter input file through the new construct of multiple materials.

  19. Galleries | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Science Education Staff Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Organization Contact Us Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Science Education Staff Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Galleries Subscribe to RSS - Galleries 2013 Young Women's Conference 2013 Young Women's Conference63 images 2013 Plasma Camp 2013 Plasma Camp7 images

  20. Plastic Deformations in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durniak, C.; Samsonov, D.

    2011-04-29

    Complex plasmas are macroscopic model systems of real solids and liquids, used to study underdamped dynamics and wave phenomena. Plastic deformations of complex plasma crystals under slow uniaxial compression have been studied experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the lattice becomes locally sheared and that this strain is relaxed by shear slips resulting in global uniform compression and heat generation. Shear slips generate pairs of dislocations which move in opposite directions at subsonic speeds.

  1. Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics Maintaining mathematic, theory, modeling, and simulation capabilities in a broad set of areas Leadership Group Leader Pieter Swart Email Deputy Group Leader (Acting) Luis Chacon Email Contact Us Administrator Charlotte Lehman Email Electron density simulation Electron density from an orbital-free quantum molecular dynamics simulation for a warm dense plasma of deuterium at density 10 g/cc and temperature 10 eV. Mathematical, theory, modeling, and

  2. Stellarators | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stellarators Subscribe to RSS - Stellarators Figure-eight shaped tubes that confine hot plasma with external magnetic fields, developed by Lyman Spitzer in 1950 at the lab that became the PPPL. Students do cool summer research projects in one of the hottest spots More than 40 college students pursuing careers in physics, engineering and computer science are spending their summer at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory working with scientists and engineers on

  3. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  4. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  5. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  6. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  7. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  8. Characteristics of plasma properties in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenherr, Tony; Nees, Frank; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-03-15

    Pulsed plasma thrusters are electric space propulsion devices which create a highly transient plasma bulk in a short-time arc discharge that is expelled to create thrust. The transitional character and the dependency on the discharge properties are yet to be elucidated. In this study, optical emission spectroscopy and Mach-Zehnder interferometry are applied to investigate the plasma properties in variation of time, space, and discharge energy. Electron temperature, electron density, and Knudsen numbers are derived for the plasma bulk and discussed. Temperatures were found to be in the order of 1.7 to 3.1 eV, whereas electron densities showed maximum values of more than 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Both values showed strong dependency on the discharge voltage and were typically higher closer to the electrodes. Capacitance and time showed less influence. Knudsen numbers were derived to be in the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, thus, indicating a continuum flow behavior in the main plasma bulk.

  9. Energy Department Announces $23 Million for Small Businesses...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From Torrance, California, Transient Plasma Systems is developing a low-energy and cost-effective non-thermal plasma ignition system that enables more energy efficient and ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Aircraft (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... Single-Step Non-Thermal Plasma Synthesis of 3C-SiC Nanoparticles Chaukulkar, Rohan, P. ; ...

  11. Three-dimensional relativistic pair plasma reconnection with radiative feedback in the Crab Nebula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerutti, B.; Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C. E-mail: greg.werner@colorado.edu E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-02-20

    The discovery of rapid synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV from the Crab Nebula has attracted new interest in alternative particle acceleration mechanisms in pulsar wind nebulae. Diffuse shock-acceleration fails to explain the flares because particle acceleration and emission occur during a single or even sub-Larmor timescale. In this regime, the synchrotron energy losses induce a drag force on the particle motion that balances the electric acceleration and prevents the emission of synchrotron radiation above 160 MeV. Previous analytical studies and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations indicate that relativistic reconnection is a viable mechanism to circumvent the above difficulties. The reconnection electric field localized at X-points linearly accelerates particles with little radiative energy losses. In this paper, we check whether this mechanism survives in three dimension (3D), using a set of large PIC simulations with radiation reaction force and with a guide field. In agreement with earlier works, we find that the relativistic drift kink instability deforms and then disrupts the layer, resulting in significant plasma heating but few non-thermal particles. A moderate guide field stabilizes the layer and enables particle acceleration. We report that 3D magnetic reconnection can accelerate particles above the standard radiation reaction limit, although the effect is less pronounced than in 2D with no guide field. We confirm that the highest-energy particles form compact bunches within magnetic flux ropes, and a beam tightly confined within the reconnection layer, which could result in the observed Crab flares when, by chance, the beam crosses our line of sight.

  12. Extreme hydrogen plasma densities achieved in a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooij, G. J. van; Veremiyenko, V. P.; Goedheer, W. J.; de Groot, B.; Kleyn, A. W.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Versloot, T. W.; Whyte, D. G.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes

    2007-03-19

    A magnetized hydrogen plasma beam was generated with a cascaded arc, expanding in a vacuum vessel at an axial magnetic field of up to 1.6 T. Its characteristics were measured at a distance of 4 cm from the nozzle: up to a 2 cm beam diameter, 7.5x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} electron density, {approx}2 eV electron and ion temperatures, and 3.5 km/s axial plasma velocity. This gives a 2.6x10{sup 24} H{sup +} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} peak ion flux density, which is unprecedented in linear plasma generators. The high efficiency of the source is obtained by the combined action of the magnetic field and an optimized nozzle geometry. This is interpreted as a cross-field return current that leads to power dissipation in the beam just outside the source.

  13. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1993-04-27

    Work on ICRF interaction with the edge plasma is reported. ICRF generated convective cells have been established as an important mechanism for influencing edge transport and interaction with the H-mode, and for controlling profiles in the tokamak scrape-off-layer. Power dissipation by rf sheaths has been shown to be significant for some misaligned ICRF and IIBW antenna systems. Near-field antenna sheath work has been extended to the far-field case, important for experiments with low single pass absorption. Impurity modeling and Faraday screen design support has been provided for the ICRF community. In the area of core-ICRF physics, the kinetic theory of heating by applied ICRF waves has been extended to retain important geometrical effects relevant to modeling minority heated tokamak plasmas, thereby improving on the physics base that is standard in presently employed codes. Both the quasilinear theory of ion heating, and the plasma response function important in wave codes have been addressed. In separate studies, it has been shown that highly anisotropic minority heated plasmas can give rise to unstable field fluctuations in some situations. A completely separate series of studies have contributed to the understanding of tokamak confinement physics. Additionally, a diffraction formalism has been produced which will be used to access the focusability of lower hybrid, ECH, and gyrotron scattering antennas in dynamic plasma configurations.

  14. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  15. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  16. MHD plasma acceleration in plasma thrusters: a variational approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreussi, T.; Pegoraro, F.

    2010-12-14

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the MHD plasma flow equations in terms of noncanonical variables is briefly discussed for the case of stationary axisymmetric configurations. This formulation makes it possible to cast these flow equations in a variational form with mixed (closed and/or open) boundary conditions. Within this framework the modelling of the acceleration channel of an applied-field Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic (MPD) thruster for space propulsion is discussed and shown to provide general relationships between the flow features and the thruster performance.

  17. COLLOQUIUM: Plasma Mediated Effects on Biological Cells | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab October 8, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Plasma Mediated Effects on Biological Cells Professor Mounir Laroussi Old Dominion University Low temperature plasma (LTP) in air-containing gas mixtures produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O, O2-, and OH and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as NO and NO2 which exhibit strong oxidative properties and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. For example oxidation of the lipids and

  18. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2013-06-13

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  19. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  20. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Bentefour, E; Levin, Daniel S.; Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  1. High current plasma electron emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A.F.; Craig, D.

    1995-07-01

    A high current plasma electron emitter based on a miniature plasma source has been developed. The emitting plasma is created by a pulsed high current gas discharge. The electron emission current is 1 kA at 300 V at the pulse duration of 10 ms. The prototype injector described in this paper will be used for a 20 kA electrostatic current injection experiment in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. The source will be replicated in order to attain this total current requirement. The source has a simple design and has proven very reliable in operation. A high emission current, small size (3.7 cm in diameter), and low impurity generation make the source suitable for a variety of fusion and technological applications.

  2. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  3. Microwave Excitation In ECRIS plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Consoli, F.; Gammino, S.; Maimone, F.; Barbarino, S.; Catalano, R. S.; Mascali, D.; Tumino, L.

    2007-09-28

    A number of phenomena related to the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) has been better understood recently by means of the improvement of comprehension of the coupling mechanism between microwave generators and ECR plasma. In particular, the two frequency heating and the frequency tuning effect, that permit a remarkable increase of the current for the highest charge states ions, can be explained in terms of modes excitation in the cylindrical cavity of the plasma chamber. Calculations based on this theoretical approach have been performed, and the major results will be presented. It will be shown that the electric field pattern completely changes for a few MHz frequency variations and the changes in ECRIS performances can be correlated to the efficiency of the power transfer between electromagnetic field and plasma.

  4. Wakefield generation in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holkundkar, Amol; Brodin, Gert; Marklund, Mattias

    2011-09-15

    We consider wakefield generation in plasmas by electromagnetic pulses propagating perpendicular to a strong magnetic field, in the regime where the electron cyclotron frequency is equal to or larger than the plasma frequency. Particle-in-cell simulations reveal that for moderate magnetic field strengths previous results are reproduced, and the wakefield wave number spectrum has a clear peak at the inverse skin depth. However, when the cyclotron frequency is significantly larger than the plasma frequency, the wakefield spectrum becomes broadband, and simultaneously the loss rate of the driving pulse is much enhanced. A set of equations for the scalar and vector potentials reproducing these results are derived, using only the assumption of a weakly nonlinear interaction.

  5. Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2013-06-11

    A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

  6. Plasma fusion and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hideo, Kozima

    1996-12-31

    Fundamental problems of plasma fusion (controlled thermonuclear fusion) due to the contradicting demands of the magnetic confinement of plasma and suppression of instabilities occurring on and in plasma are surveyed in contrast with problems of cold fusion. Problems in cold fusion due to the complicated constituents and types of force are explained. Typical cold fusion events are explained by a model based on the presence of trapped neutrons in cold fusion materials. The events include Pons-Fleishmann effect, tritium anomaly, helium 4 production, and nuclear transmutation. Fundamental hypothesis of the model is an effectiveness of a new concept--neutron affinity of elements. The neutron affinity is defined and some bases supporting it are explained. Possible justification of the concept by statistical approach is given.

  7. EVIDENCE FOR THE OSCILLATING TWO STREAM INSTABILITY AND SPATIAL COLLAPSE OF LANGMUIR WAVES IN A SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; Papadopoulos, K.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu E-mail: Robert.MacDowall@nasa.gov

    2012-03-15

    We present observational evidence for the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) and spatial collapse of Langmuir waves in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. High time resolution observations from the STEREO A spacecraft show that Langmuir waves excited by the electron beam occur as isolated field structures with short durations {approx}3.2 ms and with high intensities exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. These short duration events are identified as the envelope solitons which have collapsed to spatial scales of a few hundred Debye lengths. The spectra of these wave packets contain an intense peak and two sidebands, corresponding to beam-resonant Langmuir waves, and down-shifted and up-shifted daughter Langmuir waves, respectively, and low-frequency enhancements below a few hundred Hz. The frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI. The observed high intensities, short scale lengths, sideband spectral structures, and low-frequency enhancements strongly suggest that the OTSI and spatial collapse of Langmuir waves probably control the nonlinear beam-plasma interactions in type III radio bursts.

  8. Fusion Basics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Basics What is Plasma? Plasma is a state of matter along with solids, liquids and gases. It consists of a partially-ionized gas, containing ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. So what does that mean? In a plasma, some electrons are freed from their atoms, allowing current and electricity to flow. In fact, one of the few naturally-occurring plasmas found here on Earth is lightning! Can you think of other plasmas? Fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury plasma. Stars, such as the sun are

  9. The 2014 ALPHA Immersion Workshop | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiments in plasma spectroscopy, Paschen's law of plasma breakdown and the use of Langmuir probes to measure plasma parameters. There were 5 participants from all over the...

  10. RFP Workshops - Center for Plasma in the Laboratory and Astrophysics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotating Wall Machine Plasma-Couette Experiment Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment - Theory Groups MHD Turbulence Transport in Fusion Devices Plasma Astrophysics RFP Theory -...

  11. Talks - Publications - Center for Plasma in the Laboratory and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotating Wall Machine Plasma-Couette Experiment Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment - Theory Groups MHD Turbulence Transport in Fusion Devices Plasma Astrophysics RFP Theory -...

  12. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  13. Pair creation and plasma oscillations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-12-15

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses.

  14. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top-5 Achievements at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in 2015 Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." From top left: 1.Magnetic island geometry revealing the mechanism for the density limit. (Reprinted with permission from Phys. Plasmas 22, 022514 2015); 2.Carlos Paz-Soldan and Raffi Nazikian advanced understanding of the control of heat bursts; 3.interior of the NSTX-U

  15. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel at Wendelstein 7-X celebration Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton University vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel shake hands in the Wendelstein 7-X control

  16. Links - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Links PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation No links yet

  17. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Haselton, Halsey H.

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  18. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  19. Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

    2006-06-01

    This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  20. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  1. NAC 444.731 - Class III Solid Waste Management Systems | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .731 - Class III Solid Waste Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NAC 444.731 - Class III...

  2. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title ...

  3. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum ...

  4. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III ...

  5. Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Authors: ...

  6. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: ... design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous ...

  7. Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III and group-V dopants in Si quantum dots Prev Next Title: Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III ...

  8. PART III … LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Page 130 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES - TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work Appendix B Award Fee Plan Appendix C Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F List of Applicable Directives Appendix G Personnel Appendix Appendix H Key Personnel Appendix I Small Business Subcontracting Plan Appendix J Diversity Plan Guidance Appendix K Program Management

  9. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and dewatering algae that

  10. INDUCTRACK III CONFIGURATION - A MAGLEV SYSTEM FOR HIGH LOADS - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal 100064929 Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Return to Search INDUCTRACK III CONFIGURATION - A

  11. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Creighton, J. Randall

    2010-03-02

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  12. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations by PPPL physicists suggest that external magnetic fields can calm plasma instabilities Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Magnetic Perturbations

  13. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Graduate student Vinícius Duarte

  14. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  15. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballou, Nathan E.

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  16. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballou, N.E.

    1992-04-14

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  17. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Q&A With the Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Dr. Stewart Prager Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Stewart Prager

  18. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McComas named vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." David McComas

  19. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL researchers advance understanding of plasma turbulence that drains heat from fusion reactors Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." PPPL Scientists Walter Guttenfelder and Yang Ren

  20. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compressing turbulence to improve inertial confinement fusion experiments Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Compression of a turbulent plasma. Image by Seth Davidovits

  1. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL scientists help test innovative device to improve efficiency of tokamaks Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Photo of white-hot limiter glowing in contact with the plasma during an EAST discharge.

  2. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that helps stabilize fusion plasmas Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Imène Goumiri led the design of a controller.

  3. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL wins contract for plasma-materials interaction studies on EAST tokamak Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Physicist Rajesh Maingi will lead the PPPL effort.

  4. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations by PPPL physicists suggest that external magnetic fields can calm plasma instabilities Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Magnetic Perturbations

  5. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Graduate student Vinícius Duarte

  6. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  7. Greg W Hammett | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    them to a wider range of plasma conditions, and on ways to suppress the turbulent loss of heat from a plasma, which could lead to a more economical fusion power plant. His...

  8. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  9. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  10. AC power | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for AC to DC converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine The electric ... Without it, the magnetic coils the current drives cannot contain and shape the plasma that ...

  11. Fast flow phenomena in a toroidal plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flow phenomena in a toroidal plasma* D. J. Den Hat-tog,+ A. F. Almagri, J. T. Chapman, H. ... figure prominently in a variety of plasma phe- nomena, including particle ...

  12. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  13. Thomson Scattering Lineshape Fitting for Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-02-04

    HFIT30 is used for interpreting lineshape (intensity versus frequency) data from Thomson and Rayleigh light scattering from a plasma, to obtain temperatures and number densities of the component species in the plasma.

  14. Press Releases Archive | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runaway electrons, a searing, laser-like beam of electric current released by plasma ... Read more... August 19, 2016 How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping ...

  15. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  16. Weekly Highlights | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... February 13th A new publication now online at the Physics of Plasmas website: Wang, L., ... Physics of Plasmas, 22(1), 012108. doi:10.10631.4906063. This paper compares multi-fluid ...

  17. Plasma dynamics above solar flare soft x-ray loop tops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-06-10

    We measure non-thermal motions in flare loop tops and above the loop tops using profiles of highly ionized spectral lines of Fe XXIV and Fe XXIII formed at multimillion-degree temperatures. Non-thermal motions that may be due to turbulence or multiple flow regions along the line of sight are extracted from the line profiles. The non-thermal motions are measured for four flares seen at or close to the solar limb. The profile data are obtained using the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. The multimillion-degree non-thermal motions are between 20 and 60 km s{sup 1} and appear to increase with height above the loop tops. Motions determined from coronal lines (i.e., lines formed at about 1.5 MK) tend to be smaller. The multimillion-degree temperatures in the loop tops and above range from about 11 MK to 15 MK and also tend to increase with height above the bright X-ray-emitting loop tops. The non-thermal motions measured along the line of sight, as well as their apparent increase with height, are supported by Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly measurements of turbulent velocities in the plane of the sky.

  18. Marina Gorelenkova | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marina Gorelenkova Computational Project Engineer, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Contact Information Phone: 609-243-2137 Email: mgorelen@pppl.gov

  19. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration: How it Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-05

    This animation explains how electrons can be efficiently accelerated to high energy using wakes created in a plasma.

  20. DOEFES_Plasma_Frontiers_Townhall_Vay.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.-L. Vay, E. Esarey, A. Koniges Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory J. Barnard, A. Friedman, D. Grote Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Frontiers of Plasma Science Workshops - Town Hall June 30-July 1, 2015 Predictive Community Computational Tools for Virtual Plasma Science Experiments 2 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Office of Science Advanced simula.ons play an increasingly important role in plasma science . Plasmas exhibit very complex interrelated mul.-scale mul.-physics phenomena: è

  1. Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Science Education Laboratory Overview Gallery: (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by DC Glow Discharges for Undergraduate Laboratories) (Photo by Atmospheric Plasma Laboratory) (Photo by 3D Printing Laboratory) (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by Plasma Speaker with 200 Hz input) (Photo by Dusty Plasma Laboratory) The Science Education Laboratory is a fusion (pun intended) of research between education and plasma science. This unique facility includes a teaching

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate-change Climate change en Using powerful computers, physicists uncover mechanism that stabilizes plasma within tokamaks...

  3. Careers/ Human Resources | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources Employment Opportunities Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Careers Human ...

  4. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  5. A Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single- and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Silicon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study examines the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

  6. Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2011-10-04

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  7. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  8. Expert Topics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AC power Carbon-free Climate change Education Emergency planning Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Fusion roadmapping ITER Inertial confinement fusion International collaborations Laser diagnostics Lithium Magnetic reconnection NSTX-U Nanotechnology Nuclear energy Nuclear safety Particle beam dynamics Plasma astrophysics Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics Power system design Power systems Quality assurance STEM Science literacy Stellarators Surface science Sustainability Tokamaks

  9. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Motley, Robert W.; Glanz, James

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  10. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  11. Plasma Turbulence Simulations Reveal Promising Insight for Fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Turbulence Simulations Reveal Promising Insight for Fusion Energy By Argonne ... Davis; Stephane Ethier, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Simulation of ...

  12. Contacts - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Contacts UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Contacts PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Contacts Principal Investigator Cary B. Forest Graduate Student Cami Collins Engineers John Wallace Mike Clark Undergraduate Researchers Jonathan Jara-Almonte Kristine Garot

  13. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, Charles W.; Shearer, James W.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  14. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  15. Neutrino oscillations in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendona, J. T.; Haas, F.

    2013-07-15

    A new model for the joint neutrino flavor and plasma oscillations is introduced, in terms of the dynamics of the neutrino flavor polarization vector in a plasma background. Fundamental solutions are found for both time-invariant and time-dependent media, considering slow and fast variations of the electron plasma density. The model is shown to be described by a generalized Hamiltonian formalism. In the case of a broad spectrum of electron plasma waves, a statistical approach indicates the shift of both equilibrium value and frequency oscillation of flavor coherence, due to the existence of a turbulent plasma background.

  16. Analysis of radiofrequency discharges in plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, D.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1992-08-04

    Separation of laser optogalvanic signals in plasma into two components: (1) an ionization rate change component, and (2) a photoacoustic mediated component. This separation of components may be performed even when the two components overlap in time, by measuring time-resolved laser optogalvanic signals in an rf discharge plasma as the rf frequency is varied near the electrical resonance peak of the plasma and associated driving/detecting circuits. A novel spectrometer may be constructed to make these measurements. Such a spectrometer would be useful in better understanding and controlling such processes as plasma etching and plasma deposition. 15 figs.

  17. Analysis of radiofrequency discharges in plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Devendra; McGlynn, Sean P.

    1992-01-01

    Separation of laser optogalvanic signals in plasma into two components: (1) an ionization rate change component, and (2) a photoacoustic mediated component. This separation of components may be performed even when the two components overlap in time, by measuring time-resolved laser optogalvanic signals in an rf discharge plasma as the rf frequency is varied near the electrical resonance peak of the plasma and associated driving/detecting circuits. A novel spectrometer may be constructed to make these measurements. Such a spectrometer would be useful in better understanding and controlling such processes as plasma etching and plasma deposition.

  18. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  19. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.