Sample records for iii large volume

  1. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPRESSION OF LARGE VOLUMES OF CARBON DIOXIDE-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey; Allison, Timothy; Evans, Neal; Moreland, Brian; Hernandez, Augusto; Day, Meera; Ridens, Brandon

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2. Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2. Both test programs successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  2. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  3. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  4. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  5. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Christopher Dean, Mr. Steven Shapiro, and Mr. Matthew Gilstrap. United States Fuel Resiliency: Volume III - Regional Vulnerability and Resilience iii Table of Contents I....

  6. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  7. Volume III, Issue 10 October 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnets Ready to Ship to LHC Physicists and engineers in Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division://www. bnl.gov/newsroom/news. php?a=11579 A view of the toroid barrel magnets of the ATLAS detector. Backup are in the final stages of assembling replace- ment magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Europe's CERN

  8. Dark Radiation in Anisotropic LARGE Volume Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Angus

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark radiation is a compelling extension to $\\Lambda$CDM: current experimental results hint at $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\gtrsim 0.5$, which is increased to $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\simeq 1$ if the recent BICEP2 results are included. In recent years dark radiation has been considered in the context of string theory models such as the LARGE Volume Scenario of type IIB string theory, forging a link between present-day cosmological observations and models of physics at the Planck scale. In this paper I consider an extension of the LARGE Volume Scenario in which the bulk volume is stabilised by two moduli instead of one. Consequently, the lightest modulus no longer corresponds to the compactification volume but instead to a transverse direction in the bulk geometry. I focus on scenarios in which sequestering of soft masses is achieved by localising the Standard Model on D3 branes at a singularity. The fraction of dark radiation produced in such models vastly exceeds experimental bounds, ruling out the sequestered LARGE Volume Scenario with two bulk moduli as a model of the early Universe.

  9. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gritzo, Russ E. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  10. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  11. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume III, Roadmap Explorations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozdogan, Kirk

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III of this guide may be used as an in-depth reference source for acquiring deep knowledge about many of the aspects of transitioning to lean. Lean change agents and lean implementation leaders should find this ...

  12. Solid waste operations complex W-113: Specifications. Preliminary design report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is Volume III of the Preliminary Design report for the Solid Waste Retrieval Facility at Hanford. The report was prepared by Raytheon and BNFL Inc. and submitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in January 1995. This volume is a complete listing of the specifications for construction and the required material and equipment.

  13. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section III-IX Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II, which include map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780 and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets. It should be noted that TL6100 resides in both Areas II and III. The graphic data for TL6100 are presented in Volume IV - Area III - Graphic Data of this report.

  14. Large mode-volume, large beta, photonic crystal laser resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dezfouli, Mohsen Kamandar; Dignam, Marc M. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an optical resonator formed from the coupling of 13, L2 defects in a triangular-lattice photonic crystal slab. Using a tight-binding formalism, we optimized the coupled-defect cavity design to obtain a resonator with predicted single-mode operation, a mode volume five times that of an L2-cavity mode and a beta factor of 0.39. The results are confirmed using finite-difference time domain simulations. This resonator is very promising for use as a single mode photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with high saturation output power compared to a laser consisting of one of the single-defect cavities.

  15. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume IV. Area III: graphic data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all the graphic data for Area III, which includes lines 3420 to 5320 and tie lines 6080, 6100, and 6140. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets.

  16. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of...

  17. Statistical dielectric degradation of large-volume oil-insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giao Trinh, N.; Regis, J.; Vincent, C.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to clarify the persisting controversy over the effect of the electrode area versus that of the stressed oil volume in large-oil-volume breakdown, a study was carried out under well defined conditions of the oil quality, particularly with regard to the degree of particle contamination. The results indicate that both the electrode area and the stressed oil volume can affect the dielectric strength of transformer oil, with the stressed-oil-volume effect being most pronounced under particle contamination conditions. Test results with technically clean transformer oil as currently accepted for use in power apparatus indicate that the degree of particle contamination in these oils is sufficient to produce an observable stressed-oil-volume effect. Finally, it is demonstrated that the observed phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of an apparent effect of either the electrode area or the stressed oil volume. This has led to the development of a semi-empirical method of quantitatively assessing the breakdown phenomenon in large oil volumes with reasonable accuracy.

  18. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  19. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  20. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 5. Hanna III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna III was conducted during the spring and summer of 1977. The test involved only two process wells but also had twelve water monitoring wells, eight in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and four in an aquifer above the coal seam. The test was designed to obtain information regarding the effects of the process on groundwater within the target seam and the overlying aquifer. The site for Hanna III had a low productivity aquifer above the Hanna No. 1 seam. The wells within the seam and the overlying aquifer were placed in such a manner that maximum information on groundwater flow and quality could be obtained. This report covers: (1) site selection and characterization; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 4 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Fast response system for large-volume acid stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilson, B.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the conventional approach to large-volume offshore acid stimulation has been to use a vessel dedicated to offshore stimulation services or to use a semi-permanent installation on the rig or platform. This approach often results in long-term commitment to an offshore vessel restricted to stimulation work or a great reduction of the valuable space on the rig or platform for an extended time. Both of these options usually require continuous, large capital outlays with periods of little or no use. The fast response stimulation package (FRSP) described in this paper provides a 25-bbl/min, centrally controlled, modular, acid-stimulation system with 50,000-gal acid storage capacity, 25-bbl/min, computer-operated blending equipment, acid-resistant manifold modules, and high-pressure pumping units. All processes are monitored and operated from a central control cabin. The FRSP can be quickly installed on an offshore work vessel or drilling rig of sufficient size to perform matrix acidizing and acid frac, and then be removed between jobs. The equipment has recently completed acid-stimulation services in a five-well program in 30 days, delivering up to 41,000 gal of blended acid at rates of 0.5 to 17 bbl/min from two different drilling rigs. This equipment has provided for greater versatility and better use of operator assets while providing specified requirements for stimulation services.

  2. Dark Radiation predictions from general Large Volume Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Hebecker; Patrick Mangat; Fabrizio Rompineve; Lukas T. Witkowski

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations constrain the amount of Dark Radiation ($\\Delta N_{\\rm eff}$) and may even hint towards a non-zero value of $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff}$. It is by now well-known that this puts stringent constraints on the sequestered Large Volume Scenario (LVS), i.e. on LVS realisations with the Standard Model at a singularity. We go beyond this setting by considering LVS models where SM fields are realised on 7-branes in the geometric regime. As we argue, this naturally goes together with high-scale supersymmetry. The abundance of Dark Radiation is determined by the competition between the decay of the lightest modulus to axions, to the SM Higgs and to gauge fields. The latter decay channel avoids the most stringent constraints of the sequestered setting. Nevertheless, a rather robust prediction for a substantial amount of Dark Radiation can be made. This applies both to cases where the SM 4-cycles are stabilised by D-terms and are small "by accident" as well as to fibred models with the small cycles stabilised by loops. Furthermore, we analyse a closely related setting where the SM lives at a singularity but couples to the volume modulus through flavour branes. We conclude that some of the most natural LVS settings with natural values of model parameters lead to Dark Radiation predictions just below the present observational limits. Barring a discovery, rather modest improvements of present Dark Radiation bounds can rule out many of these most simple and generic variants of the LVS.

  3. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  4. Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges Xiaohui. Large-volume APG discharges find numerous applications in processing of material surfaces,1 ozone-purity helium is presented, and the role of trace impurities in such noble gas plasmas is established. Trace

  5. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  7. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute Gwahangno 113, Yu-seong-gu, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100?G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ? 6.2?G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1?G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ? 2 × 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} ? 2?eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50?and?600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  8. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Petry; the VERITAS Collaboration

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  9. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petry, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  10. Large Scale Volume Rendering in Immersive Environments with Direct Manipulation Widgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kniss, Joe Michael

    Large Scale Volume Rendering in Immersive Environments with Direct Manipulation Widgets Master's Thesis Proposal Joe Michael Kniss May 15, 2001 1 Introduction 1.1 Thesis Statement Parallel rendering exploration. 1.2 Motivation Direct volume rendering has proven to be an important visualization tool

  11. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  12. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  13. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  14. TetSplat: Real-Time Rendering and Volume Clipping of Large Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TetSplat: Real-Time Rendering and Volume Clipping of Large Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes Ken-resolution data representations. These compact hierarchical data structures are then adaptively rendered and probed in real-time on a commodity PC. Our point-based rendering algorithm, which is inspired by QSplat

  15. Permissible loadings of generators and large motors. Facilities instructions, standards, and techniques. Volume 1-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, H.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is intended to fill the need for practical information concerning the temperature and mechanical and electrical overload limits of rotating electric equipment such as generators and large motors. Rotating electrical equipment cannot be overloaded on the same basis as transformers and is not as able to stand short-time overloads.

  16. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes Nian Liu1 lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li­O2 and Li­S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm22 ). Particle fracture and loss of electrical

  17. Large-volume granitic plutons in the Burro Mountains, southwestern New Mex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Jeff

    ABSTRACT Large-volume granitic plutons in the Burro Mountains, southwestern New Mex- ico, cover are part of the ca. 1.4 Ga granite and rhyolite province stretching across Laurentia. U-Pb zircon dating of five samples of the biotite leuco- granite yielded ages ranging from 1469 ± 12 to 1455 ± 11 Ma (2s

  18. Probing the Earth's interior with a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kathrin A. Hochmuth; Franz v. Feilitzsch; Brian D. Fields; Teresa Marrodan Undagoitia; Lothar Oberauer; Walter Potzel; Georg G. Raffelt; Michael Wurm

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A future large-volume liquid scintillator detector would provide a high-statistics measurement of terrestrial antineutrinos originating from $\\beta$-decays of the uranium and thorium chains. In addition, the forward displacement of the neutron in the detection reaction $\\bar\

  19. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  20. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  1. Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal-lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Abstract Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal- lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro- pose a framework, using concepts from Image-Based Rendering (IBR), that decreases the required framerate for the volume ren- derer significantly. All the volume renderer needs

  2. Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal-lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    1 Abstract Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal- lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro- pose a framework, using concepts from Image-Based Rendering (IBR), that decreases the required framerate for the volume ren- derer significantly. All the volume renderer needs

  3. WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4FebruaryIII

  4. Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

  5. Anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence and large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppitz, Erich [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4Y 3B6 (Canada); Uensal, Mithat [SLAC and Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94025/94305 (United States)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  6. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Neclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume high-resolution gamma-ray detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. Three important factors affect the operation of mechanically cooled germanium detectors: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors will be studied in the laboratory at the most fundamental levels to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system. Using this knowledge, mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems will be designed and fabricated.

  7. Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

  8. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  9. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

  10. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, R.L. [ed.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  11. Measurement of cosmic muon charge ratio with the Large Volume Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Yu. Agafonova; M. Aglietta; P. Antonioli; G. Bari; R. Bertoni; V. V. Boyarkin; E. Bressan; G. Bruno; V. L. Dadykin; E. A. Dobrynina; R. I. Enikeev; W. Fulgione; P. Galeotti; M. Garbini; P. L. Ghia; P. Giusti; E. Kemp; A. S. Malgin; B. Miguez; A. Molinario; R. Persiani; I. A. Pless; V. G. Ryasny; O. G. Ryazhskaya; O. Saavedra; G. Sartorelli; M. Selvi; G. C. Trinchero; C. Vigorito; V. F. Yakushev; A. Zichichi

    2015-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge ratio ${k \\equiv \\mu^+/\\mu^-}$ for atmospheric muons has been measured using Large Volume Detector (LVD) in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy (minimal depth is 3000 m w.e.). To reach this depth muons should have the energy at the sea level greater than 1.3 TeV. The muon charge ratio was defined using the number of the decays of stopping positive muons in the LVD iron structure and the decays of positive and negative muons in scintillator. We have obtained the value of the muon charge ratio ${k}$ ${= 1.26 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.11(sys)}$.

  12. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daix, N., E-mail: dai@zurich.ibm.com; Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J. [IBM Research - Zürich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Hartmann, J. M. [CEA, LETI 17, rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Route 134 Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  13. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

  14. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'"parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  15. MPI-hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  16. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi- and Many-core Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the computing industry trending towards multi- and many-core processors, we study how a standard visualization algorithm, ray-casting volume rendering, can benefit from a hybrid parallelism approach. Hybrid parallelism provides the best of both worlds: using distributed-memory parallelism across a large numbers of nodes increases available FLOPs and memory, while exploiting shared-memory parallelism among the cores within each node ensures that each node performs its portion of the larger calculation as efficiently as possible. We demonstrate results from weak and strong scaling studies, at levels of concurrency ranging up to 216,000, and with datasets as large as 12.2 trillion cells. The greatest benefit from hybrid parallelism lies in the communication portion of the algorithm, the dominant cost at higher levels of concurrency. We show that reducing the number of participants with a hybrid approach significantly improves performance.

  17. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  18. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will evaluate these detector systems on the bench top and eventually in RASA systems to insure reliable and practical operation.

  19. VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Geoscientists build this model from the interpretation of seismic data, i.e. 3D images of the subsurface for the interpretation of seismic data. It is based on volume roaming along with efficient volume paging to manipulate Seismic interpretation is an important task in the oil and gas exploration-production (EP) workflow [9, 26

  20. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume III. Energy data on 15 selected states' manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An examination is made of the current and future energy demands, and uses, and cost to characterize typical applications and resulting services in the US and industrial sectors of 15 selected states. Volume III presents tables containing data on selected states' manufacturing subsector energy consumption, functional uses, and cost in 1974 and 1976. Alabama, California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin were chosen as having the greatest potential for replacing conventional fuel with solar energy. Basic data on the quantities, cost, and types of fuel and electric energy purchased by industr for heat and power were obtained from the 1974 and 1976 Annual Survey of Manufacturers. The specific indutrial energy servic cracteristics developed for each selected state include. 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electricity consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuel consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector average cost of purchsed fuels and electricity per million Btu by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electric energy intensity by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); manufacturing subsector average annual growth rates of (1) fuels and electricity consumption, (2) fuels and electric energy intensity, and (3) average cost of purchased fuels and electricity (1974 to 1976). Data are compiled on purchased fuels, distillate fuel oil, residual ful oil, coal, coal, and breeze, and natural gas. (MCW)

  1. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  2. Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for Plasma Cleaning of a CEBAF 5-Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Mammosser, S. Ahmed, K. Macha, J. Upadhyay, M. Nikoli, S. Popovi, L. Vuakovi

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the preliminary results on plasma generation in a 5-cell CEBAF superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity for the application of cavity interior surface cleaning. CEBAF currently has {approx}300 of these five cell cavities installed in the Jefferson Lab accelerator which are mostly limited by cavity surface contamination. The development of an in-situ cavity surface cleaning method utilizing a resonant microwave discharge could lead to significant CEBAF accelerator performance improvement. This microwave discharge is currently being used for the development of a set of plasma cleaning procedures targeted to the removal of various organic, metal and metal oxide impurities. These contaminants are responsible for the increase of surface resistance and the reduction of RF performance in installed cavities. The CEBAF five cell cavity volume is {approx} 0.5 m2, which places the discharge in the category of large-volume plasmas. CEBAF cavity has a cylindrical symmetry, but its elliptical shape and transversal power coupling makes it an unusual plasma application, which requires special consideration of microwave breakdown. Our preliminary study includes microwave breakdown and optical spectroscopy, which was used to define the operating pressure range and the rate of removal of organic impurities.

  3. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seventh annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive...

  4. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section I-II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II which consists of map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780, and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the presented data (1:62,500), this sub-section was divided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets.

  5. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, 382 428 Gujarat (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, 382 428 Gujarat (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  6. Determination of the efficiency of a detector in gamma spectrometry of large-volume samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Tertyshnik; A. T. Korsakov

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental - calculated method is proposed to determine the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of detectors {\\epsilon}(E) in case a measurement of the large-volume samples. Water is used as standard absorber in which the linear attenuation coefficients for photons {\\mu}0 (E) is well known. The value {\\mu} (E) in sample material (matrix of the sample) is determined experimentally by means of spectrometer. The formulas are given for calculation of the ratio {\\epsilon}(E)/ {\\epsilon}0(E), where {\\epsilon}0(E) is FEPE of the detector for photons those are arising in the container filled with water (it is found by adding in the container of the Reference radioactive solutions). To prove the validity of the method ethanol (density 0,8 g/cm3) and water solutions of salts (density 1,2 and 1,5 g/cm3) were used for simulation of the samples with different attenuation coefficients. Standard deviation between experimental and calculated efficiencies has been about 5 %.

  7. Determination of the efficiency of a detector in gamma spectrometry of large-volume samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tertyshnik, E G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental - calculated method is proposed to determine the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of detectors {\\epsilon}(E) in case a measurement of the large-volume samples. Water is used as standard absorber in which the linear attenuation coefficients for photons {\\mu}0 (E) is well known. The value {\\mu} (E) in sample material (matrix of the sample) is determined experimentally by means of spectrometer. The formulas are given for calculation of the ratio {\\epsilon}(E)/ {\\epsilon}0(E), where {\\epsilon}0(E) is FEPE of the detector for photons those are arising in the container filled with water (it is found by adding in the container of the Reference radioactive solutions). To prove the validity of the method ethanol (density 0,8 g/cm3) and water solutions of salts (density 1,2 and 1,5 g/cm3) were used for simulation of the samples with different attenuation coefficients. Standard deviation between experimental and calculated efficiencies has been about 5 %.

  8. Lugano, 3 December 2014 High-end connection for rapid large-volume data transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analysing enormous volumes of data, for example in the search for the Higgs boson particle. With increasingly high- performance supercomputers, it is possible

  9. Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmonds, P.; Gaw, W.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok Peter Simmonds Flack + Kurtz New York Abstract In order to conserve energy and create a comfortable climate for both.... CF'D analysis was used to investigate the effectiveness of a displacement ventilation system. A displacement ventilation system pours ventilation air into a space across the floor. The temperature difference between the supply air and the room...

  10. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  11. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  12. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUETV ColloqueC6, supplkment au Journal de Physique III,Volume 6, octobre 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    components, e.g. the pressure vessel for pressurisedwater reactors m).At low temperature,A508 C1.3 nuclear Approach of the Charpy Test at Low Temperature A. Rossoll, M. Tahar*, C. Berdin, R. Piques*, P. Forget**, C Abstract :Charpy V-notch impact testing is widely used in the toughness assessment of large forged

  13. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  14. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  15. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  16. Large-area chromogenics: Materials and devices for transmittance control. Volume IS 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Granqvist, C.G. [ed.] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromogenic materials can alter their optical properties in a persistent yet reversible manner when subjected to a change in external conditions such as irradiation intensity, temperature, or electric-field strength. In the future chromogenic materials may be used on large scale to regulate the throughput of radiant energy for windows in buildings and cars, so that comfortable lighting and temperature are maintained without excessive air conditioning. The purpose of this book is to give a broad coverage of large-area chromogenics and to discuss their applications. The book is divided into the following areas: applications; photochromic materials; thermochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; organic electrochromic materials; conductors for ions and electrons in electrochromic devices; electrochromic devices; and liquid crystals materials and devices. Separate abstracts were prepared for 33 papers in this book.

  17. Eruption and emplacement of flood basalt. An example from the large-volume Teepee Butte Member, Columbia River Basalt Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (United States)); Tolan, T.L. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows of the Teepee Butte Member, Grande Ronde Basalt, issued from a vent system in southeastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho. Three distinct basalt flows were erupted: the Limekiln Rapids flow, the Joseph Creek flow, and the Pruitt Draw flow. Together these mappable flows cover more than 52,000 km[sup 2] and have a volume exceeding 5,000 km[sup 3]. A portion of the vent system for the Joseph Creek flow is exposed in cross section in Joseph Canyon, Washington; it is one of the best preserved Columbia River Basalt Group vent complexes known. The vent complex is about 1 km in cross section, 30 m high, and composed of deposits characteristic of Hawaiian-type volcanism. The vent is asymmetrical; the eastern rampart consists of intercalated pyroclastic deposits and thin pahoehoe flows; the western rampart is composed wholly of pahoehoe flows. Flows of the Teepee Butte Member are compositionally homogeneous and were emplaced as sheet flows, each having several local flow units. Our study supports the importance of linear vent systems and the westward Palouse Slope, along with the large-volume lava flows, in controlling the distribution of Columbia River Basalt Group flows. Other factors, including the number of active fissure segments and topography, modified the shape of the flows and the number of flow units. 45 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

  19. Large

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLand and AssetLandscapingLarge

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KOIs. III. KOI 961: A SMALL STAR WITH LARGE PROPER MOTION AND THREE SMALL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Pineda, John Sebastian; Bottom, Michael; Crepp, Justin R.; Kirby, Evan N. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apps, Kevin [75B Cheyne Walk, Surrey, RH6 7LR (United Kingdom); Carter, Joshua A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Hamren, Katherine [UCO/Lick, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rojas-Ayala, Barbara [Astrophysics Department, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Schlawin, Everett; Covey, Kevin R. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 122 Sciences Drive, Ithaca, NY 14583 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W., E-mail: philm@astro.caltech.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the star KOI 961, an M dwarf with transit signals indicative of three short-period exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission. We proceed by comparing KOI 961 to Barnard's Star, a nearby, well-characterized mid-M dwarf. We compare colors, optical and near-infrared spectra, and find remarkable agreement between the two, implying similar effective temperatures and metallicities. Both are metal-poor compared to the Solar neighborhood, have low projected rotational velocity, high absolute radial velocity, large proper motion, and no quiescent H{alpha} emission-all of which are consistent with being old M dwarfs. We combine empirical measurements of Barnard's Star and expectations from evolutionary isochrones to estimate KOI 961's mass (0.13 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun }), radius (0.17 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }), and luminosity (2.40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3.0{+-}0.3} L{sub Sun }). We calculate KOI 961's distance (38.7 {+-} 6.3 pc) and space motions, which, like Barnard's Star, are consistent with a high scale-height population in the Milky Way. We perform an independent multi-transit fit to the public Kepler light curve and significantly revise the transit parameters for the three planets. We calculate the false-positive probability for each planet candidate, and find a less than 1% chance that any one of the transiting signals is due to a background or hierarchical eclipsing binary, validating the planetary nature of the transits. The best-fitting radii for all three planets are less than 1 R{sub Circled-Plus }, with KOI 961.03 being Mars-sized (R{sub P} = 0.57 {+-} 0.18 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and they represent some of the smallest exoplanets detected to date.

  1. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D. Huxley, and K. V. Kamenev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering W. Wang, D. A. Sokolov, A. D for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 015101 (2013) TOF-SEMSANS--Time-of-flight spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering J. Appl. Phys. 112

  2. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C6, supplement au Journal de Physique III, Volume 6, octobre 1996 C6-243

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Technology. The purpose of such a programme is to have a better knowledge of this approach for RPV fracture, is the l j volume of the mesh element and V, the volume of the material cell. The integration is made of the material and characterizes the resistance to cleavage fracture. Both parameters, which are assumed

  3. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  4. Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Nels Edward

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003...

  5. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

  6. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

  7. Volume painting: incorporating volumetric rendering with line integral convolution (LIC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaewook

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (NPR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II.2. Volume Rendering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II.3. Line Integral Convolution (LIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 III METHODOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 III.1... INTRODUCTION In this thesis, we introduce a new Non-Photorealistic Rendering (NPR) technique, called Volume Painting. An example of Volume Painting is shown in Figure 1. Fig. 1. Volume Painting of the Implicit Geometry. During the last decade, NPR has become...

  8. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

  9. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O'Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W. (eds.) [eds.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  10. Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A K

    2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

  11. Potential for cogeneration in Maryland. The potential for large-scale commercial and industrial cogeneration in Maryland. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the document is to present, in considerable detail, the data, assumptions, analytical processes, and results of the evaluation of large-scale cogeneration market potential in Maryland through the year 2005. The approach is to discuss each major step in the analysis, present data collected, and present analytical model outputs. Analytical results and model outputs are presented for each of the other utilities serving portions of the State (PEPCO, DP L, and Potomac Edison Co.).

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C4, supplement au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, avril 1994 C4-155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : There is a large interest in using high power lasersfor surface alloying or cladding on aluminium alloys, in order isproposedfor the solidification process resultingfrom laser cladding. I - Introduction: Aluminium alloys applications, in order to produce lighter parts. Unfortunately, surface properties of aluminium alloys

  13. Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State. Volume III. Experience of drilling five shale-gas wells in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the South-Central areas of New York State as part of this program. The program was undertaken by Arlington Exploration Company (AEC) during 1981 and 1982. The wells were drilled on educational properties in an attempt to demonstrate the economic prospect of natural gas for institutional and small commercial consumers to develop their own source of energy. All five wells were completed in the Marcellus section of the Devonian shale. Each of the five wells was connected to an appropriate heat load for the purpose of production testing. The project supports the theory that a well drilled anywhere in South-Central New York and completed in the Marcellus Shale using modern fracturing techniques (i.e. nitrogen foam) is likely to produce some gas. Important factors not yet predictable are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the volume of recoverable reserves. Depths to the Marcellus Shale generally increase from north (i.e. Houghton College) to south (i.e. Portville Central School).

  14. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping.

  15. A Large Stellar Evolution Database for Population Synthesis Studies. III. Inclusion of the full Asymptotic Giant Branch phase and Web tools for stellar population analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Cordier; Adriano Pietrinferni; Santi Cassisi; Maurizio Salaris

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar evolution tracks and isochrones are key inputs for a wide range of astrophysical studies; in particular, they are essential to the interpretation of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved and unresolved stellar populations. We have made available to the astrophysical community a large, homogenous database of up-to-date stellar tracks and isochrones, and a set of programs useful in population synthesis studies. In this paper we first summarize the main properties of our stellar model database (BaSTI) already introduced in Pietrinferni et al. (2004) and Pietrinferni et al. (2006). We then discuss an important update of the database, i.e., the extension of all stellar models and isochrones until the end of the thermal pulses along the Asymptotic Giant Branch. This extension of the library is particularly relevant for stellar population analyses in the near-infrared, or longer wavelengths, where the contribution to the integrated photometric properties by cool and bright Asymptotic Giant Branch stars is significant. A few comparisons with empirical data are also presentend and briefly discussed. We then present three web-tools that allow an interactive access to the database, and make possible to compute user-specified evolutionary tracks, isochrones, stellar luminosity functions, plus synthetic Color-Magnitude-Diagrams and integrated magnitudes for arbitrary Star Formation Histories. All these web tools are available at the BaSTI database official site: http://www.oa-teramo.inaf.it/BASTI.

  16. Volume III, Issue 9 September 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), researchers have studied the nanoscale work- ings of a lithium-ion battery), to study a lithium-ion battery anode dur- ing multiple charge-discharge cycles. Combined with a more-dioxide and into the inner workings of batteries. A robotic sample handler will aid in handling irradiated samples from

  17. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    farmer to use a combina- tion of Ordram and Propanil to control sprangletop in rice fields. For this discovery, the company that manu- factured the chemicals sent Russell and his wife Theresa on a trip to the Bahamas. Tank mixing these continued on next... climate than hogs and corn. 6 Grower Profile continued... two chemicals is now common practice, and has been a tremendous benefit to farmers throughout the rice belt. It was shortly after this trip that Theresa died of cancer, leaving behind Russell...

  18. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research on plant hormones shows promise for increasing ratoon crop yields by about 500 lbs/ac, at minimal cost to the producer. Shortly after Lee was hired, the Center also hired Dr. Yubin Yang. Yubin has played a major role in su- pervising computer... treatments for control on main and ratoon crop rice. And with the goal of reducing pesticide use, and farmer input costs, the Entomology Project will evaluate varieties for host plant resistance to this potentially devastating pest. If you believe...

  19. Volume III, Issue 5 your connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    .gov/pub/presspass/ press_releases/2013/Mu- on-g-2-201305-images.html Solar Farm Cranking Out 23 Percent More Energy Bring advanced forecasting models and techniques through a recently awarded Department of Energy grant. To learn for definitive proof. So the experiment is being dismantled and moved to the Department of Energy's Fermi

  20. Volume III, Issue 6 your connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the onset of diabetes could be related to a deficit in reward circuits in the brain. Using PET imaging are introduced to people with insulin resistance, a precur- sor to Type 2 diabetes. For those who have. "Insulin resistance is a signifi- cant contributor to obesity and diabetes," said lead author of the study

  1. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Texas continues to rise, and may top 60 this year, our po- tential young farmers are not lack- ing in desire, but opportunity. Even with all the pitfalls and incentives to pursue other careers outside of agriculture, there are many young people... that are will- ing and eager to farm. In most cases, their parents insist on either college or trade school first. Of the ten young adults inter- viewed for this story, ranging in age from 11 to 29 years old, some have already been farming a de- cade, while...

  2. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - lections and purifying the different lines. Dan and Myrtle have two children, Gary (who also works in rice consulting) and Anita, whose husband works for an ag chemical company. Anita and Troy Miller have two daughters, Abby 2 years and Ella 4 months. Since...

  3. Volume III, Issue 2 February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the petrochemical component of gasoline," said biochemist John Shanklin, who led the research. "Unlike the process

  4. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    student, and has participated in 4-H since he was old enough to qualify. He is cur- rently serving as a Chapter President. The past two years, he brought home blue ribbons in the creative arts category. In his spare time he plays baseball and soccer, rides... infrared” range, is where water absorbs energy extremely efficiently. CDT has developed a system that makes this technology pos- sible on a commercial scale. In their system, FCIR energy of the proper bandwidth is generated by cata- lyzing natural gas...

  5. Volume III, Chapter 18 Harbor Seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sand bars and mudflats in estuaries, intertidal rocks and reefs, sandy, cobble, and rocky beaches in Washington and Oregon by a state-financed population control programs that considered harbor seals

  6. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of 1974 and currently has 179 crop- land research acres. They have 40 research and ex- tension faculty and support staff and the Center is headquarters for TCE District 11, comprising 18 coun- ties in the Coastal Bend Region. Research at the Cor- pus.... Stephenville - The Stephenville Center is located on 675 acres of sandy soil in North Central Texas. The Center houses TAES staff conducting research on pea- nuts, peaches, pecans, forage, water utilization, and dairy; and TCE staff that direct extension...

  7. Volume III, Issue 4 your connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar panels. The 87,700 square foot building contains offices, 60 standard laboratories, and 4 percent, contributing toward an overall cost savings of 29 percent. In addition to energy-cost- saving by minimizing the dis- tance materials traveled to the site. The total cost for the project was $66.8 million

  8. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - lections and purifying the different lines. Dan and Myrtle have two children, Gary (who also works in rice consulting) and Anita, whose husband works for an ag chemical company. Anita and Troy Miller have two daughters, Abby 2 years and Ella 4 months. Since... they live in Dan’s hometown of Lub- bock, the Bradshaw’s make frequent trips out west to visit the grandchildren. Dan can be reached on his cell phone at 979-541- 7560 or email ricepro@wcnet.net. Bradshaw Agricultural Consulting – Gary Bradshaw Gary grew up...

  9. Volume III, Issue 7 your connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -emitting diodes (LEDs) continue to transform technology. The celebrated efficiency and versatility of LEDs and oth- er solid-state technologies including laser diodes and solar photovoltaics make them increasingly on how the material is able to provide the LED's remark- able efficiency. Using state- of

  10. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at both PhilRice and IRRI, but due to the international debate over GM crops and opposi- tion by Filipino citizens over the field testing of transgenics, only PhilRice conducted the outdoor trials in 2002. Rice breeders in the United States have been very...

  11. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  12. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 1: characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of Phase III of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed a variety of tasks including: (1) a detailed examination of thermal processing effects, such as HCl and POCl/sub 3/ gettering on impurity behavior, (2) completion of the data base and modeling for impurities in n-base silicon, (3) extension of the data base on p-type material to include elements likely to be introduced during the production, refining, or crystal growth of silicon, (4) effects on cell performance on anisotropic impurity distributions in large CZ crystals and silicon webs, and (5) a preliminary assessment of the permanence of the impurity effects. Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. For example, discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, and conventional solar cell I-V techniques, as well as descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are included. Considerable data are tabulated on the composition, electrical, and solar cell characteristics of impurity-doped silicon.

  13. Utilities and offsite design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III contains information on: water treatment (potable, process and waste water) and waste solids handling. (LTN)

  14. On the structure of blue phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; D. Marenduzzo

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilised over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities}. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  15. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume III- Technical Appendix, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2009 – December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.

    ................................................................................................................................ 9 Table 2: Simulation Results for Individual Single Family and Multi Family Residences for All Counties. .10 2009 TERP Report, Vol. III, p. 8 December 2010 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...&M University System 3 CODE AND PRE-CODE SIMULATION RESULTS BY COUNTY This appendix to the Laboratory?s 2009 Annual report contains the simulation results for single-family and multi-family residences in the 41 counties. For each county, code and pre...

  16. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  17. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  18. The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 81, October 2003 913 n recent years, the static mixer has been adopted for a large number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Ajay K.

    , the static mixer has been adopted for a large number of blending and dispersion operations. Static mixers process industry. Static mixers offer attractive features such as closed-loop operation, and no moving geometry. A typical inlet geometry to the static mixer is the centerline injector as depicted schematically

  19. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  20. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density, translucent LaBr{sub 3} ceramics samples (3-inch diameter, > 1/8-inch thick) were fabricated by hot pressing, demonstrating the superior manufacturability of the ceramic approach over single crystal growth methods in terms of size capability and cost. (6) Despite all these advances, evidence has shown that LaBr{sub 3} is thermally unstable at temperatures required for the densification process. This is particularly true for material near the surface where lattice defects and color centers can be created as bromine becomes volatile at high temperatures. Consequently, after densification these samples made using chemically prepared ultrafine powders turned black. An additional thermal treatment in a flowing bromine condition proved able to reduce the darkness of the surface layer for these densified samples. These observations demonstrated that although finer ceramic powders are desirable for densification due to a stronger driving force from their large surface areas, the same desirable factor can lead to lattice defects and color centers when these powders are densified at higher temperatures where material near the surface becomes thermally unstable.

  1. EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership- Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future anthropogenic carbon storage in this region.

  2. Forecasting model of the PEPCO service area economy. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III describes and documents the regional economic model of the PEPCO service area which was relied upon to develop many of the assumptions of future values of economic and demographic variables used in the forecast. The PEPCO area model is mathematically linked to the Wharton long-term forecast of the U.S. Volume III contains a technical discussion of the structure of the regional model and presents the regional economic forecast.

  3. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  4. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to...

  5. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume III. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: production, unsponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of the following papers: inorganic geochemistry studies of the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; lithology studies of upper Devonian well cuttings in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; possible effects of plate tectonics on the Appalachian Devonian black shale production in eastern Kentucky; preliminary depositional model for upper Devonian Huron age organic black shale in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; the anatomy of a large Devonian black shale gas field; the Cottageville (Mount Alto) Gas Field, Jackson County, West Virginia: a case study of Devonian shale gas production; the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field: a geological study of the relationships of Ohio Shale gas occurrences to structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and inorganic geochemical parameters; and a statistical analysis of geochemical data for the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field.

  6. Searching large data volumes with MISD processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mathematics and Electrical Engineering Department of Computer and Information Science Olaf René Birkeland doctor philosophiae Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics and Electrical Engineering Department Historically, supercomputing has focused on number crunching. Non- numeric applications, such as information

  7. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 9, Winter Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , daughter of William Demetris Lacy who was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and second judge of the Mu- nicipality of Colorado. They had two children; a daughter, Mary Francis, and a son who died at the age of four months. Fannie died...

  8. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  9. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  10. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume III. (Geopressure thesaurus). Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. The subject scope includes: (1) geopressure resource assessment; (2) geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of geopressured systems; (3) geopressure exploration and exploration technology; (4) geopressured reservoir engineering and drilling technology; (5) economic aspects; (6) environmental aspects; (7) legal, institutional, and sociological aspects; (8) electrical and nonelectrical utilization; and (9) other energy sources, especially methane and other fossil fuel reserves, associated with geopressured reservoirs.

  11. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

  12. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume III. Project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress and status of representative projects in each program within DOE are summarized. Subjects covered and the number of projects reported on are: conservation (2); fossil energy (11); nuclear energy (5); renewable energy resources (16); energy production and power marketing (3); general science (11); defense programs (7); contingency planning (3); and management and oversight (1). (MCW)

  13. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 9, Winter Issue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Mad Island 2 From the Editor... Inside This Issue Grower Profile: Laurance Armour at Pierce Ranch ...........3 Shanghai Days Cowboy Gathering ....................................4 Report from the 2003 Rice Outlook Conference ...............9 Employee... less harvested acreage. GLOBALLY: NO BIG WEATHER PROBLEMS Looking into the new crop year, Childs said there doesn’t appear to be any strong factor that would buoy Report from the 2003 Rice Outlook Conference prices farther out. None of the major...

  14. Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program evaluation: case studies. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-random sample of the Appropriate Technology Program grantees was selected to ensure that the basic goals of the evaluation study were met. Case studies of selected outstanding projects could provide with respect to the Program dynamics associated with success. It was believed that the non-random case study approach would assist us in assessing which approaches have the potential to impact a reduction in our nation's use of non-renewal energy. From this group of projects, 20 projects were selected to highlight in a case study format which illustrates the various types of projects approaches the Program supported.

  15. Passive solar design handbook. Volume III. Passive solar design analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Kosiewicz, C.E.; Lazarus, G.S.; McFarland, R.D.; Wray, W.O.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple analytical methods concerning the design of passive solar heating systems are presented with an emphasis on the average annual heating energy consumption. Key terminology and methods are reviewed. The solar load ratio (SLR) is defined, and its relationship to analysis methods is reviewed. The annual calculation, or Load Collector Ratio (LCR) method, is outlined. Sensitivity data are discussed. Information is presented on balancing conservation and passive solar strategies in building design. Detailed analysis data are presented for direct gain and sunspace systems, and details of the systems are described. Key design parameters are discussed in terms of their impact on annual heating performance of the building. These are the sensitivity data. The SLR correlations for the respective system types are described. The monthly calculation, or SLR method, based on the SLR correlations, is reviewed. Performance data are given for 9 direct gain systems and 15 water wall and 42 Trombe wall systems. (LEW)

  16. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  17. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume III of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1993-94 annual report; (2) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Supplementation Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 technical report; and (3) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 annual report.

  18. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  19. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  20. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 12 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 MARCH 2000 Nuclear Fusion Driven by Coulomb Explosions of Large Deuterium Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditmire, Todd

    VOLUME 84, NUMBER 12 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 MARCH 2000 Nuclear Fusion Driven laser pulse, we have accelerated ions to sufficient kinetic energy to produce DD nuclear fusion nuclear fusion if deuterium clusters are irradiated in a gas of sufficient average density. We have

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  2. Lokaratna, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muthukumarswamy and his colleagues of NFSC, Chennai to support this volume to be published in their web site for a global readership. On behalf of Folklore Foundation, Odisha Bhubaneswar , I wish a Happy and prosperous new Year 2012... (b)ali-B?eli,5 mythical Great Ancestress of the Kondhs and, at one time, a human manifestation of the earth goddess ? originally choose to manifest herself to man in her tiger form; after she had assumed such form, she killed a large quantity of game animals...

  3. Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information Associative Learning Enhances Population Coding colored dot denotes the mean response for two neurons to each of four stimuli. Each colored ellipse) For a positive relationship, neuron pairs with positive signal correlation and large noise correlation have

  4. Volume Comparison

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea:Mnt(N)3.1.Liquids ReserveVolume

  5. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012_Modeling the Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling the Performance of Large- Scale CO 2 Storage Systems: A Comparison of Different Sensitivity Analysis Methods 24 October 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012...

  6. Development of X-ray lithography and nanofabrication techniques for III-V optical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Michael H. (Michael Hong)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers the development of fabrication techniques for Bragg-grating-based integrated optical devices in III-V materials. Work on this rich family of devices has largely been limited to numerical analysis ...

  7. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

  8. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  9. METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible -Laser Focus World http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-47/issue-8/world-news/metamaterials-large-area-printed-3d-negative-index-metamaterial-is-flexible.html[8/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible - Laser Focus World-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative, with the advent of a printing process that produces large-area 3D multilayer optical NIMs --8.7 × 8.7 cm square

  10. Low current plasmatron fuel converter having enlarged volume discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA); Alexeev, Nikolai (Moscow, RU); Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Samokhin, Andrei (Moscow, RU)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel apparatus and method is disclosed for a plasmatron fuel converter ("plasmatron") that efficiently uses electrical energy to produce hydrogen rich gas. The volume and shape of the plasma discharge is controlled by a fluid flow established in a plasma discharge volume. A plasmatron according to this invention produces a substantially large effective plasma discharge volume allowing for substantially greater volumetric efficiency in the initiation of chemical reactions within a volume of bulk fluid reactant flowing through the plasmatron.

  11. Low current plasmatron fuel converter having enlarged volume discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai; Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Samokhin, Andrei

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel apparatus and method is disclosed for a plasmatron fuel converter (""plasmatron"") that efficiently uses electrical energy to produce hydrogen rich gas. The volume and shape of the plasma discharge is controlled by a fluid flow established in a plasma discharge volume. A plasmatron according to this invention produces a substantially large effective plasma discharge volume allowing for substantially greater volumetric efficiency in the initiation of chemical reactions within a volume of bulk fluid reactant flowing through the plasmatron.

  12. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  13. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  14. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  15. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  16. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  17. Advances in Lung Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Advances in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery The Ohio University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction LungVolumeReductionSurgery Spring 2010 © 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center ­ 04 Consult Ohio State's #12;The Ohio State University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Patient

  18. Tripodal aminophenolate ligand complexes of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravan, P.; Orvig, C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article focuses on the development of radiopharmaceuticals using new chelators of gallium and indium. The radionuclide kinetics and demetalation kinetics are of great consideration. This work explored the effects of ligand backbone variations on the selectivity of multidentate aminophenolate ligands among the trivalent metal ions Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) in water. 54 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Redes III Tema 0 1 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    instalación y mantenimiento. #12;Redes III Tema 0 13 Calidad de una red ­ Transparencia semántica: La calidad transparencia en el tiempo. #12;Redes III Tema 0 14 Diseño de la red · Debe satisfacer la calidad de servicio

  20. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  1. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite the presence of interplay effect, the delivered dose may be reliably estimated using the 4D composite dose. In general the interplay effect may not be a primary concern with IMPT for lung cancers for the authors' institution. The described interplay analysis tool may be used to provide additional confidence in treatment delivery.

  2. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  3. Molecular Cell, Vol. 11, 12791289, May, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press RNAse III-Mediated Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    -Mediated Degradation of Unspliced Pre-mRNAs and Lariat Introns While most RNase III-like enzymes cleave ds to bacteria, where RNase III processes and degrades a large number of mRNAs (Bardwell etRPS22B and RPL18A transcripts trigger degradation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and lariat introns and can al., 1989; Court, 1993

  4. EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

  5. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  6. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 × more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup –4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  7. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A. [Physics and Astronomy Dept. University of Bologna, Italy viale C Berti Pichat 6/II, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  8. III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2014 ... 7801, Springer, 2013, pp. 62–. 73, ISBN 978-3-642-36693-2. The authors gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Science ...

  9. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2, Issue,

  10. Computer News, Volume 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

  12. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  13. ILC Reference Design Report Volume 3 - Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phinney, Nan; Walker, Nicholas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a 200-500 GeV center-of-mass high-luminosity linear electron-positron collider, based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) accelerating cavities. The ILC has a total footprint of about 31 km and is designed for a peak luminosity of 2x10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. The complex includes a polarized electron source, an undulator-based positron source, two 6.7 km circumference damping rings, two-stage bunch compressors, two 11 km long main linacs and a 4.5 km long beam delivery system. This report is Volume III (Accelerator) of the four volume Reference Design Report, which describes the design and cost of the ILC.

  14. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIII

  15. PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART III -

  16. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolkerEvents)WCI-III Recap

  17. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII Jump

  18. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:II Wind FarmIII

  19. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  20. Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

  1. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  2. Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 3. Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Aquin, D.; Beloat, B.; Epps, B.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company, volume III of the six-volume set contains the results of measurement factors analysis, including both estimates of UAF due to fixed-factor assumptions and meter accuracy. Accurate measurement of gas volume is a function of the meter and the factors used to adjust the meter read. If the meter registers slow or fast, the actual gas volume passing through the meter will not be measured true. The estimated UAF volume from all measurement elements resulted in an overall net under-measurement of the 1991 gas volume in the SoCalGas system of 8,048,800 thousand cubic feet. Appendices include tabular numerical and graphic information on measurement parameters and other supplemental data.

  3. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: III-nitride materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-nitride materials SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award On September 9, 2013, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Events, News, News & Events,...

  5. An overview of modeling methods for thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures for reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal mixing and stratification phenomena play major roles in the safety of reactor systems with large enclosures, such as containment safety in current fleet of LWRs, long-term passive containment cooling in Gen III+ plants including AP-1000 and ESBWR, the cold and hot pool mixing in pool type sodium cooled fast reactor systems (SFR), and reactor cavity cooling system behavior in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), etc. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, 0-D steady state models (heat transfer correlations), 0-D lumped parameter based transient models, 1-D physical-based coarse grain models, and 3-D CFD models are available. Current major system analysis codes either have no models or only 0-D models for thermal stratification and mixing, which can only give highly approximate results for simple cases. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries. Due to prohibitive computational expenses for long transients in very large volumes, 3-D CFD simulations remain impractical for system analyses. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, UC Berkeley developed 1-D models basing on Zuber’s hierarchical two-tiered scaling analysis (HTTSA) method where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. This paper will present an overview on important thermal mixing and stratification phenomena in large enclosures for different reactors, major modeling methods and their advantages and limits, potential paths to improve simulation capability and reduce analysis uncertainty in this area for advanced reactor system analysis tools.

  6. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  7. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  8. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  9. Computer News, Volume 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

  10. Computer News, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

  13. Computer News, Volume 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

  14. Computer News, Volume 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

  15. Computer News, Volume 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  16. Computer News, Volume 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

  17. Computer News, Volume 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

  18. Computer News, Volume 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

  19. Computer News, Volume 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  2. Computer News, Volume 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

  3. Computer News, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  4. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  5. Computer News, Volume 35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  6. Computer News, Volume 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

  7. Computer News, Volume 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  8. Computer News, Volume 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

  9. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

  10. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

  11. LANL Volume 2_Final

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

  12. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  13. A Large Sample Volume Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the surface functional groups of HPAmeso-silicalite-1 under the condition of in-situ drying . We also show that the reaction dynamics of 2-butanol dehydration using HPA...

  14. High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample spinning rate of 3.5 kHz, 1 H and 13 C 90-degree pulse width of 8 s, constant flow control at 1.0 atmospheric pressure, and temperature control up to 250 C. This...

  15. DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)|PublishesDOEWasherMarch 21,

  16. Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Miriah

    Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer1 Hanspeter Pfister2 Charles hardware has proven valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the inter- activity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present

  17. Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles Hansen, Chris Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Image-Based Volume Rendering with Opacity Light Fields Miriah Meyer, Hanspeter Pfister, Charles valuable for volume rendering, large datasets continue to overwhelm the capabilities of the graphics cards, reducing the interactivity of volume rendering utilizing such hardware. We present a novel, image

  18. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fout, Nathaniel [UC DAVIS; Ma, Kwan - Liu [UC DAVIS

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the advantage of offering smooth animations, while spatial compression can handle volumes of larger dimensions.

  19. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  20. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  1. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  2. anticarcinogenesis mechanisms iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Engineering Websites Summary: Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order...

  3. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  4. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  5. No-migration variance petition. Volume 3, Revision 1: Appendix B, Attachments A through D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III contains the following attachments: TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms (Appendix 2.10.12 of TRUPACT-II safety analysis report); and chemical compatibility analyses for waste forms across all sites.

  6. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  7. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  8. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  9. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 switching system. This volume presents a brief discussion of the test events and the test results, and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the test program. Volume II is a detailed description of the test procedures, the test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. Volume II also presents a discussion of the conclusions and recommendations of the program. Volume III describes the post-test analysis of the measured electromagnetic fields and induced transients. Volume III also includes a comparison of the characteristic attributes of the various simulator environments.

  10. Chapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and purged with dry nitrogen gas. The flask is charged with 1.6 mL (2.8 g, 15 mmol) of titanium tetrachlorideChapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE* 50. AN ACTIVE FORM OF TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE Me3SiSiMe3 + 2Ti. ANDERSEN The reduction of TiCl4 with hexamethyldisilane does not afford titanium(II) chloride as reported

  11. Computer News, Volume 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

  13. Computer News, Volume 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

  14. Computer News, Volume 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

  15. Computer News, Volume 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  16. Imaging using volume holograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

  17. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  18. LyMAS: Predicting Large-Scale Lyman-alpha Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [abridged] We describe LyMAS (Ly-alpha Mass Association Scheme), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Ly-alpha forest on large scales from moderate resolution simulations of the dark matter distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 Mpc/h comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F_s|delta_s) of the transmitted flux F_s, smoothed (1-dimensionally) over the spectral resolution scale, on the dark matter density contrast delta_s, smoothed (3-dimensionally) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III BOSS at z=2.5, and we find optimal results for a dark matter smoothing length sigma=0.3 Mpc/h (comoving). In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1-dimensional power spectrum and 1-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum ...

  19. Replication regulates volume weighting in quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartle, James [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Hertog, Thomas [APC, UMR 7164 (CNRS, Universite Paris 7), 10 rue A.Domon et L.Duquet, 75205 Paris (France) and Intl Solvay Institutes, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB-C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilities for observations in cosmology are conditioned both on the Universe's quantum state and on local data specifying the observational situation. We show the quantum state defines a measure for prediction through such conditional probabilities that is well-behaved for spatially large or infinite universes when the probabilities that our data are replicated are taken into account. In histories where our data are rare volume weighting connects top-down probabilities conditioned on both the data and the quantum state to the bottom-up probabilities conditioned on the quantum state alone. We apply these principles to a calculation of the number of inflationary e-folds in a homogeneous, isotropic minisuperspace model with a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential. We find that volume weighting is justified and the top-down probabilities favor a large number of e-folds, hereby predicting the curvature of our Universe at the present time to be approximately zero.

  20. III-V Nanowire Growth Mechanism: V/III Ratio and Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ,17,18 The growth experiments reported in this paper were performed in a horizontal OMVPE growth tube using to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature to favor vapor-solid (VS) surface growth over VLS NW growth. By tuning both the group III flow rate

  1. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  2. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zincblende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier {\\it ab initio} calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may lead to new functionalities for designing devices that manipulate spin degrees of freedom.

  3. Fundamental deterrence and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.D.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The public`s brief respite from the specter of nuclear holocaust abruptly ended in May 1998 when India, 24 years after its only successful nuclear weapon test, detonated five more just sixty miles from its border with Pakistan. Pakistan quickly declared itself a nuclear power and threatened tests of its own. Various capitals issued condemnations and an assortment of largely symbolic political and economic sanctions. India then proclaimed a moratorium on further testing and announced its willingness to accede to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty as a declared nuclear power. Inevitably, India`s tests will prompt Pakistan and China to accelerate their own nuclear programs, to the detriment of regional stability in South Asia.

  4. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  5. Viability Assessment Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs associated with three VA design options, as described in Volume 2. These costs are provided for information and are not compiled into the integrated cost summary.

  6. Free volume distribution of nearly jammed hard sphere packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moumita Maiti; Srikanth Sastry

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the free volume distributions of nearly jammed packings of monodisperse and bidisperse hard sphere configurations. These distributions differ qualitatively from those of the fluid, displaying a power law tail at large free volumes, which constitutes a distinct signature of nearly jammed configurations, persisting for moderate degrees of decompression. We reproduce and explain the observed distribution by considering the pair correlation function within the first coordination shell for jammed hard sphere configurations. We analyze features of the equation of state near jamming, and discuss the significance of observed asphericities of the free volumes to the equation of state.

  7. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, Rene; Kiehn, Ruediger; Mueller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  8. Viability Assessment Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

  9. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  10. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Methodology for the containment, source term, consequence, and risk integration analyses; Volume 1, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, E.D.; Breeding, R.J.; Brown, T.D.; Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Murfin, W.B. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Hawaii Univ., Hilo, HI (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG-1150 examines the risk to the public from five nuclear power plants. The NUREG-1150 plant studies are Level III probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) and, as such, they consist of four analysis components: accident frequency analysis, accident progression analysis, source term analysis, and consequence analysis. This volume summarizes the methods utilized in performing the last three components and the assembly of these analyses into an overall risk assessment. The NUREG-1150 analysis approach is based on the following ideas: (1) general and relatively fast-running models for the individual analysis components, (2) well-defined interfaces between the individual analysis components, (3) use of Monte Carlo techniques together with an efficient sampling procedure to propagate uncertainties, (4) use of expert panels to develop distributions for important phenomenological issues, and (5) automation of the overall analysis. Many features of the new analysis procedures were adopted to facilitate a comprehensive treatment of uncertainty in the complete risk analysis. Uncertainties in the accident frequency, accident progression and source term analyses were included in the overall uncertainty assessment. The uncertainties in the consequence analysis were not included in this assessment. A large effort was devoted to the development of procedures for obtaining expert opinion and the execution of these procedures to quantify parameters and phenomena for which there is large uncertainty and divergent opinions in the reactor safety community.

  11. Publications Edited Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

  12. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  13. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  14. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  15. Topology-controlled volume rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gunther H; Dillard, Scott E; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type. Even when volume render- ing is applied to nonmedicalin graphics hardware. We render tubes between saddles and

  16. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  17. Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization(6), 066012 (June 2011) Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3593003] Keywords: europium; silica; luminescent; nanoshells; endocytosis. Paper

  18. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual. Volume 4, Models and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I presents modeling theory and associated numerical schemes; Volume II details instructions for code application and input data preparation; Volume III presents the results of developmental assessment cases that demonstrate and verify the models used in the code; Volume IV discusses in detail RELAP5 models and correlations; Volume V presents guidelines that have evolved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code; Volume VI discusses the numerical scheme used in RELAP5; and Volume VII presents a collection of independent assessment calculations.

  19. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C7, suppltment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Percutaneous absorptiometry by UV laser photoacoustic method using a novel open-ended cell combined with lightResearch Center,Shiseido Company Ltd., 1050Nippa-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama223,Japan *Dwartment ofIndustrial was developed. This PA cell was constructed by processing the end of a light guide as the sample chamber

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4 provides a chronological account of previous ISRP reviews, official Coeur d'Alene fisheries program responses to a series of ISRP reviews, master planning documentation, and annual reports dating back to 1990. Collectively, the materials provided by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in this Step-1 submission package comprehensively assesses key research, habitat improvement activities, and hatchery production issues to best protect and enhance native cutthroat trout populations and the historically and culturally important tribal fisheries they support.

  1. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C4, supplment au Journal de PhysiqueIII, Volume 6,juillet 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .INTRODUCTION Depuis les travaux de Hower [l] l'intensité d'un pic Compton asépar l'échantillon a été largement

  2. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC7,supplmentau Journalde Physique III,Volume 3, novembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    samplesin industrial aluminium alloys, several conclusionsfor any type of steelreinforced - aluminium matrix'est le cas des pièces compositesbase aluminium - base fer élaborées par un procédé dérivé de la fonderie sous pression (2). L'aluminium réagissant fortement avec le fer, il est nécessaire de connaître et de

  3. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C6, supplkment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 6, octobre 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by unexpectedloading in the earthquake or degradation due to hardeningby irradiation in nuclear vessels, should thickness and test temperature on toughness and scatterof toughnesscanbe well explainedby the BEREMINmodel, small size specimen tests, sub-sizeCharpy test or small.punch test are recommendedto evaluatethe

  4. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5,supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on sound propagation data of fluorocarbon fluids and low density solids by Madigosky et a l C33 t h a t ($1 capacity and adiabatic bulk mo& i n quasi-spherical molecular liquids and fluorocarbon fluids

  5. Analysis quality report on the EIA Annual Report to Congress 1978, volume III : coal supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David O.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is charged by Congress to prepare an Annual Report to Congress (ARC) which includes projections of energy supplies, consumption and prices, as well as the relation of energy to ...

  6. JOURNALDEPHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC3,supplementau Journal de Physique III, Volume 2, decembre 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PAR AUTORADIOGRAPHIE DE DÉTECTEURS Par A. ERTAUD et P. ZALESKI, Service de la Pile de Châtillon form6 sous 1'effet de la capture d'un neutron est accompagn6e de 1'6mission d'un ou de plusieurs rayons

  7. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C3, supplmentau Journalde Physique III, Volume 5, avril 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    annealing on nickel coated tungsten wires have been performed and have determineda critical annealing diffusion of nickel in the fibrous microstructure of the tungsten. Tensiletests have shown the brittle featureof this microstructuraltransformation and also the effect of the doping with potassium on tungsten

  8. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Verdict, Malcolm; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Cynthia; McKelvey, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewal International (CRI) in 2001. In 2006, funded by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, workers removed the asbestos. Through a follow up grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to support the design process of a new CRI...

  9. National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume I of III: Model overview and description. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Utility Financial Statement (NUFS) model which takes the output for the electric utility sector from the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS) model and forecasts electric utility financial statements is described. NUFS forecasts separately for public and investor owned utilities, the following tables for each region on an annual basis: income statement; balance sheet; sources and uses of funds; development of revenue requirement on an annual basis; reconciliation of tax expenses, current taxes and income taxes at a 46% statutory rate; interest coverage; external financing as a percent of total uses of funds; AFUDC as a percentage of total uses of funds; book value and market to book rate; dividends per share; and actual return on equity. In addition, NUFS has been designed to supply inputs to the MEFS iterative solution process. The first such input is the fixed charge rates for each plant type. This quantity is used to form the objective function for the MEFS electric utility model. The second set of inputs are for the existing MEFS electricity price forecasting module. These inputs are referred to as pricing coefficients and old money revenue requirements.

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C4, supplkmentau Journalde PhysiqueIII,Volume 6,juillet 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the analysis of some derivatives of petroleum crude oil (Petrol, Diesel oil, Fuel oil), is demonstrated standard method. Some problems about elements volatility (S in Diesel oil and Pb in Petrol) are solved and elemental sulphur. The lead contained in the petrol is added in the form of the antidetonant

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C5, supplmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SONY PCM-501 ES utilisant comme mémoire de masse le canal image d'un magnétoscope SONY SL-HF 950; les

  12. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueCl, supplmentau Journal de PhysiqueIII, Volume 4, janvier 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the principles of fuel cells are discussed, underlining electrocatalytic problems to be overcome to increase precieux (metaux de la mine du platine) pour la plupart des types de piles. Le probleme du stockage du vehicule, car d'une part le rendement energetique est dirninue d'un facteur de l'ordre de 0,8 (rendement du

  13. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC7, supplkmentau Journalde Physique III,Volume 5, novembre 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the materials and application prospects for higher purity in steels, which will make possible further advances processes can be more easily mastered. Steels with optimized fracture toughness can be exposed to more rods and cylinders guarantee reliability in hydraulic systems,and high-purity calenderingrolls permit

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume III. Cultural resource assessment socioeconomic background data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macfarlane, Heather; Janzen, Donald E.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared in conjunction with an environmental baseline study for a commercial coal conversion facility being conducted by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company (AECO). This report represents a cultural resource assessment for the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. This assessment presents data collected by Dames and Moore during a recent archaeological reconnaissance of the unsurveyed southeastern portion of the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. Also, results of two previous surveys on the northern and southwestern portion of the plant site for American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) and Kentucky Utilities are included. The Dames and Moore survey of the southeastern portion of the plant site identified one archaeological site, three standing structures and one historic cemetery. In addition 47 archaeological sites and six standing structures are known from two previous surveys of the remainder of the plant site (Cowan 1975 and Turnbow et al 1980). Eleven of the previously recorded archaeological sites were recommended for further assessment to evaluate their potential for inclusion within the Holt Bottoms Archaeological District currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. None of the archaeological sites or standing structures located within the plant site during the Dames and Moore survey were recommended for further assessment. A total of eight archaeological sites were located during the Dames and Moore survey of the two potential solid waste disposal areas. Of this total only two sites were recommended for further assessment. Also, one previously unknown historic cemetry was located in the southernmost potential waste disposal area.

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C8, supplementau Journalde Physique III, Volume 4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to hostile actions. Different kinds of weapon can be used against the targets depending on the military value potential weapon Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:19948104 #12;C8-684 JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV effects, such as penetration, air blast, fragments and ground shock

  16. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  17. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C6, supplkmentau Journal de Physique III,Volume 6, octobre 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , creep-fatigue test simulationsare performed. 2. MATERIAL BEHAVIOUR AND DAMAGE OF AUSTENITIC STEELAT HIGH Approach: Numerical Simulations of Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Initiation and Crack Growth in 316L SPH with sets of experimental data for two specimen geometries during load controlled tests. A damage criterion

  18. Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

  19. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

  20. The DNA of InnovaTIon: volume III ConneCtions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of MI6 secrets Professor Andrew Mills School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Smart Inks: shining by the surname of the researchers interviews: Keith Baker Photography: Marketing and Creative Services, Queen and Enterprise Directorate, Queen's University Belfast: www.qub.ac.uk/home/Researchandenterprise tel. 00 44 (0

  1. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque Cl,supplmentau Journalde PhysiqueIII,Volume 2, avril 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) and NOBES (1989) models). The follow of the process shows the progressive rearrangementof particules of argileous and calcareous sediments mainly cliffers owing to grain-size distribution which control mesures de vitesse du son. Puis les particules sont mises en dispersion,la hauteur du floculat ainsi que

  2. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III- Technical Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.; Gilman, D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do, Kee Han Kim, Stephen O’Neal, Rose Sauser and Ivonne Macouzet. 2 CODE AND PRE -CODE SIMULATION RESULTS BY COUNTY This appendix to the Laboratory’s 2011 Annual report contains the simulation results for single -family and multi-family... residences in the 41 counties. For each county, code and pre -code simulation, and annual and peak-day results for individual residence are provided (Single -Family and Multi -Family). For each county, pre -code and code simulation, and annual and peak...

  3. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emisions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III- Technical Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) All ERCOT ESL-Single Family ESL-Multifamily PUC (SB7) PUC (SB5 grant program) SECO Wind-ERCOT ESL-Commercial Federal Buildings Furnace Pilot Light Program SEER13-Single Family SEER13-Multifamily Figure 1: OSD NOx Emissions Reduction Projections... TABLE OF TABLES Table 1: List of Counties ................................................................................................................................ 9 Table 2: Simulation Results for Individual Single Family and Multi Family...

  4. Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report Rosemary Lapka, Neesha Modi, Lauren Start and David Weinglass Report No. CSS11-07 April 19, 2011 #12;Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III Keoleian, Professor #12;Document Description AURORA ORGANIC DAIRY PHASE III: CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  5. III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE HYGIENE DES MAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE PREVENTION HYGIENE DES MAINS HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE HYGIENE - IRD - MNHN - Cemagref 24/88 III.1. HYGIENE DES MAINS Elle est fondamentale et à renouveler plusieurs, on peut utiliser un gel ou une solution hydro alcoolique. III.2. HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE Un certain nombre de

  6. High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

  7. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  8. Viability Assessment Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

  9. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  10. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  11. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  12. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  13. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  14. Global regularity of wave maps III. Large energy from $\\R^{1+2}$ to hyperbolic spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Terence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that wave maps $\\phi$ from two-dimensional Minkowski space $\\R^{1+2}$ to hyperbolic spaces $\\H^m$ are globally smooth in time if the initial data is smooth, conditionally on some reasonable claims concerning the local theory of such wave maps, as well as the self-similar and travelling (or stationary solutions); we will address these claims in the sequels \\cite{tao:heatwave2}, \\cite{tao:heatwave3}, \\cite{tao:heatwave4} to this paper. Following recent work in critical dispersive equations, the strategy is to reduce matters to the study of an \\emph{almost periodic} maximal Cauchy development in the energy class. We then repeatedly analyse the stress-energy tensor of this development (as in \\cite{tao:forges}) to extract either a self-similar, travelling, or degenerate non-trivial energy class solution to the wave maps equation. We will then rule out such solutions in the sequels to this paper, establishing the desired global regularity result for wave maps.

  15. Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect KineticInnovation Portal

  16. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 1, Introduction and summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, R.L. [ed.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies or exercise. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. This volume, Volume 1, contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  17. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  18. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  19. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  20. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 2 CONTENTS A New Large Theropod................................................................................................................................................................ Danny J. Wyatt Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Cretaceouscoals near Castle Gate, Utab. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors

  1. NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    with neural network theory as proposed by Hebb in his 1949 classic The Organization of Behavior where heNDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS WALTER J FREEMAN Department chemical gradients; and order parameters that control self-organization of large populations of neurons

  2. Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Anish Singh

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .1 Unconventional resources ................................................................................. 1 1.2 Oil shale and shale oil ....................................................................................... 6 1.3 Production from unconventional..., heavy oil, shale gas and shale oil. On the other hand, conventional reservoirs can be produced at economic flow rates and produce economic volumes of oil and gas without large stimulation treatments or any special recovery process. Conventional...

  3. FY 2005 Volume 4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science

  4. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science6

  5. FY 2005 Volume 6

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science67

  6. FY 2005 Volume 7

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4

  7. Volume One Disc Two

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain Metals inVolume-One-Disc-Two

  8. Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective regulation strategies. To avoid...

  9. Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective ...

  10. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  11. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 9: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the first quarter of calendar year 1988 (January through March). The data in this volume of Appendix C cover the following wells: 199-N-58; 199-N-59; 199-N-60; 199-N-61; 199-N-67. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  12. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  13. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

  14. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  15. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII

  16. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:

  17. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:

  18. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII(b)

  19. Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen(Redirected(NorthernIII

  20. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562 RevisionI: Energy GoalsIII:

  1. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  2. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  3. An Overview of Visualization techniques for the Analysis of Large datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    ://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/ #12;Visible Human - animation #12;Information Visualization · Compact graphical presentation ­ Large: ­ animation ­ software visualisation ­ visualisation environments ­ volume rendering and visualization ­ computer graphics ­ visual programming ­ image processing ­ virtual reality ­ Scientific Visualisation

  4. Multipass laser cavity for efficient transverse illumination of an elongated volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogelsang, Jan; Antognini, Aldo; Dax, Andreas; Götzfried, Johannes; Hänsch, Theodor W; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Liu, Yi-Wei; Nebel, Tobias; Nez, Francois; Schuhmann, Karsten; Taqqu, David; Pohl, Randolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multipass laser cavity is presented which can be used to illuminate an elongated volume from a transverse direction. The illuminated volume can also have a very large transverse cross section. Convenient access to the illuminated volume is granted. The multipass cavity is very robust against misalignment, and no active stabilization is needed. The scheme is suitable for example in beam experiments, where the beam path must not be blocked by a laser mirror, or if the illuminated volume must be very large. This cavity was used for the muonic-hydrogen experiment in which 6 $\\mu$m laser light illuminated a volume of 7 x 25 x 176 mm^3, using mirrors that are only 12 mm in height. We present our measurement of the intensity distribution inside the multipass cavity and show that this is in good agreement with our simulation.

  5. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca....

  6. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  7. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  8. AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison...

  9. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  10. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  11. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  12. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  13. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

  14. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlawitschka, Mario

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ller. Volumeshop: o Interactive direct volume illustration.Kin04] [KKW05] [KTW06] Interactive Volume Rendering of Di?magic volume lens: An interactive focus+context technique

  15. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: Simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macpherson, Damien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the SKA precursor instruments WMA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35% of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27% in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable timescales, are as high as $\\sim$ 6000 and as low as $\\sim$ 11, which shows the opti...

  16. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  17. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Katharina; /JILA, Boulder /Fermilab; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  18. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  19. Large scale disease prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to present the foundation of an automated large-scale disease prediction system. Unlike previous work that has typically focused on a small self-contained dataset, we explore the possibility ...

  20. Bistability: Requirements on Cell-Volume, Protein Diffusion, and Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert G. Endres

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Bistability is considered wide-spread among bacteria and eukaryotic cells, useful e.g. for enzyme induction, bet hedging, and epigenetic switching. However, this phenomenon has mostly been described with deterministic dynamic or well-mixed stochastic models. Here, we map known biological bistable systems onto the well-characterized biochemical Schloegl model, using analytical calculations and stochastic spatio-temporal simulations. In addition to network architecture and strong thermodynamic driving away from equilibrium, we show that bistability requires fine-tuning towards small cell volumes (or compartments) and fast protein diffusion (well mixing). Bistability is thus fragile and hence may be restricted to small bacteria and eukaryotic nuclei, with switching triggered by volume changes during the cell cycle. For large volumes, single cells generally loose their ability for bistable switching and instead undergo a first-order phase transition.

  1. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AS A DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of damped Ly{alpha} absorbers (DLAs) can be used to measure gas-phase metallicities at large cosmological look-back times with high precision. Furthermore, relative abundances can still be measured accurately deep into the reionization epoch (z > 6) using transitions redward of Ly{alpha}, even though Gunn-Peterson absorption precludes measurement of neutral hydrogen. In this paper, we study the chemical evolution of DLAs using a model for the coupled evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM), which is constrained by a variety of observations. Our goal is to explore the influence of Population III stars on the abundance patterns of DLAs to determine the degree to which abundance measurements can discriminate between different Population III stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). We include effects, such as inflows onto galaxies due to cosmological accretion and outflows from galaxies due to supernova feedback. A distinct feature of our model is that it self-consistently calculates the effect of Population III star formation on the reionization of an inhomogeneous IGM, thus allowing us to calculate the thermal evolution of the IGM and implement photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation. We find that if the critical metallicity of Population III to II/I transition is {approx}< 10{sup -4} Z{sub Sun }, then the cosmic Population III star formation rate drops to zero for z < 8. Nevertheless, at high redshift (z {approx} 6), chemical signatures of Population III stars remain in low-mass galaxies (halo mass {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). This is because photoionization feedback suppresses star formation in these galaxies until relatively low redshift (z {approx} 10), and the chemical record of their initial generation of Population III stars is retained. We model DLAs as these low-mass galaxies, and assign to them a mass-dependent H I absorption cross-section in order to predict the expected distribution of DLA abundance ratios. We find that these distributions are anchored toward abundance ratios set by Population II supernova yields, but they exhibit a tail which depends significantly on the Population III IMF for z > 5. Thus, a sample of DLA metallicity and relative abundance measurements at high redshift holds the promise to constrain Population III enrichment and the Population III IMF. We find that a sample of just 10 DLAs with relative abundances measured to an accuracy of 0.1 dex is sufficient to constrain the Population III IMF at 4{sigma}. These constraints may prove stronger than other probes of Population III enrichment, such as metal-poor stars and individual metal-poor DLAs. Our results provide a global picture of the thermal, ionization, and chemical evolution of the universe, and have the potential to rule out certain Population III scenarios.

  2. REORIENTAO Ensino Mdio -Volume I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    REORIENTAÇÃO CURRICULAR PORTUGUÊS Ensino Médio - Volume I Materiais Didáticos #12;#12;GOVERNO DO SUBSECRETARIA ADJUNTA DE PLANEJAMENTO PEDAGÓGICO Alba Rodrigues Cruz #12;#12;GOVERNO DO ESTADO DO RIO DE JANEIRO

  3. Solid-state lighting : the III-V Epi Killer App.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout its history, lighting technology has made tremendous progress: the efficiency with which power is converted into usable light has increased 2.8 orders of magnitude over three centuries. This progress has, in turn, fueled large increases in the consumption of light and productivity of human society. In this talk, we review an emerging new technology, solid-state lighting: its frontier performance potential; the underlying advances in physics and materials that might enable this performance potential; the resulting energy consumption and human productivity benefits; and the impact on worldwide III-V epi manufacture.

  4. Large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsai, K.; Kerenyi, D.; Kiss, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book deals with the following aspects of transformer engineering: general principles governing the function of transformers, iron cores, windings, stray losses caused by stray flux, the insulation of transformers, and the structural parts and accessories. This edition includes the developments in theory and practice on the basis of the authors' experience in design, manufacturing and testing of large transformers. New developments have been particularly extensive in the fields of new magnetic materials, cooling methods, dielectric strength for overvoltages of different types, and stray-load loss problems, which are presented in the book in detail. The many diagrams in the book can be used directly in the design, manufacture and testing of large transformers. In preparing their text, the authors have aimed to satisfy the demand for a work that summarizes the latest experience in development and design of large power transformers.

  5. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  6. Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devulapalli, Ravi S.; Valdes, Juan B.

    of individual phases, consists of two volumes. Volume I (titled Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas: Calculation of Regional Regression Equations) presents the regional regression equations developed, while Volume II (titled Volume...

  7. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  8. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  9. Volume modulus inflation and the gravitino mass problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, J P [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Kallosh, R; Linde, A [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Quevedo, F, E-mail: jpc41@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)] [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubble constant during the last stages of inflation in a broad class of models based on the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi mechanism should be smaller than the gravitino mass, H{approx}large volume of compactification the corresponding constraint typically is even stronger, H{approx}large volume of compactification where inflation may occur exponentially far away from the present vacuum state. In these models, the Hubble constant during inflation can be many orders of magnitude greater than the gravitino mass. We introduce a toy model describing this scenario, and discuss its strengths and weaknesses.

  10. Composting Large Animal Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  11. Composting Large Animal Carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  12. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  13. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  14. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  15. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  16. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  17. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  18. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  19. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergyonWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III

  20. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  1. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  2. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  3. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  5. Pantex Volume 1 - Final.PDF

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    intentionally left blank. iii Acronyms AAAHC Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care AB Authorization Basis ACGIH American Conference of Governmental Industrial...

  6. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

  7. Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

  8. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  10. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  11. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

  12. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early restoration project types Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement). Criteria

  13. Spinodal decomposition, nuclear fog and two characteristic volumes in thermal multifragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. V. Simonenko; P. A. Rukoyatkin; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition inside the spinodal region. The experimental data for p(8.1GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) for the events with emission of at least two IMFs. It is found that the partition of hot nuclei is specified after expansion to a volume equal to Vt = (2.6+-0.3) Vo, with Vo as the volume at normal density. However, the freeze-out volume is found to be twice as large: Vf = (5+-1) Vo.

  14. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INICISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dey'ee of MASTER OF ARTS... December 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INCISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Approved as to style and content by: George F, Bass (Chair of Committee) c~) Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr...

  15. Which BPS baryons minimize volume?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

  16. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressureannual volume of world oil production and the pore volumem 3 . In 2006, the world oil production was 4.3 km 3 (73.46

  17. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A. (Tracy, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Willeke, Klaus (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  18. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  19. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Akerib; X. Bai; S. Bedikian; E. Bernard; A. Bernstein; A. Bolozdynya; A. Bradley; D. Byram; S. B. Cahn; C. Camp; M. C. Carmona-Benitez; D. Carr; J. J. Chapman; A. Chiller; C. Chiller; K. Clark; T. Classen; T. Coffey; A. Curioni; E. Dahl; S. Dazeley; L. de Viveiros; A. Dobi; E. Dragowsky; E. Druszkiewicz; B. Edwards; C. H. Faham; S. Fiorucci; R. J. Gaitskell; K. R. Gibson; M. Gilchriese; C. Hall; M. Hanhardt; B. Holbrook; M. Ihm; R. G. Jacobsen; L. Kastens; K. Kazkaz; R. Knoche; S. Kyre; J. Kwong; R. Lander; N. A. Larsen; C. Lee; D. S. Leonard; K. T. Lesko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; A. Lyashenko; D. C. Malling; R. Mannino; Z. Marquez; D. N. McKinsey; D. -M. Mei; J. Mock; M. Moongweluwan; M. Morii; H. Nelson; F. Neves; J. A. Nikkel; M. Pangilinan; P. D. Parker; E. K. Pease; K. Pech; P. Phelps; A. Rodionov; P. Roberts; A. Shei; T. Shutt; C. Silva; W. Skulski; V. N. Solovov; C. J. Sofka; P. Sorensen; J. Spaans; T. Stiegler; D. Stolp; R. Svoboda; M. Sweany; M. Szydagis; D. Taylor; J. Thomson; M. Tripathi; S. Uvarov; J. R. Verbus; N. Walsh; R. Webb; D. White; J. T. White; T. J. Whitis; M. Wlasenko; F. L. H. Wolfs; M. Woods; C. Zhang

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has designed and constructed a dual-phase xenon detector, in order to conduct a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. The goal of the LUX detector is to clearly detect (or exclude) WIMPS with a spin independent cross section per nucleon of $2\\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$, equivalent to $\\sim$1 event/100 kg/month in the inner 100-kg fiducial volume (FV) of the 370-kg detector. The overall background goals are set to have $<$1 background events characterized as possible WIMPs in the FV in 300 days of running. This paper describes the design and construction of the LUX detector.

  20. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Camp, C; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A; Chiller, C; Clark, K; Classen, T; Coffey, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, E; Dazeley, S; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dragowsky, E; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Holbrook, B; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Kyre, S; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Leonard, D S; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; Marquez, Z; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morii, M; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Rodionov, A; Roberts, P; Shei, A; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Solovov, V N; Sofka, C J; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Stiegler, T; Stolp, D; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, D; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has designed and constructed a dual-phase xenon detector, in order to conduct a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. The goal of the LUX detector is to clearly detect (or exclude) WIMPS with a spin independent cross section per nucleon of $2\\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$, equivalent to $\\sim$1 event/100 kg/month in the inner 100-kg fiducial volume (FV) of the 370-kg detector. The overall background goals are set to have $<$1 background events characterized as possible WIMPs in the FV in 300 days of running. This paper describes the design and construction of the LUX detector.

  1. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  2. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  3. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  4. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  5. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

  6. Arnold Schwarzenegger HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL Prepared-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL EISG AWARDEE InterPhases Research 166 N. Moorpark Rd. Suite 204

  7. MINIMAL VOLUME Laurent BESSI`ERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remy, Bertrand

    MINIMAL VOLUME by Laurent BESSI`ERES Abstract. -- The aim of this text is to explain some rigidity manifold, simplicial volume, global topological meth- ods (`a la Gromov). #12;2 LAURENT BESSI`ERES 1

  8. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and central Eurasia. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Minerals Yearbook -- International Review contains the latest available mineral data on more than 175 foreign countries and discusses the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations. Since the 1989 International Review, the volume has been presented as six reports. The report presents the Mineral Industries of Europe and Central Eurasia. The report incorporates location maps, industry structure tables, and an outlook section previously incorporated in the authors' Minerals Perspectives Series quinquennial regional books, which are being discontinued. This section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 45 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (EC); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA); Malta; the 11 Eastern European economies in transition (Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia); and the countries of Central Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan).

  9. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 3, Development documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program.

  10. A Study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Iodide and Organic Amine Hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackstock, Joseph Beauford

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isopropylammoniumnonaiododianti- montate(III) Tris-4 -picoliniumnonaiododiantimonate(III) Tris-$-picoliniumnonaiOdodiantimonate(III) Di-isobutylamine-antimony( III) iodide reaction product Triethanolam&ne-antimony(III) iodide reaction product Flelting Point, 'C Decomposed 193... to the starch end point . Antimony was determined on eacn compound in dupli- cate. The results of these analyses are tabulated in Table II. II. Determination of' Iodine in the Reaction Products: Iodine was determined potentiometrically using a silver...

  11. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  12. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

  13. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems’ insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B. [Sredne-Nevskiy Shipyard (SNSZ), 10 Zavodskaya str., c. Pontonniy, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor’s PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  14. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  15. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  16. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  17. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  18. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  19. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

  20. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

  1. Measuring Fast Neutrons with Large Liquid Scintillation Detector for Ultra-low Background Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Zhang; D. -M. Mei; P. Davis; B. Woltman; F. Gray

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron-gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  2. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  3. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  4. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 2, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E27-8; 299-E27-9; 299-E27-10; 299-E28-26; 299-E28-27. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 8, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W18-21; 299-W18-22; 299-W18-23; 299-W18-24. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 4, Appendix A (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E33-30; 299-E34-2; 299-E34-3; 299-E34-4; 299-E34-5; 299-E34-6. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  7. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  8. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 872.9 1,737.8 282.7 2,893.4 W W 132.1 117.6 - 249.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  9. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W NA W 1,666.1 W 2,880.1 NA W 134.2 125.5 - 259.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  10. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8,415.8 39,569.3 40,215.9 122,708.5 26,876.5 189,800.8 10,466.7 10,604.8 10,129.5 14,302.8 - 24,432.4 February ... 40,637.5 41,953.1 43,328.9 133,687.6...

  11. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,369.5 40,816.0 42,057.4 126,970.8 38,559.5 207,587.7 9,892.3 10,063.7 W 15,155.9 W 25,989.9 February ... 41,671.7 43,092.9 43,590.9 131,633.0 37,204.6...

  12. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the particle with external electromagnetic fields (i.e., wiggler, undulator) or media (i.e., transition radiation, Cerenkov, Smith-Purcell, etc.). The Fourier component,...

  13. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0 1996-2013 Lease1,706.6

  14. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170 09,369.5

  15. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170

  16. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,717041,706.6

  17. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE VOGTLE18

  18. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE

  19. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0, NUMBER

  20. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,

  1. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H Y

  2. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H

  3. VOLUME

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H0

  4. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P

  5. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3

  6. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,318 P H

  7. Annealing properties of open volumes in strained SiN films studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, A.; Ito, K.; Narumi, T.; Sometani, M.; Yamabe, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Murata, T.; Honda, K.; Hattori, N.; Matsuura, M.; Asai, K.; Ohdaira, T.; Suzuki, R. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Process Technology Development Division, Renesas Technology Corp., 4-1 Mizuhara, Itami, Hyogo 664-0005 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of annealing on open volumes in strained SiN films deposited on Si by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For compressive SiN, the stress was reduced by postdeposition annealing; this effect was attributed to the relaxation of matrix structures accompanied by an expansion of small open spaces intrinsically existing in the matrix and the introduction of large open volumes. For tensile SiN, although annealing tends to decrease the concentration of large open volumes, the size of the small open spaces and the film stress were almost constant up to 1000 deg. C annealing. This was attributed to the network structure related to the open spaces remaining stable even at 1000 deg. C annealing, and this mainly determines the stress in the tensile film.

  8. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  9. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . This technique allows for shorter imaging time and depth profiling. Non-uniformity of heating area and optical of thermography where the temperature field is monitored with an infrared camera is its fast imaging capability are measured. The phase of the modulated infrared emission is independent of optical/infrared surface

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque CX, supplCment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Institute of TechnicalPhysics,P.O. Box 245,Chelyabinsk-70,454070,Russia Rtsumt: le phenomene &attenuation du prkurseur

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sample are given and are compared to that obtained by scanning using a conventionallargephotoacoustic (PA)cell and focused down onto the sample surface. The photothermal detection system uses a diode laser probe beam spot on the sample while the probe beam diameteris 25pm at the RIG. A sodium lamp sourceprovides

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, suppltmentau Journal de PhysiqueIII, Volume4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    trois polymkres (polycarbonate, polyamide et polyBthyl6ne ttrtphtalate), d'un plastique renforct ?I la renfort. Abstract: Dynamic compressiontest results are presented for three polymers (polycarbonate at a strain rate of about lo3 s-' were conducted using the Kolsky method with the split Hopkinson pressure bar

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV 487 Colloque C9, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 3, dcembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex, France Abstract. -- The ceaseiess demand for higher temperatures in aerospace, strength above 1000 °C). Nevertheless, the bad oxidation behaviour of niobium or niobium alloys has, on niobium alloys, bare or coated. These recent investigations profit by new techniques in domains of alloys

  14. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  15. Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume III. Technical issues and design guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provide appropriate guidance for addressing the major technical issues associated with the design and installation of a photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) system. Nomographs are presented for developing preliminary sizing and costing, and issues associated with specific components and the overall design of the electrical and mechanical system are discussed. SAND82-7157/2 presents a review of current PV-T technology and operating systems and a study of potential PV-T applications. Detailed PV-T system designs for three selected applications and the results of a trade-off study for these applications are presented in SAND82-7157/4. A summary of the major results of this entire study and conclusions concerning PV-T systems and applications is presented in SAND82-7157/1.

  16. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter deals with the analysis and engineering scaling of solid breeded blankets. The limits under which full component behavior can be achieved under changed test conditions are explored. The characterization of these test requirements for integrated testing contributes to the overall test matrix and test plan for the understanding and development of fusion nuclear technology. The second chapter covers the analysis and engineering scaling of liquid metal blankets. The testing goals for a complete blanket program are described. (MOW)

  17. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C8, supplkmentau Journal de Physique III,Volume 6, ddcembre 1996 C8-119

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by electron beam melting in Rice University (Houston, TX). This samples contain oxygen and nitrogen residuals

  18. n er a I ApVolume III, Issuo 2 Guest Author -Dr. Luc Taerwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ca!ICNl (10m I t0Uf)5!1C porn! of vie... itIld weI/- lno...n lor ::5 hlsionc.rl C(NIir6 WJth m~ny medllvll bui

  19. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C4, suppl6ment au Journal de Physique III,Volume 5, mai 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Makes a Useable New Energetic Material? A.J. Sanderson NATO Insensitive Munitions Znfomtion Centre,HQ NATO, 1110 Bruxelles, Belgique ABSTRACT. In the last 50 years, very many new energetic compounds have NIMTC member nations, to study what it is that makes a new energetic material useable. Issues that were

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC5, supplmentauJournal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Helmholtzsource. Two modellingtools have been used :the finite-element codeATlLA and an equivalent circuit model'ensemble qui correspond au noeud de vibration de la structure. L'utilisation de ce boîtier est nécessaire au

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on the impact of hydrogen on water reactor safety. Volume III of IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M. (ed.)

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the area of: combustion, experiments and analysis.

  2. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC5, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . We show that contributionof each mode to response cm be pointed out using an approximate sound speed aux interfaces entre couches liquides de la pression et de la vitesse normale on explicite la solution

  3. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

    The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its...

  4. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplkment au Jou~nalde Physique III, Volume 4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , China Resume - Des specimens d'aluminium, cuivre OFHC et alliage titane Ti-6A1-4V sont charges par un-'. Abstract - Aluminum, OFHC copper and Ti-6A1-4V specimenshave been impacted with the two stage electric gun- locity histories, especially the important velocity recession process. In contrast to it, the common

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC5, supplment au Journal de PhysiqueIII, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iluctuations on the blades. Classical signal processing procedures provide the blade loadings harmonics. When rotor centrifuge à aubes couchées en arrière et un stator redresseur axial (voir la figure 1). Ce type

  6. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC5, supplkment au Journalde Physique III, Volume 6, septembre 1996 C5-223

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that similar decompositionoccurs in the Cr-enrichedferritic phase of duplex stainless steels and in single-223 Phase-Separation, Partitioning and Precipitation in MA956, an ODs Ferritic Stainless Steel H.G. Read stainless steel, aged at 475 "Cfor up to 2900 hours have been investigated. Atom probe microanalysis

  7. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

  8. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 3,novembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rueil Malmaison, France ABSTRACT A new process, dynarnic-diffusion-bonding (DDB) was improved in our laboratory (1). It offers the advantages of both classical diffusion-bonding and rapidity, which Comportement mécanique d'assemblages en acier 27CD4 et 100C6 soudés rapidementpar soudage-diffusion-dynamique G

  9. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  10. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 1. Design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report discusses in detail the design of the collector system, heat transport system, thermal storage subsystem, heat transport loop, steam generation subsystem, electrical, instrumentation, and control systems, power conversion system, master control system, and balance of plant. The performance, facility cost estimate and economic analysis, and development plan are also discussed.

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 3, novembre 1993 743

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Galilée, avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse, France Abstract Self-propagating high temperature synthesis of titanium carbide from finely divided powders of Ti and C is initiated in the solid state(s) and absolute temperature T(K). The reaction rate a (moles of carbon reacted relative to the initial amount

  12. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C6, supplkment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juin 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Circuit Design Group, P.O. Box 216 & 51,Z.P. 72000,Puehla, Pue, Mexico *IMEC, Kapeldred 75,3001Leuven-D., L. Deferm* and C. Declerck* Instituto Nacional deAstrofisica,Opticay Ekctrdnica, INAOE,Integrated sourceldrain-gate length AL, using standard electrical models, gives negative values for AL 11 1, which means

  14. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplCmentau Journal de Physique III,Volume 6, dCcembre 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    energy and the diffusion coefficientof Li in Aluminium. 1. INTRODUCTION Aluminium-Lithium alloys have Zener Relaxation in A1-Li Binary Alloys J.I. PCrez-Landaziibal, M.L. N6* and J. San Juan Dpto. Fisica% Li - 0.03 at% Zr alloy. The results show that the sequence of 6' and 6 precipitation can be followed

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C9, supplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, novembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    beamline (ID6) whose source is a high beta undulator (px=27m, Pz=13m). 2. SINGLELENS EXPERIMENTS 2.1 Setup. 3. HIGH ENERGY X-RAY TELESCOPE We used a 42mm-period undulator on the first harmonic (gap=45mm). The high energy x-ray telescope setup based on two circular BFL is presented in Fig.2. We used Si-444

  16. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C6 SupplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juin 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    cooling requirements, - low-cost manufacturingwhich implies compatibilitywith silicon integrated of activity has been devoted to study and fabrication of "second generation" infrared detectors. Today, the trends are towards detector developments which are sometimes contradictory, as the demand is focused

  17. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I. Feasibility analysis. Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Feasibility Analysis covers a wide range of studies and evaluations. The Report is divided into five parts. Section 1 contains all material relating to the Institutional Assessment including consideration of the requirements and position of the Potomac Electric Co. as they relate to cogeneration at Georgetown in parallel with the utility (Task 1). Sections 2 through 7 contain all technical information relating to the Alternative Subsystems Analysis (Task 4). This includes the energy demand profiles upon which the evaluations were based (Task 3). It further includes the results of the Life-Cycle-Cost Analyses (Task 5) which are developed in detail in the Appendix for evaluation in the Technical Report. Also included is the material relating to Incremental Savings and Optimization (Task 6) and the Conceptual Design for candidate alternate subsystems (Task 7). Section 8 contains all material relating to the Environmental Impact Assessment (Task 2). The Appendix contains supplementary material including the budget cost estimates used in the life-cycle-cost analyses, the basic assumptions upon which the life-cycle analyses were developed, and the detailed life-cycle-cost anlysis for each subsystem considered in detail.

  18. Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganow, H.C.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

  19. JOB SUMMARY JOB TITLE: RESEARCH FELLOW (Multi-Agent Systems for Large-Scale Evolving SCADA (Research Fellows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    JOB SUMMARY JOB TITLE: RESEARCH FELLOW (Multi-Agent Systems for Large-Scale Evolving SCADA, the research topics include: (i) developing multi-agent system architecture for supporting SCADA systems-agent environments and integrating planning knowledge; (iii) investigating security vulnerabilities in MAS for SCADA

  20. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline · Background on issue · Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  1. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  2. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  3. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  4. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  5. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galán, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  6. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

  7. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  8. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Ð Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  9. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exerc´icio na constru¸c~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  10. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  11. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido de cabe¸ca, com

  12. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  13. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  14. TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

  15. MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

  16. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  17. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    amorphous materials, such as ferrihydrite, to well-crystallized minerals such as goethite and hematite (5 assemblages. Experimental Section Oxide Synthesis and Characterization.A variety of synthetic Fe(III) oxides included a series of goethites with differing crystallinity and surface area, synthesized from Fe(NO3

  18. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  19. New England Wind Forum, Volume 1, Issue 1 -- January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 1 features an interview with Brother Joseph of Portsmouth Abbey. A commercial-scale Vestas V47 wind turbine will soon be installed on the grounds of the Benedictine monastery and prep school in Rhode Island, with the assistance of a grant from the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund. This will be the first large-scale turbine located behind the customer meter in the region.

  20. Iterative algorithm for the volume integral method for magnetostatics problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasciak, J.E.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume integral methods for solving nonlinear magnetostatics problems are considered in this paper. The integral method is discretized by a Galerkin technique. Estimates are given which show that the linearized problems are well conditioned and hence easily solved using iterative techniques. Comparisons of iterative algorithms with the elimination method of GFUN3D shows that the iterative method gives an order of magnitude improvement in computational time as well as memory requirements for large problems. Computational experiments for a test problem as well as a double layer dipole magnet are given. Error estimates for the linearized problem are also derived.

  1. nature neuroscience volume 14 | number 8 | AuGuST 2011 947 n e w s an d v i e w s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    nature neuroscience volume 14 | number 8 | AuGuST 2011 947 n e w s an d v i e w s 10. Seimiya, H Neurosci. 33, 193­201 (2010). 6. Jho, E.H. et al. Mol. Cell. Biol. 22, 1172­1183 (2002). 7. Azim, K. & Butt, E.B. III & Grinspan, J.B. Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 42, 255­265 (2009). 4. Tawk, M. et al. J. Neurosci

  2. Lahars Deposits Architecture and Volume in the C. Lengkong Valley at Semeru volcano, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Lahars Deposits Architecture and Volume in the C. Lengkong Valley at Semeru volcano, Indonesia. Université Paris 1 ­ Sorbonne & Univ. Gadjah Mada (Indonesia) Laboratoire de Géographie Physique CNRS UMR Lahars at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, are an ongoing phenomenon that rapidly transports large amount

  3. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the USS Genesis. To CPT Kieran Bock and his crew, the officers and crew of the Southern Cross send their very best wishes and congratulations, and we wish them fair seas and LOTS of stars to follow. The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 1 5 USS Atlantis... will be forwarded separately to each individual member. Please forward any enquiries to the Intel Officer - ENS Ashley Walker on alwalk78@optusnet.com.au. ENS Ashley Walker Operations Intelligence Officer Welcoming New Crewmembers Savannah Clark Daniel...

  4. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s Sunshine Award & Crewmember of the Year Award. Polls close on Friday, July 18. Crewmembers may vote in the official site, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uss-southerncrossawards/. The results Will be announced at the Summit. Summit Event Venues... of our good friends in Adelaide, reacquaint myself with my ?old? mates and make friends with new ones. See you in SA. COL Bruce O?Brien Commanding Officer Newsletter Publisher http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ July / August 2008 Volume 2, Issue 4...

  5. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  6. A LARGE ROCK AVALANCHE ONTO MORSRJKULL GLACIER, SOUTH-EAST ICELAND. ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ICE-SURFACE EVOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , indicating a rapid process. Photogrammetric studies of the source-area estimates the volume of the rock1 A LARGE ROCK AVALANCHE ONTO MORSÁRJÖKULL GLACIER, SOUTH-EAST ICELAND. ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ICE, IS-600 Akureyri, Iceland Abstract In spring 2007, a large rock avalanche descended onto

  7. METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pollutants Sludge Runoff to Aquifiers Noise b. Oil. As forOil-fired generate a large volume of waste as ash and as scrubber sludge.

  8. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  9. Efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Texture-Based Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresolution texture-based volume visualization is an excellent technique to enable interactive rendering of massive data sets. Interactive manipulation of a transfer function is necessary for proper exploration of a data set. However, multiresolution techniques require assessing the accuracy of the resulting images, and re-computing the error after each change in a transfer function is very expensive. They extend their existing multiresolution volume visualization method by introducing a method for accelerating error calculations for multiresolution volume approximations. Computing the error for an approximation requires adding individual error terms. One error value must be computed once for each original voxel and its corresponding approximating voxel. For byte data, i.e., data sets where integer function values between 0 and 255 are given, they observe that the set of error pairs can be quite large, yet the set of unique error pairs is small. instead of evaluating the error function for each original voxel, they construct a table of the unique combinations and the number of their occurrences. To evaluate the error, they add the products of the error function for each unique error pair and the frequency of each error pair. This approach dramatically reduces the amount of computation time involved and allows them to re-compute the error associated with a new transfer function quickly.

  10. Gas Density and the Volume Schmidt Law for Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Abramova; A. V. Zasov

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thickness of the equilibrium isothermal gaseous layers and their volume densities \\rho_{gas}(R) in the disc midplane are calculated for 7 spiral galaxies (including our Galaxy) in the frame of self-consistent axisymmetric model. Local velocity dispersions of stellar discs were assumed to be close to marginal values necessary for the discs to be in a stable equilibrium state. Under this condition the stellar discs of at least 5 of 7 galaxies reveal a flaring. Their volume densities decrease with R faster than \\rho_{gas}, and, as a result, the gas dominates by the density at the disc periphery. Comparison of the azimuthally averaged star formation rate SFR with the gas density shows that there is no universal Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, common to all galaxies. Nevertheless, SFR in different galaxies reveals better correlation with the volume gas density than with the column one. Parameter n in the Schmidt law SFR \\rho_{gas}^n, formally calculated by the least square method, lies within 0.8-2.4 range and it's mean value is close to 1.5. Values of n calculated for molecular gas only are characterized by large dispersion, but their mean value is close to 1. Hence the smaller \\rho_{gas} the less is a fraction of gas actively taking part in the process of star formation.

  11. Neuron, Volume 68 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -linear transformation of those in A. It is thus possible for the PD to perform better in one space than in the other. Previous single-electrode penetrations were largely within the area spanned by the two arrays, but also

  12. Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradecak, Silvija

    III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

  13. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  14. Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective Strategy to Improve the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of surface titanium and oxygen atoms present. PageRIVERSIDE Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an EffectiveDISSERTATION Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective

  15. Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and passivation of a compound semiconductor surface duringIn 2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, in press with2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, ECS Transaction (

  16. Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009 Renormalization in connected graded Hopf cO2008 Clay Mathemat* *ics Institute 1 #12

  17. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  19. Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

  20. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for environmental operations at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office. "We exceeded our goals and are on track to double both volume...