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Sample records for iii nj ct

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    North NJ Site - NJ 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Middlesex North, NJ Alternate Name(s): Middlesex Landfill Middlesex Municipal Landfill NJ.05-2 NJ.05-4 Location: Mountain Avenue to Bound Brook, Middlesex, New Jersey NJ.05-2 Historical Operations: Served as a disposal site for low-level radioactive pitchblende ore generated from activites at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. NJ.05-2 NJ.05-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.05-3 NJ.05-4 Site

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    18 Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STANDARD OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. OF NJ (NJ.18) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Exxon Research and Engineering Co. NJ.18-1 NJ.18-4 Location: 1900 Linden Avenue , Linden , New Jersey NJ.18-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 - 1991 NJ.18-2 Site Operations: From its Linden, NJ laboratory facilities, provided consulting services to the MED/AEC and acted as a broker in the

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maywood Site - NJ 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Maywood, NJ Alternate Name(s): Maywood Chemical Works Maywood Chemical Company Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) Stepan Chemical Company NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-7 NJ.10-11 Location: 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood/Rochelle Park, New Jersey NJ.10-4 Historical Operations: Processed monazite sands for extraction of rare earth compounds and mantle-grade thorium nitrates. NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-4 NJ.10-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.10-1 NJ.10-10

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex Sampling Plant - NJ 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling Plant - NJ 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Middlesex Sampling Plant, NJ Alternate Name(s): None Location: Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, New Jersey NJ.04-2 Historical Operations: Processed and stored domestic and foreign ores containing uranium, thorium, and berryllium. NJ.04-4 NJ.04-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.04-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.04-6 NJ.04-7 NJ.04-8 NJ.04-9 NJ.04-10 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NJ.04-11 NJ.04-12

  5. SolarWorks NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Solar Product: SolarWorks NJ, LLC, a provider of turnkey solar electricity installations and renewable energy solutions. References: SolarWorks NJ1 This article is a...

  6. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu 0 700 1,400 2,100 2,800 3,500 US MidAtl NJ ... 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours 0 400 800 1,200 ...

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Heyden Chemical Corp. (NJ.19 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Cyanamid NJ.19-2 Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.19-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.19-1 Site Operations: Commercial chemical operation. AEC was interested in their process for keeping thorium oxide in suspension. No indication of AEC contractual relationship with Heyden. NJ.19-1 NJ.19-3 Site Disposition:

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Electric Corp - NJ 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Electric Corp - NJ 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. ( NJ.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: North American Phillips Lighting Westinghouse Electric Company Lamp Divisions North American Philips Lighting Corporation NJ.03-1 NJ.03-2 NJ.03-3 Location: One Westinghouse Plaza - Building 7 , Bloomfield , New Jersey NJ.03-4 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.03-3 Site Operations: From 1941 to 1943, developed a photochemical

  9. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bakelite Corp - NJ 35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bakelite Corp - NJ 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bakelite Corp (NJ 35) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bound Brook , New Jersey NJ.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 NJ.35-1 Site Operations: Processed nickel metal and various chemicals in support of the K-25 plant. No indication that radioactive materials were handled. NJ.35-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive material was used at the site NJ.35-1

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bowen Lab - NJ 33

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bowen Lab - NJ 33 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bowen Lab (NJ.33) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Bowen Engineering, Inc. NJ.33-1 Location: North Branch , New Jersey NJ.33-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.33-2 Site Operations: Test runs of spray calcining of boiled down pitchblende raffinates was conducted on May 15 and 16, 1951. Equipment used was decontaminated on May 17. NJ.33-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fairmont Chemical Co. (NJ.25 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Newark , New Jersey NJ.25-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.25-1 Site Operations: Company was a commercial chemical company identified as a rare earths processor (hafnium). NJ.25-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NJ.25-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary

  13. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    icon arravt051tifeinberg2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wyckoff Steel Co - NJ 20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Steel Co - NJ 20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wyckoff Steel Co (NJ 20) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: ...

  15. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Callite Tungsten Co - NJ 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Callite Tungsten Co - NJ 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Callite Tungsten Co. (NJ.36 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Union City , New Jersey NJ.36-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.36-2 Site Operations: Metal fabrication - cold rolling - of uranium metal indicated at this site. NJ.36-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - only one document was found that indicated uranium was handled at this site - No indication of quantities

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Princeton University - NJ 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY (NJ.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.08-2 Site Operations: During 1940's, performed experiments on uranium isotope separation and experiments for the development of diffusion barrier material for the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. NJ.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Company - NJ 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker and Company - NJ 13 Site ID (CSD Index Number): NJ 13 Site Name: Baker and Company Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Engelhard Industries, Baker Platinum Division Alternate Name Documents: NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Location: 113 Astor Street , Newark , New Jersey Location Documents: NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): From 1943 through the mid-1950s, the facility processed spent catalyst (contaminated platinum) to recover the platinum for the

  19. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III .. III A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANAL.OGUE STATES IN 41K AND 23 Na by George A lbert Keyworth II Department of Physics Duke University A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Duke University 1968 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANALOGUE STATES IN 41 K - AND 23 Na ,. by George Albert Keyworth II

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vitro Corp of America - NJ 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NJ 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Vitro Corp. of America (NJ.02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Vitro Laboratories NJ.02-1 Location: West Orange , New Jersey NJ.02-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.02-3 Site Operations: Performed work that involved conversion of low enrichment uranium dioxide to uranium carbon spheres and for the separation of fission products. NJ.02-3 NJ.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Raritan Arsenal - NJ 32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radiological Surveys Documents: Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Site Status Documents: NJ.32-2 LTSM Requirements Text: LTSM ...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Picatinny Arsenal - NJ 31

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not ... consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NJ.31-2 Also see Documents Related to ...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Elimination of Bloomfield Tool Corp.; November 18, 1987 NJ.21-3 - AEC Memorandum; Smith, Belmore, Reichard to Stroke; Machining of Uranium Slugs from the Lackawanna Rolled ...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: J.T. BAKER CHEMICAL CO. ( NJ.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Subsidiary of Vick Chemical Company NJ.0-02-1 Location: 600 North Broad Street , Phillipsburg , New Jersey NJ.0-02-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-02-3 Site Operations: Commercial operation - licensed to process and distribute refined source material. NJ.0-02-2 NJ.0-02-3 NJ.0-02-4 NJ.0-02-5 Site Disposition:

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. (NJ.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 271 Grove Avenue , Verona or Elizabeth , New Jersey NJ.0-03-1 NJ.0-03-2 NJ.0-03-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-03-3 Site Operations: Provided nickel to Linde. NJ.0-03-3 NJ.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials were handled at this site. NJ.0-03-3 Radioactive

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Pulverizing Co - NJ 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pulverizing Co - NJ 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Pulverizing Co. (NJ.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Albany Road , Moorestown , New Jersey NJ.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-01-2 Site Operations: No record that radioactive materials were used at this site. NJ.0-01-1 NJ.0-01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No potential for contamination - No indication that International Pulverizing

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfaltz and Bauer Inc - Richfield - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    28 Richfield - NJ 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PFALTZ AND BAUER, INC. - RICHFIELD (NJ.28) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Richfield , New Jersey NJ.28-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.28-1 Site Operations: Commercial supplier of thorium nitrate for manufacture of gas lantern mantles. NJ.28-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No record of AEC contracts NJ.28-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials

  8. New Jersey Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power) Place: New Jersey Sector: Solar Product: A photovoltaic engineering...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Radium Corp - NJ 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radium Corp - NJ 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U S Radium Corp (NJ.09) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - NJ 24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NJ 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Aluminum Co of America (NJ.24 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ALCOA (Garwood Plant) NJ.24-1 Location: Garwood , New Jersey NJ.24-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 NJ.24-5 Site Operations: Constructed and altered die-casting dies and conducted die casting operation on uranium slugs. NJ.24-1 NJ.24-3 NJ.24-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual contamination considered remote due to limited

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Pipe and Foundry Co - NJ 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pipe and Foundry Co - NJ 23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U.S. PIPE AND FOUNDRY CO. (NJ.23 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Burlington , New Jersey NJ.23-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 NJ.23-2 Site Operations: Performed experimental development of beryllium tubing. NJ.23-2 NJ.23-3 NJ.23-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were used at the site NJ.23-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  12. Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment...

  13. The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J Droids, a science ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Engineers but will eventually transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Aerial Photograph of the Maywood, New Jersey, Site NJ.10-1 - DOE Letter;...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tube Reducing Co - NJ 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fernald, Ohio; December 11, 1994, and Attachments NJ.11-4 - DOE Memorandum; DeLaney to Lynch; Subject: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support of...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wayne Site - NJ 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This site is currently managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers but will eventually transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. NJ.16-1 - DOE ...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING CORP. (NJ.34) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: South Yard, New York Shipbuilding facility on the Delaware River , Camden , New Jersey NJ.34-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.34-2 Site Operations: NYX Project (1951 - 1954) - fabricated and assembled equipment (reactors) for the AEC Savannah River Plant under subcontract to AEC Prime. Later built the

  18. Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse (Waste Management Conference 2007) Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse (Waste Management Conference 2007) (431.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Assessing and

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E I Du Pont - NJ 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - NJ 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites E.I. Dupont, NJ Alternate Name(s): E.I. Du Pont De Nemours and Company E.I. Du Pont Company Dupont Chambers Works Plant NJ.06-1 NJ.06-5 Location: Pennsville and Carney Townships, Southeast bank of the Delaware River, Deepwater, New Jersey NJ.06-5 Historical Operations: Development of a process for converting uranium oxide to uranium tetraflouride, production of uranium tetraflouride, research into conversion of uranium oxide to uranium metal, and production of

  20. The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J Droids, a science club in Warren, N.J., at the end of a long day of competing with the Science Bowl trophies in the foreground. They took home the largest of the trophies after winning the U.S. Department of Energy's New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Feb. 21. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: John Hubert Associates, North Cape May, NJ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in North Cape May, NJ, that scored a HERS 46 without PV or HERS 9 with 6.5 kW of PV. The two-story, 1,871-ft2 home has advanced-framed above-grade walls...

  2. NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I &-?I, I . . . ,- . . -' * 3 8OC NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY: _____ -&-&~--------STATE: . . ------ .- OWNER(S) -------- P=st:~__------_-____--------- Current: ~~~~~~~-~----~-~~-~--~-~~~ Owner contacted q yes I-J no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ~_--_---_-~~----- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical Studies? $0 Sample & Analysis E Production 0.

  3. NJ.?3

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 Contract Terms ......Supporting chemical re- search on uranium chemistry. (See ... first industrial firms to enter the atomic energy field and ...

  4. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe May 21, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Adam Cohen, center, PPPL's Deputy Director for Operations, and other PPPL employees clean up the grounds to celebrate Earth Week last month. Some 32 volunteers collected 350 pounds of trash and 35 pounds of leaves for composting. PPPL's composting and recycling efforts resulted in a 40 percent reduction in the amount of trash

  5. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe May 21, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Adam Cohen, center, PPPL's Deputy Director for Operations, and other PPPL employees clean up the grounds to celebrate Earth Week last month. Some 32 volunteers collected 350 pounds of trash and 35 pounds of leaves for composting. PPPL's composting and recycling efforts resulted in a 40 percent reduction in the amount of trash

  6. **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 3, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: John Hubert Associates, EXIT-0, North Cape May, NJ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hubert Associates EXIT-0 House North Cape May, NJ DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are

  8. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University

  9. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J TOC i PART III List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J - List of Attachments Table of Contents Attachment No: Attachment: J.1 Appendix A - Advance Understandings on Human Resources J.2 Appendix B - Performance and Evaluation Measurement Plan J.3 Appendix C - Special Financial Institution Account Agreement J.4 Appendix D - Budget Program J.5 Appendix E - PPPL DOE (Lessee) Ingrants J.6 Appendix F - Contractor Resources, Commitments and

  10. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  11. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seymour CT Site - CT 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Seymour, CT Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Company Seymour Specialty Wire Reactive Metals, Inc. National Distillers and Chemical Co. Havens Plant CT.02-2 CT.02-3 CT.02-6 Location: 15 Franklin Street, Seymour, Connecticut CT.02-4 Historical Operations: Procured, processed and stored uranium oxides, salts, and metals for AEC and processed the products by cold-forming or extruding natural uranium metal. CT.02-3 CT.02-9 Eligibility Determination:

  13. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Counties included in New York City metro area The list below includes the counties in the EIA-878 definition for New York City Metro Area. Bergen County, NJ Bronx County, NY Essex County, NJ Fairfield County, CT Hudson County, NJ Hunterdon County, NJ Kings County, NY Litchfield County (partial), CT Middlesex County, NJ Monmouth County, NJ Morris County, NJ Nassau County, NY New Haven County (partial), CT New York County, NY Ocean County, NJ Orange County, NY Passaic County, NJ Putnam, NY Queens

  14. WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Texas A&M University College Station, TX February 12-16, 2005 WCI-III Steering Committee Philippe Chomaz Francesca Gulminelli Joe Natowitz Sherry Yennello

  15. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy...

  16. CT Solar Loan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  17. CT Solar Lease

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CT Solar Lease allows homeowners to lease a photovoltaic (PV) or solar thermal system, with fixed monthly payments, for a term of 20 years, at no upfront down payment.* This program, which takes...

  18. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers: Solid-State Lighting Science Center for Frontiers of ... III-Nitride Nanowires HomeEnergy ResearchEFRCsSolid-State Lighting Science EFRC...

  19. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the phase-space integral ...III-1 I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy The evaluation of V ud , experiment and theory ......

  20. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy quark three-body collisional energy loss in quark-gluon plasma...... III-1 C. M. Ko and Wei Liu Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy ion ...

  1. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...III-1 A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, V.Z. Goldberg, G. Rogachev, E. Johnson, S. Brown, K. Kemper, A. Momotyuk, and B. Roeder The Trojan Horse Method: an Indirect Technique...

  2. Part III The President

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    III The President Executive Order 13653-Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 05, 2013 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717...

  3. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Offshore Place: Otterup, Denmark Zip: 5450 Sector: Wind energy Product: Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project...

  4. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  5. Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporate Technology CT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place: Erlangan, Germany Sector: Solar Product: R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently...

  6. George F. Smoot III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George F. Smoot III About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit ⇒ Navigate Section About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit smoot 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) * Bibliography of Dr. Smoot's Works * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) The October 3, 2006 press conference at Berkeley Lab introducing its newest Nobel Prize winner, George Smoot, to a throng of visiting media is available for viewing online.

  7. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  8. Iii;.} An Ann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iii;.} An Ann otated Bibli ography of the Red - Coc kaded Woodpecker bv * Jerom e A. Jack son A Publi cati on of the Sava nnah River Plonl Notional En... ironmentol Research Pork PrOQ rom United Stales Dep ortment of Ene r gy An Annotated Bibliography of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker, Picoides borealis Jerome A. Jackson Department of Biological Sciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, Mississippi A Publication of the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park Prepared

  9. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  10. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M280 Attachment 1 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. DIRECTIVE NUMBER DATE DOE DIRECTIVE TITLE APPH Chapter X Revision 10 09/08/98 Accounting Practices & Procedures Handbook Chapter

  11. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  12. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  13. SPIDERS Phase III

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPIDERS Phase III John Bothof Burns & McDonnell Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a microgrid is "a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid [and can] connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island-mode." Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a

  14. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January

  15. SECTION III. NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III. NUCLEAR THEORY Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in 28Si and 208Pb A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonances in 28Si, 40Ca, 58Ni, and 116Sn by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance in 58Ni by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets,

  16. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  17. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  18. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    County, NH Merrimack County, NH Middlesex County, MA Nantucket County, MA Norfolk ... NY Litchfield County (partial), CT Middlesex County, NJ Monmouth County, NJ Morris ...

  19. CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Investment Partners LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: WC2A 2AZ Sector: Carbon Product: Venture capital arm of...

  20. Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT...

  1. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jersey City NJ Site - NJ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FACT SHEET This fact sheet provides information about the Jersey City, New Jersey, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Jersey ...

  3. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location...

  4. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  5. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  6. NJ_19-3.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - _ / ., :.- :.- :

  7. NJ_21-1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. NJ Clean Energy- WARMAdvantage Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NOTE: Residents affected by Hurricane Sandy are eligible for an additional incentive of $200 for qualifying furnaces, boilers, and water heaters purchased after October 29, 2012.  It should also be...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dorr Corp - CT 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dorr Corp. (CT.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Dorr - Oliver Corporation CT.14-2 Location: 737 Canal Street , Stamford , Connecticut CT.14-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 CT.14-3 Site Operations: Conducted heat treatment tests of source material using depleted uranium in an enclosed calciner CT.14-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.14-3

  10. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  11. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Recap Workshop Information Program Schedule Registration List Announcement Letter Tentative Outline for Book Steering Committee Presentation Files (Power Point or PDF) Saturday (Morning, Afternoon) Sunday (Morning, Afternoon) Monday (Morning, Afternoon) Tuesday (Morning, Afternoon) Wednesday (Morning, Afternoon) Misc. Pictures

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition:

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Canaan Site - CT 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW CANAAN SITE (CT.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Canaan , Connecticut CT.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site located in this city CT.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Torrington Co - CT 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TORRINGTON CO. (CT.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Torrington Co. - Specialties Division CT.09-1 Location: Torrington , Connecticut CT.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.09-1 Site Operations: Performed swaging experiments on small quantities of uranium rods circa 1951 to 1953 as a subcontractor to Bridgeport Brass Co. CT.09-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Combustion Engineering Co - CT 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Combustion Engineering Co - CT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Combustion Engineering, CT (CT.03 ) Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Designated Name: Combustion Engineering Alternate Name: CE Site Asea Brown Boveri S1C Prototype CT.03-1 Location: 1000 Prospect Hill Road, Windsor, Connecticut CT.03-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.03-1 Site Operations: Used natural, enriched, and highly enriched uranium to make fuel assemblies for the AEC. CT.03-3 CT.03-4 Site Disposition: Eligible

  17. Predix and Robots in CT Systems | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robots and Predix make Beijing's CT factory brilliant Guoshuang Cai 2015.04.16 GE Healthcare's Beijing plant is one of the largest factories producing computed tomography (CT) ...

  18. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  19. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer...

  20. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for GRED III Phase II Citation Bernie Karl. 2010. GRED III Phase II. p....

  1. William A. Goddard III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    william a. goddard iii Principal Investigator Email: wag@wag.caltech.edu Dr. Goddard is a pioneer in developing methods for quantum mechanics (QM), force fields, molecular dynamics (MD), and Monte Carlo predictions on chemical and materials systems and is actively involved in applying these methods to ceramics, semiconductors, superconductors, thermoelectrics, metal alloys, polymers, proteins, nuclei acids, Pharma ligands, nanotechnology, and energetic materials. He uses QM methods to determine

  2. Thomas Francis Miller III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THOMAS FRANCIS MILLER III Principal Investigator Email: tfm@caltech.edu Dr. Miller's research group develops theoretical and computational methods to understand a variety of molecular processes, including enzyme catalysis, solar-energy conversion, dendrite formation in lithium batteries, and the dynamics of soft matter and biological systems. An important aspect of this challenge is that many systems exhibit dynamics that couple vastly different timescales and lengthscales. A primary goal of

  3. SUPPLEMENT III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION SCHEDULE FOR: ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office (As of January 19, 2016) THIRD SUPPLEMENT TO LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION ANNOUNCEMENT FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEES FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS Solicitation Number: DE-SOL- DE-SOL-0007791 OMB Control Number: 1910-5134; OMB Expiration Date 11/30/2016 Announcement Type: Supplemental Supplement Date: January 19, 2016 The above-referenced Loan Guarantee Solicitation

  4. Joel W. Ager III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w. ager iii Principal Investigator Email: jwager@lbl.gov Dr. Ager's research interests include the fundamental electronic and transport characteristics of photovoltaic materials, development of new photoanodes and photocathodes based on abundant elements for solar fuels production, and the development of new oxide- and sulfide-based transparent conductors. In JCAP, Dr. Ager is investigating interactions of carbon-based supports with CO2-reduction electrocatalysts. His group is studying

  5. Registration List - WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Registration List Sandro Barlini, INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Wolfgang Bauer, Michigan State Aldo Bonasera, Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN Alexander Botvina, Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow Kyrill Bugaev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Xavier Campi, LPTMS Abdou Chbihi, GANIL Philippe Chomaz, GANIL Marco Cinausero, INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Gianluca Colo', Dipartimento di Fisica Romualdo deSouza, Indiana University/IUCF Massimo Di Toro,

  6. John H. Hale III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    John H. Hale III About Us John H. Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John H. Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged

  7. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  8. Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  9. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PDF icon SBIRPhaseIII.pdf More Documents...

  10. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  11. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    82 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the

  14. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  15. GRED III Phase II | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III Phase II GRED III Phase II Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: To gain a better understanding of the geothermal reservoir at Chena Hot Springs Resort in Alaska; Test and document the reliability of previous predictions as to the nature of the reservoir. egs_karl_gred_3_phase_2.pdf (601.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology

  16. Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue...

  17. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  18. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  19. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  20. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Terminal Woodbridge, NJ 1,000 Williams Energy Services New Haven, CT 500 Motiva Enterprises LLC New Haven, CT 250 Motiva Enterprises LLC Providence, RI 250 Source: Energy...

  1. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM SBIR_Phase_III.pdf (228.04 KB) More Documents & Publications SBIR_Phase_III.pdf PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 Albany HTS Power Cable

  2. "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul ... CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC wCCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore ...

  3. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  4. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  5. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

  6. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  7. Chest wall invasion by lung cancer: limitations of CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennes, D.R.; Glazer, G.M.; Wimbish, K.J.; Gross, B.H.; Long, R.W.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-three patients with peripheral pulmonary malignancies contiguous with a pleural surface were evaluated for chest wall invasion by computed tomography (CT). CT criteria included pleural thickening adjacent to the tumor, encroachment on or increased density of the extrapleural fat, asymmetry of the extrapleural soft tissues adjacent to the tumor, apparent mass invading the chest wall, and rib destruction. The CT scans were classified as positive, negative, or equivocal for invasion, and a decision matrix was constructed comparing CT results with pathologic data. CT scanning has low accuracy in assessing chest wall invasion in patients with peripheral lung cancers.

  8. Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used with this technology. Below is a...

  9. Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes

  10. Jack R. Ferrell III | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jack R. Ferrell III Jack R. Ferrell III Research Engineer Jack.Ferrell@nrel.gov | 303-384-7777 Research Interests Jack Ferrell works in the Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development (R&D) group and manages tasks on analytical standardization for pyrolysis oil and on kinetic and hydrodynamic modeling of biomass-to-biofuels processes. Research interests include: Standardization of analytical techniques for the analysis of bio-oils Electrochemical upgrading of biomass-derived

  11. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) ...

  12. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike III II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  13. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project III Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  14. Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte...

  15. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  16. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT CODES (TRUCON-III) Revision 2 July 2012 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP 10-3458, Revision 1 DOE/WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT CODES (TRUCON-III) Revision 2 July 2012 Approved by: [Signature on File] Date:_ 12 July 2012 _ J. R. Stroble, Director, Office of the National TRU Program DOE/WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2, July 2012 3 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information PO Box

  17. SBIR_Phase_III.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SBIR_Phase_III.pdf SBIR_Phase_III.pdf (228.04 KB) More Documents & Publications PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Albany HTS Power Cable

  18. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  19. Doublet III neutral beam power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

  20. Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimization of ozone dose and contact time for CT calculations was performed in the pilot ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Ozone: Science and Engineering (The Journal of the ...

  1. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  2. New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT), and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada NNSA Statement Regarding Nevada National Security Site Management & Operating Contract WASHINGTON - On August 26, 2016, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) awarded the contract for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to Nevada Site Science Support and Technologies Corporation (NVS3T). The... NNSA Awards Nevada National Security Site Management & Operating Contract to NVS3T Contract Award Provides Best

  3. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    pay more for electricity than the average U.S. household. * New Jersey homes are 20% larger than the average U.S. home. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Nearly half the energy consumed in ...

  4. Valero Refining Company - NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56325 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  5. NJ_0-03-1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  6. NJ Clean Energy- Residential New Construction Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NOTE: The program offerings have been significantly changed for the fiscal year 2016. The changes go into effect starting September 1st, 2015.  More information about changes can be accessed in the...

  7. PPPL_Procurement_map_NJ_FY15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procured Materials and Services 2015 (10.8M) small business total firms 23.1k 27.2k 2 1 2 3 4 12 6 7 Hunterdon Somerset Middlesex Morris ...

  8. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    These ores, imported for use in the nation's early atomic energy program, were assayed at ... mile away. In 1980's, the contaminated residential properties were cleaned up, and the ...

  9. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Maywood NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    All of the residential properties have been remediated under an ongoing Comprehensive ... was assigned to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as a decontamination research and ...

  10. ZERH Training Session: East Brunswick, NJ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  11. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Wayne NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 26 Federal Plaza, New York, NY 10278 tel: 212-264-0120 mailto: allen.d.roos@usace.army.mil, web: http:www.nan.usace.army.mil US Army Corps of Engineers New York District

  12. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  13. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  14. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  15. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  16. American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  17. MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

  18. MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Chain and Cable Co - CT 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chain and Cable Co - CT 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Chain and Cable Co (CT.15 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bridgeport , Connecticut CT.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.15-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving uranium metal reclamation. CT.15-1 CT.15-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials and short duration of

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    England Lime Co - CT 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW ENGLAND LIME CO. (CT.10) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: NELCO (Magnesium Division) CT.10-1 Location: Canaan , Connecticut CT.10-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.10-1 Site Operations: AEC source for magnesium and calcium. Conducted limited tests to evaluate potential for recovery of magnesium from uranium residues. CT.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    05 Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    III VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US ... InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of ...

  3. Microsoft Word - SECARB Phase III CO2 sequestration Final EA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase III Early Test March 2009 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy SECARB Phase III Early Test National Energy ...

  4. Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and guidance for Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ...

  5. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 PDF icon 000521 & ...

  6. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PDF icon sbirphase3pg3.pdf...

  7. M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities

  8. J. Taylor Childers III | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Taylor Childers III Assistant Physicist Education 2002 - 2007 University of Minnesota, PhD. in Physics 1998 - 2002 University of Kentucky, BS. in Physics Experience 2013 - present Assistant Physicist at Argonne National Lab, Chicago, IL, USA 2011 - 2013 Fellow at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland 2007 - 2011 Postdoctoral Researcher at Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Summary of Research I am an Assistant Physicist at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, USA. As a member of ATLAS, I am

  9. III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS For fiscal year 2010, no DOE programs have compliance requirements that are distinct from the general compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance (General Compliance Supplement). Therefore, audits of recipients and subrecipients with fiscal years ending in 2010 should be conducted in accordance with the compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance. For fiscal years subsequent to 2010, program-specific compliance

  10. Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-34 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 4-1 Chapter IV This chapter addresses the role of infrastructure in ensuring U.S. energy security in a global marketplace. It first describes the evolution of the concept of U.S. energy security in response to interconnected global energy markets. It then discusses the security

  11. Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later

  12. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates...

  13. Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act (1.28 MB) More Documents & Publications American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000

  14. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  15. Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, W.W.M.; Solti-Bohman, L.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Gruskin, P.

    1984-12-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex is a readily recognizable and treatable entity that is more common than previously realized. Cholesterol granuloma grows slowly in the petrous apex as a mass lesion until it produces hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, and facial twitching. Twelve cases of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex are illustrated; ten of these analyzed in detail, especially with respect to CT findings. A sharply and smoothly marginated expansile lesion in the petrous apex, isodense with plain and nonenhancing on CT, is in all probability a cholesterol granuloma. Preoperative recognition by CT is important for planning proper treatment.

  16. BAIC CT T SK Holdings JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Place: Beijing Municipality, China Product: China-based JV to manufacture and sell electric cars. References: BAIC, CT&T & SK Holdings JV1 This article is a stub. You can...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mayor R. Mortemsem; Subject: Information regarding Fenn Mfg. Site; December 2, 1994 CT.11-3 - US AEC Letter; R. Smith to D. Sturges; Subject: Uranium Fabrication; November 8, 195

  18. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02

  19. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and

  20. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26

  1. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference III. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference III was held to review the status of transmission substation diagnostics by EPRI, as well as that of the universities, manufacturers, testing organizations, and other researchers. The papers presented were organized under three categories of diagnostics: Transformers, Miscellaneous Equipment, and Systems. A reception on the evening of the first day of the Conference provided an opportunity for the researchers, utilities and manufacturers to display their equipment for the attendees. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for articles from this conference.

  2. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell

  3. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00039 Revision 1 August 28, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 8,770 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location

  4. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00076 Revision 1 Posted Date: December 2, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,066 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  5. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2015-00014 Revision 1 Posted Date: May 29, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,894 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  6. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 1 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 722 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cells 5A and 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  7. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2016-00025 Revision 1 Post Date: May 27, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 744 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  8. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SRR-ESH-2016-00052 Revision 1 Post Date: August 26, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 11,143 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  9. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SRR-ESH-2016-00068 Revision 0 Post Date: August 26, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 11,610 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  10. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00052 Revision 1 Post Date: August 28, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,948 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  11. CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on

  12. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  13. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  14. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  15. Extraction Based on in situ Formation of Dithiocarbamate for Separation of Am(III) from Ln(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyashita, Sunao; Yanaga, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Suganuma, Hideo; Satoh, Isamu

    2007-07-01

    A new solvent extraction technique based on in situ extractant formation of dithiocarbamate derivatives was constructed for the purpose of separation of Am(III) from Ln(III). Ammonium salts of dithiocarbamate in this technique are formed during the extraction course by the reaction between secondary amines and carbon disulfide in organic phase. The effects of substituent of secondary amines against the behavior of in situ formation of dithiocarbamate and the distribution behaviors of Am(III) and Ln(III)(especially Eu(III)) into nitrobenzene phase using in situ formation of dithiocarbamate were investigated. It was revealed that amines containing substituent in {alpha} position of amine were not suited that for in situ extractant formation method. The values of separation factor of Am(III)/Eu(III) >10{sup 4} were obtained by the new method using five di-substituted amines/CS{sub 2}/nitrobenzene system. (authors)

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location

  17. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  18. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ranallo, F. N.; Judy, P. F.; Gierada, D. S.; Fain, S. B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12100 mA s currenttime product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP

  19. Best Practices Case Study: Tindall Homes - Princeton, NJ, Legends at Mansfield, Columbus, NJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case Study of Tindall Homes, who worked with Building America to design an optimal package including advanced framing, insulated precast concrete basement walls, polyurethane foam in the walls, and R-49 of batt plus blown cellulose in the attics. Some homes included a detached garden shed with photovoltaic panel-covered roofs.

  20. Title III of the Defense Production Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Title III of the Defense Production Act Title III of the Defense Production Act Matthew Seaford presentation on Title III of the Defense Production Act at the Industry Roundtable. 2_seaford_roundtable.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications A National Strategic Plan For Advanced Manufacturing Market Drivers for Biofuels Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Supplement to the President's Budget (February 2010)

  1. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  2. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology, Geochemistry, Hydrothermal Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  3. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy Applications March 20, ... Wang is a Challenge Leader in the Solid State Lighting Science Energy Frontier Research ...

  4. Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Authors: ...

  5. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The coyote universe III: simulation suite and ...

  6. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calvin O. Butts, III About Us Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III - President, State University of New York (SUNY) College at Old Westbury Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, is President of State University of New York, College at Old Westbury and Pastor of the renowned Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City. Regularly sought by leaders in politics, business, and the media for his insight and opinions, he has had a pervasive impact across his career on such wide-ranging issues as

  7. Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interfacial Chemistry of III-V Semiconductors for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting You are ...

  8. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SDSS-III: Massive...

  9. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: ... agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the CEQ's regulations. ...

  10. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Zhang, Di; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  11. Passport to Knowledge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Passport to Knowledge Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Passport to Knowledge Name: Passport to Knowledge Place: Morristown, New Jersey Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  12. The Solar Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Solar Energy Consortium TSEC Address: 430 Old Neighborhood Road Place: Kingston, New York Zip: 12401 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT...

  13. Sunlight Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunlight Solar Energy Address: 4 Oxford Road Place: Milford, Connecticut Zip: 06460 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar...

  14. New England Energy Management Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: New England Energy Management Inc Address: 5 Shelter Rock Road Place: Danbury, Connecticut Zip: 06810 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  15. Competitive Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 06492 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand side management programs Website: www.competitiveresourcesinc.co Coordinates:...

  16. Solar Connecticut | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Connecticut Address: PO Box 515 Place: Higganum, Connecticut Zip: 06441 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website:...

  17. Energy Recovery Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Landfill Gas, Digester Gas, mixed methane and Greenhouse gases recovery and utilization equipment and projects. Number of...

  18. Standard Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standard Solar Name: Standard Solar Address: 202 Perry Parkway Place: Gaithersburg, Maryland Zip: 20877 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar...

  19. Enernoc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York Zip: 10005 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand response provider serving commercial and industrial customers Website:...

  20. Comverge (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 07936 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Utility demand response system provider Website: www.comverge.com Coordinates: 40.8303322,...

  1. EnergyConnect (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Zip: 19428 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand response system provideroperator Website: www.energyconnectinc.com Coordinates:...

  2. Hycrete | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Buildings Product: Makes an additive that allows concrete to be more easily crushed and recycled Website: www.hycrete.com Coordinates:...

  3. Solarity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solarity Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solarity Address: 200 Innovation Blvd Suite 260A Place: State College, Pennsylvania Zip: 16801 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  4. Avalence LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Milford, Connecticut Zip: 06460 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Hydrogen generating equipment Website: www.avalence.com Coordinates:...

  5. Plextronics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 15238 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Organic solar cells and OLED's Website: www.plextronics.comindex.aspx Coordinates: 40.5449851,...

  6. Business Council of Westchester County (NY) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    101 Place: White Plains, New York Zip: 10604 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.westchesterny.org Coordinates:...

  7. Levco Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ave. Place: Norwalk, Connecticut Zip: 06851 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.levcoenergy.com Coordinates:...

  8. IDT Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Street Place: Newark, New Jersey Zip: 07102 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.idtenergy.comgreennew.as...

  9. NYSEG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Road Place: Ithaca, New York Zip: 14850 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.nyseg.com Outage Map:...

  10. CPower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Provides various energy efficiencymanagement services Number of Employees: 51-200 Year Founded: 2000 Phone Number: 212-361-6300...

  11. Long Island Power Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blvd Place: Uniondale, New York Zip: 11553 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.lipower.org References: EIA Form...

  12. Allegheny Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Greensburg, Pennsylvania Zip: 15601 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.alleghenypower.com Coordinates:...

  13. Energy Cooperative Association of Pennsylvania | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Zip: 19102 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.theenergyco-op.com Coordinates:...

  14. UGI Utilities Electric Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    360 Place: Reading, Pennsylvania Zip: 19605 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.ugi.comelectricindex.htm...

  15. ConEdison Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: White Plains, New York Zip: 10604 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: conedisonsolutions.com Coordinates:...

  16. Ultralife Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Batteries, stationary power services Website: www.ultralifebatteries.com Coordinates: 43.0247483, -77.0904787...

  17. Strategic Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip: 15222 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.directenergybusiness.com Coordinates:...

  18. LiquidPiston Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Zip: 06002 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: New combustion engine technology to drastically improve efficiency Website:...

  19. United Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    284, Old Deal Rd Place: Eatontown, New Jersey Zip: 07722 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Number of Employees:...

  20. Mid Atlantic Renewable Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2036 Foulk Rd Place: Wilmington, Delaware Zip: 19810 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Project Finance Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 2009 Website:...

  1. Poulsen Hybrid, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 Waterview Drive Place: Shelton, Connecticut Zip: 06615 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Vehicles Product: Poulsen Hybrid Year Founded: 2007 Phone Number:...

  2. LighthouseSolar (New Paltz) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Cherry Hill Rd Place: New Paltz, New York Zip: 12561 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar Electric and Solar Thermal Website:...

  3. Rowan Energy Integration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    12 West Avenue Place: Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania Zip: 19010 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Vehicles Product: Vehicle to Grid technologies Year Founded: 2009 Phone...

  4. Itron (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Road, Suite 107 Place: Melville, New York Zip: 11747 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Manufacturessells advanced meters and data collection...

  5. GeoPeak Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    285 Davidson Avenue Place: Somerset, New Jersey Zip: 08873 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Residential and Commercial PV Solar Installations Phone...

  6. Ocean Power Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1590 Reed Road Place: Pennington, New Jersey Zip: 08534 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year Founded: 1994 Website: www.oceanpowertechnologies.com Coordinates:...

  7. E2SOL LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenwich, Rhode Island Country: United States Zip: 02818 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Solar, Wind, Hydropower Systems Number of...

  8. First Wind (Formerly UPC Wind) (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10535 Rynders Road Place: Cohocton, New York Zip: 14826 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind power developer Website: www.firstwind.com...

  9. Mascoma Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    679 Ellsworth Road Place: Rome, New York Zip: 13441 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Producer of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass using...

  10. EverPower Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    44 East 30th Street Place: New York, New York Zip: 10016 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Wind energy Product: Develops wind power projects Website:...

  11. EnerSys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2366 Bernville Road Place: Reading, Pennsylvania Zip: 19605 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Stored energy solutions for industrial applications...

  12. Cleantech Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York Zip: 10023 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Energy efficiency solutions and consumption monitoring systems for buildings Website:...

  13. SAIL Venture Partners (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partners (New York) Name: SAIL Venture Partners (New York) Address: 30 Rockefeller Plaza Place: New York, New York Zip: 10112 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product:...

  14. The Paper Battery Company Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    12180 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Buildings Product: Scalable energy storage sheet Year Founded: 2008 Phone Number: 5182669027 Website: www.paperbatteryco.com...

  15. Prospero LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 06854 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Merchant bank providing financial services and capital to companies in the technology and energy sectors Year...

  16. Connecticut Light and Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Light and Power Address: P.O. Box 270 Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: 06141 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer...

  17. A comparison of MR and CT in suspected sacroiliitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittram, C.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Williams, J.W.; Bucknall, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study to compare the MR and CT images of patients with suspected sacroilitis and to establish the optimal MR sequences to demonstrate the changes of sacroilitis was conducted. Thirty-nine patients and nine controls were imaged in the axial plane, with SE T1-, T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2), T1 with fat suppression (T1WFS), and fast short T inversion recovery (fast STIR) sequences on a 1.5 T system. The sacroiliac joints of all patients were imaged with CT. The images were evaluated by two independent radiologists. Following the blinded reading, direct comparison of T1 and T1WFS, T2, and fast STIR of the CT positive group was made to determine the optimal MR sequences. The sensitivity and specificity of MR images for the detection of cortical erosions and subchondral sclerosis when compared to CT images were 100 and 94.3%, respectively; interobserver variation was low (k = 0.80). T1WFS and fast STIR images were superior to-T1 and T2 images, respectively, in demonstrating the changes of sacroilitis. MRI (T1WFS and fast STIR) can replace CT in cases with a strong clinical suspicion of sacroilitis and equivocal or normal plain radiographs. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/?3.2% in

  19. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  20. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  1. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  2. bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process - Project Brief [PDF-265KB] Southern Company Services, Newnan, GA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process, Final Report (Jan 1997) Volume 1, Executive Summary [PDF-4.6MB] Volume 2, Operation [PDF-32.8MB] Volume 2 Appendices [PDF-6.3MB] Volume 3, Equipment Vol 3a, Materials and Maintenance [PDF-34.6MB] Vol 3b, Instrumentation and Control

  3. Can nontriggered thoracic CT be used for coronary artery calcium scoring? A phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xueqian; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Jong, Pim A. de; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Coronary artery calcium score, traditionally based on electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. However, nontriggered CT is extensively utilized. The study-purpose is to evaluate the in vitro agreement in coronary calcium score between nontriggered thoracic CT and ECG-triggered cardiac CT.Methods: Three artificial coronary arteries containing calcifications of different densities (high, medium, and low), and sizes (large, medium, and small), were studied in a moving cardiac phantom. Two 64-detector CT systems were used. The phantom moved at 0–90 mm/s in nontriggered low-dose CT as index test, and at 0–30 mm/s in ECG-triggered CT as reference. Differences in calcium scores between nontriggered and ECG-triggered CT were analyzed by t-test and 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity to detect calcification was calculated as the percentage of positive calcium scores.Results: Overall, calcium scores in nontriggered CT were not significantly different to those in ECG-triggered CT (p > 0.05). Calcium scores in nontriggered CT were within the 95% confidence interval of calcium scores in ECG-triggered CT, except predominantly at higher velocities (≥50 mm/s) for the high-density and large-size calcifications. The sensitivity for a nonzero calcium score was 100% for large calcifications, but 46%± 11% for small calcifications in nontriggered CT.Conclusions: When performing multiple measurements, good agreement in positive calcium scores is found between nontriggered thoracic and ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Agreement decreases with increasing coronary velocity. From this phantom study, it can be concluded that a high calcium score can be detected by nontriggered CT, and thus, that nontriggered CT likely can identify individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, a zero calcium score in nontriggered CT does not reliably exclude coronary calcification.

  4. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  5. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Yu, Lifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  6. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  7. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofeng Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Mao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 13 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUSCT image fusion. After TRUSCT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% 0.86%, and the

  8. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  10. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  11. Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NMR) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in

  12. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  13. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  14. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  15. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  16. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  17. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2015-03-24

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  18. The Preparation of an Ultrastable Mesoporous Cr(III)-MOF via...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Kinetic labilization of the Fe(III)-O coordination bond in a mesoporous metal-organic framework, PCN-333-Fe(III), is realized by the reduction of Fe(III) by Cr(II). The ...

  19. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  20. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  1. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of a buried water pipeline to an existing solar evaporation pond for water treatment. ... the Abajo Mountains, U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site OU III ...

  2. EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

  3. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SL EJEK EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdminSupport) RETIREMENT ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 11 13.9% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 29 36.7%...

  4. Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A.1 A-4 A-3 Item 1 Description: Revise the language in Attachment A1, "Container Storage," Section A1-1c(1) "TRUPACT-III Management" to address manual bolt removal from the ...

  5. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  6. Proceedings of the Fermilab III Instabilities Workshop, held...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Proceedings of the Fermilab III Instabilities Workshop, held at Fermilab June 25-29, 1990 Authors: Peggs, Stephen ; Harvey, M. Publication Date: 1990-08-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  7. Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems STEVENS III,JOHN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STEVENS III,JOHN W.; BONN,RUSSELL H.; GINN,JERRY W.; GONZALEZ,SIGIFREDO; KERN,GREG 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; INTERCONNECTED POWER SYSTEMS;...

  8. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3+ (A), Cr(pic)3 (pic) 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-CrCl2(OH2)4+ ...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and

  10. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV

  11. Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs):

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary | Department of Energy III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Technical targets for CCMs in stationary applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_ccms_stat.pdf (93.65 KB) More Documents & Publications R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes

  12. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy Applications March 20, 2012 at 3pm/36-428 George T. Wang Advanced Materials Science, Sandia National Laboratories Wang001_000 Abstract: Nanowires based on the III nitride (AlGaInN) materials system have attracted attention as potential nanoscale building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films,

  13. III-V/Si Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers; Article No. 263904 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, ...

  14. GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report GRED Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review ...

  15. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  16. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N; Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  17. Complexation of Curium(III) with DTPA at 10–70 °C: Comparison with Eu(III)–DTPA in Thermodynamics, Luminescence, and Coordination Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Martin, Leigh R.; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-02-16

    Separation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) from trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) is a challenging task because of their nearly identical chemical properties. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA), a key reagent used in the TALSPEAK process that effectively separates An(III) from Ln(III), is believed to play a critical role in the An(III)/Ln(III) separation. However, the underlying principles for the separation based on the difference in the complexation of DTPA with An(III) and Ln(III) remain unclear. In this work, the complexation of DTPA with Cm(III) at 10-70 ºC was investigated by spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, in conjunction with computational methods. The binding strength, the enthalpy of complexation, the coordination modes, and the luminescence properties are compared between the Cm(III)-DTPA and Eu(III)-DTPA systems. The experimental and computational data have demonstrated that the difference between Cm(III) and Eu(III) in the binding strength with DTPA can be attributed to the stronger covalence bonding between Cm(III) and the nitrogen donors of DTPA.

  18. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  19. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the

  20. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A.; Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be

  1. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  2. ANL CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-05-01

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms when using a massively parallelized computer architecture such as a Beowuif cluster by parallelizing the X-ray CT reconstruction routine. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple 1-D or 2-D X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection.

  3. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  4. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  5. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  6. Tmu: J. A. Erl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Facilities cc wiencls: Commissioner Larson Commissioner Doub Commissioner Kriegsman ... N.N. *Picari""y Arsenal Dover, N.J. ,' - liction Take" Unit III deconraminated ...

  7. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    November 4, 2005 First Reserve Terminal Woodbridge, NJ 1,000 Williams Energy Services New Haven, CT 500 Motiva Enterprises LLC New Haven, CT 250 Motiva Enterprises LLC Providence,...

  8. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 30, 2005 First Reserve Terminal Woodbridge, NJ 1,000 Williams Energy Services New Haven, CT 500 Motiva Enterprises LLC New Haven, CT 250 Motiva Enterprises LLC Providence,...

  9. HEATRESV.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Terminal Woodbridge, NJ 1,000 Williams Energy Services New Haven, CT 500 Motiva Enterprises LLC New Haven, CT 250 Motiva Enterprises LLC Providence, RI 250 Total 2,000 Source:...

  10. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 sbir_phase3_pg3.pdf (227.38 KB) More Documents & Publications SBIR_Phase_III.pdf PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Albany HTS Power Cable

  11. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  12. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvn waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvn waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvn waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  13. Modification of Doublet III to a large Dee facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, L.G.; Rawls, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Doublet III facility represents a unique opportunity to convert an existing device to a powerful test bed for FED design and operation issues. Such a conversion is made possible by virtue of the demountability of the devices toroidal field coils. Doublet III can be partially disassembled then reassembled with a large dee-shaped vacuum vessel and associated poloidal coils and structure. Doublet III presently possesses or is acquiring adequate auxiliary heating (14 MW of neutral beams and 2 MW of ECH), stored energy (3 GJ), and power conversion equipment (some added field shaping power equipment is required) to support large dee, reactor-level, plasma experiments. The only modifications required of the device are those directly caused by installing a larger vessel - the vessel itself (and its internal protection system); poloidal field coils that interfere with the larger vessel; and a support system for the new vessel and coils.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.19 - 2004.09.05 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.02 - 2004.08.10 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III 2004.04.01 - 2004.09.29 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract Radiosonde launches from NSA were timed to coincide with overpasses of the Aqua satellite carrying the AIRS sensor for the purpose of providing in situ validation data for development and testing of AIRS water vapor retrievals

  17. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  18. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  19. Automated matching and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Jiayong; Zhao Binsheng; Curran, Sean; Zelenetz, Andrew; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2007-01-15

    In patients with lymphoma, identification and quantification of the tumor extent on serial CT examinations is critical for assessing tumor response to therapy. In this paper, we present a computer method to automatically match and segment lymphomas in follow-up CT images. The method requires that target lymph nodes in baseline CT images be known. A fast, approximate alignment technique along the x, y, and axial directions is developed to provide a good initial condition for the subsequent fast free form deformation (FFD) registration of the baseline and the follow-up images. As a result of the registration, the deformed lymph node contours from the baseline images are used to automatically determine internal and external markers for the marker-controlled watershed segmentation performed in the follow-up images. We applied this automated registration and segmentation method retrospectively to 29 lymph nodes in 9 lymphoma patients treated in a clinical trial at our cancer center. A radiologist independently delineated all lymph nodes on all slices in the follow-up images and his manual contours served as the ''gold standard'' for evaluation of the method. Preliminary results showed that 26/29 (89.7%) lymph nodes were correctly matched; i.e., there was a geometrical overlap between the deformed lymph node from the baseline and its corresponding mass in the follow-up images. Of the matched 26 lymph nodes, 22 (84.6%) were successfully segmented; for these 22 lymph nodes, several metrics were calculated to quantify the method's performance. Among them, the average distance and the Hausdorff distance between the contours generated by the computer and those generated by the radiologist were 0.9 mm (stdev. 0.4 mm) and 3.9 mm (stdev. 2.1 mm), respectively.

  20. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  1. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Purpose: ...

  2. Shear induced permeability test: Stripa Granite X-ray CT files and explanation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-01-21

    This folder contains X-ray CT images and an explanation related to the shear induced permeability testing of Stripa granite

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House Standards with 5.5-in. of foil-faced polysiocyanurate foam boards lining the outside walls, R-55 of rigid EPS foam under the slab,

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2 certified homes that have 2x4 walls filled with 1.5 in. closed-cell spray foam, 2-in. fiberglass batt,

  5. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  6. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    || | ct II | PAD | | | | | | Year |(Conti-|Distri-| | | | | | Month | nued) | ct III| | | | | | ||Average|Average| ID...

  7. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  8. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  9. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Simpson, Michael L.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  10. Quant-CT: Segmenting and Quantifying Computed Tomography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Quant-CT is currently a plugin to ImageJ, designed as a Java-class that provides control mechanism for the user to choose volumes of interest within porous material, followed by the selection of image subsamples for automated tuning of parameters for filters and classifiers, and finally measurement of material geometry, porosity, and visualization. Denoising is mandatory before any image interpretation, and we implemented a new 3D java code that performs bilateral filtering of data. Segmentation of themore » dense material is essential before any quantifications about geological sample structure, and we invented new schemes to deal with over segmentation when using statistical region merging algorithm to pull out grains that compose imaged material. It make uses of ImageJ API and other standard and thirty-party APIs. Quant-CT conception started in 2011 under Scidac-e sponsor, and details of the first prototype were documented in publications below. While it is used right now for microtomography images, it can potentially be used by anybody with 3D image data obtained by experiment or produced by simulation.« less

  11. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  12. SU-E-J-148: Tools for Development of 4D Proton CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dou, T; Ramos-Mendez, J; Piersimoni, P; Giacometti, V; Penfold, S; Censor, Y; Faddegon, B; Low, D; Schulte, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop tools for performing 4D proton computed tomography (CT). Methods: A suitable patient with a tumor in the right lower lobe was selected from a set of 4D CT scans. The volumetric CT images formed the basis for calculating the parameters of a breathing model that allows reconstruction of a static reference CT and CT images in each breathing phase. The images were imported into the TOPAS Monte Carlo simulation platform for simulating an experimental proton CT scan with 45 projections spaced by 4 degree intervals. Each projection acquired data for 2 seconds followed by a gantry rotation for 2 seconds without acquisition. The scan covered 180 degrees with individual protons passing through a 9-cm slab of the patient’s lung covering the moving tumor. An initial proton energy sufficient for penetrating the patient from all directions was determined. Performing the proton CT simulation, TOPAS provided output of the proton energy and coordinates registered in two planes before and after the patient, respectively. The set of projection data was then used with an iterative reconstruction algorithm to generate a volumetric proton CT image set of the static reference image and the image obtained under breathing motion, respectively. Results: An initial proton energy of 230 MeV was found to be sufficient, while for an initial energy of 200 MeV a substantial number of protons did not penetrate the patient. The reconstruction of the static reference image set provided sufficient detail for treatment planning. Conclusion: We have developed tools to perform studies of proton CT in the presence of lung motion based on the TOPAS simulation toolkit. This will allow to optimize 4D reconstruction algorithms by synchronizing the acquired proton CT data with a breathing signal and utilizing a breathing model obtained prior to the proton CT scan. This research has been supported by the National Institute Of Biomedical Imaging And Bioengineering of the National

  13. TH-C-18A-08: A Management Tool for CT Dose Monitoring, Analysis, and Protocol Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Chan, F; Newman, B; Larson, D; Leung, A; Fleischmann, D; Molvin, L; Marsh, D; Zorich, C; Phillips, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a customizable tool for enterprise-wide managing of CT protocols and analyzing radiation dose information of CT exams for a variety of quality control applications Methods: All clinical CT protocols implemented on the 11 CT scanners at our institution were extracted in digital format. The original protocols had been preset by our CT management team. A commercial CT dose tracking software (DoseWatch,GE healthcare,WI) was used to collect exam information (exam date, patient age etc.), scanning parameters, and radiation doses for all CT exams. We developed a Matlab-based program (MathWorks,MA) with graphic user interface which allows to analyze the scanning protocols with the actual dose estimates, and compare the data to national (ACR,AAPM) and internal reference values for CT quality control. Results: The CT protocol review portion of our tool allows the user to look up the scanning and image reconstruction parameters of any protocol on any of the installed CT systems among about 120 protocols per scanner. In the dose analysis tool, dose information of all CT exams (from 05/2013 to 02/2014) was stratified on a protocol level, and within a protocol down to series level, i.e. each individual exposure event. This allows numerical and graphical review of dose information of any combination of scanner models, protocols and series. The key functions of the tool include: statistics of CTDI, DLP and SSDE, dose monitoring using user-set CTDI/DLP/SSDE thresholds, look-up of any CT exam dose data, and CT protocol review. Conclusion: our inhouse CT management tool provides radiologists, technologists and administration a first-hand near real-time enterprise-wide knowledge on CT dose levels of different exam types. Medical physicists use this tool to manage CT protocols, compare and optimize dose levels across different scanner models. It provides technologists feedback on CT scanning operation, and knowledge on important dose baselines and thresholds.

  14. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  15. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ge Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  16. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  17. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  18. Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

    2006-06-01

    This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  19. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  20. NAC 444.731 - Class III Solid Waste Management Systems | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .731 - Class III Solid Waste Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NAC 444.731 - Class III...

  1. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the ... Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title ...

  2. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum ...

  3. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III ...

  4. Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Authors: ...

  5. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: ... design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous ...

  6. Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III and group-V dopants in Si quantum dots Prev Next Title: Chemical trend of the formation energies of the group-III ...

  7. Investigation of statistical iterative reconstruction for dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT has great potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) in dedicated breast CT is a promising alternative to traditional filtered backprojection (FBP). One of the difficulties in using SIR is the presence of free parameters in the algorithm that control the appearance of the resulting image. These parameters require tuning in order to achieve high quality reconstructions. In this study, the authors investigated the penalized maximum likelihood (PML) method with two commonly used types of roughness penalty functions: hyperbolic potential and anisotropic total variation (TV) norm. Reconstructed images were compared with images obtained using standard FBP. Optimal parameters for PML with the hyperbolic prior are reported for the task of detecting microcalcifications embedded in breast tissue.Methods: Computer simulations were used to acquire projections in a half-cone beam geometry. The modeled setup describes a realistic breast CT benchtop system, with an x-ray spectra produced by a point source and an a-Si, CsI:Tl flat-panel detector. A voxelized anthropomorphic breast phantom with 280 ?m microcalcification spheres embedded in it was used to model attenuation properties of the uncompressed woman's breast in a pendant position. The reconstruction of 3D images was performed using the separable paraboloidal surrogates algorithm with ordered subsets. Task performance was assessed with the ideal observer detectability index to determine optimal PML parameters.Results: The authors' findings suggest that there is a preferred range of values of the roughness penalty weight and the edge preservation threshold in the penalized objective function with the hyperbolic potential, which resulted in low noise images with high contrast microcalcifications preserved. In terms of numerical observer detectability index, the PML method with optimal parameters yielded substantially improved

  8. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  9. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schller, Sren; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hlsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrie, Marc

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The polychromatic nature of the x-ray beams and their effects on the reconstructed image are often disregarded during standard image reconstruction. This leads to cupping and beam hardening artifacts inside the reconstructed volume. To correct for a general cupping, methods like water precorrection exist. They correct the hardening of the spectrum during the penetration of the measured object only for the major tissue class. In contrast, more complex artifacts like streaks between dense objects need other techniques of correction. If using only the information of one single energy scan, there are two types of corrections. The first one is a physical approach. Thereby, artifacts can be reproduced and corrected within the original reconstruction by using assumptions in a polychromatic forward projector. These assumptions could be the used spectrum, the detector response, the physical attenuation and scatter properties of the intersected materials. A second method is an empirical approach, which does not rely on much prior knowledge. This so-called empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) and the previously mentioned physical-based technique are both relying on a segmentation of the present tissues inside the patient. The difficulty thereby is that beam hardening by itself, scatter, and other effects, which diminish the image quality also disturb the correct tissue classification and thereby reduce the accuracy of the two known classes of correction techniques. The herein proposed method works similar to the empirical beam hardening correction but does not require a tissue segmentation and therefore shows improvements on image data, which are highly degraded by noise and artifacts. Furthermore, the new algorithm is designed in a way that no additional calibration or parameter fitting is needed. Methods: To overcome the segmentation of tissues, the authors propose a histogram deformation of their primary reconstructed CT image. This step is essential for the

  10. PART III … LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Page 130 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES - TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work Appendix B Award Fee Plan Appendix C Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F List of Applicable Directives Appendix G Personnel Appendix Appendix H Key Personnel Appendix I Small Business Subcontracting Plan Appendix J Diversity Plan Guidance Appendix K Program Management

  11. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  12. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and dewatering algae that

  13. INDUCTRACK III CONFIGURATION - A MAGLEV SYSTEM FOR HIGH LOADS - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal 100064929 Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Return to Search INDUCTRACK III CONFIGURATION - A

  14. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Creighton, J. Randall

    2010-03-02

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  15. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, K; Godley, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc.

  16. NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and...

  17. DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at PPPL, adult visitors must show a government-issued photo I.D. - for example, a passport or a driver's license. Non-U.S. citizens must show a government-issued photo I.D.,...

  18. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To commemorate what BPA considers a 75-year partnership with the Columbia River, which is the cornerstone of BPA's relationship with the people and utilities of the Northwest, BPA releases the second video of a series detailing its history. You can see the rest of the series on BPA's 75th Anniversary YouTube channel. Teresa Waugh Public Affairs Specialist, Bonneville Power Administration What does a power lineman do? Linemen work on the complex electrical systems that power our homes and

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Lead Co - NJ 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MEDAEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation ...

  20. ERSUG Meeting: June 3-6, 1997 (Princeton, NJ)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3th T3E Training, Tuesday, June 3th PPPL, LOB, conf room B318 Time Topic 8:30 Take the hotel shuttle from Novotel to PPPL 9:00 - 10:15 Introduction ... Read More Minutes...

  1. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (1.49 MB) Remarks of Damir Novosel, President, Quanta Technology and President-Elect IEEE Power and Energy Society (125.23 KB) Remarks of David Hallquist, CEO, Vermont Electric ...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Brunswick NJ Site -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FACT SHEET This fact sheet provides information about the New Brunswick, New Jersey, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Aerial ...

  3. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  4. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  5. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  6. NJ Clean Energy- ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When mail-in rebates are active, as a general rule, all appliances must be ENERGY STAR rated; however, additional requirements may apply to different types of appliances. Rebate requests must...

  7. A Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single- and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Silicon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study examines the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

  8. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  9. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  10. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  11. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Constraints | Department of Energy Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Meeting Date and Location: April 21, 2014 9:00A.M.. to 1:00 P.M. EST (Providence, RI) - 1:00 P.M. EST to 5:00 P.M. EST (Hartford, CT) Providence: Rhode Island Convention Center, 1 Sabin St., Ballroom B, Providence, RI Hartford: Connecticut Department of

  12. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  13. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  14. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  15. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana K.; Jetter, Robert I; Nestell, James E.; Burchell, Timothy D; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  16. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  17. Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010 Membrane Areal Resistance in cell, operating temperature Ω-cm 2 0.1 0.1 0.1 Cost b $/kW --TBD 250 100 Operating Temperature o C 160 120-160 c 140-180 Durability Hours 5000 >15000 >40000 Survivability o C -20 -30 -40 Catalyst loading mg/cm 2 2 1 0.25 Performance (0.7 V) --EOL A/cm 2 0.15 0.25 0.35 G/kW for loading

  18. Part III - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Updated 9/30/15 to Mod 0588 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Section J - Page 1 Part III - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments Section J LIST OF ATTACHMENTS Document Appendix A - Personnel Appendix (Revised RAs 1-12 and Mods M0541, M0558) Appendix B - Statement of Work (Revised M244, M264) Appendix C - Special Bank Account Agreement (Revised M248, M271, M461, M497, M508) Appendix D - Key Personnel (Revised M216, M224, M227, M229, M233, M252, M257, M272, M275,

  19. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i900,9SS L%nfam Phm, S. W.. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Tlkphme: (20.7) 4S.S-M)o 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES I - The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance M1.oS with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02

  20. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  1. Polyamide preparation with pentaamine cobalt (III) complex catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.Y.M.; Ball, L.E.; Coffey, G.P.

    1987-11-17

    A process is described for preparing a polyamide containing amide groups as integral parts of the main polymer chain comprising polymerizing a polyamide forming system, chosen from (1) an alpha, beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid and ammonia, (2) an ammonium salt of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid, (3) an alpha, beta-unsaturated nitrile and water, (4) an alpha, beta-unsaturated amine and ammonia, (5) or a beta-amino propionic acid or its alkyl derivatives, in contact with a catalyst comprising a pentaamine cobalt (III) complex.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House...

  3. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  4. TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier Transform and Anatomical Features Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory...

  5. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  6. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  7. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  8. 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security | Department of Energy A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and

  9. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matenine, Dmitri Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  10. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  11. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  12. Carbon doping of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moll, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Focus of the study is C acceptor doping of GaAs, since C diffusion coefficient is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of other common p-type dopants in GaAs. C ion implantation results in a concentration of free holes in the valence band < 10% of that of the implanted C atoms for doses > 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Rutherford backscattering, electrical measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were amonth the techniques used. Ga co-implantation increased the C activation in two steps: first, the additional radiation damage creates vacant As sites that the implanted C can occupy, and second, it maintains the stoichiometry of the implanted layer, reducing the number of compensating native defects. In InP, the behavior of C was different from that in GaAs. C acts as n-type dopant in the In site; however, its incorporation by implantation was difficult to control; experiments using P co-implants were inconsistent. The lattice position of inactive C in GaAs in implanted and epitaxial layers is discussed; evidence for formation of C precipitates in GaAs and InP was found. Correlation of the results with literature on C doping in III-V semiconductors led to a phenomenological description of C in III-V compounds (particularly GaAs): The behavior of C is controlled by the chemical nature of C and the instrinsic Fermi level stabilization energy of the material.

  13. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-07

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  14. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  15. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, Rene; Kiehn, Ruediger; Mueller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas

    2010-06-23

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  16. DE-SOL-0002555 WIPP Solicitation J-33 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J ATTACHMENT H: RESERVED

  17. Theoretical Prediction of Am(III)/Eu(III) Selectivity to Aid the Design of Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Agents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2015-03-20

    Selective extraction of minor actinides from lanthanides is a critical step in the reduction of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. However, the design of suitable ligands for separating chemically similar 4f- and 5f-block trivalent metal ions poses a significant challenge. Furthermore, first-principles calculations should play an important role in the design of new separation agents, but their ability to predict metal ion selectivity has not been systematically evaluated. We examine the ability of several density functional theory methods to predict selectivity of Am(III) and Eu(III) with oxygen, mixed oxygen–nitrogen, and sulfur donor ligands. The results establish a computational method capablemore » of predicting the correct order of selectivities obtained from liquid–liquid extraction and aqueous phase complexation studies. To allow reasonably accurate predictions, it was critical to employ sufficiently flexible basis sets and provide proper account of solvation effects. The approach is utilized to estimate the selectivity of novel amide-functionalized diazine and 1,2,3-triazole ligands.« less

  18. Electrochemistry in neutral ambient-temperature ionic liquids. 1. Studies of iron (III), neodymium (III), and lithium(I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osteryoung, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    An ambient-temperature neutral ionic liquid composed of aluminum chloride and either N-1-butylpyridinium or 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride, BuPyCl or ImCl, respectively, was employed in studies that take advantage of their unusual properties. These include an extended electrochemical window, readily controlled additions of excess chloride (base) or aluminum chloride (acid), and the fact that the physical properties of the neutral melt do not change about the 1:1 mole ratio of AlCl/sub 3/ to RCl. Li/sup +/ was found to be reducible in the neutral AlCl/sub 3/-ImCl melt, and its diffusion coefficient was found to be .00000086 sq cm/s. The stoichiometry of the complex formed between Nd(III) and Cl/sup +/ in the molten salt system was investigated by what is essentially an amperometric titration and was found to be NdC/sub 6/(3-). The structure of the Fe(III) chloro complex that exists in basic or acidic melts just slightly varying in composition from the neutral melt was also investigated; a constant value for the diffusion coefficient-viscosity product in both systems suggests no change in structure.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-IIIs four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSSs main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  20. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  1. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  2. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  3. Neodymium(III) Complexation by Amino-Carbohydrates via a Ligand-Controlled Hydrolysis Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2011-07-28

    Chelation of neodymium-III Nd(III) by D-glucosamine (DGA) and chitosan was investigated in solution at near-physiological pH and ionic strength. This research demonstrates the first example of the lanthanide ion heteroleptic hydroxo-carbohydrate complex in solution. It was demonstrated that DGA and chitosan suppressed formation of polynuclear Nd(III) species at elevated pH.

  4. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride semiconductor compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yuriy; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2015-03-17

    Methods are disclosed for growing group III-nitride semiconductor compounds with advanced buffer layer technique. In an embodiment, a method includes providing a suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. The method includes forming an AlN buffer layer by flowing an ammonia gas into a growth zone of the processing chamber, flowing an aluminum halide containing precursor to the growth zone and at the same time flowing additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas into the growth zone of the processing chamber. The additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas that is flowed into the growth zone during buffer layer deposition suppresses homogeneous AlN particle formation. The hydrogen halide or halogen gas may continue flowing for a time period while the flow of the aluminum halide containing precursor is turned off.

  5. AVTA: 2010 Toyota Prius Gen III HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  6. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L Sham

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  8. Burst mode FEL with the ETA-III induction linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C.J.; Allen, S.L.; Felker, B.

    1993-05-13

    Pulses of 140 GHz microwaves have been produced at a 2 kHz rate using the ETA-III induction linac and IMP wiggler. The accelerator was run in bursts of up to 50 pulses at 6 MeV and greater than 2 kA peak current. A feedback timing control system was used to synchronize acceleration voltage pulses with the electron beam, resulting in sufficient reduction of the corkscrew and energy sweep for efficient FEL operation. Peak microwave power for short bursts was in the range 0.5--1.1 GW, which is comparable to the single-pulse peak power of 0.75--2 GW. FEL bursts of more than 25 pulses were obtained.

  9. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  10. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 105?0.6CT and 106?0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  11. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  12. DE-SOL-0002555 WIPP Solicitation J-23 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J ATTACHMENT F: GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN DE-SOL-0002555 WIPP Solicitation J-24 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER...

  13. Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $4,000,000 Low-cost III-V photovoltaics have the potential to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) because III-V cells outperform silicon in terms of efficiency and annual energy

  15. Final Report - Vapor Transport Deposition for III-V Thin Film...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon, the dominant photovoltaic (PV) technology, is reaching its fundamental ... III-V semiconductors such as GaAs are used to make the highest-efficiency photovoltaic ...

  16. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Year Award 2014 | Department of Energy John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant of the Year Award 2014 John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant of the Year Award 2014 December 4, 2014 - 10:32am Addthis John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant of the Year Award 2014 At a ceremony in Washington D.C. on November 21, the Minority Chamber of Commerce (MCC) awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's

  17. Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics ...

  18. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing; Jiang,Hong-Xing; Lin, Jing-Yu

    2008-03-18

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  19. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-003-2012_MetalSedimentAssociations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sediment. Suggested Citation: Varadharajan, C.; Tinnacher, R.; Nico, P.S.; Zheng, L. Laboratory and Synchrotron Analysis of Metal Sediment Associations; NRAP- TRS-III-003-2012;...

  20. Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single-and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Czochralski Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.

    2014-05-01

    In this analysis we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE).

  1. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Hudson, N.

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  2. Multienergy CT acquisition and reconstruction with a stepped tube potential scan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Le; Xing, Yuxiang

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Based on an energy-dependent property of matter, one may obtain a pseudomonochromatic attenuation map, a material composition image, an electron-density distribution, and an atomic number image using a dual- or multienergy computed tomography (CT) scan. Dual- and multienergy CT scans broaden the potential of x-ray CT imaging. The development of such systems is very useful in both medical and industrial investigations. In this paper, the authors propose a new dual- and multienergy CT system design (segmental multienergy CT, SegMECT) using an innovative scanning scheme that is conveniently implemented on a conventional single-energy CT system. The two-step-energy dual-energy CT can be regarded as a special case of SegMECT. A special reconstruction method is proposed to support SegMECT. Methods: In their SegMECT, a circular trajectory in a CT scan is angularly divided into several arcs. The x-ray source is set to a different tube voltage for each arc of the trajectory. Thus, the authors only need to make a few step changes to the x-ray energy during the scan to complete a multienergy data acquisition. With such a data set, the image reconstruction might suffer from severe limited-angle artifacts if using conventional reconstruction methods. To solve the problem, they present a new prior-image-based reconstruction technique using a total variance norm of a quotient image constraint. On the one hand, the prior extracts structural information from all of the projection data. On the other hand, the effect from a possibly imprecise intensity level of the prior can be mitigated by minimizing the total variance of a quotient image. Results: The authors present a new scheme for a SegMECT configuration and establish a reconstruction method for such a system. Both numerical simulation and a practical phantom experiment are conducted to validate the proposed reconstruction method and the effectiveness of the system design. The results demonstrate that the proposed Seg

  3. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup 4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  4. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchers, Lieuwe J.; Clausen, Martijn J.A.M.; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Schuuring, Ed

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was optimized on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using glioblastoma tissue. It was compared with EGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression using a specific reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction also optimized for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays including 531 HNSCCs of various stages with complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were tested for the presence of EGFRvIII. Results: None of the 531 cases showed EGFRvIII protein expression. Using an immunohistochemistry protocol reported by others revealed cytoplasmic staining in 8% of cases. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the EGFRvIII transcript of the 28 highest cytoplasmic staining cases, as well as 69 negative cases, did not show expression in any of the tested cases, suggesting aspecific staining by a nonoptimal protocol. Conclusions: The EGFRvIII mutation is not present in HNSCC. Therefore, EGFRvIII does not influence treatment response in HNSCC and is not a usable clinical prognostic marker.

  5. Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall; Wang, George T.

    2008-11-11

    A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

  6. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  7. Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yu; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong; Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan; Lian Jun; Shen Dinggang

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms

  8. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  9. SU-E-I-68: Practical Considerations On Implementation of the Image Gently Pediatric CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J; Adams, C; Lumby, C; Dillon, J; Woods, E; Richer, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: One limitation associated with the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols is practical implementation of the recommended manual techniques. Inconsistency as a result of different practice is a possibility among technologist. An additional concern is the added risk of data error that would result in over or underexposure. The Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) features automatically reduce radiation for children. However, they do not work efficiently for the patients of very small size and relative large size. This study aims to implement the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols in the practical setting while maintaining the use of AEC features for pediatric patients of varying size. Methods: Anthropomorphological abdomen phantoms were scanned in a CT scanner using the Image Gently pediatric protocols, the AEC technique with a fixed adult baseline, and automatic protocols with various baselines. The baselines were adjusted corresponding to patient age, weight and posterioranterior thickness to match the Image Gently pediatric CT manual techniques. CTDIvol was recorded for each examination. Image noise was measured and recorded for image quality comparison. Clinical images were evaluated by pediatric radiologists. Results: By adjusting vendor default baselines used in the automatic techniques, radiation dose and image quality can match those of the Image Gently manual techniques. In practice, this can be achieved by dividing pediatric patients into three major groups for technologist reference: infant, small child, and large child. Further division can be done but will increase the number of CT protocols. For each group, AEC can efficiently adjust acquisition techniques for children. This implementation significantly overcomes the limitation of the Image Gently manual techniques. Conclusion: Considering the effectiveness in clinical practice, Image Gently Pediatric CT protocols can be implemented in accordance with AEC techniques, with adjusted baselines, to

  10. Bowtie filters for dedicated breast CT: Theory and computational implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontson, Kimberly Jennings, Robert J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To design bowtie filters with improved properties for dedicated breast CT to improve image quality and reduce dose to the patient. Methods: The authors present three different bowtie filters designed for a cylindrical 14-cm diameter phantom with a uniform composition of 40/60 breast tissue, which vary in their design objectives and performance improvements. Bowtie design #1 is based on single material spectral matching and produces nearly uniform spectral shape for radiation incident upon the detector. Bowtie design #2 uses the idea of basis material decomposition to produce the same spectral shape and intensity at the detector, using two different materials. Bowtie design #3 eliminates the beam hardening effect in the reconstructed image by adjusting the bowtie filter thickness so that the effective attenuation coefficient for every ray is the same. All three designs are obtained using analytical computational methods and linear attenuation coefficients. Thus, the designs do not take into account the effects of scatter. The authors considered this to be a reasonable approach to the filter design problem since the use of Monte Carlo methods would have been computationally intensive. The filter profiles for a cone-angle of 0° were used for the entire length of each filter because the differences between those profiles and the correct cone-beam profiles for the cone angles in our system are very small, and the constant profiles allowed construction of the filters with the facilities available to us. For evaluation of the filters, we used Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the full cone-beam geometry. Images were generated with and without each bowtie filter to analyze the effect on dose distribution, noise uniformity, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) homogeneity. Line profiles through the reconstructed images generated from the simulated projection images were also used as validation for the filter designs. Results: Examples of the three designs are

  11. Alliance for Clean Energy New York | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alliance for Clean Energy New York Address: 194 Washington Ave Place: Albany, New York Zip: 12210 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  12. Exolis Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Zip: 19422 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Esco with DG Year Founded: 2009 Phone Number: 610-260-1449 Coordinates: 40.132841,...

  13. Enginuity Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    17050 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Biomass Product: Power Generation and Energy Conservation Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 2007 Phone Number: 717 796...

  14. Steven Winters Associates Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Buildings Product: Research, design and consulting for high performance buildings Website: www.swinter.com Coordinates: 40.746817, -73.993158 Show Map...

  15. Steven Winters Associates Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Buildings Product: Research, design and consulting for high performance buildings Website: www.swinter.com Coordinates: 41.100098, -73.420395 Show Map...

  16. Novomer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Carbon Product: Converts CO2 feedstocks into ultra-performance materials Website: www.novomer.com Coordinates: 42.421605, -76.502016 Show Map...

  17. Schott North America Inc | Open Energy Information

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    Schott North America Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schott North America Inc Address: 555 Taxter Road Place: Elmsford, New York Zip: 10523 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA...

  18. Vencon Management Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vencon Management Inc Address: 65 West 55th Street Place: New York, New York Zip: 10019 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  19. Vencon Management, Inc | Open Energy Information

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    Management, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vencon Management, Inc Address: 301 West 53rd Street Place: New York, New York Zip: 10019 Region: New York Area - NY NJ CT PA...

  20. Community Management Company | Open Energy Information

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    Community Management Company Address: 1 St. Nicholas Terrace Place: New York, New York Zip: 10029 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Coordinates: 40.812561, -73.952389 Show...

  1. Emc3 LLC | Open Energy Information

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    Emc3 LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Emc3 LLC Name: Emc3 LLC Address: 5 Blue Anchor Street Place: Marlton, New Jersey Zip: 08053 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector:...

  2. EMC3, llc | Open Energy Information

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    EMC3, llc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: EMC3, llc Name: EMC3, llc Address: 5 Blue Anchor Street Place: Marlton, New Jersey Zip: 08053 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Phone...

  3. Marathon Capital LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marathon Capital LLC (New York) Name: Marathon Capital LLC (New York) Address: 245 Park Avenue, 24th Floor Place: New York, New York Zip: 10167 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  4. Capital Equity Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

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    Partners LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Capital Equity Partners LLC Address: 410 Park Avenue Place: New York, New York Zip: 10022 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  5. Ardour Capital | Open Energy Information

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    Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ardour Capital Investments LLC Address: 350 5th ave Place: New York, New York Zip: 10118 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of...

  6. Asia West LLC | Open Energy Information

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    West LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Asia West LLC Name: Asia West LLC Address: One East Weaver Street Place: Greenwich, Connecticut Zip: 06831 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT...

  7. BioEnergy of America Inc | Open Energy Information

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    America Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: BioEnergy of America Inc Address: 30 Executive Avenue Place: Edison, New Jersey Zip: 08817 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  8. US Renewables Group (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York) Name: US Renewables Group (New York) Address: 10 Bank Street, Suite 580 Place: White Plains, New York Zip: 10606 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Private...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Water Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total ...

  10. CeeLite | Open Energy Information

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    CeeLite Jump to: navigation, search Name: CeeLite Address: 66 Bethlehem Pike Place: Colmar, Pennsylvania Zip: 18915 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product:...

  11. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and ...

  12. United Illuminating | Open Energy Information

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    St Place: New Haven, Connecticut Zip: 06510 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.uinet.com Coordinates: 41.3073289,...

  13. Rochester Gas and Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avenue Place: Rochester, New York Zip: 14649 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.rge.com Coordinates: 43.156495,...

  14. Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Edison) | Open Energy...

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    Place Place: New York, New York Zip: 10003 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.coned.com Coordinates: 40.7341329,...

  15. RecycleBank | Open Energy Information

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    Address: 95 Morton Street Place: New York, New York Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Number of Employees: 51-200 Website: www.recyclebank.com...

  16. OnForce Solar | Open Energy Information

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    728 East 136th St. Place: Bronx, New York Zip: 10454 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Renewable Energy Year Founded: 2007 Phone Number: 347 590 5450 Website:...

  17. Deepwater Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Street Suite 402 Place: Hoboken, New Jersey Zip: 07030 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Wind energy Product: offshore wind Phone Number: 201.850.1717 Website:...

  18. Adirondack North Country Association | Open Energy Information

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    Street, Suite 201 Place: Saranac Lake, New York Zip: 12946 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 1954 Phone Number: 518 891 6200 Website:...

  19. Civitas Energy | Open Energy Information

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    E 69th St, Suite 7S Place: New York, New York Zip: 10021 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar Energy Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 2009...

  20. Rutgers EcoComplex | Open Energy Information

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    Rd. Place: Bordentown, New Jersey Zip: 08505 Region: New York Area - NY NJ CT PA Website: ecocomplex.rutgers.edu Coordinates: 40.078026, -74.755129 Show Map Loading...

  1. Battelle Ventures | Open Energy Information

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    Center, Suite 100 Place: Princeton, New Jersey Zip: 08540 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Venture fund supporting new and early-stage companies Number of Employees:...

  2. General Electric | Open Energy Information

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    General Electric Place: Fairfield, Connecticut Zip: 06828 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year Founded: 1892 Website: www.ge.com Coordinates: 41.1758333, -73.2719444...

  3. Pontchartrain Mechanical Company | Open Energy Information

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    716 Little Farms Ave. Place: Metairie, Louisiana Zip: 70003 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Renewable Energy Number of Employees: 51-200 Year Founded: 1972 Phone...

  4. Good Energies (New York) | Open Energy Information

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    Avenue, 29th Floor Place: New York, New York Zip: 10172 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Global investor in renewable energy and energy efficiency industries Year...

  5. Apricus Solar | Open Energy Information

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    West Main Street Place: Branford, Connecticut Zip: 06405 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Solar hot water Phone Number: 203 488 8215 Website: www.apricus.com...

  6. 5 boro biofuel | Open Energy Information

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    boro biofuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: 5 boro biofuel Name: 5 boro biofuel Address: 100 maiden lane Place: New York, New York Zip: 10035 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA...

  7. GreenShift Corporation | Open Energy Information

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    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreenShift Corporation Address: 1 Penn Plaza, Suite 1612 Place: New York, New York Zip: 10119 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  8. Category:Clean Energy Economy Regions | Open Energy Information

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    Economy Regions" The following 7 pages are in this category, out of 7 total. B Bay Area G Greater Boston Area N Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area P Pacific Northwest Area R Rockies...

  9. Public Service Enterprise Group (PSE&G) | Open Energy Information

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    Group (PSE&G) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Public Service Enterprise Group (PSE&G) Address: 80 Park Plaza Place: Newark, New Jersey Zip: 07102 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA...

  10. Global Renewable Energy Network | Open Energy Information

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    Renewable Energy Network (GReEN) Name: Global Renewable Energy Network (GReEN) Address: P.O. Box 1999 Place: Massapequa, NY Zip: 11758 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number...

  11. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  12. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ☉} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ∼20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  13. Evaluating the Influence of Wall-Roughness on Fracture Transmissivity with CT Scanning and Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant; McIntyre, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    Combining CT imaging of geomaterials with computational fluid dynamics provides substantial benefits to researchers. With simulations, geometric parameters can be varied in systematic ways that are not possible in the lab. This paper details the conversion of micro-CT images of a physical fracture in Berea sandstone to several tractable finite volume meshes. By computationally varying the level of detail captured from the scans we produced several realistic fracture geometries with different degrees of wall-roughness and various geometric properties. Simulations were performed and it was noted that increasing roughness increased the resistance to fluid flow. Also, as the distance between walls was increased the mean aperture approached the effective aperture.

  14. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Kyra B.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-23

    NAFLD, liver component of the 'metabolic' syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  15. TU-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: CT Dose Optimization Technologies II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driesser, I; Angel, E

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The imaging topic this year is CT scanner dose optimization capabilities. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Siemens‘ Commitment to the Right Dose in Computed Tomography Presentation Time: 11:15 - 11:45 AM Providing sustainable clinical results at highest patient safety: This is the challenge in medical imaging. Especially for Computed Tomography this means applying not simply the lowest, but the right dose for sound diagnostic imaging. Consequently, Siemens is committed to deliver the right dose in CT. In order to reduce radiation to the right dose, the first step is to provide the right dose technology. Through decades of research and development in CT imaging, Siemens CT has constantly introduced new ideas leading to a comprehensive portfolio of unique CARE technologies to deliver the right dose. For example automated kV adjustment based on patient size and the clinical question with CARE kV and three generations of iterative reconstruction. Based on the right dose technology, the next step is to actually scan at the right dose. For this, it is key to know the right dose targets for every examination. Siemens continuously involves CT experts to push developments further and outline how users can best adapt their procedures to the right dose. For users to know whether they met the right dose targets, it is therefore important to understand and monitor the actual absolute dose values. All scanners are delivered with defined default protocols which automatically use the available right dose technologies. Finally, to deliver the right dose not just in singular cases, but ideally to patients everywhere, organizations need then to manage dose across

  16. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  17. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r{sup -}{sub Inter

  18. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, K; McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  19. MO-E-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING) - Calculating SSDE From CT Exams Using Size Data Available in the DICOM Header of CT Localizer Radiographs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; McNitt-Gray, M; McCollough, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of using existing data stored within the DICOM header of certain CT localizer radiographs as a patient size metric for calculating CT size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). Methods: For most Siemens CT scanners, the CT localizer radiograph (topogram) contains a private DICOM field that stores an array of numbers describing AP and LAT attenuation-based measures of patient dimension. The square root of the product of the AP and LAT size data, which provides an estimate of water-equivalent-diameter (WED), was calculated retrospectively from topogram data of 20 patients who received clinically-indicated abdomen/pelvis (n=10) and chest (n=10) scans (WED-topo). In addition, slice-by-slice water-equivalent-diameter (WED-image) and effective diameter (ED-image) values were calculated from the respective image data. Using TG-204 lookup tables, size-dependent conversion factors were determined based upon WED-topo, WED-image and ED-image values. These conversion factors were used with the reported CTDIvol to calculate slice-by-slice SSDE for each method. Averaging over all slices, a single SSDE value was determined for each patient and size metric. Patientspecific SSDE and CTDIvol values were then compared with patientspecific organ doses derived from detailed Monte Carlo simulations of fixed tube current scans. Results: For abdomen/pelvis scans, the average difference between liver dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 18.70%, 8.17%, 6.84%, and 7.58%, respectively. For chest scans, the average difference between lung dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 25.80%, 3.33%, 4.11%, and 7.66%, respectively. Conclusion: SSDE calculated using WED derived from data in the DICOM header of the topogram was comparable to SSDE calculated using WED and ED derived from axial images; each of these estimated organ dose to within 10% for both abdomen/pelvis and chest CT examinations

  20. Me-3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Efficient Sensitization of Yb(III) and Nd(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Dodani, Sheel; Jocher, Christoph; D'Aleo, Anthony; Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-11-10

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, solution stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes of Yb(III) and Nd(III) using both tetradentate and octadentate ligand design strategies and incorporating the 1-methyl-3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (Me-3,2-HOPO) chelate group are reported. Both the Yb(III) and Nd(III) complexes have emission bands in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) region, and this luminescence is retained in aqueous solution ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Yb} {approx} 0.09-0.22%). Furthermore, the complexes demonstrate very high stability (pYb {approx} 18.8-21.9) in aqueous solution, making them good candidates for further development as probes for NIR imaging. Analysis of the low temperature (77 K) photophysical measurements for a model Gd(III) complex were used to gain an insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree well with corresponding TD-DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G{sup ++}(d,p) level of theory for a simplified model monovalent sodium complex.

  1. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  2. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Nuyts, Johan; Kuncic, Zdenka; Fulton, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2...

  4. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Politte, David G.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  5. TU-F-18C-07: Hardware Advances for MTF Improvement in Dedicated Breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazi, P; Burkett, G; Yang, K; Boone, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we have designed and implemented a prototype dedicated breast CT system (bCT) to improve the spatial resolution characteristics, in order to improve detection of micro-calcifications. Methods: A 10.8 kW water-cooled, tungsten anode x-ray tube, running up to 240 mA at 60 kV, coupled with an x-ray generator specifically designed for this application, and 0.3 mm of added copper filter was used to generate x-ray pulses. A CsI CMOS flat panel detector with a pixel pitch of 0.075 mm in native binning mode was used. The system geometry was designed in a way to achieve an FOV on par with similar bCT prototypes, resulting in a magnification factor of 1.39. A 0.013 mm tungsten wire was used to generate point spread functions. Multiple scans were performed with different numbers of projections, different reconstruction kernel sizes and different reconstruction filters to study the effects of each parameter on MTF. The resulting MTFs were then evaluated quantitatively using the generated PFSs. Duplicate scans with the same parameters were performed on two other dedicated breast CT systems to compare the performance of the new prototype. Results: The results of the MTF experiments demonstrate a significant improvement in the spatial resolution characteristics. In the new prototype, using the pulsed x-ray source results in a restoration of the azimuthal MTF degradation, due to motion blurring previously seen in other bCT systems. Moreover, employing the higher resolution x-ray detector considerably improves the MTF. The MTF at 10% of the new system is at 3.5 1/mm, a factor of 4.36 greater than an earlier bCT scanner. Conclusion: The MTF analysis of the new prototype bCT shows that using the new hardware and control results in a significant improvement in visualization of finer detail. This suggests that the visualization of micro-calcifications will be significantly improved.

  6. SU-E-I-58: Detecting Tumors with Extremely Low Contrast in CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Kupelian, P; Steiberg, M; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors such as the prostate focal lesions and the brain metastases have extremely low CT contrast and MRI is usually used for target delineation. The target contours are propagated to the CT for treatment planning and patient positioning. We have employed an advanced denoising method eliminating the noise and allow magnification of subtle contrast of these focal lesions on CT. Methods: Five prostate and two brain metastasis patients with MRI T2, diffusion or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images confirmed focal lesions were included. One brain patients had 5 metastases. A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise of kVCT images used for treatment planning. The gray-level range of the resultant images was narrowed to magnify the tumor-normal tissue contrast. Results: For the prostate patients, denoised kVCT images showed focal regions at 5, 8,11-1, 2, and 8–10 oclock for the 5 patients, this is highly consistent to the radiologist confirmed focal lesions based on MRI at 5, 7, 11-1, 2 and 8–10 oclock in the axial plane. These CT focal regions matched well with the MRI focal lesions in the cranio-caudal position. The average increase in density compared to background prostate glands was 0.86%, which corresponds to ∼50% increase in cellularity and is lower than the average CT noise level of 2.4%. For the brain patients, denoised kVCT showed 5/6 metastases. The high CT-density region of a metastasis is 2-mm off from its corresponding elevated MRI perfusion center. Overall the detecting sensitivity was 91%. Conclusion: It has been preliminarily demonstrated that the higher tumor cellularity can be detected using kVCT. The low contrast-to-noise information requires advanced denoising to reveal. The finding is significant to radiotherapy by providing an additional tool to locate focal lesions for confirming MRI-CT registration and providing a highly accessible outcome assessment tool.

  7. WBU-15-0003 - In the Matter of Charles W. Trask III | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 - In the Matter of Charles W. Trask III WBU-15-0003 - In the Matter of Charles W. Trask III On April 2, 2015, the OHA issued a decision denying, due to lack of jurisdiction, an Appeal filed by Mr. Charles W. Trask III of the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint by the Whistleblower Program Manager for the Employee Concerns Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration. Mr. Trask filed the Complaint against his former employer, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), under the

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - DigiCORA-III transition and AIRS preparation IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsDigiCORA-III transition and AIRS preparation IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : DigiCORA-III transition and AIRS preparation IOP 2002.06.17 - 2002.07.31 Lead Scientist : Barry Lesht For data sets, see below. Abstract We will install the digiCORA-III at the SGP. In addition, we will monitor regular production (digiCORAII) soundings to collect a set of sounding data files to

  9. WBH-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy WBH-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III WBH-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III On April 10, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting two motions to dismiss the Part 708 Complaint filed by Edward G. Gallrein, III. Babcock & Wilcox Y-12, LLC, and GemTech Y-12, LLC, each filed a motion to dismiss Mr. Gallrein's Complaint against them, in which he alleged that he made disclosures protected under 10 C.F.R. § 708.5(a) that

  10. WBZ-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy WBZ-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III WBZ-13-0017 - In the Matter of Edward G. Gallrein, III On April 10, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting two motions to dismiss the Part 708 Complaint filed by Edward G. Gallrein, III. Babcock & Wilcox Y-12, LLC, and GemTech Y-12, LLC, each filed a motion to dismiss Mr. Gallrein's Complaint against them, in which he alleged that he made disclosures protected under 10 C.F.R. § 708.5(a) that

  11. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup }, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a redder NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP

  12. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  13. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moteabbed, M. Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  14. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by {gamma}-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH {approx} 12.5) were {gamma}-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of {gamma}-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite ({approx}Fe{sub 2.71}O{sub 4}) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+}. Upon 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form ({approx}Fe{sub 2.93}O{sub 4}). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+} resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+}. The Fe{sup 3+} was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed

  15. EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect the Heartland Wind, LLC, proposed Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project in Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota, to DOE’s Western Area Power Administration transmission system.

  16. Neutronics modeling of the SPERT III E-Core critical experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutronics modeling of the SPERT III E-Core critical experiments with MPACT and KENO Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 28, 2017 ...

  17. NNSA, Air Force Conduct Successful W87/Minuteman III Joint Flight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA, Air Force Conduct Successful W87Minuteman III Joint Flight Test March 01, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Air Force ...

  18. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide ...

  19. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a liquid core waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide ...

  20. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide You ...