Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

2

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

3

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY...

4

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

5

NJ.?3  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

r-2 r-2 . . . * c J/y. a5 NJ.?3 ti I "( -r par 7 This docam& consists of 3tiHpages, ~$0. .F of 2' topics, Series A WY/~ F/yS. 5 2 --s.d %6/e /. Prospectus On Uranium Center Operation Speciri! Rcreview FInsI Dctei mmaiion February 1, 1951 # A. L. Baker President THE KELLEX CORPORATION 233 BROADWAY NEW YORK 7, N.Y. "CAUTION" This document contains information affecting the National Defense of the Ulliterl :JI.F~*?s. ~. _________-.-.. ___-.-~~ -- . CONTENTS " ' -' P F. Brown INTRODUCTION ............................................ Page 5 PROPOSED PROGRAM ...................................... 7 Contract Scope ....................................... 7 Corporate Mechanism ................................. 8 Contract Terms ...................................... 9

6

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05 Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Middlesex North, NJ Alternate Name(s): Middlesex Landfill Middlesex Municipal Landfill NJ.05-2 NJ.05-4 Location: Mountain Avenue to Bound Brook, Middlesex, New Jersey NJ.05-2 Historical Operations: Served as a disposal site for low-level radioactive pitchblende ore generated from activites at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. NJ.05-2 NJ.05-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.05-3 NJ.05-4 Site Status: Certification Basis and Federal Register Notice. USACE determination for additional remediation is pending. NJ.05-5 NJ.05-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

7

Grow NJ (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grow NJ (New Jersey) Grow NJ (New Jersey) Eligibility Commercial Savings For Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization...

8

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14 Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites New Brunswick, NJ Alternate Name(s): New Brunswick Laboratory NJ.14-1 Location: 986 Jersey Avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey NJ.14-2 Historical Operations: Performed radiochemical analyses on uranium, thorium, beryllium, and zirconium metals and compounds for MED, AEC, ERDA, and DOE to support nuclear power and weapons programs. NJ.14-3 NJ.14-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Surveys NJ.14-2 NJ.14-4 NJ.14-6 Site Status: Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice Included NJ.14-5 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP Also see New Brunswick, New Jersey, Site

9

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maywood Site - NJ 10 Maywood Site - NJ 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Maywood, NJ Alternate Name(s): Maywood Chemical Works Maywood Chemical Company Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) Stepan Chemical Company NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-7 NJ.10-11 Location: 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood/Rochelle Park, New Jersey NJ.10-4 Historical Operations: Processed monazite sands for extraction of rare earth compounds and mantle-grade thorium nitrates. NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-4 NJ.10-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.10-1 NJ.10-10 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.10-6 NJ.10-7 NJ.10-8 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NJ.10-9 NJ.10-13 USACE FUSRAP Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site

10

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07 Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Jersey City, NJ Alternate Name(s): Kellex Laboratory Jersey City Laboratory Kellex/Pierpont Vitro Corporation of America Delco-Levco Pierpont Property M.W. Kellogg Site NJ.07-1 NJ.07-2 NJ.07-6 Location: New Jersey Route 440 and Kellogg Street, Jersey City, New Jersey NJ.07-5 Historical Operations: Conducted research and development for MED and AEC on gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment using uranium hexaflouride and solvent extraction process for uranium recovery from ores. Also conducted solvent extraction of uranium and other byproducts from waste. Processes resulted in contamination of uranium, radium, and thorium. NJ.07-3 NJ.07-5 Eligibility Determination: Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey, Verification Survey NJ.07-4

11

Palmco Power NJ, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palmco Power NJ, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Palmco Power NJ, LLC Place New York Utility Id 56501 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes References...

12

SolarWorks NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product SolarWorks NJ, LLC, a provider of turnkey solar electricity installations and renewable energy solutions. References SolarWorks...

13

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton University - NJ 08 Princeton University - NJ 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY (NJ.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.08-2 Site Operations: During 1940's, performed experiments on uranium isotope separation and experiments for the development of diffusion barrier material for the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. NJ.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NJ.08-1 NJ.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.08-2 NJ.08-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NJ.08-1 NJ.08-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

14

Valero Refining Company - NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valero Refining Company - NJ Valero Refining Company - NJ Jump to: navigation, search Name Valero Refining Company - NJ Place New Jersey Utility Id 56325 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0652/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Valero_Refining_Company_-_NJ&oldid=411921" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

15

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21 Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bloomfield Tool Co. (NJ.21 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bloomfield , New Jersey NJ.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.21-2 Site Operations: During a small-scale experiment, uranium slugs were machined. NJ.21-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope and duration of the operations NJ.21-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.21-2 NJ.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Bloomfield Tool Co. NJ.21-1 - AEC Memorandum; Reichard to Files; Visit to Bloomfield

16

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15 Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVY AMMUNITION DEPOT (NJ.15) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Earle, New Jersey NJ.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.15-2 Site Operations: Storage facility and disposal unit for drummed radioactive waste that was dumped at sea. NJ.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NJ.15-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radioactive Waste Materials NJ.15-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NJ.15-2 Also see Documents Related to NAVY AMMUNITION DEPOT NJ.15-1 - AEC Memorandum; Piccot to the Files; Subject: Visit to

17

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Heyden Chemical Corp. (NJ.19 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Cyanamid NJ.19-2 Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.19-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.19-1 Site Operations: Commercial chemical operation. AEC was interested in their process for keeping thorium oxide in suspension. No indication of AEC contractual relationship with Heyden. NJ.19-1 NJ.19-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of AEC operations conducted on the site NJ.19-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium Oxide NJ.19-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

18

Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)], E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Baillet, Georges [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Cuvier, Caroline [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Sarandi, Farid [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wayne Site - NJ 16  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wayne Site - NJ 16 Wayne Site - NJ 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Wayne, NJ Alternate Name(s): Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) W.R. Grace and Company W.R. Grace Site Rare Earths, Inc. Davison Chemical Division NJ.16-1 NJ.16-2 NJ.16-3 Location: 868 Black Oak Road, Wayne, New Jersey NJ.16-5 Historical Operations: Produced crude thorium hydroxide and rare earth elements from monazite sands. Site was also used for interim storage of contaminated material removed from vicinity properties under FUSRAP. NJ.16-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.16-1 NJ.16-11 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.16-3 NJ.16-6 NJ.16-7 NJ.16-8 NJ.16-9 Site Status: USACE cleanup complete, not yet delisted from the National Priorities List. USACE Website EPA Website Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

20

Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJ NJ Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Atlantic City, NJ" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVMidriseApartment Atl... 62 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 64 KB SVSecondarySchool Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVSecondarySchool Atla... 62 KB SVStandAloneRetail Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVStandAloneRetail Atl... 63 KB SVHospital Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bowen Lab - NJ 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bowen Lab - NJ 33 Bowen Lab - NJ 33 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bowen Lab (NJ.33) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Bowen Engineering, Inc. NJ.33-1 Location: North Branch , New Jersey NJ.33-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.33-2 Site Operations: Test runs of spray calcining of boiled down pitchblende raffinates was conducted on May 15 and 16, 1951. Equipment used was decontaminated on May 17. NJ.33-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited quantities of material used and the duration of the tests, and subsequent cleanup of the site following the tests. NJ.33-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.33-1

22

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fairmont Chemical Co. (NJ.25 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Newark , New Jersey NJ.25-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.25-1 Site Operations: Company was a commercial chemical company identified as a rare earths processor (hafnium). NJ.25-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NJ.25-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Fairmont Chemical Co. NJ.25-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; Wallo to File; Fairmont Chemical

23

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bakelite Corp - NJ 35  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bakelite Corp - NJ 35 Bakelite Corp - NJ 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bakelite Corp (NJ 35) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bound Brook , New Jersey NJ.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 NJ.35-1 Site Operations: Processed nickel metal and various chemicals in support of the K-25 plant. No indication that radioactive materials were handled. NJ.35-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive material was used at the site NJ.35-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Bakelite Corp NJ.35-1 - DOE Checklist/Memorandum; D.Levine to the File; Subject:

24

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tube Reducing Co - NJ 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

experiments involving the sizing and reduction of rolled Uranium rod by the "Rockrite Process" for National Lead Company of Ohio. NJ.11-1 NJ.11-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated -...

25

Palmco Power NJ, LLC (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJ, LLC (New Jersey) Jump to: navigation, search Name Palmco Power NJ, LLC Place New Jersey Utility Id 56501 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

26

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E I Du Pont - NJ 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- NJ 06 - NJ 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites E.I. Dupont, NJ Alternate Name(s): E.I. Du Pont De Nemours and Company E.I. Du Pont Company Dupont Chambers Works Plant NJ.06-1 NJ.06-5 Location: Pennsville and Carney Townships, Southeast bank of the Delaware River, Deepwater, New Jersey NJ.06-5 Historical Operations: Development of a process for converting uranium oxide to uranium tetraflouride, production of uranium tetraflouride, research into conversion of uranium oxide to uranium metal, and production of uranium metal. NJ.06-3 NJ.06-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.06-3 NJ.06-5 NJ.06-7 NJ.06-8 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NJ.06-2 NJ.06-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion.

27

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - NJ 24  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NJ 24 NJ 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Aluminum Co of America (NJ.24 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ALCOA (Garwood Plant) NJ.24-1 Location: Garwood , New Jersey NJ.24-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 NJ.24-5 Site Operations: Constructed and altered die-casting dies and conducted die casting operation on uranium slugs. NJ.24-1 NJ.24-3 NJ.24-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed at the site NJ.24-2 NJ.24-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium metal NJ.24-1 NJ.24-3 NJ.24-4 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

28

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: J.T. BAKER CHEMICAL CO. ( NJ.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Subsidiary of Vick Chemical Company NJ.0-02-1 Location: 600 North Broad Street , Phillipsburg , New Jersey NJ.0-02-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-02-3 Site Operations: Commercial operation - licensed to process and distribute refined source material. NJ.0-02-2 NJ.0-02-3 NJ.0-02-4 NJ.0-02-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No basis for inclusion in FUSRAP NJ.0-02-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.0-02-5 NJ.0-02-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

29

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vitro Corp of America - NJ 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NJ 02 NJ 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Vitro Corp. of America (NJ.02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Vitro Laboratories NJ.02-1 Location: West Orange , New Jersey NJ.02-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.02-3 Site Operations: Performed work that involved conversion of low enrichment uranium dioxide to uranium carbon spheres and for the separation of fission products. NJ.02-3 NJ.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NJ.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Compounds NJ.02-2 NJ.02-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NJ.02-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Vitro Corp. of America

30

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. (NJ.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 271 Grove Avenue , Verona or Elizabeth , New Jersey NJ.0-03-1 NJ.0-03-2 NJ.0-03-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-03-3 Site Operations: Provided nickel to Linde. NJ.0-03-3 NJ.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials were handled at this site. NJ.0-03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. NJ.0-03-1 - Letter; Goman to Metals Disintegrating Company, Inc.

31

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker and Williams Co (NJ 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Baker and Company, Inc. Engelhard Industries, Baker Platinum Division NJ.13-8 NJ.13-1 Location: 113 Astor Street , Newark , New Jersey NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Evaluation Year: 1990 NJ.13-2 NJ.13-7 Site Operations: From 1943 through the mid-1950s, the facility processed spent catalyst (contaminated platinum) to recovery the platinum for the AEC. From the Mid-1950s to the early-1960s the facility conducted research and development on metal fabrication processes including rolling, drawing uranium metal metals continued recovery operations (uranium from scrap under AEC source material license). NJ.13-3

32

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Lead Co - NJ 29  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead Co - NJ 29 Lead Co - NJ 29 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: United Lead Co. (NJ.29 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

33

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34 Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING CORP. (NJ.34) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: South Yard, New York Shipbuilding facility on the Delaware River , Camden , New Jersey NJ.34-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.34-2 Site Operations: NYX Project (1951 - 1954) - fabricated and assembled equipment (reactors) for the AEC Savannah River Plant under subcontract to AEC Prime. Later built the N.S. Savannah, the world's first nuclear-powered cargo-passenger ship -- a joint project of the AEC and the Maritime Administration authorized by the Congress in 1956. NJ.34-1 NJ.34-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination related to work for Savannah River Plant considered remote due to the limited quantity of radioactive material involved and duration of the activity NJ.34-2

34

NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 22, 2013, 8:00am February 22, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz

35

New Jersey Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power Jump to: navigation, search Name New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power) Place New Jersey Sector Solar Product A photovoltaic engineering firm which offers and installs a complete line of solar electric products for residential, commercial, and institutional customers. References New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power) is a company located in New Jersey . References ↑ "New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=New_Jersey_Solar_Power_LLC_NJ_Solar_Power&oldid=349171

36

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs April 2, 2010 - 2:27pm Addthis Joshua DeLung In Newark, N.J., times are still tough for some residents. Among the rows of worn brick architecture, though, there are signs of hope, thanks to a local community action agency's weatherization assistance program and an extra boost in funding from the Recovery Act. The stories of homes in need of retrofitting in Newark are like those in many cities across America. Sammie Rutledge worked as a carpenter since he was a teenager but stopped working in 2004 when he was diagnosed with cancer. Faced without a paycheck from a full-time job and with high energy bills, as much as $600 each month, Sammie was distraught. Then, a friend

37

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs April 2, 2010 - 2:27pm Addthis Joshua DeLung In Newark, N.J., times are still tough for some residents. Among the rows of worn brick architecture, though, there are signs of hope, thanks to a local community action agency's weatherization assistance program and an extra boost in funding from the Recovery Act. The stories of homes in need of retrofitting in Newark are like those in many cities across America. Sammie Rutledge worked as a carpenter since he was a teenager but stopped working in 2004 when he was diagnosed with cancer. Faced without a paycheck from a full-time job and with high energy bills, as much as $600 each month, Sammie was distraught. Then, a friend

38

January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 05:00 January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl registration closes Registration for the 2014 New Jersey Regional Science Bowl...

39

**NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 23, 2013, 8:00am February 23, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional High School Science Bowl

40

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NJ1PA DETERMINATION NJ1PA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Abengoa Solar Inc. Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbu Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbu ell) Number DE·PS36-08G098032 G018156 GFQ.G018156-003 G018156 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but nollimiled to, literature surveys. inventories. audits), data analysis (indudm9 computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accomplishments accomplishments are impressive in themselves, and associ- ated with each milestone is the expansion of future produc- tion opportunities as another technical barrier is overcome. The extension of recovery opportunities into deep water has established the deep offshore as an area of considerable national significance. A second source of increased supply is gas from coalbed formations. Natural gas production from coalbed methane fields continued to grow in 1996 as projects initiated mainly in the early to mid 1990's matured through the dewatering phase into higher rates of gas production. Coalbed forma- tions contribute almost 1 trillion cubic feet, roughly 5 per- cent, to total U.S. production. Continued production growth from coalbeds is not likely in light of the precipitous drop in new wells completed in coalbed formations since the termination of the production tax

42

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural...

43

NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I &-?I, I . . . ,- . . -' * 3 8OC NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY: _____ -&-&~--------STATE: . . ------ .- OWNER(S) -------- P=st:~__------_-____--------- Current: ~~~~~~~-~----~-~~-~--~-~~~ Owner contacted q yes I-J no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ~_--_---_-~~----- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical Studies? $0 Sample & Analysis E Production 0. Disposal/Storage q Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Cpansored Faci 1 i ty 0 Other ~~~-~~~-~-_~~--~--~-- TYPE OF CONTRACT ~-_-----~-~----- A Prime q Subcontractk- 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price,

44

H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' : H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M E W BRUNSWICK UBORAIORY; MONDAY, EOVEKBER 1, '1948 REFER TO SYb5BOLt SA:HBF tu 14-7 2 Those presentr M r. Rodden, Dr. Donovan, Hr. K&lay, Dr. Chadwell, Messrs. Fry, Bslmore and Hill, The purpose of the meeting was to disouss the program and working relationships of the New York Offioe and the laboratory at New Brunswick. There is attached an agenda for the meeting. There was no disagreement on the functiona of the laboratory described by Mr. Belmore as followat 1. To assist the Produotion Division in oontrolling wality of uranium, thori=, beryllium, zirconium metals and oompounds, (or any material assigned to NYOO). (a) By analyzing various raw materials, intermediater and

45

US. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF ENERGY OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:ELECTRATHERM, Inc. STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE: ·Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: MiningOperation" Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PNK:urement Instrument Number N£PA Control Number em Number OE+FOAOOOO336 DE-EEOOO4435 GF0-0004435-002 G04435 Based on my review of the information c:oncerning tbe proposed action, 85 NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Info rm ation gathering, analysis, and d issemination Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

46

DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM PORT OF NY/NJ DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM THE PORT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Liters Transported (Source: New Jersey Petroleum Council) Rank Port Liters 1 New York Harbor, NY/NJ 106 Jersey ranks first in the United States in volume of petroleum products handled each year. In addition to the discharge of significant amounts of petroleum hydrocarbons into the waters of the New York/New Jersey region

Brookhaven National Laboratory

47

SECTION III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University ...powering the 21 st century economy... West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Final Report 29 June 2009 2 of 142 Disclaimer This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the West Virginia

48

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

49

u.s. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ!PA DETEJU,llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT CENTER MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ!PA DETEJU,llNATION RECIPIENT :Ocean Renewable Power Company, LlC Page I of2 STATE: AK PROJECf TITLE: Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions withCook Inlet Tidal Energy Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO69 DE-EE0002657 GFO-O002657-002 G02657 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.3 Research related to Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly conservation of fish, wildlife, related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the protection of cultural

50

2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices April 27-29, 2011:40 Welcome, S. Prager, Director, PPPL 8:45 Announcement: Local organizer Session I-A. Lithium in Magnetic

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

51

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999. 196 pp. $32.50.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press level is one of the great- est and most important questions facing science. The Molecular Biology of the Brain reviews the state of current knowledge about the molecular foundations of brain function and gives

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

52

Reconstruction of CT Images from Parsimonious Angular ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal human organs in a non-invasive manner. Any CT scan ...... Relative reconstruction error results for CT data without measurement error types of noisy CT...

53

Nicholas Camillone III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanometer-Thick Covalently-Bound Organic Overlayers" N. Camillone III, T. Pak, K. Adib, K.A. Khan, and R.M. Osgood, Jr. J. Phys. Chem. B, 110, 11334 (2006). Full Publications List...

54

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

55

RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Power Systems Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-FOA-0000293 DE-EE0003640 GFO-000364~001 GOO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, ~terature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

56

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridgeport, CT Bridgeport, CT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Bridgeport, CT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVHospital Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVHospital Bridgeport ... 71 KB SVLargeHotel Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Bridgepor... 67 KB SVLargeOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Bridgepo... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Bridgep...

57

Practical CT technology and techniques  

SciTech Connect

This handbook equips both radiologists and radiologists in training with a thorough working knowledge of the mechanisms and processes of computed tomography (CT) image generation, the common causes of image artifacts, and useful examination protocols for each area of the body. The author explains the fundamental technological principles of CT, focusing on those concepts crucial to successful CT examinations. The first part of the book succinctly reviews the fundamentals of CT technology. It begins with a methodical introduction to key principles of X-ray physics and technology, in which topics such as the modulation transfer function, magnification, and the X-ray tube are discussed in understandable, nonmathematical terms. The author then explains the basic technology of CT scanners, the principles of scan projection radiography, and the essential rules for radiation dosage determination and radiation protection. Careful attention is given to selectable scan factors in both routine and dynamic scanning, as well as to the processes involved in image creation and refinement and the chief determinants of image quality. Basic and specialized program features and the technology of image display, recording, and storage are also thoroughly described.

Berland, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name CT Investment Partners LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Venture capital arm of the...

59

Volume III, Issue 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

60

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Offshore CT Offshore Place Otterup, Denmark Zip 5450 Sector Wind energy Product Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project management, damage assessment and stabilization as well as other activities related to wind farms and subsea maintenance. Coordinates 55.543228°, 10.40294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.543228,"lon":10.40294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Processing Materials for Properties III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 20, 2008 ... PLEASE NOTE: The PMP-III Conference originally scheduled for December 2008 in Thailand was cancelled by TMS and the co-sponsoring...

62

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,- -.-=* ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January 1987 to obtain information that might assist'in the iden- tification of the source or sources of elevated concentrations of thorium and radium discovered on properties in the vicinity of the Bendix Plant described in the ORNL letter of December 22, 1986, to

63

Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III III Wind Farm Klondike III III Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser PG&E/PSE/EWEB/BPA Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must...

65

Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place Erlangan, Germany Sector Solar Product R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently researching buckyballs and conductive plastic for solar...

66

Export.gov - NJ Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerospace Agribusiness ArchitectureConstruction AutomotiveTransportation Education Energy Environmental Technology Franchising HotelRestaurant Information & Communication...

67

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Sungage, Inc. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT101F

68

Shiloh III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh III Facility Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Montezuma Hills Coordinates 38.1550771°, -121.7336226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1550771,"lon":-121.7336226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

69

Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Barnes County ND Coordinates 47.135175°, -97.935219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.135175,"lon":-97.935219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco III Minco III Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco III Facility Minco III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Minco OK Coordinates 35.35444115°, -98.13928127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.35444115,"lon":-98.13928127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.co [Department of Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, CA (United States); Sardesai, Milind [Department of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA (United States); Sun, Sean [Department of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Miller, Daniel W. [Department of Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: III: YBCO Conductor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: Session III: YBCO Conductor Development. Sponsored by: Jt: EMPMD/SMD Superconducting Materials...

73

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brass Co - CT 01 Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only CT.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

74

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities and relatively small quantities of radioactive material used CT.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP CT.11-2

75

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta III Alta III Facility Alta III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Grant Program MSEO Solar Electric Rebate Program NHPUC Renewable Energy Rebate Program NJCEP Customer Onsite Renewable Energy (CORE) Program NJ

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyanamid Co - CT 13 Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities involving radioactive material performed at this site CT.13-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.13-1 Radiological Survey(s): No

78

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. CT.07-1 - Sperry Products Letter; VanValkenburg to DeRenzis;

79

Extraction of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) from citrate medium by high molecular weight amines  

SciTech Connect

High molecular weight amines have been used for the extraction of citrate complexes of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III). The effect of different variables on extraction has been studied. The citrate species extracted in the organic phase have been proposed as ((RNH/sub 3//sup +/)/sub 3/) (M(Cit)/sub 2/)/sup 3 -/.

Jain, A.; Singh, O.V.; Tandon, S.N.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Potentiometric studies on mixed ligand complexes of La (III), Pr (III), and Nd (III) with nitrilotriacetic acid and mercapto acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to investigate the systems MAL (where M = La (III), Pr (III), or Nd (III), A = NTA, and L = TGA or TMEA) in order to observe the contribution of pi-interaction in the M-S bond.

Tandon, J.P.; Rana, H.S.; Sharma, M.K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

82

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session III: Processing, Microstructure and Properties. Sponsored by: MSD Flow & Fracture and Phase...

83

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

84

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wesleyan University - CT 12 Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.12-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Wesleyan University

85

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site...

86

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts TRUPACT-III Quick Facts Please see below for TRUPACT-III fact sheet. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts More Documents & Publications EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement...

87

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond  

SciTech Connect

An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Decameter Type III-Like Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

V. N. Melnik; A. A. Konovalenko; B. P. Rutkevych; H. O. Rucker; V. V. Dorovskyy; E. P. Abranin; A. Lecacheux; A. I. Brazhenko; A. A. Stanislavskyy

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute; Javier LLorca,...

92

PMP-III 2008: Travel - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PMP-III: Travel. For Thailand and Bangkok travel information, visit the Tourism Authority of Thailand. AIRORT TRANSPORTATION. Public metered taxi is the...

93

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

94

SNAP-III--THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR ENVIRONMENTAL TEST. VOLUME III  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests on four thermoelectric generators (two each of two different configurations) of the Snap III type to both the J.P.L. and the L.M.S.D. specifications for shock, vibration. and acceleration test are reported. The simulated levels were based on the anticipated environments of the Vega (J.P.L.) and WS117L (L.M.S.D.) systems. All four generators exhibited the same characteristic behavior pattern throughout the vibration portion of the test prograna, showing a d-c ripple in the generator output only in the Y place. This behavior of the generator is attributed to the oscillatory change in internal resistance resulting from vibratory elastic deformation of the thermoelectric elements. This produces a transient in the electrical output with a resultant reduction in generator efficiency. The maximum reduction in efficiency was noted in the 700 cps region. A resonance on the generator shell at 1845 cps was noted, but generator electrical output and efficiency were not affected. Upon discontinuance of the induced vibration, the generators returned to normal operating conditions. While undergoing shock test, a d-c transient was noted at the time of impact, resulting in a slight decrease in effi ciency. The generators immediately returned to their normal operating efficiency. In the acceleration portion of the test no d-c transient was evident in any of the three planes, therefore the generator efficiency remained constant. Steady state conditions were re-established at the start of each new test phase (i.e., changing planes of excitation, changing from shock to vibration, etc.). Thus, any variation from pretest efficiency was attributed to the external load resistance becoming umnatched due to the change in internal resistance. The important result is that complete generator recovery was consistent in all cases and normal operation continued The generator, shell, internal structure and pressure, and the hot and cold junction temperature were not affected during the test. As a result of this test program, it was concluded that the Snap III thermoelectric generator will operate reliably in the enviromnents associated with the Vega and WS117L vehicles. (auth)

Gross, L.W.; Schramm, E.J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

John Hale III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hale III John Hale III About Us John Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small disadvantaged, 8(a), women-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, and Historically Underutilized Business Zone businesses. He

97

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Washoe, Nevada Coordinates 40.5608387°, -119.6035495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5608387,"lon":-119.6035495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated N0.63' 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, kfC900

99

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors - Energy ...  

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a ...

100

CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma  

SciTech Connect

A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R A D O. U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 89 Table CT6. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960 ...

102

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 365 Table CT2. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960-2011, North ...

103

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning For Petrophysical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Fac R&D Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS David Wildman Division Director Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4913 david.wildman@netl.doe.gov T. Robert McLendon Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2008 t.mclen@netl.doe.gov Duane H. Smith Geosciences Division

104

CT-121_cover.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CT-121 FGD PROCESS PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2002 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0449 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

105

Piecewise structural diffusion defined on shape index for noise reduction in dual-energy CT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing radiation dose in dual-energy CT (DE-CT) scanning due to the double exposures at 80 kVp and 140 kVp is a major concern in the application of DE-CT. This paper presents a novel image-space denoising method, called piecewise structural ... Keywords: dual-energy CT, dual-energy CT colonography, noise reduction

Wenli Cai; June-Goo Lee; Da Zhang; Christina Piel; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

CT reconstruction from limited projection angles  

SciTech Connect

When the available CT projection data are incomplete, there exists a null space in the space of possible reconstructions about which the data provide no information. Deterministic CT reconstructions are impotent in regard to this null space. Furthermore, it is shown that consistency conditions based on projection moments do not provide the missing projections. When the projection data consist of a set of parallel projections that do not encompass a complete 180/sup 0/ rotation, the null space corresponds to a missing sector in the Fourier transform of the original 2-D function. The long-range streak artifacts created by the missing sector can be reduced by attenuating the Fourier transform of the reconstruction smoothly to zero at the sector boundary. It is shown that the Fourier transform of a reconstruction obtained under a maximum entropy constraint is nearly zero in the missing sector. Hence, maximum entropy does not overcome the basic lack of information. It is suggested that some portion of the null space might be filled in by use of a priori knowledge of the type of image expected.

Hanson, K.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Former Worker Program - Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense...

109

Electronic cleansing in CT colonography: past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fecal tagging is a means of marking' fecal residues (stool and fluid) in a colon by use of the oral administration of a positive contrast agent (barium or iodine) in CT Colonography (CTC). Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for ... Keywords: CT colonography, bowel preparation, electronic cleansing, fecal tagging

Wenli Cai; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings...

111

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (a) III (a) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (a) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenrock III Wind Farm Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenrock III Wind Farm Facility Glenrock III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser EnXco Location Converse WY Coordinates 43.0347917°, -105.8439737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0347917,"lon":-105.8439737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

Waverly III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waverly III Wind Farm Waverly III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly III Wind Farm Facility Waverly III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Waverly Light & Power Developer Waverly Light & Power Energy Purchaser Waverly Light & Power Location Waverly IA Coordinates 42.7241°, -92.4786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7241,"lon":-92.4786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Microsoft Word - Ct121R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Applications Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2002/1177 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

119

CT113-53 Cape Wind Report_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation Technology Service Corporation an employee-owned company 55 Corporate Drive 3rd Floor, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611 Phone: (203) 268-1249 Fax: (203) 452-0260 www.tsc.com Ref: TSC-CT113-53 Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project Submitted to the United States Coast Guard December 16, 2008 USCG Order #HSCG24-08-F-16A248

120

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Loan Solar Loan No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 29, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Connecticut Name CT Solar Loan Incentive Type State Loan Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State/Territory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Terms 15 years Program Administrator The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Website http://www.energizect.com/residents/programs/ctsolarloan Last DSIRE Review 03/29/2013 References Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency[1] Summary The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Wayne NJ.rtf  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) Wayne, New Jersey FACT SHEET January 2004 DESCRIPTION: The Wayne site is located in a highly developed area of northern New Jersey, approximately 20 miles north-northwest of Newark, New Jersey. The site was formerly owned and operated by Rare Earths, Inc. and W.R. Grace & Co. Contamination at the property resulted from rare earths and thorium processing activities conducted at the facility during the period of 1948 to 1971. The property is now owned by the U.S. government and is designated as the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS). The site is located at the intersection of Black Oak Ridge Road and Pompton Plains Cross Road in Wayne Township, Passaic County, New Jersey. The WISS consists of approximately 6.5 acres of fenced property, roughly

122

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

were traces of radioactive materials that had been carried offsite over the years by wind and rain to yards of neighboring homes. Also, records later revealed that in 1948, some...

123

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in New Jersey homes is for space heating. Air conditioning accounts for a larger share of household consumption than other Northeast states, but still only accounts for 3% of the...

124

The January Thaw at New Brunswick, NJ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of the January thaw phenomenon, a period of unseasonable warmth, was conducted using daily maximum temperatures recorded at New Brunswick, New Jersey, from 18581981. Student's t-tests, comparing long-term means of daily maximum ...

John R. Lanzante; Robert P. Harnack

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

than the average U.S. household. * New Jersey homes are 20% larger than the average U.S. home. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Nearly half the energy consumed in New Jersey homes is for...

126

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Maywood NJ.rtf  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maywood, New Jersey Maywood, New Jersey FACT SHEET January 2004 DESCRIPTION: The Maywood site is located in a highly developed area of northeastern New Jersey, in the boroughs of Maywood and Lodi and the township of Rochelle Park. It is located approximately 13 miles northeast of Newark, New Jersey. Contamination at the properties resulted from rare earths and thorium processing activities conducted at the Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) from the early 1900 through 1959. MCW stopped extracting thorium in 1959. The property was subsequently sold to the Stepan Company (Stepan), a pharmaceutical manufacturer, in 1959. The Maywood site is composed of the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and various nearby properties, including the Stepan property and numerous residential, commercial, and

127

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoney Corners III Stoney Corners III Facility Stoney Corners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209°, -85.275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.209,"lon":-85.275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

129

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Cost Considerations III: Cost Considerations Moderator: Dana Christensen Panelists: Phil Macey Paul Torcellini Rich von Luhrte NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Road to Net Zero Dana Christensen Deputy Laboratory Director Science & Technology RSF Workshop July 27-28, 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Managing Costs Paul Torcellini, PhD, PE Group Manager, Advanced Commercial Buildings Research Group Innovation for Our Energy Future 4 I II III IV Value Added 5 * Owner made tough decisions up-front * Set budget * Sought maximum value for that budget

130

Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kotzebue Wind Project III Kotzebue Wind Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.83716°, -162.556955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.83716,"lon":-162.556955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

131

Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pomeroy III Wind Farm Pomeroy III Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pocahontas County IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Crystal Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Crystal Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Hancock/Winnebago Counties IA Coordinates 43.304401°, -93.824029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.304401,"lon":-93.824029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

134

III-Nitride Semiconductors for Photovoltaic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a band-structure method that includes bandgap correction, we study the chemical trends of the bandgap variation in III-V semiconductors and predict that the bandgap for InN is 0.85 0.1 eV. This result suggests that InN and its III-nitride alloys are suitable for photovoltaic applications. The unusually small bandgap for InN is explained in terms of the atomic energies and the bandgap deformation potentials. The electronic and structural properties of the nitrides and their alloys are also provided.

Wei, S. H.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to D. Arnold; Subject: Description of work and associated costs for tests; October 19, 1954 CT.14-2 - US NRC Letter; R. Bellamy to J. Russo; Subject: NRC Safety Inspection and...

136

Composite structure development decisions using X-ray CT measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides measurement data useful for making composite manufacturing development decisions. X-ray CT measurements of material characteristics are quantitative in terms of the dimensions, density, and composition. The CT data on internal conditions, such as consolidation, gaps, delaminations, cracks, porosity and detail placement can be applied to the refinement of production techniques for composite manufacture. The key item of interest is the effect of variations in pressure loading, temperature, mold shape, material surface preparation, and bond layer thickness on the resulting consolidation or bondline quality in new composite manufacturing processes. X-ray CT measurements of densification and defect presence as a function of technique parameters are of critical importance to processes such as resin transfer molding, injection molding, composite welding, composite layup and advanced bonding methods.

Bossi, R.H.; Georgeson, G.E. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microsoft Word - CT for NETL Final rev4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Display 32 Fig. 25. Sensor Side of 64-Element Array 33 Fig. 26. Integral Surface Mount Support Electronics 33 Fig. 27. Screen Shot of 64-Element Display 34 Fig. 28. 16-Element CT...

138

Supervised probabilistic segmentation of pulmonary nodules in CT scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic method for lung nodule segmentation from computed tomography (CT) data is presented that is different from previous work in several respects. Firstly, it is supervised; it learns how to obtain a reliable segmentation from examples in a training ...

Bram van Ginneken

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Segmentation of airway trees from multislice CT using fuzzy logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation and reconstruction of the human airway tree from volumetric computed tomography (CT) images facilitates many clinical applications and physiological investigations. The main problem with standard automated region-growing segmentation ...

Tan Kok Liang; Toshiyuki Tanaka; Hidetoshi Nakamura; Toru Shirahata; Hiroaki Sugiura

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and commercial applications. CT.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CT.0-02-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

142

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 000521 & 000519...

143

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apollo Energy III LLC Apollo Energy III LLC Place Delaware, Delaware Product The company owns and operates a landfill gas to liquiefied natural gas production facility. Coordinates 39.145271°, -75.418762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.145271,"lon":-75.418762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b) b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

147

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Selling Corp - CT 0-01 Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location CT.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist D. Levine to File; Subject -

150

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Radium CT.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator CT.05-1 - MED Memorandum; To the Files, Thru Ruhoff, et. al.;

151

A New Approach in Metal Artifact Reduction for CT 3D Reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D representation of CT scans is widely used in medical application such as virtual endoscopy, plastic reconstructive surgery, dental implant planning systems and more. Metallic objects present in CT studies cause strong artifacts like beam hardening ...

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorens; Patricia Paniagua; Mariano Alcaiz; Salvador Albalat

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Surface-Layer Fluxes Measured Using the CT2-Profile Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first experimental test of obtaining heat and momentum fluxes from measurements of the profile of the temperature structure parameter CT2 is performed. The parameter CT2 is obtained from resistance-wire thermometers as well as from optical-...

Reginald J. Hill; Gerard R. Ochs; James J. Wilson

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data  

SciTech Connect

Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR/FB, 85601-970, Caixa Postal 135, Francisco Beltrao - PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR/FB,85601-970,Caixa Postal 135,Francisco Beltrao-PR (Brazil) and Faculdades Pequeno Principe-FPP, Av. Iguacu, 333, Rebou (Brazil); Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina - UFSC/ARA, 88900-000, Rua Pedro Joao Pereira, 150, Ararangua - SC (Brazil); Klock, Margio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR Litoral, 80230-901, Rua Jaguaraiva 512, Caioba, Matinhos - PR (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoPeak Energy + , Energy Company + , Solar + , Residential and Commercial PV Solar Installations + , Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area + , Somerset + , New Jersey +...

156

Former Worker Program - Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Springdale, CT); Gerity-Michigan Corporation (Adrian, MI); Revere Copper and Brass (Detroit, MI); Wolverine Tube Division (Detroit, MI); National Beryllia (Haskell, NJ);...

157

PPL EnergyPlus LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

con":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Display map Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Utility Id 28802 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC Activity...

158

Equal rights for equal action : women's mobilization for suffrage in Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Dictatorship in Venezuela, 1945-1959. Hamden, CT: Archonand Political Change in Venezuela. Princeton, NJ: Princetonand the Church in Venezuela. Journal of Interamerican

Skog, Erica Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later Operable Unit III documents and Operable Units I and II post-Record of Decision documents are located in the Information Repository. Complete copies of the records are located at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503, and at the Monticello Field Office, 1665 S. Main Street,

160

Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III - Permitting and Initial Development III - Permitting and Initial Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase III: Permitting and Initial Development GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

162

SunShot Initiative: Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions...

163

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

164

Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Revise TRUPACT-III Management Language * Revise Procedure Reference for the Bolting Station in Table...

165

Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

Tjandra, Meiliana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Notices III. Summary of Public Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32 Federal Register 32 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 246 / Friday, December 21, 2012 / Notices III. Summary of Public Comments Received and Agency Response to Comments During the public comment period provided, EPA received no comments in response to the September 26, 2012 Federal Register notice announcing the Agency's receipt of the requests for voluntary cancellation and termination of all uses of products listed in Table 1 of Unit II. IV. Cancellation Order Pursuant to FIFRA section 6(f), EPA hereby approves the requested cancellation and termination of all uses of halofenozide registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. Accordingly, the Agency hereby orders that the product registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. are canceled and all uses of halofenozide are terminated. The

167

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

168

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

169

Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 3.0 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2A 2.6 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2B c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout disposed to date Not Applicable 1.4 x 10 4 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L

170

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

171

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

172

Build Your Own Pentium III PC, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Build your own Pentium III PC and save a bundle!Why pay big bucks for a Pentium III system when legendary build-it-yourself guru Aubrey Pilgrim can help you construct one at home for a fraction of dealer prices? In Build Your Own Pentium ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

III-Nitride LEDs with photonic crystal structures.  

SciTech Connect

Electrical operation of III-Nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic crystal structures is demonstrated. Employing photonic crystal structures in III-Nitride LEDs is a method to increase light extraction efficiency and directionality. The photonic crystal is a triangular lattice formed by dry etching into the III-Nitride LED. A range of lattice constants is considered (a {approx} 270-340nm). The III-Nitride LED layers include a tunnel junction providing good lateral current spreading without a semi-absorbing metal current spreader as is typically done in conventional III-Nitride LEDs. These photonic crystal III-Nitride LED structures are unique because they allow for carrier recombination and light generation proximal to the photonic crystal (light extraction area) yet displaced from the absorbing metal contact. The photonic crystal Bragg scatters what would have otherwise been guided modes out of the LED, increasing the extraction efficiency. The far-field light radiation patterns are heavily modified compared to the typical III-Nitride LED's Lambertian output. The photonic crystal affects the light propagation out of the LED surface, and the radiation pattern changes with lattice size. LEDs with photonic crystals are compared to similar III-Nitride LEDs without the photonic crystal in terms of extraction, directionality, and emission spectra.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Sigalas, M. M. (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA); Epler, J. E. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Krames, M. R. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Li, D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Shagam, M. (Boston University, Boston, MA); Gardner, N. F. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Wierer, Jonathan J. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

176

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

177

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

178

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU`s) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU's) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

Fredberg Persson, Gitte, E-mail: gitte.persson@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Korreman, Stine Sofia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven National Laboratory William Brookhaven National Laboratory William Floyd Parkway Upton New York http www bnl gov Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Calverton Business Incubator Calverton Business Incubator Middle Country Rd Calverton New York http www sunysb edu research calverton Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research H Street NW Washington District of Columbia http www cgiar org Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Knowledge Strategies Knowledge Strategies Atwell Ct Potomac Maryland Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Passport to Knowledge Passport to Knowledge Morristown New Jersey http passporttoknowledge com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Rutgers EcoComplex Rutgers EcoComplex Florence Columbus Rd Bordentown

183

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

184

TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

MIEDER, WOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004. 304 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selecta bibliografa, Proverbs: A Handbook interesado en unWOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood,libros de referencia de Handbooks" publicado en el nueva la

Lee, Alejandro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administrati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11...

188

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Group III-selenides: new silicon compatible semiconducting materials for phase change memory applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project investigates a series of III-Selenide materials (III xSey), where III=Al, Ga and In, through study of the interacting chemical, kinetic and structural constraints (more)

Lu, Chih-Yuan, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

193

Precios de Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precios de Gasolina para Ciudades en EEUU Pulse en el mapa para ver los precios de la gasolina en diferentes ciudades de su estado. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV...

194

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV cell-and then worked with industry to develop the industry-standard GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge) technology. III-V multijunction cells, which address both space and terrestrial power needs, have achieved the highest energy conversion efficiencies of all PV cells, with the current record exceeding 40%.

195

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin- phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility General Information Name GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility Facility GEM Resources III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 3300 East Evan Hewes Highway Location Holtville, California Zip 92250 Coordinates 32.776035405529°, -115.26321172714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.776035405529,"lon":-115.26321172714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA Regulations, the last version appeared in the Federal Register of Friday, December 21,1984 (49 FR 49754). Note: The specfic contact information is outdated and should not be used for consultation or outreach. Appendix I - Federal and Federal-State Agency NEPA Contacts Appendix II - Federal and Federal- State Agencies With Jurisdiction by Law or Special Expertise on Environmental Quality Issues Appendix III - Federal and Federal-State Agency Offices for

198

Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (EUI) Wind Farm III (EUI) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Energy Unlimited Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157583013418°, -115.63876390457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157583013418,"lon":-115.63876390457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Facility Pyron (Roscoe III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Near Roscoe TX Coordinates 32.354161°, -100.344825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.354161,"lon":-100.344825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II & III II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.839104°, -162.556894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.839104,"lon":-162.556894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs....

204

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Weatherization program in Region III: a management study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Weatherization Program, which uses Federal funds and job training program employees to weatherize the homes of low-income homeowners, was examined in the five states of Federal Region III (Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia).

Baldwin, F.D.; Kinney, L.F.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates Speaker(s): Connie Chang-Hasnain Date: February 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location:...

207

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Creek III Wind Farm Panther Creek III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek III Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location TX Coordinates 31.9685988°, -99.9018131° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9685988,"lon":-99.9018131,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV)=10 cm, and slice thickness=0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to >4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

Li Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B.; Hsieh, Jiang [Applied Science Laboratory, General Electric Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and

211

Metal artifact reduction in dental CT images using polar mathematical morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Most dental implant planning systems use a 3D representation of the CT scan of the patient under study as it provides a more intuitive view of the human jaw. The presence of metallic objects in human jaws, such as amalgam or gold fillings, ... Keywords: Artifact reduction, Dental CT, Polar morphology

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorns; Mariano Alcaiz; Fernando Lpez-Mir

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

214

ECG-correlated image reconstruction from subsecond multi-slice spiral CT scans of the heart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsecond spiral computed tomography(CT) offers great potential for improving heartimaging. The new multi-row detector technology adds significantly to this potential. We therefore developed and validated dedicated cardiacreconstruction algorithms for imaging the heart with subsecond multi-slice spiral CT utilizing electrocardiogram (ECG) information. The single-slice cardiacz-interpolation algorithms 180CI and 180CD [Med. Phys. 25

Marc Kachelrie; Stefan Ulzheimer; Willi A. Kalender

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Product Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Inc Advanced Materials Partners Inc Pine Partners Inc Advanced Materials Partners Inc Pine Street New Canaan Connecticut Venture investor http www amplink com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Akeida Capital Management Akeida Capital Management New York New York Financing Environmental Projects http www akeidacapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Ardour Capital Ardour Capital th ave New York New York http www ardourcapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Asia West LLC Asia West LLC One East Weaver Street Greenwich Connecticut Strategic investor in environmental technologies http www asiawestfunds com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area BEV Capital BEV Capital Tresser Blvd th Floor Stamford Connecticut Venture capital firm http www bevcapital com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Battelle Ventures Battelle Ventures Carnegie Center Suite Princeton

216

Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yongliang, Xiong [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

218

The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ~0.4 to ~0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for gamma-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 1E-8 pb to be probed.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; K. Lyons; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; R. Taylor; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Study at Ambient and High Pressure Diane E. Cabelli, James F. Wishart, Jerzy Holcman, Martin Meier, and Rudi van Eldik J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5131-5136 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction between OH radicals and [CuII(P2O7)2(H2O) 2]6- results in the formation of a Cu(III) complex. No reaction is observed with N3· or Br2·-, whereas SO4·- initiates the same steps as seen with ·OH. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves a ligand interchange or H · atom abstraction process. The Cu(III) complex undergoes a rapid first-order reaction, probably loss of a P2O74- chelate, followed by addition of OH- (pKOH ~ 10) to yield a Cu(III) complex that is predominantly hydroxylated

220

Separation of actinide(III) from lanthanide(III) by thermo-sensitive gel co-polymerized with TPPEN derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) was examined by the thermal-swing extraction technique using a thermo-sensitive gel, poly-N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPA) co-polymerized with a TPEN derivative, N,N,N',N'- tetrakis(4-propenyl-oxy-2-pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN). The separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) was observed in the swollen state of gel (5 deg. C) and the separation factor of Am(III) was evaluated as about 18 at pH 5.2. More than 90% of Am(III) extracted into the gel was released by the volume phase transition of gel from the swollen state (5 deg. C) to the shrunken one (40 deg. C). The repetition test for the thermal swing extraction of a soft metal ion, Cd(II), which was used as a substitute of Am(III), was carried out and the extraction and release of Cd(II) were repeated three times stably under the thermal-swing operation between 5 deg. C and 40 deg. C. The radiation effect of gel on the extraction of Am and Eu was tested by the irradiation of {gamma}-ray (10 kGy) and the long-term adsorption of {alpha}-emitter ({sup 244}Cm). The TPPEN-NIPA gel sustained no damage by these radiation tests. These results suggest that the thermal-swing extraction technique is applicable to the MA partitioning process indispensable for the establishment of P and T technology. (authors)

Takeshita, Kenji; Fugate, Glenn [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsumura, Tatsuro [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaragi, 319-1195 (Japan); Nakano, Yoshio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan); Mori, Atsunori; Fukuoka, Sachio [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

222

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be leveraged by more than $2.2 billion in private capital cost share as part of the third round of the Department's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The selections demonstrate technologies that: make progress toward a target CO2 capture efficiency of 90 percent;

223

Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners III Wind Farm Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Grand Ridge III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser AEP-Appalachian Power Location La Salle County IL Coordinates 41.15496°, -88.750234° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.15496,"lon":-88.750234,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

SEGS III Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Solar Power Plant III Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS III Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 35.021632311687°, -117.56598472595° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.021632311687,"lon":-117.56598472595,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Klondike III I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III I Wind Farm Klondike III I Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Foote Creek Rim III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWestM&N Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Carbon County WY Coordinates 41.643488°, -106.198876° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.643488,"lon":-106.198876,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Absorption spectrophotometric characterization of Sm(II), Sm(III), and Sm(II/III) bromides and Sm(III) oxybromide in the solid state  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption spectra obtained from SmBr/sub 3/, SmBr/sub 2/, and Sm0Br were used in identifying the samarium species in several mixed-valence Sm(II/III) compounds produced by H/sub 2/ reduction of SmBr/sub 3/. The nature of the absorption of Sm0Br made it possible to detect even traces of Sm0Br in the Sm bromides.

Wood, A.B.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Haschke, J.M.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Facility East Winds (formerly Altech III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Nichimen America Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Facility Sweetwater Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Catamount Developer DKRW/Babcock & Brown/Catamount Energy Purchaser CPS Energy/Austin Energy Location Sweetwater TX Coordinates 32.368084°, -100.333722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.368084,"lon":-100.333722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Lithography scaling issues associated with III-V MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we investigate fabrication issues associated with scaling down the gate length and source drain contact separation of a III-V MOSFET. We used high resolution electron-beam lithography and lift-off for gate and ohmic contact patterning to ... Keywords: E-beam, GaAs, Lift-off, MOSFET, PMMA, Resist thickness variation

O. Ignatova; S. Thoms; W. Jansen; D. S. Macintyre; I. Thayne

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

237

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

238

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

239

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

240

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), the Obama Administration will advance a major initiative to produce next generation aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, the

243

RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This is a fully licensed facility with established safety and chemical handling protocols . All activities meet OSHA standards and the site is monitored and audited by OSHA,...

244

To cities, with nothing : prisoner resettlement in Newark, NJ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis considers how cities can improve employment outcomes of recently released, formerly incarcerated people. The Newark Prisoner Reentry Initiative (NPRI) is a unique case where the city directly managed six ...

Feeney, Kevin Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

246

DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

247

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous ammonium thiocyanate by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate and related compounds  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior and separation factors of Am(III) and Eu(III) from low acid ammonium thiocyanate solutions were studied using dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and related compounds. It was found that very dilute (<0.1 M) solutions of ammonium thiocyanate were sufficient to allow quantitative extraction of Am(III) with DHDECMP. Significant differences between DHDECMP and dibutylbutylphosphonate (DB(BP)) in the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from thiocyanate were found and indicate chelation is occurring with DHDECMP, unlike the situation in the low acid lithium nitrate system. Infrared spectroscopy of the extracted complexes of La(III) and extraction studies with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP), dihexyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDIBCMP), and di-(2-ethylbutyl)-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DEBDECMP) confirm that chelation occurs with thiocyanate complexes of Am(III) and Eu(III). Separation factors, ..cap alpha.., for Am(III) and Eu(III) were the lowest with DB(BP) (..cap alpha.. = 5.84) and the highest with DHDIBCMP (..cap alpha.. = 10.8).

Muscatello, A.C.; Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

RecQ helicase stimulates both DNA catenation and changes in DNA topology by topoisomerase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Activity of RecQ Helicase and Topo III 28. DiGate,2003 Printed in U.S.A. RecQ Helicase Stimulates Both DNA95616 Together, RecQ helicase and topoisomerase III (Topo

Harmon, Frank G; Brockman, Joel P; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller patients. However, the overall risk of cancer incidence attributable to the CT examination was much higher for the newborn (2.4 in 1000) than for the teenager (0.7 in 1000). For the two pediatric-aged patients in our study, CTDI{sub vol} underestimated dose to large organs in the scan coverage by 30%-48%. The effective dose derived from DLP using published conversion coefficients differed from that calculated using patient-specific organ dose values by -57% to 13%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 60 were used, and by -63% to 28%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 103 were used. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations by combining a validated Monte Carlo program with patient-specific anatomical models that are derived from the patients' clinical CT data and supplemented by transformed models of reference adults. With the construction of a large library of patient-specific computer models encompassing patients of all ages and weight percentiles, dose and risk can be estimated for any patient prior to or after a CT examination. Such information may aid in decisions for image utilization and can further guide the design and optimization of CT technologies and scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Oak Creek Energy Systems Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Oak Creek Energy Systems Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oak Creek Energy Systems Developer Oak Creek Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility McNeilus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner G. McNeilus Developer G. McNeilus Energy Purchaser Dairyland Power /Alliant Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.673251°, -92.665436° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.673251,"lon":-92.665436,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

255

Top of Iowa III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Top of Iowa III Wind Farm Facility Top of Iowa III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Madison Gas & Electric Developer Midwest Renewable Energy Projects Energy Purchaser Madison Gas & Electric Location Worth County IA Coordinates 43.361088°, -93.294282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.361088,"lon":-93.294282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Ridgetop Energy Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.1317°, -118.451° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1317,"lon":-118.451,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

III-V/Silicon Lattice-Matched Tandem Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. To accomplish this, we have developed techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.; McMahon, W.; Romero, M.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Norman, A.; Duda, A.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

262

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electronic structure of BAs and boride III-V alloys  

SciTech Connect

Boron arsenide, the typically ignored member of the Group-III--V arsenide series BAs-AlAs-GaAs-InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its {Gamma} conduction-band minimum is p-like ({Gamma}{sub 15}), not s-like ({Gamma}{sub 1c}), it has an X{sub 1c}-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong s--s repulsion in BAs relative to most other Group-III--V compounds. We find unexpected valence-band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence-band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAs-GaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small ({approx}3.5 eV) and composition-independent band-gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap; (ii) boron ''semilocalized'' states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaN-GaAs alloys); and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies that are smaller than in GaN-GaAs alloys. The unique features of boride Group-III--V alloys offer new opportunities in band-gap engineering.

Hart, Gus L. W.; Zunger, Alex

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electronic structure of BAs and boride IIIV alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron arsenide, the typically-ignored member of the IIIV arsenide series BAsAlAsGaAs InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its ? conduction band minimum is p-like (?15), not s-like (?1c), it has an X1c-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong ss repulsion in BAs relative to most other IIIV compounds. We find unexpected valence band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAsGaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small (?3.5 eV) and composition-independent band gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap (ii) boron semi-localized states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaNGaAs alloys), and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies which are smaller than in GaNGaAs alloys. The unique features of boride IIIV alloys offer new opportunities in band gap engineering. I.

Gus L. W. Hart; Alex Zunger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lamar Wind Energy Project III Lamar Wind Energy Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project III Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Arkansas River Power Authority Developer Arkansas River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Arkansas River Power Authority Location Prowers County CO Coordinates 38.0326°, -102.532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0326,"lon":-102.532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

266

Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT---III TRUPACT---III Q uick F acts Cask: TRUPACT---III Manufacturer: ABW Certification: U.S. N uclear R egulatory C ommission C ertificate N umber 9 305 General D escription: A r ectangular c ontainer u sed t o t ransport t ransuranic w aste i n a S tandard L arge B ox 2 (SLB2) b y h ighway t rucks. T he p ackaging i s s ingle---contained a nd c omprised o f i nner and o uter s tainless s teel p lates a nd p olyurethane f oam t o p rotect a gainst p otential punctures a nd f ire d anger. A n o verpack c over i s d esigned t o p rotect t he c losure l id. Package T ype: B Gross W eight: Package ( maximum a llowable l oaded w ith c ontents): 55,116 l bs. Expected w eight: 49,000 l bs. Approximate E mpty P ackage: 43,630 l bs. Maximum P ayload W eight: 11,486 l bs. Overall D imensions: Outer w idth o f c ontainer: 8.2 f eet Height

267

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Specific DNA cleavage mediated by [SalenMn(III)][sup +  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of [SalenMn(III)][sup +] and a terminal oxidant affords efficient and specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in regions rich in A:T base pairs. Metal complexes of the tetradentate chelating ligands Salen (Salen = N,N[prime]-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) have been part of the inorganic chemistry literature for several decades. The cationic manganese(III) complex [SalenMn(III)][sup +] (1) is an efficient catalyst for the epoxidation of olefins with terminal oxidants such as iodosylbenzene. 1 also catalyzes oxidative C-H bond activation. The flat, crescent shape of 1, its aromatic and cationic nature, and its ability to catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation are features shared in whole or in part by metal complexes which bind to DNA and cleave it via oxidative processes. These similarities prompted the authors to evaluate the DNA-cleaving properties of 1, and they now report that 1 mediates specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in a reaction requiring a terminal oxidant. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Gravert, D.J.; Griffin, J.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of 'see-saw' design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial 4D-CT systems. When imaging objects with large amplitudes, the completeness criterion described here indicates the number of phase bins required to prevent missing data in MIPs and AIPs. This is most relevant for small lesions undergoing large motions.

Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia) and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queesland 4001, Australia and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, DPAM, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, PO Nilore, Islamabad 45450 (Pakistan); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, ARPANSA, Yallambie, Vic 3085 (Australia); Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Ql d 4001 (Australia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT. SNAP III THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP-III thermoelectric generator procedures power from the decay heat of 2100 curies of Po/sup 210/. This generator is to be used as a source of auxiliary power in a terrestrial satellite. For purposes of analysis, the satellite system postulated is launched from the Pacific Missile Bange into a 275- statute mile polar orbit with an orbital lifetime of about 1 year. Po/sup 210/ is an alpha emitter having a half life of 138 days and alpha and gamma decay energies of 5.3 and 0.8 mev, respectively. It is a natural component of the earth's crust, as a member of the uranium disintegration series. Sampling of polonium in the biosphere was conducted specifically for this program to determine background radiation levels. Since the fuel is primarily an alpha emitter, there is no direct radiation problem. An analysis was performed to determine the ability of the fuel container to withstand the various thermal, mechanical, and chemical forces imposed upon the generator by vehicle failures. Where theoretical analysis was impossible and experimental evidence was desired, capsules and generators were tested under simulated missile-failure conditions, Thus, the safety limits of SNAP-III in a satellite application were defined. SNAP-III is designed to be aerothermodynamically consumed on reentry into the earth's atmosphere so that the polonium will be dispersed as aerosols in the upper stratosphere. Since heating rates will be lower for aborts occurring prior to orbiting, 65 abort cases have been considered to define the general consequences of vehicle failures. The spatial and temporal relations of vehicle aborts are summarized in cartographic and tabular form. (auth)

Hagis, W.; Dix, G.P.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Nestell, James E. [MPR Associates Inc.; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Sham, Sam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(IV) with Arsenazo III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric procedure was developed for determining U(IV) in the presence of U(VI) by forming a colored complex with Arsenazo III in 4M HCl. The results compare satisfactorily with U(IV) determinations by ceric titration. Total uranium can be determined after reduction of U(VI) with metallic zinc. The concentration range for the absorbance cell solution is 0 to 2 ..mu..g U(IV)/mL. Other tetravalent ions, such as thorium, zirconium, hafnium, plutonium, and neptunium, will interfere.

Baumann, E.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Classification of the Colonic Polyps in CT-Colonography Using Region Covariance as Descriptor Features of Suspicious Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to classify polyps in CT colonography images utilizing covariance matrices as object descriptors. Since these descriptors do not lie on a vector space, they cannot simply be fed to traditional machine learning tools such as support ... Keywords: CT colonography, Colonic polyp detection, Covariance descriptor

Niyazi Kilic; Olcay Kursun; Osman Nuri Ucan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Search for Untriggered GRB Afterglows with ROTSE-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for untriggered gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment-III (ROTSE-III) telescope array. This search covers observations from September 2003 to March 2005. We have an effective coverage of 1.74 deg^2 yr for rapidly fading transients that remain brighter than ~ 17.5 magnitude for more than 30 minutes. This search is the first large area survey to be able to detect typical untriggered GRB afterglows. Our background rate is very low and purely astrophysical. We have found 4 previously unknown cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 1 new flare star. We have not detected any candidate afterglow events or other unidentified transients. We can place an upper limit on the rate of fading optical transients with quiescent counterparts dimmer than ~ 20th magnitude at a rate of less than 1.9 deg^-2 yr-1 with 95% confidence. This places limits on the optical characteristics of off-axis (orphan) GRB afterglows. As a byproduct of this search, we have an effective ~ 52 deg^2 yr of coverage for very slowly decaying transients, such as CVs. This implies an overall rate of outbursts from high galactic latitude CVs of 0.1 deg^2 yr^-1.

E. S. Rykoff; F. Aharonian; C. W. Akerlof; K. Alatalo; M. C. B. Ashley; T. Guver; D. Horns; R. L. Kehoe; U. Kiziloglu; T. A. McKay; M. Ozel; A. Phillips; R. M. Quimby; B. E. Schaefer; D. A. Smith; H. F. Swan; W. T. Vestrand; J. C. Wheeler; J. Wren; S. A. Yost

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features. Results: The authors acquire a total of 20 MRI-CT patient studies and use the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate four different LSSMs. First, a fusion-based LSSM (fLSSM) is built using expert ground truth delineations of the prostate on MRI alone, where the ground truth for the gland on CT is obtained via coregistration of the corresponding MRI and CT slices. The authors compare the fLSSM against another LSSM (xLSSM), where expert delineations of the gland on both MRI and CT are employed in the model building; xLSSM representing the idealized LSSM. The authors also compare the fLSSM against an exclusive CT-based SSM (ctSSM), built from expert delineations of the gland on CT alone. In addition, two LSSMs trained using trainee delineations (tLSSM) on CT are compared with the fLSSM. The results indicate that the xLSSM, tLSSMs, and the fLSSM perform equivalently, all of them out-performing the ctSSM. Conclusions: The fLSSM provides an accurate alternative to SSMs that require careful expert delineations of the SOI that may be difficult or laborious to obtain. Additionally, the fLSSM has the added benefit of providing concurrent segmentations of the SOI on multiple imaging modalities.

Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

Kim, Jung-Ha [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); Nuyts, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, Roger [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

A PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this "blind" biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. ... Keywords: 3D ultrasound imaging, PET/CT, image segmentation, imageguided biopsy, molecular imaging, nonrigid image registration, prostate cancer, wavelet transform

Baowei Fei; Viraj Master; Peter Nieh; Hamed Akbari; Xiaofeng Yang; Aaron Fenster; David Schuster

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production. estiMateD cost The estimated cost to implement the Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project is $15,582,600. (Estimated costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERPLouisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion The Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project

288

Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma': Making a Place for Historians in the Climate Change and Energy Debates," Environmental History History (undergraduate lecture) Energy in American History (undergraduate seminar) United States GlobalPaul Sabin Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324 Telephone: (203) 436

289

The noise power spectrum in CT with direct fan beam reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The noise power spectrum (NPS) is a useful metric for understanding the noise content in images. To examine some unique properties of the NPS of fan beam CT, the authors derived an analytical expression for the NPS of fan beam CT and validated it with computer simulations. The nonstationary noise behavior of fan beam CT was examined by analyzing local regions and the entire field-of-view (FOV). This was performed for cases with uniform as well as nonuniform noise across the detector cells and across views. The simulated NPS from the entire FOV and local regions showed good agreement with the analytically derived NPS. The analysis shows that whereas the NPS of a large FOV in parallel beam CT (using a ramp filter) is proportional to frequency, the NPS with direct fan beam FBP reconstruction shows a high frequency roll off. Even in small regions, the fan beam NPS can show a sharp transition (discontinuity) at high frequencies. These effects are due to the variable magnification and therefore are more pronounced as the fan angle increases. For cases with nonuniform noise, the NPS can show the directional dependence and additional effects.

Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

Sotiropoulou, Evangelia ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Stathochristopoulou, Irene [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Stathopoulos, Konstantinos ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.co ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Robust Segmentation and Anatomical Labeling of the Airway Tree from Thoracic CT Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for automatic extraction and labeling of the airway tree from thoracic CT scans is presented and extensively evaluated on 150 scans of clinical dose, low dose and ultra-low dose data, in inspiration and expiration from both relatively healthy ...

Bram Ginneken; Wouter Baggerman; Eva M. Rikxoort

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Synthesis and Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted N4-Tetradentate Ligands for Implementation in An(III)/Ln(III) Separations  

SciTech Connect

The previous literature demonstrates that donor atoms softer than oxygen are effective for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) from trivalent actinides (An(III)) (Nash, K.L., in: Gschneider, K.A. Jr., et al. (eds.) Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, vol. 18-Lanthanides/Actinides Chemistry, pp. 197-238. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1994). It has also been shown that ligands that 'restrict' their donor groups in a favorable geometry, appropriate to the steric demands of the cation, have an increased binding affinity. A series of tetradentate nitrogen containing ligands have been synthesized with increased steric 'limits'. The pK a values for these ligands have been determined using potentiometric titration methods and the formation of the colored copper(II) complex has been used as a method to determine ligand partitioning between the organic and aqueous phases. The results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted amine ligands are encouraging, but the results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted diimines indicate that these ligands are unsuitable for implementation in a solvent extraction system due to hydrolysis.

Mark D. Ogden; G. Patrick Meier; Kenneth L. Nash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

The He II Fowler lines and the O III and N III Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new measure of reddening (E$_{(B-V)}$$\\sim$0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the $\\ion{He}{ii}$ Fowler (n$\\to$3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of n$_H$ from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-$\\alpha$ line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative $\\ion{O}{iii}$ intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new $\\ion{O}{iii}$ Bowen lines near $\\lambda$ 2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the $\\ion{N}{iii}$ $\\lambda$ 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d $^2D_{5/2}$ and 3d $^2D_{3/2}$ levels of $\\ion{N}{iii}$. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and $\\ion{N}{iii}$ near $\\lambda$ 374 and show that the observed $\\ion{N}{iii}$ line ratios and intensities can be explained in terms of line fluorescence by the three resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ at $\\lambda$$\\lambda$ 374.432, 374.162 and 374.073 under optically thick conditions.

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test.of Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain. DECOVALEX III, Taskmodeling of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. DECOVALEX

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Analise Matematica III Cursos de Matematica e Engenharia Electrotecnica, Mecanica e Fsica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An??alise Matem??atica III 1 o ? Teste Cursos de Matem??atica e Engenharia Electrot??ecnica, Mec??anica

Matos, João Palhoto

298

Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers has invented the first vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technology yielding III-V photovoltaics. The photovoltaics ...

299

Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

G Subject: Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-74 References: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schrder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

303

Cellulose hydrolysis in evolving substrate morphologies III: Timescale analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis Hydrolysis in Evolving Substrate Morphologies III: Time-Scale Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Computational Systems Biology Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 11 December 2009; revision received 4 May 2010; accepted 10 May 2010 Published online 1 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22814 ABSTRACT: We present a time-scale analysis for the enzy- matic hydrolysis of solid cellulosic substrates,

304

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous Waste Bureau Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.nmenv.state.nm.us  DAVE MARTIN Secretary RAJ SOLOMON, P.E. Deputy Secretary CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED January 21, 2011 Edward Ziemianski, Acting Manager Farok Sharif, President Carlsbad Field Office Washington TRU Solutions LLC Department of Energy P.O. Box 2078 P.O. Box 3100 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-5608 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs. Ziemianski and Sharif: On September 20, 2010, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received a

305

CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i5W 95.5 L' i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

306

Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

307

Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 42.099444444444°, -113.38222222222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.099444444444,"lon":-113.38222222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

309

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

310

KT Monograph Section D5 Pottery Data - Level III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#7;1#7;#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;Libation arm#7;#7;#7;#7;2#7;28#7;34#7;#7;4#7;#7;Trefoil rim#7;#7;2#7;#7;9#7;4#7;9#7;2#7;1#7;#7;Pilgrim flask#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;#7;2#7;#7;Spindle bottle#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7... overhanging rim 2 1 1 Libation arm 2 28 34 4 Trefoil rim 2 9 4 9 2 1 Pilgrim flask 1 2 Spindle bottle 1 1 Table D5:1 - Sherd counts for Level III by phase. These figures are taken from the following units: 1376, 1417, 1421, 1428, 1428, 1436, 4001, 4004, 4010...

Hansen, C; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

ICP dry etching of III-V nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN, AlN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was investigated in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of dc bias, and ICP power. The etch rates were generally quite low, as is common for III-nitrides in CH{sub 4} based chemistries. The etch rates increased with increasing dc bias. At low rf power (150 W), the etch rates increased with increasing ICP power, while at 350 W rf power, a peak was found between 500 and 750 W ICP power. The etched surfaces were found to be smooth, while selectivities of etch were {le} 6 for InN over GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN under all conditions.

Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, ASME, 2012, Reference.

D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect

The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

Kevin G. DeWall

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Charge exchange measurements on the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two passive charge exchange analyzers were installed on the Doublet III tokamak. Both were of the E parallel B type, permitting H-D discrimination by mass. Deuterons with energies up to about 90 keV could be observed at the highest spectrometer magnetic fields available. Beam injection energy on Doublet III was typically 75 keV. One of the analyzers could scan across the beam injection angle of approximately 27/sup 0/ at the magnetic axis, while the other analyzer observed parallel neutral flux across nearly the entire cross section from about 10 cm inside the limiter to tangency radii of about 85 cm, intersecting the centerpost. Beam injection was angled toward the direction of positive plasma current and co-going particles were generally observed by both analyzers. When neutral beam power was increased in steps, generally the observed fast neutral flux did not increase proportionally at higher power levels. In addition, the parallel analyzer in a few cases showed evidence for a fast particle loss at a single energy, with the distribution function being filled in from higher and lower energies. Flux bursts were observed in synchronism with limiter H/sub ..cap alpha../ spikes at the low energy range of the parallel analyzer. The perpendicular analyzer, observing fast particles near their injected pitch angle, detected bursts at all energies, with especially pronounced correlation with H/sub ..cap alpha../ activity at high energies. When fishbone activity was seen magnetically, simultaneous bursts were often, but not always, observed on the perpendicular analyzer, but were never seen on the parallel instrument.

Lohr, J.; Armentrout, C.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliance for Clean Energy New York Alliance for Clean Energy New York Washington Ave Albany New York Coalition dedicated to promoting clean energy energy efficiency a healthy environment and a strong economy for the Empire State http www aceny org Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Center for Clean Air Policy CCAP Center for Clean Air Policy CCAP First Street NE Suite Washington District of Columbia http www ccap org Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Coalition for Rainforest Nations CfRN Coalition for Rainforest Nations CfRN Lexington Avenue th Floor New York New York http www rainforestcoalition org eng Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Conservation International Conservation International Crystal Drive Suite Arlington Virginia http www conservation org Pages default aspx Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank ESMAP

318

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

boro biofuel boro biofuel maiden lane New York New York Biofuels Multi boro biofuel boro biofuel maiden lane New York New York Biofuels Multi feed stock http borobiofuel com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area AWS Truewind AWS Truewind New Karner Road Albany New York Wind energy Energy assessment resource mapping project engineering due diligence performance evaluation and forecasting http www awstruewind com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Advanced Solar Power Inc Advanced Solar Power Inc New York New York Gateway Solar Solar electric systems solar hot water http solarli com index html Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Aircuity Inc Aircuity Inc W Evergreen Avenue Philadelphia Pennsylvania Efficiency Manufacturer of integrated sensing and control solutions http www aircuity com Marketing index asp Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Allegheny Power Allegheny Power Cabin Hill Drive Greensburg Pennsylvania

319

Figure 23. Average price of natural gas delivered to U.S. commercial...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

320

Microsoft Word - figure_22.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey http www smra com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area SunCity SunCity Harvard Blvd Lynn Haven Florida Sustainable Energy Society Southern Africa SESSA Sustainable Energy...

322

International Monetary Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Monetary Fund Name International Monetary Fund Address 700 19th Street, N.W., Place Washington, D.C. Zip 20431 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded...

323

Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using either step function based or typical clinical arterial input function (AIF) inputs. The measured TACs were in excellent agreement with predictions across all comparison metrics with goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The predicted output functions were similarly accurate producing R{sup 2} values between 0.92 and 0.99 and maximum enhancement to within 9.0%. The effect of ROI size on the arterial input function (AIF) was investigated in order to determine an operating range of ROI sizes which were minimally affected by noise for small dimensions and partial volume effects for large dimensions. It was possible to establish the measurement sensitivity of both the Toshiba (ROI radius range from 1.5 to 3.2 mm ''low dose'', 1.4 to 3.0 mm ''high dose'') and GE scanner (1.5 to 2.6 mm ''low dose'', 1.1 to 3.4 mm ''high dose''). This application of the phantom also provides the ability to evaluate the effect of the AIF error on kinetic model parameter predictions. Conclusions: The dynamic flow imaging phantom is capable of producing accurate and reproducible results which can be predicted and quantified. This results in a unique tool for perfusion DCE-CT validation under realistic flow conditions which can be applied not only to compare different CT scanners and imaging protocols but also to provide a ground truth across multimodality dynamic imaging given its MRI and PET compatibility.

Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)  

SciTech Connect

The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Complexation Studies of Bidentate Heterocyclic N-Donor Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect

A new bidentate nitrogen donor complexing agent that combines pyridine and triazole functional groups, 2-((4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)pyridine (PTMP), has been synthesized. The strength of its complexes with trivalent americium (Am3+) and neodymium (Nd3+) in anhydrous methanol has been evaluated using spectrophotometric techniques. The purpose of this investigation is to assess this ligand (as representative of a class of similarly structured species) as a possible model compound for the challenging separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides. This separation, important in the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles, is best achieved through the agency of multidentate chelating agents containing some number of nitrogen or sulfur donor groups. To evaluate the relative strength of the bidentate complexes, the derived constants are compared to those of the same metal ions with 2,2*-bipyridyl (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), and 2-pyridin-2-yl-1H-benzimidazole (PBIm). At issue is the relative affinity of the triazole moiety for trivalent f element ions. For all ligands, the derived stability constants are higher for Am3+ than Nd3+. In the case of Am3+ complexes with phen and PBIm, the presence of 1:2 (AmL2) species is indicated. Possible separations are suggested based on the relative stability and stoichiometry of the Am3+ and Nd3+ complexes. It can be noted that the 1,2,3-triazolyl group imparts a potentially useful selectivity for trivalent actinides (An(III)) over trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)), though the attainment of higher complex stoichiometries in actinide compared with lanthanide complexes may be an important driver for developing successful separations.

Ogden, Mark; Hoch, Courtney L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Kinetics of Chromium(III) Oxidation by Manganese(IV) Oxides Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This represents the first study to determine the chemical kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on Mn-oxides. The results focusing on the "chemical" kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on manganese oxides, i.e., the initial rates of Obtaining and Analyzing Kinetic Data. In Rates of Soil Chemical Processes, Sparks, D. L., Suarez, D. L., Eds

Sparks, Donald L.

330

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques Q.H. FAN,, , X.L. TAN, , J.X. LI , X.K. WANG* , W.S. WU* , G. Montavon&* Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lauren Milone lauren.milone@em.doe.gov 301-903-3731 Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the first shipment of transuranic waste using the newly approved shipping package known as the TRUPACT-III safely arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The shipment, which originated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, arrived at WIPP on August 25. The new shipping package - the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 3 or TRUPACT-III - allows the Department to package and ship large-sized transuranic waste in a single box that would otherwise

334

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, 37: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect the Heartland Wind, LLC, proposed Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project in Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota, to DOE's Western Area Power Administration transmission system. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 29, 2012 EIS-0437: Notice of Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, SD

335

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lauren Milone lauren.milone@em.doe.gov 301-903-3731 Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the first shipment of transuranic waste using the newly approved shipping package known as the TRUPACT-III safely arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The shipment, which originated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, arrived at WIPP on August 25. The new shipping package - the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 3 or TRUPACT-III - allows the Department to package and ship large-sized transuranic waste in a single box that would otherwise

336

Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data  

SciTech Connect

Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 {times} 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH z *?CT"Hh?x*4* *??C*? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH?z?*?CT"Hh?x*4*?*??C*???;G@ PBJ}???????IUu????`o?1\\?*N????x

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy is currently being studied for the treatment of osteosarcoma using a preclinical translational model in dogs to assess its potential efficacy and toxicity. In this study, dosimetry calculations are performed for Y-90 liquid brachytherapy in a dog with osteosarcoma using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. A total of 611.83 MBq Y-90 radiopharmaceutical is administered via direct injections, and the in vivo distribution of Y-90 is assessed using a time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT scanner. A patient-specific geometry is built using anatomical data obtained from CT images. The material properties of tumor and surrounding tissues are calculated based on a CT number - electron density calibration. The Y-90 distribution is sampled in Geant4 from PET images using a collapsing 3-D rejection technique to determine the decay sites. Dose distributions in the tumor bed and surrounding tissues are calculated demonstrating significant heterogeneity with multiple hot spots at the injection sites. Dose volume histograms show about 33.9 percent of bone and tumor and 70.2 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose over 200 Gy; about 3.2 percent of bone and tumor and 31.0 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET/CT scanners for the direct quantitative assessment of Y-90 activity concentration, and assessment of efficacy of the Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy.

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review  

SciTech Connect

As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Detection sensitivity of x-ray CT imaging for NDE of green-state ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved ceramic-processing methods that use pressure slip-casting and injection molding are being developed at Norton Advanced Ceramics, with a goal of producing reliable structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of ceramic parts at different stages of processing can provide useful diagnostic information to help improve processing techniques. For example, an evaluation of density gradients in as-cast green-body samples can be used to judge mold performance and make changes in mold design. Also, the ability to detect minute flaws (20 to 50 {mu}m), such as agglomerates, inclusions, and voids, in green-body, presintered, and densified parts is important in ensuring structural reliability of the final parts, because these flaws, above certain critical sizes, can lead to catastrophic failure. Three-dimensional microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for application to quantitative NDE evaluation of ceramics. This paper evaluates the detection sensitivity of the ANL X-ray CT system when used to determine density gradients, inclusions, and voids in green-state Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. A theoretical account of key system- and sample-related parameters affecting X-ray CT detection sensitivity is given, and results of experimental evaluation are presented. Density calibration phantoms and net-shape-formed tensile rods with seeded defects were used in the experimental evaluation of detection limits. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Gopalsami, N.; Rizo, P.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Tracey, D.M. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

343

Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commodity Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 464 490 49 518 1,521 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 89 236 1 209 539 Residual Fuel Oil 26 18 11 16 469 540 Still Gas 13,838 50,328 108,359 8,694 38,875 220,094 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 528 166 694 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 9,003 17,611 42,614 2,852 12,416 84,496 Natural Gas (million cubic feet) 38,347 143,702 474,359 26,971 159,849 843,228 Coal (thousand short tons) 30 0 0 0 0 30 Purchased Electricity (million kWh) 2,355 11,892 23,255 2,003 5,130 44,635 Purchased Steam (million pounds) 3,849 12,723 88,922 1,439 14,426 121,359 Other Products 40 47 677 67 1,141 1,972

344

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S. from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The InstalledMW No. Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installedbuilding-integrated, tracking, non-tracking, crystalline,

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Intermediate States of Ribonuclease III in Complex with Double-Stranded RNA  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) can affect RNA structure and gene expression in either of two ways: as a processing enzyme that cleaves double-stranded (ds) RNA, or as a binding protein that binds but does not cleave dsRNA. We previously proposed a model of the catalytic complex of RNase III with dsRNA based on three crystal structures, including the endonuclease domain of RNase III with and without bound metal ions and a dsRNA binding protein complexed with dsRNA. We also reported a noncatalytic assembly observed in the crystal structure of an RNase III mutant, which binds but does not cleave dsRNA, complexed with dsRNA. We hypothesize that the RNase III {center_dot} dsRNA complex can exist in two functional forms, a catalytic complex and a noncatalytic assembly, and that in between the two forms there may be intermediate states. Here, we present four crystal structures of RNase III complexed with dsRNA, representing possible intermediates.

Gan, Jianhua; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua (NIH)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Recovery of Cr(III) from tannery spent chrome liquor for reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper embodies details on the extraction behavior of Cr(III) along with Al(III), Fe(III), Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from hydrochloric acid media employing the Cyanex 301-toluene system. All of these metals, except Cr(III), Mg(II), and Mn(II), are extracted into the organic phase. This property of the extractant has been used to separate Cr(III) from the binary mixtures. The partition data have been extended onto spent chrome liquor, and this waste has been treated in such a manner so that it becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. The hydrolytic stability and recycling capacity has been reported. Because the concentration of Cr(III) in the waste is much lower than that required for chromium depositions in Cr(III) plating baths, a concentration step using MgO as a precipitating agent has been appended. To summarize, this paper envisages a new approach to tannery waste management that focuses on treating spent chrome liquors using a solvent extraction technique in such a manner that the waste becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. This would not only help abate pollution but also recover the metal in a pure form.

Khwaja, A.R.; Singh, R.; Tandon, S.N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

348

Those early days as we remember them (part III) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III) III) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

349

MinWind III-IX Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III-IX Wind Farm III-IX Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name MinWind III-IX Wind Farm Facility MinWind III-IX Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Near Luverne MN Coordinates 43.6505°, -96.3892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6505,"lon":-96.3892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Up-Hill ET in (NH3)5Ru(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c: Rates, Thermodynamics, and the Mediating Role of the Ruthenium Moiety Ji Sun, James F. Wishart, and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 34, 3998-4000 (1995) Abstract: At moderate to high ionic strengths (>0.1 M), Co(oxalate)33- oxidizes native cytochrome c very slowly, however it undergoes a rapid reaction with pendant ruthenium complexes covalently attached to the surface of the protein. Under these conditions, the rate of the thermodynamically unfavorable (up-hill) FeII-to-RuIII electron transfer process in pentaammineruthenium-modified horse-heart cytochrome c can be revealed using sufficiently high Co(oxalate) 33- concentrations. Rate measurements performed over a wide range of CoIII concentrations confirm the proposed

351

Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Changes Late in Title II or Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2006-Y12-HEUMF-0001 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Victoria Pratt Date: 4/24/2010 Contact: 202-586-7358 Statement: Expect increased costs as well as omissions and errors if significant design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous changes in design requirements late in Title II and early in Title III resulted in significant concurrency in the design-and-build process, making it difficult to avoid major schedule delays and meet commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity, which led to further design changes and refinements in Title III. This necessitated major structural changes to address

352

Record of Decision - Klondike III/ Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project - 10-25-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE) 1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects,

353

Thermal considerations for advanced SOI substrates designed for III-V/Si heterointegration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon-on-lattice engineered substrates (SOLES) are SOI substrates with embedded Ge layers that facilitate III-V compound integration for advanced integrated circuits. The new materials integration scheme in SOLES requires ...

Bulsara, Mayank

354

Oxidation of phosphine by iron(III) chloride complexes supported on activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

It has been discovered that iron(III) chloride complexes supported on activated charcoal oxidize phosphine under normal conditions. The process accelerates as the concentration of the chloride ions and the proton acid increases.

Rakitskaya, T.L.; Kostyukova, I.S.; Red'ko, T.D.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) ...

Kenneth Sassen; Jennifer M. Comstock

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AECL and CTH). 2. Phase II: 3D ice-sheet/drainage modelingmodeling (AECL and CTH). 3. Phase III: 3D ice-sheet/drainagePhase I: Enhancing numerical tools for simulations of the climate drive, ice-

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V ...  

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V ... depending on the surface energy constraints of the nucleation ... scaling all times in ...

358

Platform for monolithic integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors and Si complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor (CMOS) enables the creation of advanced circuits with new functionalities. In order to merge the two technologies, ...

Pacella, Nan Yang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Explicit Simulation of Cumulus Ensembles with the GATE Phase III Data: Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The macroscopic behavior of cumulus convection and its mesoscale organization during Phase III of the Global Atmospheric Research Program's (GARP) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) is simulated with a two-dimensional (2D) cloud ensemble model. ...

Kuan-Man Xu; David A. Randall

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laser-fluorescence measurements of hydrogen and metal densities in the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general overview of the Doublet III laser-spectroscopy program is presented. This program includes tokamak diagnostic experiments and laboratory development work. Measurements of titanium and deuterium in Doublet III are presented along with recent laboratory results. Sputtering of the vacuum walls by energetic charge-exchange neutrals from the plasma center appears to be responsible for the observed Ti impurities in Doublet III. Resonance-fluorescence scattering from deuterium atoms near the plasma center has been observed using a broadband dye laser and a narrow-band detector. The feasibility of determining ion temperatures using this technique is discussed. Using the measured deuterium densities we have calculated a local-electron particle-confinement time. Laboratory measurements of carbon and oxygen densities using two-photon laser excitation and of FeI speed distributions (temperatures) using a laser double-pulse excitation technique are shown to be applicable to the tokamak conditions of Doublet III.

Muller, C.H. III; Eames, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository  

SciTech Connect

The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

Keane, Christopher M.

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Substrate engineering for monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ge virtual substrates, fabricated using Si1-xGex-.Ge, compositionally graded buffers, enable the epitaxial growth of device-quality GaAs on Si substrates, but monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS ...

Dohrman, Carl Lawrence

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Quantitative analysis of the EGFRvIII mutant receptor signaling networks in Glioblastoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive adult brain tumor and remains incurable despite multimodal intensive treatment regimens. EGFRvIII is a truncated extracellular mutant of the EGF receptor (EGFR) that is ...

Huang, Hua Ming Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nano-scale metal contacts for future III-V CMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As modem transistors continue to scale down in size, conventional Si CMOS is reaching its physical limits and alternative technologies are needed to extend Moore's law. Among different candidates, MOSFETs with a III-V ...

Guo, Alex

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Toxic and hazardous chemicals, Title III and communities: An outreach manual for community groups  

SciTech Connect

The manual was prepared for State and local government officials, local emergency planning committee (LEPCs), and other community groups that want to make Title III work. It is intended as a practical guide for those who have little or no previous experience in the field of communication, whose time must be snatched from home and office, and whose resources are limited. The manual has three major sections: Part I discusses planning, which is vital to the success of a communication program; Part II suggests ways to get and keep people involved, especially important because Title III affects so many different sectors of the community; Part III, a how-to-do-it section, talks about specific tasks, such as giving a speech or writing a press release. Appendices include a detailed explanation of the law, a glossary, a list of recent studies related to Title III communications, a list of educational materials, and a list of State contacts.

McNeil, C.; Arkin, E.B.; McCallum, D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microsoft Word - FINAL HQ DOE TP-III RELEASE.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Lauren Milone, (301) 903-3731 August 29, 2011 lauren.milone@em.doe.gov FIRST TRUPACT-III SHIPMENT ARRIVES SAFELY AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT...

368

Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume III, Roadmap Explorations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume III of this guide may be used as an in-depth reference source for acquiring deep knowledge about many of the aspects of transitioning to lean. Lean change agents and lean implementation leaders should find this ...

Bozdogan, Kirk

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Circulation Statistics Derived from Level III-b and Station-Based Analyses during FGGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of Northern Hemisphere circulation fields and statistics are derived for the months of January and June 1979 from level III-b analyses produced by GFDL using a 4-dimensional data assimilation scheme which incorporates measurements from a ...

Richard D. Rosen; David A. Salstein; JosP. Peixoto; Abraham H. Oort; Ngar-Cheung Lau

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in monochromatic images, the optimal energy was lower than that when minimizing noise level. When the total radiation dose was equally distributed between low and high energy in dual-energy scans, for minimum noise, the optimal energies were 68, 71, 74, and 77 keV for small, medium, large, and extra-large (xlarge) phantoms, respectively; for maximum iodine CNR, the optimal energies were 66, 68, 70, 72 keV. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the CNR was better than that in a single-energy scan at 120 kV for the same radiation dose. Compared to an 80 kV scan, however, the iodine CNR in monochromatic images was lower for the small, medium, and large phantoms. Conclusions: In dual-source dual-energy CT, optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on patient size, dose partitioning, and the image quality metric optimized. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the iodine CNR was better than that in 120 kV images for the same radiation dose. Compared to single-energy 80 kV images, the iodine CNR in virtual monochromatic images was lower for small to large phantom sizes.

Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Solar neutrino results in Super-Kamiokande-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of the third phase of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino measurement are presented and compared to the first and second phase results. With improved detector calibrations, a full detector simulation, and improved analysis methods, the systematic uncertainty on the total neutrino flux is estimated to be ?2.1%, which is about two thirds of the systematic uncertainty for the first phase of Super-Kamiokande. The observed 8B solar flux in the 5.0 to 20 MeV total electron energy region is 2.32+/-0.04 (stat.)+/-0.05 (sys.) *10^6 cm^-2sec^-1, in agreement with previous measurements. A combined oscillation analysis is carried out using SK-I, II, and III data, and the results are also combined with the results of other solar neutrino experiments. The best-fit oscillation parameters are obtained to be sin^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.30+0.02-0.01(tan^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.42+0.04 -0.02) and {\\Delta}m2_21 = 6.2+1.1-1.9 *10^-5eV^2. Combined with KamLAND results, the best-fit oscillation parameters are found to be sin^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.31+/-0.01(tan^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.44+/-0.03) and {\\Delta}m2_21 = 7.6?0.2*10^-5eV^2 . The 8B neutrino flux obtained from global solar neutrino experiments is 5.3+/-0.2(stat.+sys.)*10^6cm^-2s^-1, while the 8B flux becomes 5.1+/-0.1(stat.+sys.)*10^6cm^-2s^-1 by adding KamLAND result. In a three-flavor analysis combining all solar neutrino experiments, the upper limit of sin^2 {\\theta}13 is 0.060 at 95% C.L.. After combination with KamLAND results, the upper limit of sin^2 {\\theta}13 is found to be 0.059 at 95% C.L..

K. Abe; Y. Hayato; T. Iida; M. Ikeda; C. Ishihara; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; K. Kobayashi; Y. Koshio; Y. Kozuma; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; S. Nakayama; Y. Obayashi; H. Ogawa; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; Y. Takenaga; K. Ueno; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; S. Yamada; T. Yokozawa; S. Hazama; H. Kaji; T. Kajita; K. Kaneyuki; T. McLachlan; K. Okumura; Y. Shimizu; N. Tanimoto; M. R. Vagins; L. Labarga; L. M Magro; F. Dufour; E. Kearns; M. Litos; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; W. Wang; M. Goldhaber; K. Bays; D. Casper; J. P. Cravens; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; C. Regis; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; K. S. Ganezer; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; J. S. Jang; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; J. Albert; R. Wendell; T. Wongjirad; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; Y. Watanabe; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nishikawa; H. Nishino; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; A. Minamino; T. Nakaya; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; T. Tanaka; C. K. Jung; G. Lopez; C. McGrew; R. Terri; C. Yanagisawa; N. Tamura; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; S. Mino; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; H. Toyota; Y. Kuno; M. Yoshida; S. B. Kim; B. S. Yang; T. Ishizuka; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; Y. Yokosawa; M. Koshiba; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; S. Chen; Y. Heng; Z. Yang; H. Zhang; D. Kielczewska; P. Mijakowski; K. Connolly; M. Dziomba; E. Thrane; R. J. Wilkes

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III III Comment Response Document September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOE/EIS-0026-S-2 COMMENT RESPONSE DOCUMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS TC-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................AC-1 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................IN-1 1.0 ALTERNATIVES ................................................................................ 1-1 01.01 General..................................................................................... 1-1 01.02 Proposed Action and Action Alternatives ........................................... 1-2 01.03 No Action Alternatives and Other Disposal

374

Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

A robust geometry estimation method for spiral, sequential and circular cone-beam micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The authors propose a novel method for misalignment estimation of micro-CT scanners using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm is able to estimate the rotational geometry, the direction vector of table movement and the displacement between different imaging threads of a dual source or even multisource scanner. The calibration procedure does not rely on dedicated calibration phantoms and a sequence scan of a single metal bead is sufficient to geometrically calibrate the whole imaging system for spiral, sequential, and circular scan protocols. Dual source spiral and sequential scan protocols in micro-computed tomography result in projection data that-besides the source and detector positions and orientations-also require a precise knowledge of the table direction vector to be reconstructed properly. If those geometric parameters are not known accurately severe artifacts and a loss in spatial resolution appear in the reconstructed images as long as no geometry calibration is performed. The table direction vector is further required to ensure that consecutive volumes of a sequence scan can be stitched together and to allow the reconstruction of spiral data at all. Results: The algorithm's performance is evaluated using simulations of a micro-CT system with known geometry and misalignment. To assess the quality of the algorithm in a real world scenario the calibration of a micro-CT scanner is performed and several reconstructions with and without geometry estimation are presented. Conclusions: The results indicate that the algorithm successfully estimates all geometry parameters, misalignment artifacts in the reconstructed volumes vanish, and the spatial resolution is increased as can be shown by the evaluation of modulation transfer function measurements.

Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany) and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If these images are used for treatment planning, the average proton range uncertainty is estimated to be less than 1.5% for an imaging dose in the milligray range. Conclusions: The proposed method can be used to convert x-ray projections into virtual proton projections. The converted proton projections can be blended with existing proton projections or can be used solely for pCT reconstruction, addressing the range limit problem of pCT using current therapeutic proton machines.

Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

CT calorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reactions can alter the temperature in various ways, producing a ... The four black items at right below the centimeter rule are ... That way, the immediate ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in that those glasses that were found to contain nepheline after the centerline canister cooled (ccc) heat treatment generally had normalized release values that were greater than their quenched counterparts on a statistically significant basis. The current nepheline discriminator as implemented at the DWPF was shown to continue to work well in predicting nepheline prone glass compositions. A main objective of this study was to identify any compositional regions where conservatism in the current nepheline discriminator was preventing access to those regions that would otherwise be acceptable for DWPF processing by the PCCS models. Four glasses (based on the measured compositions) were identified through this study that met those criteria. However, a review of the individual compositions of these glasses revealed no clear trends that might indicate a driver for suppression of nepheline. Another objective of this study was to evaluate an alternative nepheline discriminator model developed using theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. Unfortunately this new model, in its current state, was unsuccessful in predicting nepheline crystallization in the glass compositions selected for this study. It is recommended that the data collected in this study be incorporated into the new model for further refinement.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

Kos, Sebastian, E-mail: skos@gmx.de; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland); Baumhoer, Daniel [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Pathology (Switzerland); Guillaume, Nicolas [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Jacob, Augustinus L. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards.

Madsen, Mark T.; Anderson, Jon A.; Halama, James R. [Radiology, University of Iowa (United States)] (and others)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Detective quantum efficiency of CT reconstruction: the detection of small objects  

SciTech Connect

The loss of detection sensitivity incurred by any stage of image processing may normally be characterized by the frequency dependence of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of that stage of processing, provided the image is represented in continuous coordinates. However, limitations to the DQE concept arise when discretely sampled projection data are used to obtain discretely sampled computed tomographic (CT) reconstructions. The source of these limitations is the aliasing produced by the discrete sampling which mixes contributions from various frequencies. An associated problem is that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the detection of an object can depend upon the position of the object relative to the discrete reconstruction pixels. The effective SNR for discrete images must take into account this variation. While there may be no loss in the detection SNR for reconstructions in continuous coordinates (DQE = 100%), a reduction in the SNR will result from aliasing for discrete reconstructions. A simple one-dimensional model elucidates the characteristics of discrete CT reconstruction.

Hanson, K.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Fe(III) and U(V) Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Our new research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Our previous NABIR project (DE-FG02-01ER63180/63181/63182, funded within the Biotransformation Element) focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II) and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. The new project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Burgos, William D.; Roden, Eric E.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

KINEMATICS AND METALLICITIES IN THE BOOeTES III STELLAR OVERDENSITY: A DISRUPTED DWARF GALAXY?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the Booetes III (BooIII) stellar overdensity carried out with the Hectospec multifiber spectrograph on the MMT telescope. Radial velocities have been measured for 193 BooIII candidate stars selected to have magnitudes and colors consistent with its upper main sequence and lower red giant branch, as well as a number of horizontal-branch candidates. From 20 identified candidate BooIII members, we measure a systemic velocity of V {sub sun} = 197.5 {+-} 3.8 km s{sup -1} and a velocity dispersion of {sigma}{sub o} = 14.0 {+-} 3.2 km s{sup -1}. We use the somewhat large velocity dispersion and the implied highly radial orbit, along with morphological evidence from Grillmair and stellar abundances, to argue that BooIII is likely the first known object observed in a transitional state between being a bound dwarf galaxy and a completely unbound tidal stream.

Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Nidever, David L.; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Grillmair, Carl J. [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Munoz, Ricardo R. [Yale University, Astronomy Department, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)], E-mail: jcarlin@virginia.edu, E-mail: dln5q@virginia.edu, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu, E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: ricardo.munoz@yale.edu

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

THE FORMATION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM LOW-MASS POP III SEEDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes (BHs) in massive galaxies by z {approx} 7 is one of the great unsolved mysteries in cosmological structure formation. One theory argues that they originate from the BHs of Pop III stars at z {approx} 20 and then accrete at the Eddington limit down to the epoch of reionization, which requires that they have constant access to rich supplies of fuel. Because early numerical simulations suggested that Pop III stars were {approx}>100 M{sub Sun }, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds considered up to now were 100-300 M{sub Sun }. However, there is a growing numerical and observational consensus that some Pop III stars were tens of solar masses, not hundreds, and that 20-40 M{sub Sun} BHs may have been much more plentiful at high redshift. However, we find that natal kicks imparted to 20-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III BHs during formation eject them from their halos and hence their fuel supply, precluding them from Eddington-limit growth. Consequently, SMBHs are far less likely to form from low-mass Pop III stars than from very massive ones.

Whalen, Daniel J. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0.86, 0.95) and 0.92 (0.87, 0.96), respectively. The correlation coefficients of the MLR and ANN predictions with the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.76 (0.69, 0.82, p < 0.001) and 0.78 (0.71, 0.83, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The MLR and ANN models constructed using the DICOM header information offer promise in predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed abdomen CT images.

Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Informational Statistics, Hoseo University, 165, Sechul-ri, Baebang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Statistics, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex-Daejeon, 139 Seonsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon, 302-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online learning mechanism, the authors carried out a comparison between partial online update strategy and full online update strategy. Using the full online update strategy, the mean DSC was improved from 86.6% to 89.3% with 2.8% gain. On the basis of full online update strategy, the manual modification before online update strategy was introduced and tested, the best performance was obtained; here, the mean DSC and the mean ASD achieved 92.4% and 1.47 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed prostate segmentation method provided accurate and robust segmentation results for CT images even under the situation where the samples of patient under radiotherapy were limited. A conclusion that the proposed method is suitable for clinical application can be drawn.

Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Extraction of Am(III) and Fe(III) by selected dihexyl N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethyl-phosphonates, -phosphinates and -phospine oxides from nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

A series of neutral bifunctional extractants related to dihexyl N,N,-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) have been prepared and studied for the liquid-liquid extraction of Am(III) and Fe(III) from nitrate solutions. Changes in the steric bulk of the substitutent alkyl chains and in the electronegativity of the groups attached to the phosphoryl center in these compounds have brought about large changes in distribution ratios and selectivities for the extraction of these metals. Comparisons of these extractants to related monofunctional phosphorus-based compounds have revealed that these bifunctional species behave as monodentate, rather than chelating, extractants. The presence of the carbamoyl portion of the extractant molecules is important not for coordination to the metal, but for the ability to buffer the extractant against the effects of HNO/sub 3/. 9 figures, 2 tables.

Kalina, D.G.; Horwitz, E.P.; Kaplan, L.; Muscatello, A.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin [Department of Medical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

878 878 doi:10.1107/S1744309110022529 Acta Cryst. (2010). F66, 878-880 Acta Crystallographica Section F Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications ISSN 1744-3091 Structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum Markus Alahuhta, Qi Xu, Roman Brunecky, William S. Adney, Shi-You Ding, Michael E. Himmel and Vladimir V. Lunin* BioSciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3305, USA Correspondence e-mail: vladimir.lunin@nrel.gov Received 29 April 2010 Accepted 11 June 2010 PDB Reference: fibronectin type III-like module, 3mpc. The 1.6 A ˚ resolution structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum (PDB code 3mpc) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit is reported. The crystals used for data collection belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with

393

New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology is investigating a Known Geothermal Resource Area in Socorro NM in attempts at locating a low temperature (65-100 °C) geothermal reservoir for direct-use heating on campus. The KGRA is positioned near the Socorro Peak mountain block, a Basin and Range normal-fault terrain superimposed by an Oligocene caldera margin. Preexisting evidence of this geothermal resource includes heat gradients upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring

394

G Subject: Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B, Title III, Title V and Division C B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-74 References: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Title III, Section 301(a), 301(b), 316 Pub. L. No. 112-74 Title V, Sections 501, 504, 505 Title VII, Sections 725 When is this Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) effective? The statutory provisions addressed in this FAL were effective on the enactment date of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, December 23, 2011. When does this FAL expire? This FAL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the intended audience? Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Contracting Officers. Who is the point of contact?

395

Circle plus partial helical scan scheme for a flat panel detector-based cone beam breast X-ray CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very ...

Dong Yang; Ruola Ning; Weixing Cai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. ... Keywords: 4D graph, enhancement, multi-phase CT, segmentation, shape

Marius George Linguraru; John A. Pura; Ananda S. Chowdhury; Ronald M. Summers

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantification of tc-99m sestamibi distribution in normal breast tissue using dedicated breast SPECT-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Tc-99m-Sestamibi in molecular breast imaging is common due to its preferential uptake in malignant tissue. However, quantification of the baseline uptake in normal, healthy breast tissue is not possible using planar-imaging devices. Using ... Keywords: CT, SPECT, breast cancer, breast imaging, quantification, sestamibi

Steve D. Mann; Kristy L. Perez; Emily K. E. McCracken; Jainil P. Shah; Kingshuk R. Choudhury; Terence Z. Wong; Martin P. Tornai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Validation of mutual information-based registration of CT and bone SPECT images in dual-isotope studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The registration of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) images can substantially enhance patient diagnosis as it allows for the fusion of anatomical and functional information, as well as the attenuation correction of NM images. However, ... Keywords: Accuracy, Bone SPECT, Dual-isotope studies, Multi-modality registration, Multi-resolution, Mutual information, Precision, Qualitative evaluation, Quantitative validation, Reproducibility, Robustness, Sensitivity

Lisa Tang; Ghassan Hamarneh; Anna Celler

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Geophysics. · Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 2003-2007. Posdoc in Isotope geochemistry. Department of GeologicalHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520 Plants: Physiological Role and Isotopic Composition. Adviser: Dan Yakir. Professional experience · Yale

400

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel) [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Preferred Builders, Inc. Old Greenwich, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

404

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPC Green BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

405

Automatic heart isolation for CT coronary visualization using graph-cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a means to automatically and efficiently isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomography (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visualized despite the proximity of surrounding organs such as the ribs and pulmonary blood vessels. Numerous techniques have been described for segmenting the left ventricle of the heart in images from various types of medical scanners but rarely has the entire heart been segmented. We make use of graphcuts to do the segmentation and introduce a novel means of initiating and constraining the graph-cut technique for heart isolation. The technique has been tested on 70 patient data sets. Results are compares with hand labeled results. 1.

G. Funka-lea; Y. Boykov; C. Florin; M. -p. Jolly; R. Moreau-gobard; R. Ramaraj; D. Rinck

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of SDSS-III DR8 photometric luminous galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872,921 galaxies over ~ 10,000 deg^2 between 0.45~ 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS (Percival et al. 2010) and WiggleZ (Blake et al. 2011). We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al. 2011; de Putter et al. 2011) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.

Seo, Hee-Jong; White, Martin; Cuesta, Antonio; Ross, Ashley; Saito, Shun; Reid, Beth; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J; de Putter, Roland; Schlegel, David; Eisenstein, Daniel; Xu, Xiaoying; Schneider, Donald; Skibba, Ramin; Verde, Licia; Nichol, Robert; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Costa, Luiz; Gott, J; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Nicholas; Simmons, Audrey; Simoni, Fernando; Shelden, Alaina; Snedden, Stephanie; Zehavi, Idit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

412

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex November 28, 2001 Washington, DC 20585 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 3 INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX VOLUME III Table of Contents Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... 5 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 7 2.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 9 3.0 Conclusions..........................................................................................................................................

413

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultt III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio-und Werkstoffwissenschaften  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio- und Werkstoffwissenschaften Spannende Chemie-Vorträge für saarländische Schulen Professor / Fachgebiet Thema der Vorträge Prof. Dr. G. Kickelbick / Anorganische Chemie kickelbick@mx.uni-saarland.de Chemiker als Architekten für neue High

Mayberry, Marty

414

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultt III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio-und Werkstoffwissenschaften  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio- und Werkstoffwissenschaften Spannende Chemie-Vorträge für saarländische Schulen Die Saarbrücker Chemie-Professoren möchten den Chemieunterricht an saarländischen Schulen durch Schulbesuche und Vorträge zu allgemeinen Themen der Chemie

Mayberry, Marty

415

Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OEIM 210. Industrial Mechanics III 4 cr. Air compressors, sliding surface bearings, boiler maintenance, boiler tube repairs, basic arc and gas welding, measurement tools, gauge glass maintenance, heat by employer and instructor on boiler inspection and cleaning, centrifugal pumps, basic rigging, piping

Castillo, Steven P.

417

Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Kainz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods: All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results: Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is

Wolfgang Kainz; Franois Alesch; Dulciana Dias; Chan Open Access

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

Enomoto, Ryoji

419

Exploiting genetic diversity by directed evolution: molecular breeding of type III polyketide synthases improves productivityw z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploiting genetic diversity by directed evolution: molecular breeding of type III polyketide 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b717705d Applying directed evolution to the phloroglucinol synthase PhlD from activity and the productivity goals for industrial application,5 and several examples of applying directed

Zhao, Huimin

420

Application of the BISON Fuel Performance Code to the FUMEX-III Coordinated Research Project  

SciTech Connect

INL recently participated in FUMEX-III, an International Atomic Energy Agency sponsored fuel modeling Coordinated Research Project. A main purpose of FUMEX-III is to compare code predictions to reliable experimental data. During the same time period, the INL initiated development of a new multidimensional (2D and 3D) multiphysics nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. Interactions with international fuel modeling researchers via FUMEX-III played a significant and important role in the BISON evolution, particularly influencing the selection of material and behavioral models which are now included in the code. BISON's ability to model integral fuel rod behavior did not mature until 2011, thus the only FUMEX-III case considered was the Riso3-GE7 experiment, which includes measurements of rod outer diameter following pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) resulting from a power ramp late in fuel life. BISON comparisons to the Riso3-GE7 final rod diameter measurements are quite reasonable. The INL is very interested in participation in the next Fuel Modeling Coordinated Research Project and would like to see the project initiated as soon as possible.

R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii nj ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III: a quasi-harmonic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The results of this approach are compared to phase diagrams previously derived by thermodynamic integration using path integral and classical simulations, as well as to experimental data. The studied models are based on both flexible (q-TIP4P/F) and rigid (TIP4P/2005, TIP4PQ/2005) descriptions of the water molecule. Many aspects of the simulated phase diagrams are reasonably reproduced by the quasi-harmonic approximation. Advantages of this simple approach are that it is free from the statistical errors inherent to computer simulations, both classical and quantum limits are easily accessible, and the error of the approximation is expected to decrease in the zero temperature limit. We find that the calculated phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III depends strongly on the hydrogen disorder of ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. Either ice II (in the classical limit) or ice III (in t...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P; 10.1063/1.4757064

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Simquake III: Seismic Interactions Between Building Structures and Rock-Socketed Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simquake III database contains information on structure-foundation interactions resulting from forced-vibration and simulated-earthquake ground motions. These data can help nuclear plant designers better understand the seismic behavior of buildings with rock-socketed foundations.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Molecular beam epitaxy passivation studies of Ge and III-V semiconductors for advanced CMOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future CMOS technologies will require the use of substrate material with a very high mobility in order to fulfil the performance requirements. Therefore, combination of Ge p-MOS with n-MOS devices made out of high mobility III/V compounds, such as GaAs, ... Keywords: High mobility semiconductors, Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), Passivation

C. Merckling; J. Penaud; D. Kohen; F. Bellenger; A. Alian; G. Brammertz; M. El-Kazzi; M. Houssa; J. Dekoster; M. Caymax; M. Meuris; M. M. Heyns

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Investigation of Containment Flooding Strategy for Mark-III Nuclear Power Plant with MAAP4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Containment flooding is an important strategy for severe accident management of a conventional boiling water reactor (BWR) system. The purpose of this work is to investigate the containment flooding strategy of the Mark-III system after a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) breach. The Kuosheng Power Plant is a typical BWR-6 nuclear power plant (NPP) with Mark-III containment. The Severe Accident Management Guideline (SAMG) of the Kuosheng NPP has been developed based on the BWR Owners Group (BWROG) Emergency Procedure and Severe Accident Guidelines, Rev. 2. Therefore, the Kuosheng NPP is selected as the plant for study, and the MAAP4 code is chosen as the tool for analysis. A postulated specific station blackout sequence for the Kuosheng NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. Because of the design features of Mark-III containment, the debris in the reactor cavity may not be submerged after an RPV breach when one follows the containment flooding strategy as suggested in the BWROG generic guideline, and the containment integrity could be challenged eventually. A more specific containment flooding strategy with drywell venting after an RPV breach is investigated, and a more stable plant condition is achieved with this strategy. Accordingly, the containment flooding strategy after an RPV breach will be modified for the Kuosheng SAMG, and these results are applicable to typical Mark-III plants with drywell vent path.

Su Weinian; Wang, S.-J.; Chiang, S.-C

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Error Structure of Multiparameter Radar and Surface Measurements of Rainfall. Part III: Specific Differential Phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parts I and II of this three part paper dealt with the error structure of differential reflectivity and X-band specific attenuation in rainfall as estimated by radar and surface disdrometers. In this Part III paper we focus on the error structure ...

V. Chandrasekar; V. N. Bringi; N. Balakrishnan; D. S. Zrni?

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium(III)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium-mail: kmeyer@ucsd.edu Abstract: The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of the mononuclear uranium complex [((ArO)3tacn)UIII (NCCH3)] is reported. The uranium(III) complex reacts with organic azides

Meyer, Karsten

427

The Surface Wave Environment In the GATE B/C ScalePhase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface wave environment in the GATE B/C scale is described from wave measurements made from buoys and aircraft during Phase III (September 1974). Particular emphasis is given to the wave measurements made from the pitch-roll buoy deployed in ...

V. Cardone; H. Carlson; J. A. Ewing; K. Hasselmann; S. Lazanoff; W. McLeish; D. Ross

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for Fe Isotope Fractionation I C E . R O D E N , A N D B R I A N L . B E A R D Department of Geology and Geophysics, University (DIR) is an important pathway for carbon oxidation in anoxic sediments, and iron isotopes may

Roden, Eric E.

429

RESULTS FROM THE CHANDRA MULTIVERSE. III. THE PHYSICAL NATURE OF DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESULTS FROM THE CHANDRA MULTIVERSE. III. THE PHYSICAL NATURE OF DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY TOM ABSTRACT This paper solves the dark-matter and dark-energy problem by taking into account that our universe because there already are theoretical studies of them as dark matter. Dark energy has been used

Gehrels, Tom

430

PART III DIVISION 15 PAGE 1 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL MAY 2007 DIVISION 15 MECHANICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For cooling towers, use 78o F WB design. #12;PART III DIVISION 15 PAGE 4 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL MAY OPEN-CIRCUIT, MECHANICAL-DRAFT COOLING TOWERS A. Design Considerations RESERVED B. Special Documentation Requirements RESERVED C. Materials and Methods of Construction 1. Cooling towers shall be packaged

431

POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BREAKOUT CRITERIA FOR ACCRETION-POWERED JETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency {eta}. By varying the efficiency {eta} and opening angle {theta}{sub op} for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition {eta} {approx}> 10{sup -4}({theta}{sub op}/8 Degree-Sign ){sup 2} is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.

Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ioka, Kunihito, E-mail: hiroki@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [KEK Theory Center, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley-known increase with age in fracture risk of human bone is essential. This also represents a challenge from accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them

Ritchie, Robert

433

EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

434

Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

435

Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.0