Sample records for iii kevin dome

  1. Kevin Brosnahan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kevin Brosnahan is formerly with the Office of Technology Advancement and Outreach in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  2. Kevin Morris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointed toCAMD TargetsKevin

  3. Kevin L. Rotz's Web Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin's Page. My name is Kevin L. Rotz, and I am currently a sixth year graduate student in the Purdue University Department of Mathematics. During the spring ...

  4. Radar investigation of the Cote Blanche salt dome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Robert Donald

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE COTE BLANCHE SALT DOME. Geology of the Cote Blanche Salt-Dome Azea. . Economic History of the Cote BLanche Salt-Dome Azea, Salt. . Oil and gas. III. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION. . . Radar Speed in Air and in Salt. . . Velocity...' zznd i'r. mzznz 1959) . The east, south, end west flanks are nearly vertical. However, the north side oi the dome is characterised by a massive overhang. A well drilled by Shell Oil Company, Caffrey No. 1, confirmed the presence of a minimum of 3300...

  5. Kevin Smith Sutherland House 234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Kevin Smith Sutherland House 234 PMB 3342 Nashville, TN 37235 January 27, 2010 Mr. Scott at Kevin.m.smith@vanderbilt.edu or by phone at (543)3843909. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Kevin Smith The cover letter needs to be in business letter format...this includes

  6. EIS-0075: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Also see EIS-0021 and EIS-0029. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Office developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of expanding the existing SPR storage capacity from 538 million to 750 million barrels of storage and increasing the drawdown capability from 3.5 million to 4.5 million barrels per day. This EIS incorperates two previously issued EISs: DOE/EIS-0021, Seaway Group of Salt Domes, and DOE/EIS-0029, Texoma Group of Salt Domes.

  7. EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership- Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future anthropogenic carbon storage in this region.

  8. Kevin L Kenney*

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointed toCAMD TargetsKevin Hardingfuture

  9. Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................. 58 1 CHAPTER I 2. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Teapot Dome field, also known as Naval Petroleum Reserve #3 (NPR-3) is located in the southwest portion of the Powder River Basin, 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming... through the reservoir, precipitates such as gypsum can form.5 12 CHAPTER III 2. GEOLOGY REVIEW 3.1 Introduction Teapot Dome also known as the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) is located in central Wyoming, near...

  10. Soft gamma repeaters Kevin Hurley *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1331 1. Introduction The soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are sporadic sources of bursts of X- and gamma-rays), and a rather soft spectrum compared to those of cosmic gamma-ray bursts; a rough description of the spectrumReview Soft gamma repeaters Kevin Hurley * University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences

  11. Geocoding Patent Data Kevin Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Geocoding Patent Data Kevin Johnson University of California, Berkeley College of Engineering://www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu/sites/default/ les/GeocodingPatent.pdf August 7, 2013 130 Blum Hall #5580 Berkeley, CA 94720-5580 | (510) 664.S. patent data, we can understand what encourages and discourages innovation. We are particularly interested

  12. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  13. Lava Dome | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy DevelopmentLaurentian Energy Authority Jump to:Dome

  14. Dome Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling FarmCenter,Dolliver, Iowa:Dome Tech Jump

  15. Geothermal studies of seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report defines and compares the geothermal environments of eight selected Gulf Coast salt domes. The thermal regimes in and around Gulf Coast salt domes are not well documented. The data base used for this study is an accumulation of bottom-hole temperature readings from oil and gas exploration wells and temperature logs run for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. The bottom-hole tempreatures were corrected in order to estimate the actual geothermal environments. Prior thermal studies and models indicate temperatures in and around salt domes are elevated above the norm by 1/sup 0/F to 25/sup 0/F. Using existing geothermal data and accepted theory, geothermal gradients for the selected domes and surrounding sediments were estimated. This study concludes that salt domes within a given basin have similar geothermal gradients, but that the basins differ in average geothermal gradients. This relationship is probably controlled by deep basement structural trends. No evidence of residual heat of emplacement was found associated with any of the selected domes.

  16. Kevin Harding | Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointed toCAMD TargetsKevin Harding Kevin

  17. Radar investigation of the Hockley salt dome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hluchanek, James Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Geophysics RADAR INVESTIGATION OF THE HOCKLEY SALT DOME A Thesis by UAMES ANDREW HLUCHANEK A'pproved as to style and content by: (Head of Departme t ? Member) May 1. 973 ABSTRACT Radar investigation of the Hockley Salt Dome. . (Nay, 1973) James... Andrew Hluchanek, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Robert R. Unterberger Radar probing through salt was accomplished at 17 radar stations established in the United Salt Company mine at Hockley, Texas. The top of the salt dom is mapped...

  18. Facebook i18n Workshop Kevin Scannell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannell, Kevin Patrick

    Facebook i18n Workshop Kevin Scannell Saint Louis University 21 May 2013 #12;Trendsetting l10n of these are among the most widely localized Google search: 152 locales, 143 languages Facebook: 105 locales, 94 languages Firefox: 94 locales, 87 languages Microsoft: 106 (LIPs) #12;Facebook l10n Crowdsourced

  19. Translating Facebook into Endangered Languages Kevin Scannell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannell, Kevin Patrick

    Translating Facebook into Endangered Languages Kevin Scannell Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA [kscanne@gmail.com] Abstract: Facebook is an incredibly popular social networking site to Facebook as a way for small and scattered speaker populations to connect with each other online

  20. Power Management in Wireless Networks Kevin Klues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    Power Management in Wireless Networks Kevin Klues Abstract This paper presents a survey on the various power saving techniques used in wireless networking today. The work presented covers topics at each layer of a wireless networking protocol stack. The types of wireless networks considered include

  1. March 2014 KEVIN LANG Professor, Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    March 2014 KEVIN LANG Professor, Economics Department of Economics Boston University 270 Bay State, Economics, 1978-1982. M.Sc. Universite de Montreal, Economics, 1976-1978 B.A. University of Oxford (St. Catherine's College), Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE), (1973-1976; M.A. awarded 1980) ACADEMIC

  2. Borehole locations on seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simcox, A.C.; Wampler, S.L.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is designed as an inventory of all wells known to have been drilled within a five-mile radius of each of seven salt domes within the Interior Salt Basin in east Texas, northern Louisiana and Mississippi. There are 72 boreholes that entered salt above an elevation of -3000 feet mean sea level. For these, details of location, drilling dates, depth of casing and cement, elevation of top of caprock and salt, etc., are given on tables in the appendix. Of the seven domes, Oakwood has the largest number of boreholes, thirty-eight (including two sidetracked wells) that enter the salt stock above -3000 feet mean sea level; another dome in northeast Texas, Keechi, has eight; in northern Louisiana, Rayburn's has four and Vacherie has five; in southern Mississippi, Cypress Creek has seven, Lampton has one, and Richton has nine. In addition, all wells known outside the supra-domal area, but within a five-mile radius of the center of the 7 domes are separately catalogued.

  3. andrzej muszynski kevin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    document classification, and language modeling. In doing Smith, Noah 494 Kevin Shelley NPM Program Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Program Mike Ballweg UWEX Sheboygan Co....

  4. Sweave: First Steps Toward Reproducible Kevin R. Coombes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John D.

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology #12;Introduction to Microarrays 2 Alternate Forms of the Same Problem 1 2006 Kevin R. Coombes Bioinformatics and Computational Biology #12;Introduction to Microarrays 3--on the same data--six months later. ©Copyright 2006 Kevin R. Coombes Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

  5. A Software Engineering Approach to Constraint Programming Systems Ka Boon Kevin Ng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henz, Martin

    Application Technologies Honeywell Automation and Control Solutions kevin.ng@honeywell.com Chiu Wo Choi Dept

  6. Identifying suitable "piercement" salt domes for nuclear waste storage sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehle, R.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piercement salt domes of the northern interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico are being considered as permanent storage sites for both nuclear and chemically toxic wastes. The suitable domes are stable and inactive, having reached their final evolutionary configuration at least 30 million years ago. They are buried to depths far below the level to which erosion will penetrate during the prescribed storage period and are not subject to possible future reactivation. The salt cores of these domes are themselves impermeable, permitting neither the entry nor exit of ground water or other unwanted materials. In part, a stable dome may be recognized by its present geometric configuration, but conclusive proof depends on establishing its evolutionary state. The evolutionary state of a dome is obtained by reconstructing the growth history of the dome as revealed by the configuration of sedimentary strata in a large area (commonly 3,000 square miles or more) surrounding the dome. A high quality, multifold CDP reflection seismic profile across a candidate dome will provide much of the necessary information when integrated with available subsurface control. Additional seismic profiles may be required to confirm an apparent configuration of the surrounding strata and an interpreted evolutionary history. High frequency seismic data collected in the near vicinity of a dome are also needed as a supplement to the CDP data to permit accurate depiction of the configuration of shallow strata. Such data must be tied to shallow drill hole control to confirm the geologic age at which dome growth ceased. If it is determined that a dome reached a terminal configuration many millions of years ago, such a dome is incapable of reactivation and thus constitutes a stable storage site for nuclear wastes.

  7. A mechanical model of early salt dome growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Frank Albert

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    salt and the upper layer representing the overlying sediment, is used to study the mechanics of growth in the early stages of salt dome formation. Three cases of this model, each representing a particular rate of removal of the surface topography..., are examined to determine which case best fits observations of salt domes in East Texas, Northwest Germany, and the North Sea. These observations include the spacing and growth rate of the dome and the amount of deformation of the sediments above the dome...

  8. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, USA, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  9. Salt dome gas storage solves curtailment threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 1981, Valero Transmission Co. (San Antonio, TX) opened two salt-dome storage caverns with a combined capacity of 5 billion CF (1.5 billion of cushion gas, 3.5 of working gas). The facility's maximum deliverability is 400 million CF/day for 9 days; when two more caverns are finished in late 1982, the $55 million complex will be able to sustain that level for 18 days, making Valero less dependent on linepacking and spot sales to avoid curtailing deliveries to its customers.

  10. Kevin Harms | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointed toCAMD TargetsKevin Harding

  11. UPWELLING IN THE COSTA RICA DOME BY KLAUS WYRTKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This current, the Costa Rica Coastal Current, and parts of the North Equatorial Current form a cyclonic circu'the horizontal circula~ion. The upwelling in the dome is caused by the cyclonic flow around the dome. When survey a deep-reaching" eddy transporting lOX 1018 cm.a/sec. "appeared to be separated and to drift north

  12. 'ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON Abstract.We clarify the relationship between higher 'etale wild kernels * *of a number- cyclotomic tower of the field. We also determine the relationship betwee* *n the 'etale wild kernel

  13. Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology and...

  14. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  15. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  16. A mechanical model of early salt dome growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Frank Albert

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) December 1988 A Mechanical Analysis of Early Salt Dome Growth. (December 1988) Frank Albert Irwin, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Raymond C. Fletcher A two-layer superposition model, the lower layer representing... of the sediments results in growth rates much higher than those observed. Analysis of the case with a diffusivity of 104m2/Ka agrees with all observa- tions. A range of diffusivities which will produce a realistic salt dome model is then determined. The lower...

  17. Facebook in all six Celtic Languages Kevin Scannell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannell, Kevin Patrick

    Facebook in all six Celtic Languages (mar dhea) Kevin Scannell Saint Louis University May 31, 2012 #12;Social media and endangered languages Social media: Facebook, Twitter, blogs, podcasts (audio Appealing to kids, the most important demographic! #12;Facebook for language revitalization I spent

  18. FIA-12-0001- In the Matter of Kevin Leary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OHA issued a decision denying a FOIA appeal filed by Kevin Leary of a final determination issued by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RO). Mr. Leary requested copies of e-mails, the associated metadata, and instant messages for Margot Voogd, Larry Romine and Bryan Foley, from August 1, 2005, through January 31, 2009. RO informed Mr. Leary that no documents existed.

  19. FIA-12-0001- In the Matter of Kevin Leary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OHA issued a decision denying a FOIA appeal filed by Kevin Leary of a final determination issued by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RO). Mr. Leary requested copies of e-mails, the associated metadata, and instant messages for Margot Voogd, Larry Romine and Bryan Foley, from August 1, 2005, through January 31, 2009.

  20. Leadership in self-managing virtual teams Kevin Crowston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    1 Leadership in self-managing virtual teams Kevin Crowston Syracuse University, School acknowledge the contri- butions of Hala Annabi, Chengetai Masango and James Howison. #12;Leadership in self-managing virtual teams Leadership in self-managing virtual teams Abstract In this paper, we present a theory

  1. Deterministic Microfluidic Ratchet Kevin Loutherback,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deterministic Microfluidic Ratchet Kevin Loutherback,1,2 Jason Puchalla,3 Robert H. Austin,1 ratchet where the trajectory of particles in a certain size range is not reversible when the sign through the array. The ratchet irreversibly moves particles of a certain size range in a direction

  2. ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #19; ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON Abstract. We clarify the relationship between higher #19;etale wild kernels of a number #12;eld at the prime 2 and the Galois between the #19;etale wild kernel and the group of in#12;nitely divisible elements of H 2 (F; Z 2 (j + 1

  3. ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ´ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON Abstract. We clarify the relationship between higher ´etale wild kernels of a number field at the prime 2 and the Galois between the ´etale wild kernel and the group of infinitely divisible elements of H2 (F, Z2(j + 1)){2}. 1

  4. A Simplified Model Of QuickCheck Automata Kevin Falzon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    A Simplified Model Of QuickCheck Automata Kevin Falzon University of Malta kfal0002@um.edu.mt Gordon J. Pace University of Malta gordon.pace@um.edu.mt ABSTRACT Placing guarantees on a program in this publication is partially funded by the Strategic Educational Pathways Scholarship (Malta). The scholarship

  5. WA_96_004_GE_CORPORATE_RESEARCH_and_DEVELOPMENT_Waiver_of_Dome...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RATERESEARCHandDEVELOPMENTWaiverofDome.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993012GENERALELECTRICCOMPANY--CORPORATERESEARCHAND.pdf WA1994013GENERALELECTRICCOMPANY...

  6. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  7. Site testing for submillimetre astronomy at Dome C, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremblin, P; Schneider, N; Durand, G Al; Ashley, M C B; Lawrence, J S; Luong-Van, D M; Storey, J W V; Durand, G An; Reinert, Y; Veyssiere, C; Walter, C; Ade, P; Calisse, P G; Challita, Z; Fossat, E; Sabbatini, L; Pellegrini, A; Ricaud, P; Urban, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years a major effort has been put into the exploration of potential sites for the deployment of submillimetre astronomical facilities. Amongst the most important sites are Dome C and Dome A on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Chajnantor area in Chile. In this context, we report on measurements of the sky opacity at 200 um over a period of three years at the French-Italian station, Concordia, at Dome C, Antarctica. We also present some solutions to the challenges of operating in the harsh polar environ- ment. Dome C offers exceptional conditions in terms of absolute atmospheric transmission and stability for submillimetre astron- omy. Over the austral winter the PWV exhibits long periods during which it is stable and at a very low level (0.1 to 0.3 mm). Higher values (0.2 to 0.8 mm) of PWV are observed during the short summer period. Based on observations over three years, a transmission of around 50% at 350 um is achieved for 75% of the time. The 200-um window opens with a typical transmission...

  8. NNSA Announces Kevin W. Smith as Los Alamos Site Office Manager...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Kevin W. Smith as Los Alamos Site Office Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  9. Eliciting and Combining Influence Diagrams: Tying Many Bowties Krol Kevin Mathias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekhtyar, Alexander

    Eliciting and Combining Influence Diagrams: Tying Many Bowties Together Krol Kevin Mathias developed a distinctive elicitation procedure and influence diagram format, which we refer to as a "bowtie

  10. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  11. Glacier geophysical studies at Taylor Dome: Your three

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, D.L.; Waddington, E.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Taylor Dome is the site of an ongoing ice core/paleoclimate project. The main activities of the 1992-1993 season included surveys by ground-based optical methods, surveys using satellite receivers, radio-echo sounding of bedrock topography, and depositional environment characterization. Monitoring continued of accumulation rate and three cores were sampled to detect the depths of atmospheric nuclear test fallout products. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

  13. Methyl chloride variability in the Taylor Dome ice core during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhulst, Kristal R; Aydin, Murat; Saltzman, Eric S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Taylor Dome ice core during the Holocene Kristal R.2005GB002680. Lee-Taylor, J. , and K. R. Redeker (2005),

  14. Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

  15. Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Grant

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Norphlet Formation (Bearden and Mink, 1989). Comprehensive high-quality multifold seismic reflection data have not previously been available for detailed seismic stratigraphic analysis in the Destin Dome region. Establishment of a seismic stratigraphic... DD-2 Destin Dome Exxon 162 17 938 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-3 Destin Dome Sun Oil 166 17 608 P, V, G, S, SP, D DD-4 Destin Dome Gulf 360 20 988 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-5 Destin Dome Chevron 422 22 222 V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-6 Destin Dome Sohio...

  16. Kevin Redding | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointed toCAMD TargetsKevinAna Moore Anne

  17. Kevin Shaw | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015JustKateKent Hibben AboutTutorialKevin

  18. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Price

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two classes of natural solid media (glacial ice and salt domes) are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy >1e18 eV. Though insensitive to 1e11 to 1e16 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because, due to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced very far apart. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size 0.2 cm at -51 degrees C, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 km and 25 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, respectively, and the absorption length is calculated to be 9 km at frequencies above 100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 km and 1.4 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 30,000 km and 3300 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor.

  19. Carbon dioxide source development, northeast Jackson Dome, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studlick, J.R.J.; Shew, R.D.; Basye, G.L.; Ray, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot conducted at Little Creek field Mississippi, in the 1970s indicated that the injection of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) could lead to the successful recovery of additional oil reserves even after waterflood operations. It was realized early that a large volume of CO/sub 2/ would be required for enhanced oil recovery operations Little Creek and other prospective fields. Shell's search for CO/sub 2/ in the area began in the early 1970s. Exploratory drilling for hydrocarbons as early as 1950 had indicated high concentrations of CO/sub 2/ present in central Mississippi. These occur in salt-generated structures north and east of the intrusive Jackson igneous dome; the area is therefore termed the N.E. Jackson Dome Source Area. CO/sub 2/ generation is believed to have occurred by the thermal metamorphism associated with the intrusion of Jurassic-age carbonates. The CO/sub 2/ migrated updip and is concentrated in the Buckner, Smackover, and Norphlet Formations at depths of 14,000 to 17,000 ft. The objectives are sandstones and dolomites that are interpreted as dune and sabkha deposits. Reservoir quality is variable (abundant illite locally in the Norphlet and highly compacted sandstones in the Buckner) but generally good. Rates of 20 MMCFGD have been tested from these wells. Many salt-related structures have been defined in the source area by seismic data. Leasing began in 1973 and drilling in 1977. Eight structures have been tested, with all but one encountering commercial CO/sub 2/ accumulations. Shell has drilled 15 wells (13 successful, 1 junked and abandoned, and 1 dry hole) on 640- and 1280-ac spacing. Gas compositions vary: Smackover CO/sub 2/ is sour and will require treatment, whereas the Buckner and Norphlet sands contain sweet and semisweet CO/sub 2/, respectively. Industry reserves in N.E. Jackson Dome exceed 6 tcf of gas.

  20. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  1. Cold domes over the warm pool: a study of the properties of cold domes produced by mesoscale convective systems during TOGA COARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caesar, Kathy-Ann Lois

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are known to cool the subcloud layer by the introduction of penetrative downdrafts to the surface, resulting in the formation of cold domes (also known as cold pools). Five MCSs sampled during the Tropical Ocean...

  2. Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical,CNRS - Université d'Orleans, 45067 Orleans 2, France Abstract In SE China, a Mesozoic granitic dome coeval and granitic gneisses, and the E­W-trending Late-Paleozoic­Mesozoic Pingxiang and Anfu basins are located along

  3. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  4. Restoration of cross sections above intrusive salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, R.C.; Groshong, R.H. Jr. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of bed-length restoration to the sequence above a vertical intrusion of salt was tested on an experimental model that included deposition of units during uplift. Restoration of the model resulted in an apparently unbalanced cross section due to excess bed length in the pre-growth interval. The excess bed length was due to significant internal strain. For a correct restoration, it is thus important to distinguish between the growth and pre-growth sequences. The thinning index, which quantifies the thinning onto the uplift, aids in making this distinction. A thinning index vs. depth curve has a sharp inflection at the top of the pre-growth sequence. The pre-growth sequence is restored by area balancing. The growth sequence deforms mainly by formation of a crestal graben, with little other strain. Sequential restoration of growth intervals shows the growth history of the dome. When applied to the Pool Creek salt dome from the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the methods developed for the model served to separate the pre-growth from the growth sequence and to indicate a growth history of vertical intrusion changing through time to vertical intrusion plus regional extension.

  5. Petroleum storage potential of the Chacahoula salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magorian, T.R. (Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (USA)); Neal, J.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chacahoula salt dome, eight miles southwest of Thibodaux, LA, could be solution mined to create caverns for storing as much as 500 million barrels (MMB) of crude oil, should the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) require additional storage volume. The salt mass geometry is confirmed by more than 50 oil wells, and also from previous exploratory drilling for sulphur. Top of salt occurs at {minus}1100 ft, and some 1300 acres exist within the {minus}2000 ft salt contour. Frasch mining of 1.35 million long tons of sulphur caused the surface to subside about one foot on the northeastern part of the dome. Creep-induced subsidence averaging {approximately}2.7 ft over 30 yrs is estimated for a 200 MMB cavern array, which would require perimeter diking to control localized perennial flooding. Earthquakes approaching intensity MM 6 have occurred nearby and are expected to recur on the order of {approximately}100 yrs but would not affect cavern stability. Additional study of brine disposal methods and hurricane surge probabilities are needed to establish design parameters and cost estimates for storage. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

  7. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  8. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  9. Kevin Wood Landscape: a study in Texas Hill Country landscape design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secker, William Walker

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kevin Wood Landscape resides in Austin, Texas as the premier residential landscape design firm. The firm, although small in stature, tackles a variety of projects throughout Austin and the immediate Hill Country. Close inspection within...

  10. Total Synthesis of (+)-Amphidinolide K David R. Williams* and Kevin G. Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David R.

    Total Synthesis of (+)-Amphidinolide K David R. Williams* and Kevin G. Meyer Department) For recent studies directed toward the amphidinolides, see: Williams, D. R.; Meyer, K. G. Org. Lett. 1999, 1

  11. THE HOUGH TRANSFORM'S IMPLICIT BAYESIAN FOUNDATION Neil Toronto, Bryan S. Morse, Dan Ventura, Kevin Seppi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    THE HOUGH TRANSFORM'S IMPLICIT BAYESIAN FOUNDATION Neil Toronto, Bryan S. Morse, Dan Ventura, Kevin methods into the Hough transform have email: ntoronto@cs.byu.edu, morse@cs.byu.edu, ventura

  12. 2013 China Latin America Economic Bulletin Rebecca Ray and Kevin P. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    2013 China ­ Latin America Economic Bulletin Rebecca Ray and Kevin P. Gallagher The China-Latin America Economic Bulletin is an annual note that summarizes and synthesizes trends in the burgeoning China-Latin America economic

  13. A review of "Rebranding Rule: The Restoration and Revolution Monarchy, 1660-1714" by Kevin Sharpe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Catherine

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    241 seventeenth-century news Kevin Sharpe. Rebranding Rule: The Restoration and Revolution Monarchy, 1660-1714. London and New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013. xxii + 849 pp. Review by catherine patterson, university of houston. This hefty... volume is the final work in Kevin Sharpe’s three-part study of the images of monarchy in early modern England. Sadly, Sharpe succumbed to cancer before its completion. His colleague Mark Knights brought the manuscript to publication, and scholars...

  14. Variable structure control of a flexible manipulator / by Kevin Barry Shelburne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelburne, Kevin Barry

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR A Thesis by KEVIN BARRY SHELBURNE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 19gg Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering VARIABLE STRIrCTURE CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR A Thesis by KEVIN BARRY SHELBURNE Approved as to style snd content by: Louis Ev~er (Chairman of Committee) Carl Gerhold (Member) Amitabh...

  15. Ice Dome Construction for Large Scale Habitats on Atmosphereless Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Stefan Harsan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest difficulties that space exploration faces is the lack of technology necessary to establish large volumes of habitable spaces on site. Both transporting the pre-built enclosures or transporting the equipment necessary for building them on site from conventional materials face the same enormous problem: the need to transport huge quantities of material into space, which is technically close to impossible. The current paper, explores the possibility and one approach of building these large spaces from an alternative material, water ice, a material that is a prerequisite for any settlement. The feasibility of dome shaped, pressurized, water ice buildings is analyzed from a structural integrity point of view and the possibility of building them with a technique using water sublimation and deposition onto a thin plastic film, a process which requires extremely little construction equipment with respect to the resulting habitable space.

  16. Kevin E. Trenberth John Fasullo Lesley Smith Trends and variability in column-integrated atmospheric water vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    Kevin E. Trenberth Ã? John Fasullo Ã? Lesley Smith Trends and variability in column. E. Trenberth (&) Ã? J. Fasullo Ã? L. Smith National C

  17. Gravity and seismic reflection studies over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordero Ardila, Vladimir Francisco

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and not com- pletely understood f orm. The study of salt domes is important because: (1) more than four-fift'ns or all oil and gas accumulations in fields in the Gulf Coast province have been geologically affected by the growth of the salt domes (Halbouty... to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map of the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, (2) a seismic reflection study in order to obtain a seismic section of the area of investigation, and (3) an analysis and interpretation of these studies to obtain a reasonable model...

  18. Structural constraints on the exhumation of the Tso Morari Dome, NW Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Ryan J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tso Morari culmination in the Ladakh region of northwest India is a large (>3,000 km²) structural dome cored by coesite-bearing rocks of Indian continental crustal affinity. As one of only two localities in the Himalaya ...

  19. EIS-0010: Strategic Petroleum Reserves, Sulphur Mines Salt Dome, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves prepared this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of the proposed storage of 24 million barrels of crude oil at the Sulphur Mines salt dome located in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, including construction and operation impacts.

  20. Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottlieb, Erik S

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entering Georges Bas- in, the slope water mixes with the endemic, less-dense bottom water (Hopkins and Gar- field, 1979). The newly formed bottom water accumulates in Georges Basin, resulting in an upward doming of the interface (found between 50 and 200...VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  1. An investigation of the subsurface Bouguer anomaly in the vicinity of shallow salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, William Charles

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'itted to the anomaly data in vertical profiles. Analysis of the anomalous vertical gravity gradients indicates that such gradients are too minute for purposes of salt dome exploration. However, calculations of the Bouguer anomaly reveal data which would be easily... detected in the field and amenable to geological interpretation. The empirical curves are fourd to be useful in estimating the Bouguer anomaly for salt domes not explicitly represented by the models. ACKNONLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his...

  2. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  3. Percutaneous Ethanol Injection via an Artificially Induced Right Hydrothorax for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Hepatic Dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kume, Akimichi, E-mail: kumea@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nimura, Yuji; Kamiya, Junichi; Nagino, Masato; Kito, Yasushi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550, Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery (Japan)

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the efficacy of sonographically (US) guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) via an artificially induced right hydrothorax (transthoracic PEI) to treat US-invisible hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the hepatic dome. Five cirrhotic patients with US-invisible HCC in the hepatic dome, who were poor surgical candidates, underwent transthoracic PEI. An artificial right hydrothorax was created by instilling 500 ml saline, and absolute ethanol was injected transhydrothoracically into the hepatic dome lesion under local anesthesia. The success and complications were assessed radiologically. The patients were followed up serologically and radiologically for 12-44 (mean 28.4) months. Twenty-five hydrothoraces were induced. All hydrothoraces enabled US visualization of the entire hepatic dome. Eight of the nine small lesions were treated successfully by the treatment. Two of the three local recurrences were eradicated by repeat transthoracic PEI. One large lesion was treated by a combination of transthoracic and regular PEI. The only complication was one clinically insignificant pneumothorax. Induction of a right hydrothorax is feasible and safe. The hydrothorax enables US visualization of the entire hepatic dome and permits US-guided PEI for HCC in the hepatic dome that otherwise would not be possible.

  4. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  5. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  6. A Review of "Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660" by Kevin Sharpe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atlantic studies. Kevin Sharpe. Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010. xvii + 665 pp. $55.00. Review by tillman w. nechtman, skidmore college. Kevin Sharpe?s Image Wars: Promoting Kings...

  7. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  8. Flattening Scientific CCD Imaging Data with a Dome Flat Field System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Marshall; D. L. DePoy

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the flattening of scientific CCD imaging data using a dome flat field system. The system uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate a carefully constructed dome flat field screen. LEDs have several advantages over more traditional illumination sources: they are available in a wide range of output wavelengths, are inexpensive, have a very long source lifetime, and are straightforward to control digitally. The circular dome screen is made of a material with Lambertian scattering properties that efficiently reflects light of a wide range of wavelengths and incident angles. We compare flat fields obtained using this new system with two types of traditionally-constructed flat fields: twilight sky flats and nighttime sky flats. Using photometric standard stars as illumination sources, we test the quality of each flat field by applying it to a set of standard star observations. We find that the dome flat field system produces flat fields that are superior to twilight or nighttime sky flats, particularly for photometric calibration. We note that a ratio of the twilight sky flat to the nighttime sky flat is flat to within the expected uncertainty; but since both of these flat fields are inferior to the dome flat, this common test is not an appropriate metric for testing a flat field. Rather, the only feasible and correct method for determining the appropriateness of a flat field is to use standard stars to measure the reproducibility of known magnitudes across the detector.

  9. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  10. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  11. Energy Efficient Process Heating: Insulation and Thermal Mass Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    1 Energy Efficient Process Heating: Insulation and Thermal Mass Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock/or evaporation. A practical way of reducing heat loss is by insulating or covering the surfaces. This paper presents methods to quantify heat loss and energy savings from insulating hot surfaces and open tanks

  12. Fractal templates in the escape dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms Kevin A. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steck, Daniel A.

    Fractal templates in the escape dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms Kevin A. Mitchell School nonlinear dynamics, we predict that fractal behavior can be seen in experimental escape data. These data can. This fractal pattern is particularly well resolved below the Bose-Einstein transition temperature--a direct

  13. How to Manage the Chinese Coal Value Chain by Kevin Jianjun Tu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the China Huaneng Group Clean Energy Technology Research Institute, Wang Jinnan at the Chinese AcademyI How to Manage the Chinese Coal Value Chain by Kevin Jianjun Tu Carnegie Endowment enormously from speakers and participants at two US-China Coal Value Chain Exchanges, especially Ni Weido, Li

  14. Energy budgets of Atlantic hurricanes and changes from 1970 Kevin E. Trenberth and John Fasullo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    . NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index [Levinson and Waple, 2004] approx- imates the collectiveEnergy budgets of Atlantic hurricanes and changes from 1970 Kevin E. Trenberth and John Fasullo of the current observational record of tropical cyclones and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Atlantic

  15. A Review of "Marriage, Performance, and Politics at the Jacobean Court" by Kevin Curran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for women?s sacrifice. Kevin Curran. Marriage, Performance, and Politics at the Jacobean Court. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009. ix + 187 pp. $99.95. Review by m. l. stapleton, indiana university-purdue university, fort wayne. This study analyzes the six...

  16. Evaluating Trace Cache Energy Efficiency MICHELE CO, DEE A. B. WEIKLE, and KEVIN SKADRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    Evaluating Trace Cache Energy Efficiency MICHELE CO, DEE A. B. WEIKLE, and KEVIN SKADRON University of Virginia Future fetch engines need to be energy efficient. Much research has focused on improving fetch of basic blocks translates to significant energy-efficiency gains. We compare proces- sor performance

  17. Time Series Methods for ForecastingElectricityMarket Pricing Zoran Obradovic Kevin Tomsovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    tested by attempting to capture relationships between present and past share prices using simpleTime Series Methods for ForecastingElectricityMarket Pricing Zoran Obradovic Kevin Tomsovic PO Box the predictability of electricity price under new market regulations and the engineering aspects of large scale

  18. Geospatial Mapping and Navigation of the Web Kevin S. McCurley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    Geospatial Mapping and Navigation of the Web Kevin S. McCurley IBM Almaden Research Center 650 proximity. Keywords:. Geospatial information retrieval, geographic in- formation systems, browsers by geospatial criteria. Information re- trieval based on geographic criteria is a fairly common task. Examples

  19. Honeybees consider flower danger in their waggle dance Kevin R. Abbott*, Reuven Dukas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukas, Reuven

    Honeybees consider flower danger in their waggle dance Kevin R. Abbott*, Reuven Dukas Department foraging on dangerous flowers are less likely to perform the waggle dance and engage in fewer waggle runs foragers effectively steer nai¨ve recruits away from dangerous flowers and raise interesting questions

  20. Kevin Yager on the Nanoscience of Studying Scattered X-Rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yager; Kevin

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Kevin Yager, a scientist at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses his research on materials spanning just billionths of a meter. Yager specializes in making new materials through meticulously guided self-assembly and probing nanoscale structures with a technique called x-ray scattering.

  1. GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu Advisors: Yu-Dong Yao, the once only theoretical concept of Software-Defined Radio is now a practical reality. Using an open source software-defined radio package called GNU Radio and a basic radio hardware component called

  2. Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation Kevin E. Trenberth1 and John T. Fasullo1 from an energy budget standpoint comes from increases in absorbed solar radiation that stem directly. T. Fasullo (2009), Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation, Geophys. Res. Lett

  3. Surveying the Citizen Science Landscape by Andrea Wiggins & Kevin Crowston1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    1 Surveying the Citizen Science Landscape by Andrea Wiggins & Kevin Crowston1 Abstract Citizen of the diversity of the field as a whole. In this work, we present the results of a survey of citizen science between citizen science projects and to other online communities. Contents Introduction Rubric & Cases

  4. Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tamás Bánsági, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

  5. Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b , Kelly A. Burke b: Cell culture Shape memory Thermally responsive material Surface topography a b s t r a c t Cell culture-responsive cell culture system that uses shape memory polymer (SMP) substrates that are programmed to change

  6. CSC418 Tutorial 6 OpenGL Lighting and Shading Prepared by Kevin Forbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC418 Tutorial 6 ­ OpenGL Lighting and Shading Prepared by Kevin Forbes Types of lighting and viewing angle; used as a `fudge' to approximate 2nd order and higher reflections Diffuse: Light scattered not actually give off light Implementation Specifics · Two kinds of parameters, lighting and material

  7. Ccile Hannay, Julio Bacmeister, Rich Neale, John Truesdale, Kevin Reed, and Andrew Gettelman.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannay, Cécile

    Cécile Hannay, Julio Bacmeister, Rich Neale, John Truesdale, Kevin Reed, and Andrew Gettelman has some skills to simulate tropical cyclones #12;Storm Count: Tropical Storm, Hurricane, Major Hurricane. Observations: IBTrACS CAM5: 0.25 degree Global - Obs - CAM5 West Pacific - Obs - CAM5 North

  8. Ccile Hannay, Julio Bacmeister, Rich Neale, John Truesdale, Kevin Reed, and Andrew Gettelman.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannay, Cécile

    Cécile Hannay, Julio Bacmeister, Rich Neale, John Truesdale, Kevin Reed, and Andrew Gettelman.25 degree has some skills to simulate tropical cyclones #12;Storm Count: Tropical Storm, Hurricane, Major Hurricane. Observations: IBTrACS CAM5: 0.25 degree Global - Obs - CAM5 West Pacific - Obs - CAM5 North

  9. Mapping Medline Papers, Genes, and Proteins Related to Melanoma Research Kevin W. Boyack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börner, Katy

    Mapping Medline Papers, Genes, and Proteins Related to Melanoma Research Kevin W. Boyack , Ketan@indiana.edu} Abstract What is the structure of the research reported on melanoma? How has it evolved over the last 40 of the melanoma research field. 1. Introduction Given the explosive growth of biomedical databases, a large

  10. Minority-Carrier Thermoelectric Devices Kevin P. Pipe and Rajeev J. Ram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minority-Carrier Thermoelectric Devices Kevin P. Pipe and Rajeev J. Ram Research Laboratory the thermoelectric performance of the electronic devices themselves. Recognizing that minority carriers play for thermoelectric effects in a p-n diode (a prototypical electronic and optoelectronic component) where diffusion

  11. A new synthesis of symmetric boraindacene (BODIPY) dyesw Liangxing Wu and Kevin Burgess*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Kevin

    A new synthesis of symmetric boraindacene (BODIPY) dyesw Liangxing Wu and Kevin Burgess* Received on the web 19th September 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b810503k BODIPY dyes were synthesized from pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde an 8-substituent are obtained via condensation of a pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde with a pyrrole,3

  12. Landscape Ecology: Past, Present and Future Samuel A. Cushman, Jeffery Evans, and Kevin McGarigal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    Chapter 4 Landscape Ecology: Past, Present and Future Samuel A. Cushman, Jeffery Evans, and Kevin McGarigal 4.1 Historical Origins of Landscape Ecology In the preceding chapters we discussed the central role that spatial and temporal variability play in ecological systems, the importance

  13. Conjugated Polymer Photovoltaic Cells Kevin M. Coakley and Michael D. McGehee*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Conjugated Polymer Photovoltaic Cells Kevin M. Coakley and Michael D. McGehee* Department semiconductors for photovoltaic cells because they are strong absorbers and can be deposited on flexible to create, transport, and store electricity. For photovoltaic (PV) cells to gain widespread ac- ceptance

  14. The Limits of ESS Methodology Simon M. Huttegger Kevin J. S. Zollman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Kevin

    The Limits of ESS Methodology Simon M. Huttegger Kevin J. S. Zollman December 31, 2010 Abstract of evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) can tell us about evolutionary processes. We shall argue that ESS is very on refinements of Nash equilibrium. In the first place, ESS can also be viewed as a Nash equilibrium refinement

  15. Adaptive Jitter Control for UPnP M-Search Kevin Mills and Christopher Dabrowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaptive Jitter Control for UPnP M-Search Kevin Mills and Christopher Dabrowski Information service-discovery system, UPnP, permits clients to include a jitter bound in multicast (M-Search) queries. Qualifying devices use the jitter bound to randomize timing of their responses. Initially, clients lack

  16. Foraging theory for autonomous vehicle speed choice Theodore P. Pavlic , Kevin M. Passino 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foraging theory for autonomous vehicle speed choice Theodore P. Pavlic Ã, Kevin M. Passino 1 consider the optimal control design of an abstract autonomous vehicle (AAV). The AAV searches an area cost of depleted vehicle fuel), and search costs depend on search speed. However, the designer rewards

  17. An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T. FASULLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T, in final form 25 September 2007) ABSTRACT Monthly net surface energy fluxes (FS) over the oceans ocean energy content" are compared with the directly observed ocean energy content (OE) and tendency

  18. Submillimetre/TeraHertz Astronomy at Dome C with CEA filled bolometer array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Minier; Gilles Durand; Pierre-Olivier Lagage; Michel Talvard; Tony Travouillon; Maurizio Busso; Gino Tosti

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Submillimetre/TeraHertz (e.g. 200, 350, 450 microns) astronomy is the prime technique to unveil the birth and early evolution of a broad range of astrophysical objects. A major obstacle to carry out submm observations from ground is the atmosphere. Preliminary site testing and atmospheric transmission models tend to demonstrate that Dome C could offer the best conditions on Earth for submm/THz astronomy. The CAMISTIC project aims to install a filled bolometer-array camera with 16x16 pixels on IRAIT at Dome C and explore the 200-$\\mu$m windows for potential ground-based observations.

  19. A review of "Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England." by Kevin Sharpe and S. N. Zwicker eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey Johnson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to undo Satanic rhetoric. Kevin Sharpe and Steven N. Zwicker, eds. Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. ix + 363 pp. $70.00. Review by JEFFREY JOHNSON, NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY.... This collection of essays takes as its subject the history of reading, and the purpose of the volume, as Kevin Sharpe and Steven N. Zwicker clarify in their Introduction is ?to bring into central focus the critical and historical hermeneutics of early modern...

  20. Moraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    GEOLOGIC Inc., PO Box 52, 12021 Middle Bay Drive, Kodiak, AK 99615, USA d Department of Geology and SchoolMoraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a, , J.P. Briner b , G. Carver, Jerusalem 91904, Israel b Department of Geology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA c CARVER

  1. UPb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and Ttd history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    U­Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and T­t­d history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet M.C. Quigley a al., 2004; Aoya et al., 2005, 2006; Quigley et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2006). Several workers have

  2. Ar thermochronology of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet: Implications for tectonic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    of the North Himalayan gneiss domes Mark Quigley a,, Yu Liangjun b , Liu Xiaohan b , Christopher J.L. Wilson: +61 3 8344 7761. E-mail address: m.quigley2@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au (M. Quigley). 0040-1951/$ - see front

  3. Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

  4. Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon This publication accompanies the traveling exhibition Pulse Dome Project: Art &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    a form of sustainable architecture that was in harmony with natural processes--a structure he calledpulse dome #12;Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon #12;This publication accompanies the traveling architecture, wombs, and such natural forms as caves, tunnels, and volcanoes to learn what had been done

  5. Carboniferous tectonic history of the eastern flank of the Ozark dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed geologic mapping in southwestern Illinois and southeastern Missouri indicates that the eastern flank of the Ozark dome was a low positive area throughout Carboniferous (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) time. Rock units of this age consistently thin onto the flank of the dome, and are punctuated by numerous disconformities. Effects of shoaling are prominent in Chesterian strata, which change from dominantly subtidal in the proto-Illinois basin to shallow subtidal, intertidal and supratidal on the flank of the dome. Although the dome probably was exposed subaerially for much of Carboniferous time, it contributed little sediment eastward. The exposed rocks were largely carbonates, which weathered by solution. Several long-lived basement structures on the east flank of the Ozarks were active during the Carboniferous. Chief among them were the Lincoln and Waterloo-Dupo anticlines, the Du Quoin monocline, and the Ste. Genevieve fault zone. All are high-angle reverse faults that strike north to northwest, and are overlain by sharp folds in sedimentary cover. Major displacements took place in late Valmeyeran to Atokan time, and addition deformation occurred in Desmoinesian through post-Pennsylvanian time. The compressional deformation probably is a product of the Ouachita orogeny.

  6. Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower T the boundary layer: mounting a telescope on a tower that physically puts it above the turbulent layer such a goal, two solutions can be proposed. The most intuitive one is to place a telescope on a tower

  7. Supplemental DOME Documentation for Researchers with Bricks Version 1.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , the script /diesel/init.pl is executed. This is DOME's bootstrap script; it configures the brick, starts address so that it can be inherited by a VM. o Start a process to manage the 3G modem (/diesel/bustracker3gx.py). #12;2 o Start the gpsd daemon. o Start a process to install any updates (/diesel

  8. Beryllium-10 in the Taylor Dome ice core: Applications to Antarctic glaciology and paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steig, E.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ice core was drilled at Taylor dome, East Antarctica, reaching to bedrock at 554 meters. Oxygen-isotope measurements reveal climatic fluctuations through the last interglacial period. To facilitate comparison of the Taylor Dome paleoclimate record with geologic data and results from other deep ice cores, several glaciological issues need to be addressed. In particular, accumulation data are necessary as input for numerical ice-flow-models, for determining the flux of chemical constituents from measured concentrations, and for calculation of the offset in age between ice and trapped air in the core. The analysis of cosmogenic beryllium-10 provides a geochemical method for constraining the accumulation-rate history at Taylor Dome. High-resolution measurements were made in shallow firn cores and snow pits to determine the relationship among beryllium-10 concentrations, wet and dry deposition mechanisms, and snow-accumulation rates. Comparison between theoretical and measured variations in deposition over the last 75 years constrains the relationship between beryllium-10 deposition and global average production rates. The results indicate that variations in geomagnetically-modulated production-rate do not strongly influence beryllium-10 deposition at Taylor Dome. Although solar modulation of production rate is important for time scales of years to centuries, snow-accumulation rate is the dominant control on ice-core beryllium-10 concentrations for longer periods. Results show that the Taylor Dome core can be used to provide new constraints on regional climate over the last 130,000 years, complementing the terrestrial and marine geological record from the Dry Valley, Transantarctic Mountains and western Ross Sea.

  9. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  10. Imaging dipping sediments at a salt dome flank -VSP seismic interferometry and reverse-time Rongrong Lu*, Mark Willis, Xander Campman, Jonathan Ajo-Franklin, M. Nafi Toksz, ERL, MIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Imaging dipping sediments at a salt dome flank - VSP seismic interferometry and reverse We present results of applying seismic interferometry to image dipping sediments abutting a salt dome overhanging salt dome. The sediment reflectors in the model dip up towards the salt dome flank. To process

  11. The following are typical equations and conversions for calculating flux densities of sensible, latent and carbon dioxide from eddy covariances presented by Kevin Tu, St. Louis (10/97). The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Kevin

    , latent and carbon dioxide from eddy covariances presented by Kevin Tu, St. Louis (10/97). The properties

  12. The origin of the structural depression above Gulf coast salt domes with particular reference to Clay Creek dome, Washington County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Alfred Norman

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek, indioatos that the ~ ouroe layer is at least 17, 000 feet below the surfaoe and is older than F. E. Heath, J. A. Waters, and W. B. Ferguson, op. oit. c p, A3. 8, C. W. Saith, "Gulf Coast Oil Fields", The World Oil, Vol. 130, Eo, 7 {June, 1950... information on salt dome geology published sinoe 1936. However, muoh of the pertinent literature since that date consists of field development data with little to no discussion of struotural prooesses ~ An impsrtant exoeption to this apparently diminished...

  13. EIS-0029: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Texoma Group Salt Domes, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana and Jefferson County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which could occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of four proposed candidate sites in the Texoma Group of salt domes.

  14. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade C. Adams

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.

  15. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  16. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  17. The Thermal Environment of the Fiber Glass Dome for the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Verdoni; C. Denker; J. R. Varsik; S. Shumko; J. Nenow; R. Coulter

    2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Solar Telescope (NST) is a 1.6-meter off-axis Gregory-type telescope with an equatorial mount and an open optical support structure. To mitigate the temperature fluctuations along the exposed optical path, the effects of local/dome-related seeing have to be minimized. To accomplish this, NST will be housed in a 5/8-sphere fiberglass dome that is outfitted with 14 active vents evenly spaced around its perimeter. The 14 vents house louvers that open and close independently of one another to regulate and direct the passage of air through the dome. In January 2006, 16 thermal probes were installed throughout the dome and the temperature distribution was measured. The measurements confirmed the existence of a strong thermal gradient on the order of 5 degree Celsius inside the dome. In December 2006, a second set of temperature measurements were made using different louver configurations. In this study, we present the results of these measurements along with their integration into the thermal control system (ThCS) and the overall telescope control system (TCS).

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  19. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)] [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration at the Panorama Formation, North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Walter, Malcolm R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne hyperspectral remote sensing dataset was obtained of the North Pole Dome region of the Pilbara Craton in October 2002. It has been analyzed for indications of hydrothermal minerals. Here we report on the identification and mapping of hydrothermal minerals in the 3.459 Ga Panorama Formation and surrounding strata. The spatial distribution of a pattern of subvertical pyrophyllite rich veins connected to a pyrophyllite rich palaeohorizontal layer is interpreted to represent the base of an acid-sulfate epithermal system that is unconformably overlain by the stromatolitic 3.42 Ga Strelley Pool Chert.

  1. Private Memoirs of a Smart Meter Andres Molina-Markham, Prashant Shenoy, Kevin Fu, Emmanuel Cecchet, and David Irwin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Prashant

    Private Memoirs of a Smart Meter Andr´es Molina-Markham, Prashant Shenoy, Kevin Fu, Emmanuel,shenoy,kevinfu,cecchet,irwin}@cs.umass.edu Abstract Household smart meters that measure power consumption in real-time at fine granularities are the foundation of a future smart electricity grid. However, the widespread deployment of smart meters has serious

  2. Structural Health Monitoring Using FFT Kevin Loewkea, David Meyerb, Anthony Starra and Sia Nemat-Nasser*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Structural Health Monitoring Using FFT Kevin Loewkea, David Meyerb, Anthony Starra and Sia Nemat of microprocessors. Keywords: Fast Fourier Transform, FFT, Structural Health Monitoring 1. INTRODUCTION Composite composite materials that monitor their own health using em- bedded micro-sensors and local network

  3. Query Routing: Finding Ways in the Maze of the Deep Web Govind Kabra Chengkai Li Kevin Chen-Chuan Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chengkai

    Query Routing: Finding Ways in the Maze of the Deep Web Govind Kabra Chengkai Li Kevin Chen-occurrence framework for ranking and select- ing Deep Web sources that provide information relevant to users requirement. Given the huge number of heterogeneous Deep Web data sources, the end users may not know

  4. Initial Performance Evaluation of the Cray SeaStar Interconnect Ron Brightwell Kevin Pedretti Keith D. Underwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightwell, Ron

    Initial Performance Evaluation of the Cray SeaStar Interconnect Ron Brightwell Kevin Pedretti Keith supercomputer. The SeaStar was designed specifically to meet the performance and reliability needs of a large-scale, distributed-memory scientific computing platform. In this paper, we present an initial performance evaluation

  5. Socially intelligent computing to support citizen science Kevin Crowston, PI Syracuse University School of Information Studies Grant 0968470

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Socially intelligent computing to support citizen science Kevin Crowston, PI Syracuse University and enhance citizen science projects; ·Generate new models of SoCS that support large-scale public. Project plan Year 1: Survey and case studies of citizen science websites (completed) Year 2: Develop

  6. RECENT TRENDS IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND ASSEL1, KEVIN CRONK2 and DAVID NORTON1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commonwealth Blvd, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105-2945, U.S.A. 2The University of Michigan, Cooperative InstituteRECENT TRENDS IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND ASSEL1, KEVIN CRONK2 and DAVID NORTON1 1 for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099, U.S.A. Abstract

  7. An analysis of research procedures used during the restoration of the dome of the Texas State Capitol, Austin, 1989 to 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hocker, Emma Elizabeth

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the exterior of the building. One of the least accessible areas proved to be the dome. This thesis examines the archival and physical research procedures undertaken to determine the condition of the dome, how this information was used, and what discrepancies...

  8. Dome takes a 20% interest in the Arctic pilot project to move LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, B.; Bell, J.

    1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to B. Richards of Dome Petroleum Ltd., Dome's interest will be shared with its partially owned subsidiary, Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Ltd. According to J. Bell of Petro-Canada, the operator for the Arctic project, negotiations are under way with Tenneco Inc. for gas sales of up to 225 million cu ft/day to begin in 1985-86. At first, two tankers would ship LNG to a delivery terminal at an as yet unselected site on Canada's east coast, but by 1992, nine ships capable of delivering 1.23 billion cu ft/day of LNG, could be in service. The U.S. and European potential LNG markets amounts to 3-4 trillion cu ft/yr and 3.5-4 trillion cu ft/yr, respectively. Petro-Canada also supports the Polar Gas Ltd. project to lay a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands and Mackenzie Delta to the south; the projects are not considered to be in competition.

  9. Potential radiological exposure rates resulting from hypothetical dome failure at Tank W-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main plant area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains 12 buried Gunite tanks that were used for the storage and transfer of liquid radioactive waste. Although the tanks are no longer in use, they are known to contain some residual contaminated sludges and liquids. In the event of an accidental tank dome failure, however unlikely, the liquids, sludges, and radioactive contaminants within the tank walls themselves could create radiation fields and result in above-background exposures to workers nearby. This Technical Memorandum documents a series of calculations to estimate potential radiological exposure rates and total exposures to workers in the event of a hypothetical collapse of a Gunite tank dome. Calculations were performed specifically for tank W-10 because it contains the largest radioactivity inventory (approximately half of the total activity) of all the Gunite tanks. These calculations focus only on external, direct gamma exposures for prescribed, hypothetical exposure scenarios and do not address other possible tank failure modes or routes of exposure. The calculations were performed with established, point-kernel gamma ray modeling codes.

  10. Development and Calibration of New 3-D Vector VSP Imaging Technology: Vinton Salt Dome, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt J. Marfurt; Hua-Wei Zhou; E. Charlotte Sullivan

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vinton salt dome is located in Southwestern Louisiana, in Calcasieu Parish. Tectonically, the piercement dome is within the salt dome minibasin province. The field has been in production since 1901, with most of the production coming from Miocene and Oligocene sands. The goal of our project was to develop and calibrate new processing and interpretation technology to fully exploit the information available from a simultaneous 3-D surface seismic survey and 3-C, 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) survey over the dome. More specifically the goal was to better image salt dome flanks and small, reservoir-compartmentalizing faults. This new technology has application to mature salt-related fields across the Gulf Coast. The primary focus of our effort was to develop, apply, and assess the limitations of new 3-C, 3-D wavefield separation and imaging technology that could be used to image aliased, limited-aperture, vector VSP data. Through 2-D and 3-D full elastic modeling, we verified that salt flank reflections exist in the horizontally-traveling portion of the wavefield rather than up- and down-going portions of the wavefield, thereby explaining why many commercial VSP processing flow failed. Since the P-wave reflections from the salt flank are measured primarily on the horizontal components while P-wave reflections from deeper sedimentary horizons are measured primarily on the vertical component, a true vector VSP analysis was needed. We developed an antialiased discrete Radon transform filter to accurately model P- and S-wave data components measured by the vector VSP. On-the-fly polarization filtering embedded in our Kirchhoff imaging algorithm was effective in separating PP from PS wave images. By the novel application of semblance-weighted filters, we were able to suppress many of the migration artifacts associated with low fold, sparse VSP acquisition geometries. To provide a better velocity/depth model, we applied 3-D prestack depth migration to the surface data. The reflector dip calculated from these images were used to further constrain the depth images from the less well sampled VSP data. In spite of the above technical success, we were less than pleased with our final VSP images. Since no extra sources are used, simultaneous recording of the surface and VSP data were believed to provide a cost-effective means to acquire 3-D VSP data. However, the subsurface sampling associated with the VSP is quite different from that associated with the surface seismic data. After our analysis, we find that considerable shot infill would result in a better, unaliased subsurface image. We were able to ascertain that the subsurface illuminated by the VSP was extremely small, with the PS image being even smaller than the PP image. One-way wave equation extrapolators do not work well for the VSP geometry, where we wish to extrapolate energy sideways (from the VSP well towards and away from the salt dome) as well as vertically (away from the shots on the earth surface). Merging separately-generated images proved to be both cumbersome and error-prone. Alternative, advanced multiarrival traveltime calculations that we obtained from research colleagues at other institutions could not be easily modified to image rays that had an upgoing component. In the end, we used a simpler first-arrival Eikonal-based traveltime algorithm with its well-known limitations. While the surface acquisition using radial receiver lines and concentric shot lines provided good illumination of the salt dome, this unconventional geometry proved to be particularly difficult to process using commercial software, where the lack of ''shot lines'' and ''receiver lines'' necessary for dip filtering, residual statics, and residual velocity analysis proved to be nearly intractable. We also learned that while commercial software available at UH works well for a bootstrapped velocity model computed from the seismic data alone, it was severely limited in its ability to include the dense well control available at Vinton Dome. To more accurately estimate velocities, we develope

  11. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  12. Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite-greenstone terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite August 2003; accepted 24 October 2003; published 27 January 2004. [1] The Archean East Pilbara Granite duration, following the burial of radiogenic granitic crust beneath the accumulated greenstone pile

  13. EIS-0021: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Seaway Group Salt Domes, Brazoria County, Texas (also see EIS-0075-S and EIS-0029)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office developed this statement to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Seaway Group of salt domes.

  14. Triaxial creep measurements on rock salt from the Jennings dome, Louisiana, borehole LA-1, core {number_sign}8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.; Zimmerer, D.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tejas Power Company requested that facilities in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories be used to assess the time-dependent properties of rock salt from the Jennings dome in Acadia Parish, Louisiana. Nominally 2.5-inch diameter slat core from borehole LA-1, core 8 (depth 3924.8 to 3837.8 ft; 1196.8--1197.1 m) was provided to accomplish two tasks: (1) Using the smallest possible number of experiments, evaluate the tendency of Jennings salt to undergo time-dependent deformation (creep) under constant applied stresses, and compare the creep of Jennings salt with creep data for rock salt from other locations. (2) Assess the applicability of published laboratory-derived creep properties for rock salt from several bedded and domal sites in finite element analyses concerning the design of new gas storage caverns in the Jennings dome. The characterization of Jennings salt followed the same strategy that was applied in earlier laboratory experiments on core from the Moss Bluff dome near Houston, Texas. This report summarizes the relevant details of five creep experiments on a sample from depth 3927.5 ft, the results obtained, and how these results compared with laboratory creep measurements gathered on rock salt from other locations including the West Hackberry, Bryan Mound and Moss Bluff domes. The report also considers the estimates of specific creep parameters commonly used in numerical engineering design analyses.

  15. Geologic technical assessment of the Richton salt dome, Mississippi, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical assessment and remodeling of existing data indicates that the Richton salt dome, located in southeastern Mississippi, appears to be a suitable site for expansion of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The maximum area of salt is approximately 7 square miles, at a subsurface elevation of about -2000 ft, near the top of the salt stock. Approximately 5.8 square miles of this appears suitable for cavern development, because of restrictions imposed by modeled shallow salt overhang along several sides of the dome. The detailed geometry of the overhang currently is only poorly understood. However, the large areal extent of the Richton salt mass suggests that significant design flexibility exists for a 160-million-barrel storage facility consisting of 16 ten-million-barrel caverns. The dome itself is prominently elongated from northwest to southeast. The salt stock appears to consist of two major spine features, separated by a likely boundary shear zone trending from southwest to northeast. The dome decreases in areal extent with depth, because of salt flanks that appear to dip inward at 70-80 degrees. Caprock is present at depths as shallow as 274 ft, and the shallowest salt is documented at -425 ft. A large number of existing two-dimensional seismic profiles have been acquired crossing, and in the vicinity of, the Richton salt dome. At least selected seismic profiles should be acquired, examined, potentially reprocessed, and interpreted in an effort to understand the limitations imposed by the apparent salt overhang, should the Richton site be selected for actual expansion of the Reserve.

  16. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Thoms, R.L. [AGM, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P. [Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  17. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan; Cho, Kyuil; Kim, Hyong June; Tanatar, Makariy

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more »This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  18. C-105 heel pit removed and C-105 dome cut paves way for new retrieval technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, Thomas C.; Sutey, Michael J.

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For just the second time, crews have cut a hole in the top of an active radioactive waste storage tank at Hanford. Workers began cutting a 55-inch hole in the top of Tank C-105 last Tuesday night on graveyard shift, completing the cut early Wednesday. The hole will allow for installation of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) Vacuum into the tank. The cut was made through 17 inches of concrete and rebar using the newly developed rotary-core cutting system, which uses a laser-guided steel canister with teeth on the bottom to drill a round hole into the tank dome. The project was completed safely and successfully in a high-rad area without contamination or significant dose to workers.

  19. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Cho, Kyuil [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Kim, Hyong June [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Tanatar, Makariy [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''. This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.

  20. ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Priest, E. R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Galsgaard, K., E-mail: dpontin@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection.

  1. Characterizing the Weeks Island Salt Dome drilling of and seismic measurements from boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.; Harding, R.S.; Jacobson, R.D.; Finger, J.T.; Keefe, R.; Neal, J.T.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sinkhole 36 ft across, 30 ft deep was first observed in the alluvium over the Weeks Island Salt Dome (salt mine converted for oil storage by US Strategic Petroleum Reserve) May 1992. Four vertical, two slanted boreholes were drilled for diagnostics. Crosswell seismic data were generated; the velocity images suggest that the sinkhole collapse is complicated, not a simple vertical structure. The coring operation was moderately difficult; limited core was obtained through the alluvium, and the quality of the salt core from the first two vertical wells was poor. Core quality improved with better bit selection, mud, and drilling method. The drilling fluid program provided fairly stable holes allowing open hole logs to be run. All holes were cemented successfully (although it took 3 attempts in one case).

  2. EIS-0024: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Capline Group Salt Domes, Iberia, Napoleonville, Weeks Island Expansion, Bayou Choctaw Expansion, Chacahoula- Iberia, Iberville, and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Capline Group of salt domes.

  3. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  4. Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

  5. Key word:Daylight Factor Window Wall Ratio Pendentive dome Lighting design Tropical region Architecture and Interior design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Mazloomi

    Abstract: Daylighting design plays important role in architecture of religious buildings such as churches and mosques where pendentive dome construction is frequently used. In daylighting design, many designers face difficulty in estimating the interior share of light which is usually expressed by daylight factor due to complexity of interior form. This study aims to provide designers with a rather high precision rule of thumb for average daylight factor in pendentive dome building. Thus, it investigates the Daylight Factor [DF] distribution of such buildings with reference to the tropics. It takes the Window Wall Ratio [WWR] into account and seeks its influence on daylight factor. By a 12 X 12 points grid, it examines five different ratios including 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 on DF of the floor beneath the dome. The results endorse the direct relation of WWR and DF. The least WWR equal to 0.1 yields an average DF of 0.55 % while the greatest WWR of 0.5 yields in average DF of 2.56%. The intermediate WWR in steps of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 correspond to 1.04, 1.56 and 2.07 percent respectively. As a relatively precise rule of thumb, any increment in consequent steps of WWR with 0.1 intervals results in 0.5 % increase in DF. This can be employed by architects and interior designers for lighting design of pendentive dome buildings in tropical region.

  6. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Besson; J. Jenkins; S. Matsuno; J. Nam; M. Smith; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; P. W. Gorham; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previous measurements, but somewhat lower than others.

  7. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, D; Matsuno, S; Nam, J; Smith, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previ...

  8. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  9. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  10. Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

  11. Parts Feeding on a Conveyor with a One Joint Robot Srinivas Akella Wesley H. Huang Kevin M. Lynch Matthew T. Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    a simple and flexible method for feeding parts in industrial automation applications. In this paper we" that is suited to the parts feeding application. Our robot cannot impart arbitrary motions to a partParts Feeding on a Conveyor with a One Joint Robot Srinivas Akella Wesley H. Huang Kevin M. Lynch

  12. A Gas-Actuated Anthropomorphic Transhumeral Prosthesis Kevin B. Fite, Member, IEEE, Thomas J. Withrow, Keith W. Wait, and Michael Goldfarb, Member,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Gas-Actuated Anthropomorphic Transhumeral Prosthesis Kevin B. Fite, Member, IEEE, Thomas J of an anthropomorphic 21 degree-of-freedom, 9 degree-of-actuation arm prosthesis for use by transhumeral amputees to obtain a self-powered dexterous prosthesis in which all of the requisite power, actuation, and sensing

  13. Lithium Doping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Battery and Semiconductor Applications Kevin Donaher, Columbia University, Georgia Institute of Technology SURF 2010 Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Lithium Doping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Battery and Semiconductor Applications Kevin Jang, Mentor: Wonsang Koh Abstract The properties of lithium doped (5,5) metallic and (8 lithium binds to carbon nanotubes and how this affects the band structure of the semiconducting carbon

  14. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  15. Soluble and insoluble lithium dust in the EPICA DomeC ice core--Implications for changes of the East Antarctic dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    Soluble and insoluble lithium dust in the EPICA DomeC ice core--Implications for changes Editor: G.D. Price Available online 16 March 2007 Abstract Continental dust impurities in Antarctic ice with special emphasis on the lithium (Li) content of dust. We obtained two complementary Li-records using a new

  16. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment We consider coupled subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment ­ B ­ We consider coupled subsurface flow). (1) How is the conductive temperature distribution affected by the thermal conductivity of the salt in the simulation? In particular, compare the flow direction along the salt flanks. #12;Model domain No vertical

  17. Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is difficult to come by, widely accepted industry rumors are that numerous existing caverns have experienced major operational problems, including salt falls, sheared casings, and unintended releases of stored product(s). Many of these difficulties may be related to on-going differential movement of individual salt spines or to lateral movement at the caprock-salt interface. The history of operational problems, only some of which appear to be a matter of public record, combined with the potential for encountering escaped product from other operations, renders the Stratton Ridge salt dome a less-than-desirable site for SPR purposes.

  18. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  19. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  20. Tripodal aminophenolate ligand complexes of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravan, P.; Orvig, C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article focuses on the development of radiopharmaceuticals using new chelators of gallium and indium. The radionuclide kinetics and demetalation kinetics are of great consideration. This work explored the effects of ligand backbone variations on the selectivity of multidentate aminophenolate ligands among the trivalent metal ions Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) in water. 54 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Redes III Tema 0 1 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    instalación y mantenimiento. #12;Redes III Tema 0 13 Calidad de una red ­ Transparencia semántica: La calidad transparencia en el tiempo. #12;Redes III Tema 0 14 Diseño de la red · Debe satisfacer la calidad de servicio

  2. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  3. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  4. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  5. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

  6. III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2014 ... 7801, Springer, 2013, pp. 62–. 73, ISBN 978-3-642-36693-2. The authors gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Science ...

  7. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2, Issue,

  8. Cloning and trapping of magnetostatic spin-wave pulses by parametric pumping Kevin R. Smith,1 Vitaliy I. Vasyuchka,1,2 Mingzhong Wu,1 Gennadiy A. Melkov,2 and Carl E. Patton1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, Carl

    Cloning and trapping of magnetostatic spin-wave pulses by parametric pumping Kevin R. Smith,1 media,3 phase noise re- duction in crystal oscillators,4 theoretical production of neutrino in nonlinear media. The specific work was done for 5 GHz magnetostatic spin-wave pulses in a single

  9. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIII

  10. PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART III -

  11. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolkerEvents)WCI-III Recap

  12. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII Jump

  13. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:II Wind FarmIII

  14. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  15. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: III-nitride materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-nitride materials SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award On September 9, 2013, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Events, News, News & Events,...

  17. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  18. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  19. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  20. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  1. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  2. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lechel, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  3. SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L. Erickson1, Carlos F. M. Coimbra2 and Alberto E. Cerpa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L data for ground solar irradiance (direct normal and global irradiance) is a major obstacle for the de- velopment of adequate policies to promote and take advan- tage of existing solar technologies. Although

  4. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper soil pressure on the tank walls. Seismic time histories (in the horizontal and vertical directions) are applied to the seismic model. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has code requirements for nuclear safety-related concrete structures (ACI-349-06) that are used to evaluate the structural integrity of the SSTs. ACI-349-06 recommends evaluating factored load combinations against reduced tank section capacities to account for both loading and material uncertainties. From both the TOLA and seismic models the structural demands (forces and moments) are extracted from sections throughout the tank under the appropriate load combinations. These demands are compared against the ACI-349-06 capacities at each of the sections. This ratio of demand to capacity is reported as a measure of structural integrity. The Type II and Type III appurtenances configurations are found to increase the demand to capacity ratios in local regions near the appurtenances. Away from the appurtenances the influence on structural integrity is minor. A comparison of the Type II and III results show that even though the Type II offset pits weight less, they have a larger impact on the structural integrity of the tanks due to their locations. Finally, lessons learned from the Type II and Type III appurtenance analysis, and their application to the more complex Type IV structural integrity analysis, will be discussed.

  5. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  6. anticarcinogenesis mechanisms iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Engineering Websites Summary: Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order...

  7. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Heigold, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  8. Kevin R Minard | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1989 Physics Alumni Award, SUNYGeneseo, 1987 Research Interests: Dr. Minard's dissertation focussed on the development of actively shielded gradient coils and their use in...

  9. Kevin Fox | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implementing the file access infrastructure to enhance security and performing software updates.As part of the DARPA HPC challenge benchmark to develop new performance metrics...

  10. Kevin M. Rosso | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Rosso Instruments STMAFM (PicoSPM) EMSL's Molecular Imaging, Inc. PicoSPM(tm) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)atomic force microscopy (AFM) supports a wide range of...

  11. KEVIN AVRUCH Curriculum Vitae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Humanities and Social Sciences (GMU); Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies (University of Malta TEACHING EXPERIENCE: 2011, 2012 Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies (University of Malta) 2009 Joan University #12;2 (Dept. Sociology & Anthropology and ICAR) 1994 (summer) University of Malta, Msida, Malta

  12. Kevin L Kenney*

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production...

  13. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  14. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  15. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  16. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  17. Chapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and purged with dry nitrogen gas. The flask is charged with 1.6 mL (2.8 g, 15 mmol) of titanium tetrachlorideChapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE* 50. AN ACTIVE FORM OF TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE Me3SiSiMe3 + 2Ti. ANDERSEN The reduction of TiCl4 with hexamethyldisilane does not afford titanium(II) chloride as reported

  18. On the structure of blue phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; D. Marenduzzo

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilised over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities}. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  19. CX-012441: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project - Surface Monitoring Studies CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 41878 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012444: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geomechanical Monitoring for CO2 Hub Storage: Production and Injection at Kevin Dome CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 41878 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-012438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geomechanical Monitoring for CO2 Hub Storage: Production and Injection at Kevin Dome CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41878 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  3. III-V Nanowire Growth Mechanism: V/III Ratio and Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ,17,18 The growth experiments reported in this paper were performed in a horizontal OMVPE growth tube using to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature to favor vapor-solid (VS) surface growth over VLS NW growth. By tuning both the group III flow rate

  4. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  5. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  7. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  8. Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization(6), 066012 (June 2011) Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3593003] Keywords: europium; silica; luminescent; nanoshells; endocytosis. Paper

  9. Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report Rosemary Lapka, Neesha Modi, Lauren Start and David Weinglass Report No. CSS11-07 April 19, 2011 #12;Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III Keoleian, Professor #12;Document Description AURORA ORGANIC DAIRY PHASE III: CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  10. III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE HYGIENE DES MAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE PREVENTION HYGIENE DES MAINS HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE HYGIENE - IRD - MNHN - Cemagref 24/88 III.1. HYGIENE DES MAINS Elle est fondamentale et à renouveler plusieurs, on peut utiliser un gel ou une solution hydro alcoolique. III.2. HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE Un certain nombre de

  11. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  12. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  13. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  14. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  15. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  16. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  17. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  18. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

  19. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  20. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII

  1. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:

  2. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:

  3. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII(b)

  4. Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen(Redirected(NorthernIII

  5. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562 RevisionI: Energy GoalsIII:

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  7. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  8. Remotely releasable template and dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.G. Jr.

    1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a remotely releasable template assembly for precision placement of a template of the type having at least one sleeve member for placing about a well casing stub extending from the sea floor, comprising: mating means mounted with the template for demountably coupling the template to a complementary end of a drill string extending from a support structure located above the well casing stub. The mating means is positioned near the template assembly center of balance when the template assembly is demountably coupled to the drill string; the vertical axis of the drill string being essentially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the sleeve member when the drill string is demountably couple to the template assembly; the end of the drill string includes a gyroscopic orientation means for detecting the deviation of the template from a desired bearing; and the mating means maintains the template semi-ridgidly coupled to the drill string until the template is controllably released from the drill string; whereby the rotation of the drill string about the vertical axis of the drill string rotates the template assembly into the desired orientation.

  9. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca....

  10. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  11. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  12. AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison...

  13. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  14. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  15. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  16. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  17. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  18. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two independent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys flown by Airmag Surveys, Inc. and interpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc were merged, processed and reinterpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc for this study. Derived products included depth filtered and reduced to pole maps of total magnetic intensity, vertical and horizontal gradients, interpreted STARMAG structure, lineament analysis and an overall interpretation. The total magnetic intensity patterns of the combined survey conformed reasonably well to those of coarser grid, non-proprietary regional aeromagnetic surveys reviewed. The merged study also helped illustrate regional basement patterns adjacent to and including the northwest edge of the Rome trough. The tectonic grain interpreted is dominantly southwest-northeast with a secondary northwest-southeast component that is consistent with this portion of the Appalachian basin. Magnetic susceptibility appears to be more important locally than basement structure in contributing to the magnetic intensity recorded, based on seismic to aeromagnetic data comparisons made to date. However, significant basement structures cannot be ruled out for this area, and in fact are strongly suspected to be present. The coincidence of the Henderson Dome with a total magnetic intensity low is an intriguing observation that suggests the possibility that structure in the overlying Lower Paleozoic section may be detached from the basement. Rose diagrams of lineament orientations for 2.5 minute unit areas are more practical to use than the full-quadrangle summaries because they focus on smaller areas and involve less averaging. Many of these illustrate a northeast bias. Where orientations abruptly become scattered, there is an indication of intersecting fractures and possible exploration interest. However, the surface lineament study results are less applicable in a practical sense relative to the seismic, subsurface or aeromagnetic control used. Subjectivity in interpretation and uncertainty regarding the upward propagation of deeper faulting through multiple unconformities, salt-bearing zones and possible detachments are problematic. On the other hand, modern day basement-involved earthquakes like the nearby 1998 Pymatuning event have been noted which influenced near-surface, water-bearing fractures. This suggests there is merit in recognizing surface features as possible indicators of deeper fault systems in the area. Suggested future research includes confirmation of the natural mode-conversion of P-waves to down going S-waves at the level of the Onondaga Limestone, acquisition of 3-C, 2-D seismic as an alternative to more expensive 3-D seismic, and drilling one or two test wells in which to collect a variety of reservoir information. Formation Imaging Logs, a Vertical Seismic Profile and sidewall cores would be run or collected in each well, providing direct evidence of the presence of fractures and the calibration of fractured rocks to the seismic response. If the study of these data had indicated the presence of fractures in the well(s), and efforts to calibrate from well bores to VSPs had been successful, then a new seismic survey would have been designed over each well. This would result in a practical application of the naturally mode-converted, multi-component seismic method over a well bore in which microfractures and production-scale fractures had been demonstrated to exist, and where the well-bore stratigraphy had been correlated from well logs to the seismic response.

  19. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  20. FINAL SCHEDULE FOR KEVIN KOLEVAR

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1:00 PM ENERGY VAMPIRES 1:30 PM BlakeFaulknerKolevarRandall B. Moorhead and Brian Smith of Phillips Electronics 1 2:00 PM DP'S ISOTOPE PRODUCTION FACILITY BRIEFING 3:00 PM...

  1. Kevin Banks | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    friction and wear on machines using engine oils. "What I liked most about my internship experience was really, everything," said Banks. "It gave me a very diverse and...

  2. Agricultural NPS Measures Kevin Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality mandate through joint administration (with TCEQ) of the Texas Nonpoint Source Management Program · Water Quality ­ Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) Program ­ TMDL Program ­ Watershed Protection Plan to a customer's specific needs - Resource Management Systems (RMS) · NRCS provides financial assistance for many

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Kevin Stokes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Electric field NOx gases Cosmic ray intensity Efficiency of thin film and flat panel solar cells UV and certify space-flight hardware Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) , Ramaty High Energy Solar design, scheduling, project management, electronics, programming, sensors, atmospheric science, heat

  4. Agricultural NPS Measures Kevin Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    state agency for the regulation of pesticide use and application · Texas AgriLife Research ­ Research Storage Reservoir436 10Microirrigation (all needed components)441 20Irrigation Water Conveyance, Pipeline

  5. Segmenting nanopore traces Kevin Karplus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    Spectrum Noise is "white"--equal power at all frequencies, total power proportional to bandwidth. Moving of DNA. #12;Noise Simplest model of nanopore is as a 10G variable resistor. Thermal noise: ithermal = 4kBTIf V Shot noise: ishot = 2qIf Amplifier noise is also thermal noise and shot noise, but based

  6. Kevin Lynn | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999 InspectionVolunteersKaren PattersonAir-conditioning

  7. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  8. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  9. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  10. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  11. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Christopher Dean, Mr. Steven Shapiro, and Mr. Matthew Gilstrap. United States Fuel Resiliency: Volume III - Regional Vulnerability and Resilience iii Table of Contents I....

  12. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  13. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  14. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  15. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  16. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergyonWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III

  17. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  18. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  19. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  20. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

  1. Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

  2. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  4. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  5. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

  6. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  7. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early restoration project types Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement). Criteria

  8. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INICISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dey'ee of MASTER OF ARTS... December 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INCISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Approved as to style and content by: George F, Bass (Chair of Committee) c~) Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr...

  9. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  10. A Study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Iodide and Organic Amine Hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackstock, Joseph Beauford

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isopropylammoniumnonaiododianti- montate(III) Tris-4 -picoliniumnonaiododiantimonate(III) Tris-$-picoliniumnonaiOdodiantimonate(III) Di-isobutylamine-antimony( III) iodide reaction product Triethanolam&ne-antimony(III) iodide reaction product Flelting Point, 'C Decomposed 193... to the starch end point . Antimony was determined on eacn compound in dupli- cate. The results of these analyses are tabulated in Table II. II. Determination of' Iodine in the Reaction Products: Iodine was determined potentiometrically using a silver...

  11. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  12. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline · Background on issue · Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  13. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  14. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  15. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  16. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  17. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galán, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  18. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

  19. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  20. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Ð Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  1. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exerc´icio na constru¸c~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  2. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  3. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido de cabe¸ca, com

  4. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  5. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  6. TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

  7. MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

  8. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A. [Physics and Astronomy Dept. University of Bologna, Italy viale C Berti Pichat 6/II, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  9. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  10. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    amorphous materials, such as ferrihydrite, to well-crystallized minerals such as goethite and hematite (5 assemblages. Experimental Section Oxide Synthesis and Characterization.A variety of synthetic Fe(III) oxides included a series of goethites with differing crystallinity and surface area, synthesized from Fe(NO3

  11. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  12. Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradecak, Silvija

    III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

  13. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  14. Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective Strategy to Improve the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of surface titanium and oxygen atoms present. PageRIVERSIDE Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an EffectiveDISSERTATION Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective

  15. Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and passivation of a compound semiconductor surface duringIn 2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, in press with2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, ECS Transaction (

  16. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

  17. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystem Size Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystems >10 kW Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics

  18. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  19. Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

  20. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  1. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granja, Gustavo

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio teste 7 Mostre que existe uma vizinhan resolvido para u e v como fun¸c~oes de x e y. Calcule a derivada u x (1, 1). Solu¸c~ao: Consideremos a fun teorema da fun¸c~ao impl´icita, em alguma vizinhan¸ca de (1, 1, 1, 1), o sistema pode ser resolvido em

  2. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  3. Early cavity growth during forward burn. [Hoe Creek III problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, M.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.

    1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    During the early portion of the forward burn phase of the Hoe Creek III field experiment, the cavity progagated rapidly down the deviated borehole and to the top of the coal seam. As a first step to understanding this phenomena we have conducted small scale coal block experiments. Drying as well as combustion tests were performed. This paper describes the test hardware and the experimental results.

  4. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriana Dinescu; Aurora E. Clark

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H2O)x(H2O)y3+ (x = 8, 9; y = 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  5. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinescu, Adriana; Clark, Aurora E.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H?O)x(H?O)y 3+ (x =8, 9; y= 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  6. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -iso-propylammonium- sp I. tetraiodobismuthate(III) 62. 00 62. 19 + 0. 10 10. tris-di-iso-propylammonium- hexaiodob is muthate ( III) 59. 63 60. 80 0. 19 1 1. tr i= n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobismuthate(III) 58. 97 58. 87 + 0. 02 12. tris... 6. 8 tris - di-iso-pr opylammouium- hexa iodobi s mutba(III) 10 8 6 4 7. 74 7. 72 7. 85 7. 83 7. 8 tr i - n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobis muthate(111) 10 8 6 4 7. 80 7. 78 7. 95 7. 88 7. 8 TABLE III (Contd) Compound...

  7. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  8. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  9. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  10. Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,III

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  12. Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EM AcronymsIQATRUPACT---III Q uick F acts

  13. Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind Farm

  14. Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind

  15. Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublic ArtTexasUnst,Pyron (Roscoe III)

  16. Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48HPublicforManagementUnconventionalTitle ITitle III

  17. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:Wind Farm Jump to:I JumpIII

  18. Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCN Technology Jump2011) |Panasonic HomePantexIII Wind

  19. Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio: EnergyRidgeIII Jump

  20. McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation, search NameIII

  1. Olkaria III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice ofInformation Olkaria I -II GeothermalIII

  2. Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwater 4a Jump to: navigation,III Wind

  3. Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEIBixby, Oklahoma: EnergyBlackHawkBlackIII

  4. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevadaRadioactiveRadiometricsRaftIII

  5. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  6. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, Rene; Kiehn, Ruediger; Mueller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  7. Quantum Refrigerator and the III-law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amikam Levy; Robert Alicki; Ronnie Kosloff

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of temperature decrease of a cooled quantum bath is studied as its temperature is reduced to the absolute zero. The III-law of thermodynamics is then quantified dynamically by evaluating the characteristic exponent {\\zeta} of the cooling process dT(t)/dt \\sim -T^{\\zeta} when approaching the absolute zero, T \\rightarrow 0. A continuous model of a quantum refrigerator is employed consisting of a working medium composed either by two coupled harmonic oscillators or two coupled 2-level systems. The refrigerator is a nonlinear device merging three currents from three heat baths: a cold bath to be cooled, a hot bath as an entropy sink, and a driving bath which is the source of cooling power. A heat driven refrigerator (absorption refrigerator) is compared to a power driven refrigerator. When optimized both cases lead to the same exponent {\\zeta}, showing a lack of dependence on the form of the working medium and the characteristics of the drivers. The characteristic exponent is therefore determined by the properties of the cold reservoir and its interaction with the system. Two generic heat baths models are considered, a bath composed of harmonic oscillators and a bath composed from ideal Bose/Fermi gas. The restrictions on the interaction Hamiltonian imposed by the III-law are discussed. In the appendix the theory of periodicaly driven open systems and its implication to thermodynamics is outlined.

  8. Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

  9. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  10. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  11. Superplasticity dome forming of machined sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkus, Nihat; Usugi, Toshihiro; Kawahara, Masanori; Manabe, Kenichi; Nishimura, Hisashi

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental work on the superplastic bulge forming of machined sheets is presented in this study. Unlike the previously employed incremental-iterative method, a reverse deformation model was used to estimate the initial thickness distribution of the machined sheets from which a constant final thickness can be obtained when the shape of the bulged sheet is hemisphere. The reverse deformation model was obtained by modifying previously-known models, which were based on the axisymmetric membrane and the incremental strain theory. Bulge forming experiments were conducted on machined sheets of Al alloy, A5083, at about 530 C under constant pressure control mode. The result of this simulation to estimate the final constant thickness distribution agreed well with the experiment, and confirmed that the reverse deformation model can be successfully applied in optimizing the thickness distribution of the starting sheets in order to obtain the desired final thickness distribution of the free bulged hemispherical product.

  12. Resurgent Dome Complex | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze - Making the PathInformationRSG)Hawaii

  13. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  14. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNTIQUE DES MOLCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES AROMATIQUES COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    15. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNÉTIQUE DES MOLÉCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES orbitales moléculaires est étendue au cas des hydrocarbures conjugués contenant au moins quatre noyaux

  15. PopIII signatures in the spectra of PopII/I GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Q; Ciardi, B; Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate signatures of population III (PopIII) stars in the metal-enriched environment of GRBs originating from population II-I (PopII/I) stars by using abundance ratios derived from numerical simulations that follow stellar evolution and chemical enrichment. We find that at $z>10$ more than $10%$ of PopII/I GRBs explode in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (we refer to them as GRBII$\\rightarrow$III). Although the formation of GRBII$\\rightarrow$III is more frequent than that of pristine PopIII GRBs (GRBIIIs), we find that the expected GRBII$\\rightarrow$III observed rate is comparable to that of GRBIIIs, due to the usually larger luminosities of these latter. GRBII$\\rightarrow$III events take place preferentially in small proto-galaxies with stellar masses $\\rm M_\\star \\sim 10^{4.5} - 10^7\\,\\rm M_\\odot$, star formation rates $\\rm SFR \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-1}\\,\\rm M_\\odot/yr$ and metallicities $Z \\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-2}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$. On the other hand, galaxies with $Z < 10^{-2.8}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$ ar...

  16. Enhancing SMM properties via axial distortion of Mn-3(III) clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons S.; Brechin, E.K.; Collins A.; Karotsis G.; Jones L.F.; Inglis R.; Wernsdorfer W.; Perlepes S.P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacement of carboxylate and solvent with facially capping tripodal ligands enhances the single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of [Mn-3(III)] triangles.

  17. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session III Talks Print Text Size: A...

  18. NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    i" /} , NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array Structures Utilizing Smart *National Research Council hitrodoetion Mesoscale Periodic Arlay Structures (MPAS, also known as crystalline

  19. Eu(III) Complexes of Octadentate 1-Hydroxy-2-pyridinones: Stability and Improved Photophysical Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Evan G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1,2-HOPO) 2 ] ? , which lack a water molecule in the innerEu(III) complexes that lack a water molecule in their inner

  20. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–V Semiconductor Thin Films by Oxide Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–Vfor high-temperature thermoelectric charac- terization ofdiffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin-?lm ErAs:

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  2. FACULTY SENATE MEETING December 9, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    :30 ­ 4:30 P.M. CHAIR: Petre Ghenciu SECRETARY: Kevin Drzakowski VICE CHAIR: Ana Vande Linde PRESENT, John Schultz, Jeffrey Sweat, Kevin W. Tharp, Loretta Thielman, Ana Vande Linde, Keith Wojciechowski Sheet III. Minutes of October 28, 2014 Motion to approve: (Vande Linde/Kuchta) Discussion: The program

  3. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 × more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup –4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  4. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  5. Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single-and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Czochralski Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this analysis we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE).

  6. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  7. Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

  8. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  9. Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Bull-Games, III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Provenance and Identification", BSA 60 (1965),58-98; KZ = sealing from Kato Zakros (no in D.G. HOGARTH, "The Zakro Sealings", JHS 22 U902),76-93 and./or in D. LEVI, "Le cretule diZakro",ASAtene 8-9 [925-6], 157-201); M as t e rs/G roup s III = J.G. YOUNGER... irn{, anrl rincc tlrr: bull sect}1s 1r; l*uk ov*r its t*;r attrl intu it, iltr: lr*r l}t*trlil hr irgllr.rw i"rnd r"l{rl t s*lid ltlirltirrrn lihe rlie *rre built irtt{} th*, ltr}rlh"wsst {:{l!-t1rr rf Phaillt}s's r-'gfltral r6urt., Alrn t*o. il ix...

  10. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 Msun die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core collapse, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by collapse and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning ari...

  11. AVTA: 2010 Toyota Prius Gen III HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  12. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  13. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  14. Infocom 2001 VIP -Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Zarki, Magda

    Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5 Video Over IP Magda El-Zarki (University of California at Irvine) Monday, 23 April, 2001 - Morning #12;MPEG-4 over IP - Part 3 Magda El Zarki Dept. of ICS UC, Irvine elzarki@uci.edu #12;Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.3 Outline of Tutorial 1. Part

  15. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

  16. COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbusch, Karin

    COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1 , Johannes Härtel2 grammar teaching system COMPASS III. COMPASS stands for COMbina- torial and Paraphrastic Assembly]. COMPASS invites the student to construct sentences by composing syntactic trees out of lexically anchored

  17. J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification Physics Abstracts 05) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non

  18. Fusing Statecharts and Java MARIA-CRISTINA MARINESCU, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III, Leganes, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, César

    III, Legan´es, Spain C ´ESAR S ´ANCHEZ, IMDEA Software Institute, Spain and Institute for Applied Physics, CSIC, Spain This paper presents FUSE, an approach for modeling and implementing embedded software-Cristina Marinescu, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Spain; C´esar S´anchez IMDEA

  19. MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting III­V materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

  20. Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Ocean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement Ecole Doctorale de Sciences de l'Univers de l'Environnement et de l'Espace Assimilation de donn´ees de t-27Jun2007 #12;Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et

  1. UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON INDIVIDUAL FINANCIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN PHS RESEARCH UMBC # III-1.11.02 I. POLICY STATEMENT Externally sponsored research is a vital FOR POLICY UMBC strives for excellence and academic integrity in its research enterprise while also promoting

  2. Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

  3. UNIVERSIT TOULOUSE III -PAUL SABATIER U.F.R. Sciences et Vie de la Terre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo-tectonique présentée et soutenue par de la Terre TH�SE pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo

  4. Universit Paul Czanne -Aix-Marseille III pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III THÈSE pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences de l'Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III n 2007AIX30060 Discipline : Optique électromagnétique et image Chat Perdu. À Robert Mi(t)chou(m). Aux Special Ca's (Frères)...et à leur Moitié (Relax). Aux Morbai

  5. Thermodynamic Features of the Complexation of Neodymium(III) and Americium(III) by Lactate in Trifluoromethanesulfonate Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protonation of lactate has been studied in a variety of electrolyte solutions using microcalorimetry to reveal a distinct medium influence imposed on the thermochemistry of the investigated equilibrium. The thermochemistry of lactate protonation, when studied directly in 1.0 M sodium lactate, agreed well with the studies performed in trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate). This thermodynamic agreement suggests that the physical chemistry of lactate in the solutions applicable to the TALSPEAK process – a solvent extraction method for separating trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides within the scope of used nuclear fuel processing efforts – may be simulated in triflate solutions. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry have been subsequently used to study the thermodynamic features of neodymium and americium complexation by lactate using triflate as a strong background electrolyte. Three successive mononuclear lactate complexes were identified for Nd(III) and Am(III). The stability constants for neodymium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.01, log ß2 = 4.66 ± 0.02 and log ß3 = 5.6 ± 0.1, and for americium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.06, log ß2 = 4.7 ± 0.1 and log ß3 = 6.2 ± 0.2, were found to closely agree with the thermodynamic studies reported in sodium perchlorate solutions. Consequently, the thermodynamic medium effect, imposed on the TALSPEAK-related solution equilibria by the presence of strong background electrolytes such as NaClO4 and NaNO3, do not significantly impact the speciation in solution.

  6. Kevin D. Friedland Ruth E. Haas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be significantly higher for the Penobscot stock. Using image process- ing techniques, we extracted intercir- culi) National Marine Fisheries Service, NOM J66 Water Street Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 02543 e-mail address freshwater and marine en- vironments. Mixed-stock fisheries for salmon indiscriminately harvest stocks

  7. EERE Partner Testimonials - Kevin Keene, Cummins | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    overcome some of the barriers that we faced. Footage of two men in a lab working on a computer, followed by footage of a man pointing to data on a computer screen, followed by an...

  8. Kevin F. Hallock Chair and Professor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    economist Alan Krueger tried to sort out delayed-payment versus efficiency-wage methods using data from

  9. Updated 1-13 Kevin J. Lasher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Electronic Warfare and Command and Control investments and prioritize related warfighting and intelligence

  10. Hybrid Architectural Dynamic Thermal Management Kevin Skadron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    . The challenge is that even though this reduction in power density reduces heat dissipation and can be used­3 or more per watt of heat dissipated [1, 6], making it more difficult to deploy new systems. Cooling costs management (DTM) dynamically reduces the power density on the chip to maintain safe operating tem- peratures

  11. Kevin P. Hegarty Vice President and Chief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    , Financial Records, and Risk Management Linda Shaunessy Business Contract Administrator Cathy L. Hagenbaumer Wanamaker Campus Real Estate Office Lee Miara Accounting and Financial Management Kim Wicheta Policy Carol Longoria Open Records Coordinators Vijay Thiruvengadam Information Quest (IQ) John Walker Treasury

  12. Five Year Curriculum Vitae Kevin M. Folta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ,005,585. Selecting a sunn hemp cover crop genotype for weed suppression and seed production. USDA/SARE. (2008

  13. Mapping the Midwest Future Kevin D. Kephart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    ;#12;· Five Regional University Centers #12;Bioenergy #12;Biomass Feedstocks Research · More than 200 projects, sustainable, affordable, commercial-scale biomass feedstocks is our first key enabler t

  14. Kevin T. Hagerty | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturingJune 17, 2015 - SEABSmallKen T.

  15. Kevin T. Hagerty | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturingJune 17, 2015 - SEABSmallKen

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7 Kevin Brown

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember 5-6, 2001Department

  17. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluka, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka, N.III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka(t), N.solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium

  18. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 10771085 Application of europium(III) chelate-dyed nanoparticle labels in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 1077­1085 Application of europium(III) chelate for immunosensors with fluorescent europium(III) chelate nanoparticle labels (Seradyn) in a competitive atrazine

  19. 3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near-Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Sensitization of Ho(III) and Pr(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Palsson, Lars-Olof; Beeby, Andrew; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest in Near Infra-Red (NIR) emission originating from organic complexes of Ln{sup III} cations. As a major impetus, biological tissues are considerably more transparent at these low energy wavelengths when compared to visible radiation, which facilitates deeper penetration of incident and emitted light. Furthermore, the long luminescence lifetimes of Ln{sup III} complexes (eg. Yb{sup III}, {tau}{sub rad} {approx} 1 ms) when compared to typical organic molecules can be utilized to vastly improve signal to noise ratios by employing time-gating techniques. While the improved quantum yield of Yb{sub III} complexes when compared to other NIR emitters favors their use for bioimaging applications, there has also been significant interest in the sensitized emission from other 4f metals such as Ln = Nd, Ho, Pr and Er which have well recognized applications as solid state laser materials (eg. Nd {approx} 1.06 {micro}m, Ho {approx} 2.09 {micro}m), and in telecommunications (eg. Er {approx} 1.54 {micro}m) where they can be used for amplification of optical signals. As a result of their weak (Laporte forbidden) f-f absorptions, the direct excitation of Ln{sup III} cations is inefficient, and sensitization of the metal emission is more effectively achieved using the so-called antenna effect. We have previously examined the properties of several Eu{sup III} complexes which feature 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one (Fig. 1) as the light harvesting chromophore. While the 1,2-HOPO isomer was found to strongly sensitize Eu{sup III}, we noted the analogous Me-3,2-HOPO isomer does not, which prompted further investigation of the properties of this chromophore with other metals.

  20. Philosophia Mathematica (III) 17 (2009), 341362. doi:10.1093/philmat/nkn032 Advance Access publication November 6, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. easwaran@gmail.com Philosophia Mathematica (III) Vol. 17 No. 3 C

  1. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  2. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  3. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  4. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R. [comp.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  6. Phylogeny and biogeography of the mayfly family Leptohyphidae (Insecta: Ephemeroptera) with a taxonomic revision of selected genera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgardner, David Eugene

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, John D. Oswald Committee Members, Jimmy K. Olson Merrill H. Sweet James B. Woolley Head of Department, Kevin M. Heinz August 2008 Major Subject: Entomology iii ABSTRACT...

  7. Master Thesis Design of an Underactuated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    this work to them! #12;Abstract iii Abstract Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) usually utilize severalMaster Thesis Design of an Underactuated Underwater Vehicle Using Counter Rotating Propellers Kevin

  8. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  9. Nano-scale metal contacts for future III-V CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Alex

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As modem transistors continue to scale down in size, conventional Si CMOS is reaching its physical limits and alternative technologies are needed to extend Moore's law. Among different candidates, MOSFETs with a III-V ...

  10. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in...

  11. XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

  12. Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Samuel Curtis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

  13. Quantitative analysis of the EGFRvIII mutant receptor signaling networks in Glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hua Ming Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive adult brain tumor and remains incurable despite multimodal intensive treatment regimens. EGFRvIII is a truncated extracellular mutant of the EGF receptor (EGFR) that is ...

  14. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title...

  15. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012_Modeling the Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling the Performance of Large- Scale CO 2 Storage Systems: A Comparison of Different Sensitivity Analysis Methods 24 October 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012...

  16. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume III, Roadmap Explorations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozdogan, Kirk

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III of this guide may be used as an in-depth reference source for acquiring deep knowledge about many of the aspects of transitioning to lean. Lean change agents and lean implementation leaders should find this ...

  17. Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order response evident for SimTest media. Steerable Needle Application Nano

  18. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  19. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised...

  20. AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L....

  1. Microsoft Word - NRAP_TRS_III_Mobilization_and_Transport_of_Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 21 May 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2015 Disclaimer This report was...

  2. Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 -Security of Federal Automated Information Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 - Security of Federal Automated Information Resources A automated information security programs; assigns Federal agency responsibilities for the security of automated information; and links agency automated information security programs and agency management

  3. CREATING A MULTIVALENT SUBUNIT VACCINE USING TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM TIP PROTEINS AS ANTIGENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markham, Aaron Paul

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Many gram-negative bacterial pathogens employ type III secretion systems (TTSS) to transport effector proteins into eukaryotic host cell membranes and cytoplasms to subvert normal cellular functions. TTSSs contain a basal ...

  4. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  5. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  6. A high-throughput, near-saturating screen for type III effector genes from Pseudomonas syringae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    criteria defined 29 type III proteins from P. syringae pv. tomato, and 19 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola [disease resistance (R) pro- teins], a battery of host responses is triggered, including localized

  7. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy`s )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

  8. Development of X-ray lithography and nanofabrication techniques for III-V optical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Michael H. (Michael Hong)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers the development of fabrication techniques for Bragg-grating-based integrated optical devices in III-V materials. Work on this rich family of devices has largely been limited to numerical analysis ...

  9. Spectroscopic and Computational Studies of the Physical Properties and Reactivities of Peroxomanganese(III) Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Robert Alan

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of MnIII intermediates were generated and studied using various spectroscopic techniques, including electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD, ...

  10. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  11. Platform for monolithic integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacella, Nan Yang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors and Si complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor (CMOS) enables the creation of advanced circuits with new functionalities. In order to merge the two technologies, ...

  12. Substrate engineering for monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohrman, Carl Lawrence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge virtual substrates, fabricated using Si1-xGex-.Ge, compositionally graded buffers, enable the epitaxial growth of device-quality GaAs on Si substrates, but monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS ...

  13. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  14. Characterization of a synthetic peroxodiiron(III) protein model complex by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    The vibrational spectrum of an ?[superscript 1],?[superscript 1]-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex was measured by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and fit using an empirical force field analysis. Isotopic 18O2 ...

  15. The class III ribonucleotide reductase from Neisseria bacilliformis can utilize thioredoxin as a reductant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yifeng

    The class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied to date couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxynucleotides with the oxidation of formate to CO[subscript 2]. Here we report the cloning and heterologous ...

  16. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Gulf Interior Region salt domes. [Richton, Vacherie, Cypress domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Gulf Interior Region of the United States (Louisiana and Mississippi). Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Permian Basin in Texas) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in-situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homoqeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptural design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  17. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOE

  18. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOEGas

  19. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W

  20. Reactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , the reactivity of lead (Pb(II)) on naturally occurring Mn(III,IV) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals was evaluated using to suggest oxidation as an operative sorption mechanism. Lead appeared to coordinate to vacancy sitesReactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface C H R I S T O P H E R J . M

  1. Impurity-induced disorder in III-nitride materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J; Allerman, Andrew A

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impurity-induced disordering in III-nitride materials comprises growing a III-nitride heterostructure at a growth temperature and doping the heterostructure layers with a dopant during or after the growth of the heterostructure and post-growth annealing of the heterostructure. The post-growth annealing temperature can be sufficiently high to induce disorder of the heterostructure layer interfaces.

  2. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  3. The iron(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DTPA in an aqueous solution / longy Steven Harry Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christiansen, Steven Harry

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition rate, the monohydroxo form of Fe(III)-DTPA is suggested as the reactive intermediate. If the air source of the above system was eliminated, the decomposition reaction continued until the oxygen was depleted. The reaction products... Preparation of Fe(III) -DTPA Run Procedures Analytical RESULTS 32 33 34 38 Kinetics Identification of Decomposition Products 38 57 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 80 LITERATURE CITED VITA 83 87 vi LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Typical coordination...

  4. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  5. Estimation of Sorption Behavior of Europium(III) Using Biotite Flakes - 13272

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Go; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kirishima, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of biotite and Eu(III) (europium (III)) was examined by using secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometer (SIMS), fluorescence emission spectrum and decay behavior of fluorescence emission spectrum in addition to the time-changes of Eu(III) and potassium ions concentrations in a solution, using the flake form samples. The results of SIMS showed that the intensity of Eu was gradually decreasing with depth, while the intensity of Eu in the case shaken for 30 days exceeded that in the case for 1 day. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Eu(III) and potassium ions in the flake of biotite suggested that Eu ions diffuse mainly from the edges of biotite flake, while Eu ions can slightly diffuse through some small cracks existing on the flake surface far from the edges. Besides, the elution amount of potassium from the biotite flakes into a solution was proportional to the sorption amount of Eu(III). The changes nearly revealed ion exchange between these ions, while muscovite flake sample did not show such ion exchange reaction. In addition, from the time-change of Eu(III) concentration, an apparent diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 8.0x10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s, by using two-dimensional diffusion model coupled with a film between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Furthermore, the fluorescent intensity decreased with the shaking (contacting) time. This means that Eu(III) gradually diffuses into the inside of biotite edges of the biotite flakes, after the sorption of Eu(III) in the edges. This tendency was observed also in the powder samples. The observed fluorescence decay (at 592 nm in wave length) showed almost similar curve in any samples, indicating a certain sorption form of Eu(III) onto the edges of the biotite flakes. These results mentioned above suggest that the diffusion processes through internal layer in biotite mainly control the sorption behavior of multivalent ions. Such diffusion processes affect the retardation-effects on fracture surfaces in the rock matrix, depending on the fluid flow velocity of groundwater. That is, a more reliable model considering the mass transfer in the internal layer of biotite may be required to estimate the sorption behavior of RNs with biotite which controls the whole sorption behavior of granite. (authors)

  6. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  7. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zincblende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier {\\it ab initio} calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may lead to new functionalities for designing devices that manipulate spin degrees of freedom.

  8. Accreting White Dwarfs among the Planetary Nebulae Most Luminous in [O III]5007 Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose that some of the most luminous planetary nebulae (PNs) are actually proto-PNs, where a companion white dwarf (WD) accretes mass at a relatively high rate from the post-asymptotic giant branch star that blew the nebula. The WD sustains a continuous nuclear burning and ionizes the nebula. The WD is luminous enough to make the dense nebula luminous in the [O III]5007 line, In young stellar populations these WD accreting systems account for a small fraction of [O III]-luminous PNs, but in old stellar populations these binaries might account for most, or even all, of the [OIII]-luminous PNs. This might explain the puzzling constant cutoff (maximum) [O III]5007 luminosity of the planetary nebula luminosity function across different galaxy types.

  9. Modification and benchmarking of SKYSHINE-III for use with ISFSI cask arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertel, N.E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry cask storage arrays are becoming more and more common at nuclear power plants in the United States. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72, limits doses at the controlled area boundary of these independent spent-fuel storage installations (ISFSI) to 0.25 mSv (25 mrem)/yr. The minimum controlled area boundaries of such a facility are determined by cask array dose calculations, which include direct radiation and radiation scattered by the atmosphere, also known as skyshine. NAC International (NAC) uses SKYSHINE-III to calculate the gamma-ray and neutron dose rates as a function of distance from ISFSI arrays. In this paper, we present modifications to the SKYSHINE-III that more explicitly model cask arrays. In addition, we have benchmarked the radiation transport methods used in SKYSHINE-III against {sup 60}Co gamma-ray experiments and MCNP neutron calculations.

  10. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  11. The collision of Title III and Title V: A potential permitting and enforcement nightmare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facca, G.; Faler, M.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 (CAA) mandated that all facilities classified as major were to obtain a Federal Title V operating permit. In addition, any facility, either major or minor, which emits certain chemicals or compounds above a specific single quantity limit or a total aggregate limit are subject to Title III requirements and are required to obtain a Title V permit as well. The problem with obtaining a Title V permit for Title III substances is there is limited data, at least for the utilities sources, on emission factors and emission rates for many of the Title III listed chemical compounds. In addition, the emission data that exists is very conservative, and if used, would show the facilities to be significant emitters of hazardous air emissions, while actual emissions are significantly less. This could lead a facility to applying for a Title V permit unnecessarily, a time consuming process at best. In Iowa, facilities submitted the first Title V permit applications in 1994. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently in the process of reviewing the submittals prior to issuing operating permits. Title III has not been addressed at all in the submittals and therefore will not be included in this round of finished permits that are to be issued. The outcome of this is that the Title V permits will have to be opened and amended to include the applicable Title III operating conditions and constraints. This paper will examine the areas where Title III and Title V collide and the potential permitting and enforcement issues that will have to be faced by the facilities that operate under these permits. This paper is based on the opinions of two of the three responsible parties (facilities and consultants) that are dealing with the potential permitting and enforcement wreckage before the collision occurs.

  12. A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, James Ferrell

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTIOB BETWEEN BISMUTH ( III) BROMIDE AND AMIBE HYDROBROMIDES A Thesis JAMES FERRELL OSBORNE Submitted to the Graduate School ef the ASriculture and Mechanical CelleSe of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the deSree of MASTER OF SCIENCE AuSust, 1960 MaJor Sub]ect: Chemistry A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTION BETWEEN BISMUTH (III) BROMIDE AND AMINE HYDRQBRGMIDES A Thesis JAMES FEREKLL OSBORNE Approved as to style and content by...

  13. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  14. Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III, SAPT-5st, and VRT(MCY-5f) surfaces FRANK N. KEUTSCH1 , NIR GOLDMAN2 , HEATHER A. HARKER3 , CLAUDE of the water dimer very well. The VRT(MCY-5f) and especially the VRT(ASP-W)III potentials show larger

  15. Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

  16. Molecular Cell, Vol. 11, 12791289, May, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press RNAse III-Mediated Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    -Mediated Degradation of Unspliced Pre-mRNAs and Lariat Introns While most RNase III-like enzymes cleave ds to bacteria, where RNase III processes and degrades a large number of mRNAs (Bardwell etRPS22B and RPL18A transcripts trigger degradation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and lariat introns and can al., 1989; Court, 1993

  17. EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

  18. Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Herein, we show that a simple trigonal prismatic uranium(III) complex can indeed display slow magnetic

  19. UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The policy on approval of written academic agreements delineates. There are separate policies and procedures for approval of research agreements, both sponsored and unsponsored, which

  20. Calcolo 2B -Analisi III (corso 2003-2004) 14 luglio 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    globali iii) Sul quadrato chiuso ci sono i massimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse y dove la funzione vale 5 e i minimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse x dove la funzione vale -1/4. 2 #12;

  1. ROTSE-III Performance in the Swift Era Yost, S. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    436, Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract. We report the successful performance of the Robotic Optical network of 4 unfiltered 0.45m optical telescopes. The telescopes operate robotically, automatically response the the small, accurate Swift error boxes. We report ROTSE-III's general results, including OTs

  2. III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    18 III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS) 3335-5-14 Powers for a graduate degree 3335-9-32 Requirements for a professional degree DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS NOTE: If you PROGRAM PROPOSALS Completion of this form serves as a degree program proposal and provides information

  3. Identification and Characterization of Bovine Pol III Promoters to Express a Short-Hairpin RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peoples, Michael D 1978-

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Each bPol III promoter was able to express a functional shRNA resulting in a reduction of luciferase activity greater than 68 percent. The bH1 and bU6-2 Luc shRNA vectors were the most effective vectors when transfected with >76 percent (p-value <0...

  4. Light Extraction Efficiency and Radiation Patterns of III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant NETL, DE-PS26-08NT00290, the National Science]­[7], thermoelectric [8]­[11], photovoltaics and solar energy conversion [12]­[14], and terahertz photonics [15], III

  5. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BREAKOUT CRITERIA FOR ACCRETION-POWERED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ioka, Kunihito, E-mail: hiroki@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [KEK Theory Center, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency {eta}. By varying the efficiency {eta} and opening angle {theta}{sub op} for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition {eta} {approx}> 10{sup -4}({theta}{sub op}/8 Degree-Sign ){sup 2} is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.

  6. A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köhler, Kai

    A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations We give a new proof of the Jantzen sum formula for integral repre- sentations of Chevalley formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry to generalized flag varieties. Our proof involves

  7. Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    ), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

  8. Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

  9. Design Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic, and Allison M. Okamura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    and steer around obstacles to reach previously inaccessible locations. Control and planning based on a steering model can compensate for targeting disturbances due to needle bending, error in insertion angleDesign Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic

  10. Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The results indicated that the sorption of Eu. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Eu-HA complexes indicated that the distances

  11. Erwin Schroedinger and the rise of wave mechanics. III. Early response and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehra, J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article (Part III) deals with the early applications of wave mechanics to atomic problems - including the demonstration of the formal mathematical equivalence of wave mechanics with the quantum mechanics of Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan, and that of Dirac - by Schroedinger himself and others. The new theory was immediately accepted by the scientific community.

  12. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanga, Fengzai; Moodya, Michael P.; Martina, Tomas L.; Bagota, Paul A. J.; Kappersa, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    study of Cu grains 385 (Kempshall, et al., 2001). In terms of binary III-nitrides, the metal–N bond length in the 386 wurtzite structure increases from AlN, to GaN and to InN (Ambacher, 1998), being 387 associated with corresponding bond energy of 2...

  13. Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires Hadas Shtrikman,*, Ronit, 2008; Revised Manuscript Received January 13, 2009 ABSTRACT The growth of wurtzite GaAs and In wurtzite structure and are observed to thicken (via lateral growth) once the axial growth exceeds a certain

  14. Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

    Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes Dmitrii us to calculate the efficiency of an incoherent pump in general-geometry double-clad fibers. This approach yields accurate estimates of the absorption rate of each mode of the pump in the first order

  15. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  16. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    rotational­ vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H2 16 O and p-H2IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy

  17. The Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution vs. temperature and its evolution during some selected solar ares, representative of the wideThe Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres Dip. di Scienze Fisiche & Astronomiche class C5.8) to very intense ones (X9) are selected as representative of the aring Sun. The emission

  18. 412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressler, Steven L.

    - formed through this manipulation because it somehow simplifies the process of control appears Geometry, Neural Control; Muscle Models; Optimization Principles in Motor Control References Bennett, D. J412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is now

  19. Analise Matematica III Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 Termodinamica dos Gases Ideais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Anâ??alise Matemâ??atica III ­ Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 ­ Termodinâ??amica dos Gases Ideais N Termodinâ??amica afirma que existe uma funâ?ºcâ?ao E : M # R, dita a energia interna do gâ??as, cuja derivadaâ??amicos gerais pela Segunda Lei da Termodinâ??amica. 2 #12;

  20. Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

  1. Development of Light Guides for the Camera of CANGAROO-III , A. Maeshiro1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    the energy threshold of CANGAROO-III tele- scope, good light collection efficiency is very important-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Kyoto, Japan 3 MSSSO, Australian National University, ACT 2611, Australia 4 Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 5 Institute

  2. Laboratory "Behavioral and Social Sciences" (Lab III) General Rules for Using the Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at or in the building are to be reported immediately to the Laboratory Manager. 3. In order to save energy electrical. Concerning the general philosophy and the rules for booking rooms, please check the Memorandum and Memorandum for Room Booking at the Lab III website. The laboratory guidelines are meant to enable researchers to make

  3. JACQUES H. C. DELABlh REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N 1, 1975 73

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    " REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N° 1, 1975 73 ;. ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO DE LA GENITALIA DEL MACHO DE LAS ESPECIES DE ACROMYRMEX DEL URUGUAY * Lucrecia Covelo de ZoIessi, YoIanda Petrone de Abenan1 Acrumyrmex de Ias especies encontradas hasta el momento, en el Uruguay. Queremos destacar que Ia placa

  4. Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1479 Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical(OH)2 is presented. The ordered phase is reached via dynamic nuclear polarization followed to the effective magnetic field are used to determine the magnetic phase of the nuclear spin system. From

  5. PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 1 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 DIVISION 13 SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating condition. The system #12;PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 2 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 detail battery calculations per NFPA 72. 4. Indicate all A/C, fans, Dampers to be monitored by fire alarm detailed battery calculations per the

  6. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase-Product Complex,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    synthesis in mammals, nitrite and sulfite assimilation, and methane production in methanogens. Tet of two ALA molecules to form the basic pyrrole structure (porphobilinogen, PBG), and assembly of four PBG pyrroles into a linear tetraypyrrole (hydroxymethylbilane, HMB). Subsequently, uroporphyrino- gen III

  7. CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    Name: CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012 Note: You, . . . , rn of real numbers and an integer k. The problem is to output s1, s2, . . . , sn where si = k-1 q=0 ri+q, for i = 1, 2, . . . , (n - k + 1) and si = ri for i = (n - k + 2), (n - k + 3), . . . , n

  8. Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center, Division designed quantum mechanical simulation tools that have been shown to accurately predict dynamic processes. We also performed calculations on Cu phenatroline with a bidentate stator. DFT is able to accurately

  9. Solid waste operations complex W-113: Specifications. Preliminary design report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is Volume III of the Preliminary Design report for the Solid Waste Retrieval Facility at Hanford. The report was prepared by Raytheon and BNFL Inc. and submitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in January 1995. This volume is a complete listing of the specifications for construction and the required material and equipment.

  10. Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1 , Wen Chao Lee1 This study demonstrates the feasibility of using water and the contents of waste Li-ion batteries for the electrodes in a Li-liquid battery system. Li metal was collected electrochemically from a waste Li

  11. Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D from our laboratory show a modified formula of hot melt ink that can be used in 3D thermal wax printing. Fleming III* Keywords: 3D Structure, Hot Melt, Blowing Agents, Calorimetry Abstract The ability to form

  12. High temperature thermoelectric characterization of III-V semiconductor thin films by oxide bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    bonding Je-Hyeong Bahka) , Gehong Zenga) , Joshua M. O. Zide b) , Hong Luc) , Rajeev Singhd) , Di Lianga bonding technique is developed for high temperature thermoelectric characterization of the thin film III-W-N diffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin film ErAs:InGaAlAs metal/semiconductor nanocomposite

  13. Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III for 3D printing comprises different waxes, tackifier and plasticizer resins, rheology modifiers, and UV rheological (or flow) behavior. 1 3D printing, direct ink-jet printing, and related approaches such as hot

  14. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  15. III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    204 III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries* NANCY H. GOLDSTEIN for policy issues affecting the use of ferroalloys in steel making and certain other alloy production of the Delphi. The Steel and Ferroalloy Delphi included three rounds. The questions and exercises presented

  16. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  17. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifers R O B North, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 The potential for anaerobic benzene. [14C]Benzene was not oxidized to 14CO2 at most sites examined, which is consistent with previous

  18. III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    189 III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study SELWYN ENZER The application of Delphi to the identification and assessment of possible developments in plastics and competing. The ability to tailor-make plastics for various applications, enhanced by growth in understanding of organic

  19. Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    #12;Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III spacecraft on a note of high achieve- ment: the dramatic missions of Apollo XI and XII, the scientifically productive planetary operations, contrib- uted to the successful culmination of the Apollo program, and engaged

  20. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Shi [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Koike, Shota [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Pan, Li Qiang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Bin [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)] [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China)] [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki, E-mail: n-suzuki@p.chiba-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ?ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ?Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ?ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in unfolded proteins.