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1

SNAP-III--THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR ENVIRONMENTAL TEST. VOLUME III  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests on four thermoelectric generators (two each of two different configurations) of the Snap III type to both the J.P.L. and the L.M.S.D. specifications for shock, vibration. and acceleration test are reported. The simulated levels were based on the anticipated environments of the Vega (J.P.L.) and WS117L (L.M.S.D.) systems. All four generators exhibited the same characteristic behavior pattern throughout the vibration portion of the test prograna, showing a d-c ripple in the generator output only in the Y place. This behavior of the generator is attributed to the oscillatory change in internal resistance resulting from vibratory elastic deformation of the thermoelectric elements. This produces a transient in the electrical output with a resultant reduction in generator efficiency. The maximum reduction in efficiency was noted in the 700 cps region. A resonance on the generator shell at 1845 cps was noted, but generator electrical output and efficiency were not affected. Upon discontinuance of the induced vibration, the generators returned to normal operating conditions. While undergoing shock test, a d-c transient was noted at the time of impact, resulting in a slight decrease in effi ciency. The generators immediately returned to their normal operating efficiency. In the acceleration portion of the test no d-c transient was evident in any of the three planes, therefore the generator efficiency remained constant. Steady state conditions were re-established at the start of each new test phase (i.e., changing planes of excitation, changing from shock to vibration, etc.). Thus, any variation from pretest efficiency was attributed to the external load resistance becoming umnatched due to the change in internal resistance. The important result is that complete generator recovery was consistent in all cases and normal operation continued The generator, shell, internal structure and pressure, and the hot and cold junction temperature were not affected during the test. As a result of this test program, it was concluded that the Snap III thermoelectric generator will operate reliably in the enviromnents associated with the Vega and WS117L vehicles. (auth)

Gross, L.W.; Schramm, E.J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Changes Late in Title II or Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2006-Y12-HEUMF-0001 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Victoria Pratt Date: 4/24/2010 Contact: 202-586-7358 Statement: Expect increased costs as well as omissions and errors if significant design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous changes in design requirements late in Title II and early in Title III resulted in significant concurrency in the design-and-build process, making it difficult to avoid major schedule delays and meet commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity, which led to further design changes and refinements in Title III. This necessitated major structural changes to address

3

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Those early days as we remember them (part III) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III) III) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

5

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Test results of early photovoltaic concentrating collectors  

SciTech Connect

Several passively and actively cooled photovoltaic concentrating collectors built during the period 1976 to 1979 have been tested. The tests provide information on the performance characteristics of these collectors. The results of the tests are summarized.

Gerwin, H.J.; Pritchard, D.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)  

SciTech Connect

The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE ETV-1 electric test vehicle. Phase III: performance testing and system evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE ETV-1 represents the most advanced electric vehicle in operation today. Engineering tests have been conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in order to characterize its overall system performance and component efficiencies within the system environment. A dynamometer was used in order to minimize the ambient effects and large uncertainties present in track testing. Extensive test requirements have been defined and procedures were carefully controlled in order to maintain a high degree of credibility. Limited track testing was performed in order to corroborate the dynamometer results. Test results include an energy flow analysis through the major subsystems and incorporate and aerodynamic and rolling losses under cyclic and various steady speed conditions. A complete summary of the major output from all relevant dynamometer and track tests is also included as an appendix.

Kurtz, D. W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis and Design Significance of A-11 Flow-Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of the experimental data on seal pressure distributions obtained from the A-11 Flow Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III, with analytical results including porous flow through the unimpregnated inner reflector cylinder for the same operating conditions show generally very good agreement. The principal deviations between analysis and experiment occurs when high pressure ratios exist across the last seal. Additional investigation, both in the relationship used in the analytical model and in the experimental area, are required to determine the cause of the deviation found between analysis and experiment when the pressure ratio across the last seal is near critical. As a result of this comparison, it appears that the analytical methods and assumtions made in predicting unheated seal pressure distributions are resonable, and may be used with confidence in the test prediction of the NRX-A1 cold flow test.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V  

SciTech Connect

A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components.

Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Status of construction and first tests of the CLEO III RICH  

SciTech Connect

The CLEO collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of its present detector including a RICH detector for particle identification. This subdetector system follows the proximity focusing design and uses Lithium Fluoride (LiF) crystal radiators and MWPCs as photon detectors. These chambers are filled with a CH{sub 4}/TEA gas mixture and have a Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) crystal photon entrance window. Part of the radiator crystals will have the new sawtooth geometry. The authors have constructed two of the 30 detector modules and tested these together with the first planar and sawtooth radiator crystals in a muon halo beam at Fermilab. For the measurement of the Cherenkov angle they obtain a single photon measurement error of 13.5 mrad for the conventional planar radiator. With 14 detected photons they find a resolution per track of 4.5 mrad. In the first measurement ever of a sawtooth radiator they achieve a resolution of 11.8 mrad for single photons and 4.8 mrad per track for 12.3 detected photons with a reduced geometric acceptance. These results fulfill CLEO III requirements.

Artuso, M.; Azfar, F.; Efimov, A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

DOE/EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment for Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26 26 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test Decatur, Illinois October 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy MGSC Phase III National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ______________________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents i October 2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................... v LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................................................................................

15

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume III: Test protocol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers' [ASME] Center for Research and Technology Development [CRTD] has been awarded a subcontract by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory [NREL] to demonstrate the technical performance and viability of flue gas temperature control in combination with dry acid gas reagent and activated carbon injection at an existing electrostatic precipitator [ESP] equipped municipal waste combustor [MWC]. The objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration test is to economically and reliably meet 40 CFR 60 Subpart Cb Emissions Guidelines for MWC's at existing ESP equipped facilities. The effort is being directed by a Subcommittee of tile ASME Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Wastes [RCIMW] chaired by Dave Hoecke. Mr. Greg Barthold of ASME/CRTD is the Project Manager. ASME/CRTD contracted with Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc. in cooperation with A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd. to be the Principal Investigator for the project and manage the day-t o-day aspects of the program, conduct the testing reduce and interpret the data and prepare the report. Testing will be conducted at the 2 by 210 TPD, ESP equipped MWC at the Davis County Resource Recovery Facility in Layton, Utah. The test plan calls for duplicate metals (Cd, Pb and Hg), dioxin and acid gas runs.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Chapter III-2: Standards, Calibration and Testing of PV Modules and Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect

This chapter covers common PV measurement techniques and shows how potential problems and sources of error are minimized through the development and use of common standards. Measurement uncertainty, however, remains a problem for some types of PV cells, and tests continue to be developed to address these issues.

Osterwald, C. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Phase III: well testing and analysis. Progress report for the first quarter of federal FY77  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Management activities during the period are summarized. The following aspects of the geosciences program are reviewed: magnetics; seismic studies; geoelectric studies; petrography, petrology, and geochemistry; hydrology and hydrothermal geochemistry; and physical properties of rocks; and geotoxicology. The engineering program review includes numerical modelling and well testing and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

LOCKREM, L.L.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

A thermal active restrained shrinkage ring test to study the early age concrete behaviour of massive structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In massive concrete structures, cracking may occur during hardening, especially if autogenous and thermal strains are restrained. The concrete permeability due to this cracking may rise significantly and thus increase leakage (in tank, nuclear containment...) and reduce the durability. The restrained shrinkage ring test is used to study the early age concrete behaviour (delayed strains evolution and cracking). This test shows, at 20 {sup o}C and without drying, for a concrete mix which is representative of a French nuclear power plant containment vessel (w/c ratio equal to 0.57), that the amplitude of autogenous shrinkage (about 40 {mu}m/m for the studied concrete mix) is not high enough to cause cracking. Indeed, in this configuration, thermal shrinkage is not significant, whereas this is a major concern for massive structures. Therefore, an active test has been developed to study cracking due to restrained thermal shrinkage. This test is an evolution of the classical restrained shrinkage ring test. It allows to take into account both autogenous and thermal shrinkages. Its principle is to create the thermal strain effects by increasing the temperature of the brass ring (by a fluid circulation) in order to expand it. With this test, the early age cracking due to restrained shrinkage, the influence of reinforcement and construction joints have been experimentally studied. It shows that, as expected, reinforcement leads to an increase of the number of cracks but a decrease of crack widths. Moreover, cracking occurs preferentially at the construction joint.

Briffaut, M. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Benboudjema, F. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Torrenti, J.M., E-mail: jean-michel.torrenti@lcpc.f [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire central des ponts et chaussees, Paris (France); Nahas, G. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hawaii geothermal project. Phase III. Well testing and analysis. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Management and geosciences program activities are reviewed briefly. The primary emphasis in geosciences is on continued data analysis and synthesis. The engineering program continued with numerical modelling activities. The HGP-A wellhead assembly has been modified to reduce the noise level, and a new wellhead platform has been built which meets OSHA standards. HGP-A has been flash discharged from January 26 to February 11, 1977 and data obtained for throttled flow conditions by inserting orifices of varied sizes in the discharge line. A second pressure buildup test was run after the well was shut-in. Pressure and temperature profiles have been obtained during discharge and quiescent periods. Reservoir analyses have been made using pressure buildup and drawdown data.

Shupe, J.W.; Helsley, C.E.; Yuen, P.C.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Numerical Simulation of Nonsupercell Tornadogenesis. Part III: Parameter Tests Investigating the Role of CAPE, Vortex Sheet Strength, and Boundary Layer Vertical Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonsupercell tornadogenesis has been investigated in a three-part numerical study. Building on the results of Parts I and II, Part III addresses the sensitivity of nonsupercell tornadogenesis to variations in convective available potential energy ...

Bruce D. Lee; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Sample of Very Young Field L Dwarfs and Implications for the Brown Dwarf "Lithium Test" at Early Ages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a large sample of optical spectra of late-type dwarfs, we identify a subset of late-M through L field dwarfs that, because of the presence of low-gravity features in their spectra, are believed to be unusually young. From a combined sample of 303 field L dwarfs, we find observationally that 7.6+/-1.6% are younger than 100 Myr. This percentage is in agreement with theoretical predictions once observing biases are taken into account. We find that these young L dwarfs tend to fall in the southern hemisphere (Dec < 0 deg) and may be previously unrecognized, low-mass members of nearby, young associations like Tucana-Horologium, TW Hydrae, beta Pictoris, and AB Doradus. We use a homogeneously observed sample of roughly one hundred and fifty 6300-10000 Angstrom spectra of L and T dwarfs taken with the Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at the W. M. Keck Observatory to examine the strength of the 6708-A Li I line as a function of spectral type and further corroborate the trends noted by Kirkpatrick et al. (2000). We use our low-gravity spectra to investigate the strength of the Li I line as a function of age. The data weakly suggest that for early- to mid-L dwarfs the line strength reaches a maximum for a few 100 Myr, whereas for much older (few Gyr) and much younger (<100 Myr) L dwarfs the line is weaker or undetectable. We show that a weakening of lithium at lower gravities is predicted by model atmosphere calculations, an effect partially corroborated by existing observational data. Larger samples containing L dwarfs of well determined ages are needed to further test this empirically. If verified, this result would reinforce the caveat first cited in Kirkpatrick et al. (2006) that the lithium test should be used with caution when attempting to confirm the substellar nature of the youngest brown dwarfs.

J. Davy Kirkpatrick; Kelle L. Cruz; Travis S. Barman; Adam J. Burgasser; Dagny L. Looper; C. G. Tinney; Christopher R. Gelino; Patrick J. Lowrance; James Liebert; John M. Carpenter; Lynne A. Hillenbrand; John R. Stauffer

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SECTION III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University ...powering the 21 st century economy... West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Final Report 29 June 2009 2 of 142 Disclaimer This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the West Virginia

28

Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

NSTec Environmental Programs

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Honda Insight Fleet and Accelerated Reliability Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gen III Prius HEV Accelerated Testing - May 2012 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a...

30

Use of various acute, sublethal and early life-stage tests to evaluate the toxicity of refinery effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The toxicities of effluents from three Ontario, Canada, refineries were assessed with microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fish. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Microtox test, an assay based on electron transport activity in submitochondrial particles, and Daphnia magna (water flea); growth of Selenastrum capricornutum (alga); growth of Lemna minor (aquatic plant); germination of Lactuca sativa (nonaquatic plant); survival, growth, and maturation of Panagrellus redivivus (nematode); and genotoxicity in the SOS-Chromotest. Only the Microtox test and the submitochondrial particle test detected acute toxicity in the effluent samples. Reduced survival and sublethal responses were caused by some effluents, but not all effluents were toxic, and none caused a response in all of the tests applied. The results suggest that the effluent treatment systems used at Ontario refineries have largely eliminated acute toxicity to the organisms in their test battery. Although reduced survival and sublethal effects were detected in some of the effluents, the effects were minor. Some of the tests provided evidence, albeit weak, of variations in the responses of the test organisms to a temporal series of effluent samples. Not unexpectedly, there were also minor differences in the responses of the tests to effluents from the three refineries. The fathead minnow test seems to be a sensitive indicator of the sublethal toxicity of Ontario refinery effluents.

Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Dutka, B. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

TESTING A PREDICTION OF THE MERGER ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: A CORRELATION BETWEEN STELLAR POPULATIONS AND ASYMMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key predictions of the merger hypothesis for the origin of early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies is that tidally induced asymmetric structure should correlate with signatures of a relatively young stellar population. Such a signature was found by Schweizer and Seitzer at roughly 4{sigma} confidence. In this paper, we revisit this issue with a nearly ten-fold larger sample of 0.01 gas-rich major and minor mergers that reproduces their observed buildup from z = 1 to the present day and the distribution of present-day colors and ages. We show using this model that if both stellar populations and asymmetry were ideal 'clocks' measuring the time since last major or minor gas-rich interaction, then we would expect a rather tight correlation between age and asymmetry. We suggest that the source of extra scatter is natural diversity in progenitor star formation history, gas content, and merger mass ratio, but quantitative confirmation of this conjecture will require sophisticated modeling. We conclude that the asymmetry-age correlation is in basic accord with the merger hypothesis, and indicates that an important fraction of the early-type galaxy population is affected by major or minor mergers at cosmologically recent times.

Gyory, Zsuzsanna [Department of Physics, Eoetvoes University, Budapest, Pf. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Bell, Eric F., E-mail: gyory.zsuzsa@googlemail.co, E-mail: ericbell@umich.ed [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part III: Forecasting with Secondary-Applications Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from the Army Test and Evaluation Commands Four-Dimensional Weather Systems mesoscale model is used to drive secondary-applications models to produce forecasts of quantities of importance for daily decision making at U.S. Army test ...

Robert D. Sharman; Yubao Liu; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Thomas T. Warner; Daran L. Rife; James F. Bowers; Charles A. Clough; Edward E. Ellison

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the ninth quarter of the program. During this quarter, the natural gas baseline testing at the Penn State demonstration boiler was completed, results were analyzed and are presented here. The burner operates in a stable manner over an 8/1 turndown, however due to baghouse temperature limitations (300{degrees}F for acid dewpoint), the burner is not operated for long periods of time below 75% load. Boiler efficiency averaged 83.1% at the 100 percent load rate while increasing to 83.7% at 75% load. NO{sub x} emissions ranged from a low of 0.17 Lbs/MBtu to a high of 0.24 Lbs/MBtu. After the baseline natural gas testing was completed, work continued on hardware optimization and testing with the goal of increasing carbon conversion efficiency on 100% coal firing from {approx}95% to 98%. Several coal handling and feeding problems were encountered during this quarter and no long term testing was conducted. While resolving these problems several shorter term (less than 6 hour) tests were conducted. These included, 100% coal firing tests, 100% natural gas firing tests, testing of air sparges on coal to simulate more primary air and a series of cofiring tests. For 100% coal firing, the carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) obtained this quarter did not exceed the 95-96% barrier previously reached. NO{sub x} emissions on coal only ranged from {approx} 0.42 to {approx} 0.78 Lbs/MBtu. The burner has not been optimized for low NO{sub x} yet, however, due to the short furnace residence time, meeting the goals of 98% CCE and <0.6 Lbs/MBtu NO{sub x} simultaneously will be difficult. Testing on 100% natural gas in the boiler after coal firing indicated no changes in efficiency due to firing in a `dirty` boiler. The co-firing tests showed that increased levels of natural gas firing proportionately decreased NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO.

Jennings, P.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

36

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal or coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Test Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to conduct RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of Coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Lalit S. Shah; William K. Davis

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

Warren, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microsoft Word - SECARB Phase III CO2 sequestration Final EA MNM 3-2 as sent.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 25 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Early Test March 2009 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy SECARB Phase III Early Test National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ______________________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents i March 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS i LIST OF TABLES iv LIST OF FIGURES iv ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS v USE OF SCIENTIFIC NOTATION ix 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Summary 1 1.2 Purpose and Need 5 1.3 Legal Framework 8 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 15 2.1 Proposed Action 15 2.1.1 Project Location 15

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41

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test.of Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain. DECOVALEX III, Taskmodeling of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. DECOVALEX

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

43

Nicholas Camillone III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanometer-Thick Covalently-Bound Organic Overlayers" N. Camillone III, T. Pak, K. Adib, K.A. Khan, and R.M. Osgood, Jr. J. Phys. Chem. B, 110, 11334 (2006). Full Publications List...

44

Phased Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)  

SciTech Connect

Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. These tests are described in separate planning documents. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: (1) Define the test scope for the FRS and IWTS; (2) Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; (3) Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and (4) Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

PITNER, A.L.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

TEST TEST TEST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA/EA-1375 NNSA/EA-1375 Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a New Office Building and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 26, 2001 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area Office Environmental Assessment for Proposed Construction and Operation of a New Office Building and Related Structures NNSA/LAAO July 26,, 2001 iii Contents Acronyms and Terms .................................................................................................................. vi Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................... ix 1.0 Purpose and Need

48

Volume III, Issue 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

49

Analise Matematica III Cursos de Matematica e Engenharia Electrotecnica, Mecanica e Fsica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An??alise Matem??atica III 1 o ? Teste Cursos de Matem??atica e Engenharia Electrot??ecnica, Mec??anica

Matos, João Palhoto

50

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

iii TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This generic verification protocol is based upon a peer-reviewed specific test/quality assurance (QA) plan entitled Test/QA Plan for Field Demonstration of Mercury Continuous Emission Monitors at the TSCA Incinerator, Rev. 3 (dated June 19, 2002). The test/QA plan was developed with vendor and stakeholder input by the ETV Advanced Monitoring Systems

At A Full-scale; Waste Incinerator

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Processing Materials for Properties III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 20, 2008 ... PLEASE NOTE: The PMP-III Conference originally scheduled for December 2008 in Thailand was cancelled by TMS and the co-sponsoring...

54

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,- -.-=* ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January 1987 to obtain information that might assist'in the iden- tification of the source or sources of elevated concentrations of thorium and radium discovered on properties in the vicinity of the Bendix Plant described in the ORNL letter of December 22, 1986, to

56

Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III III Wind Farm Klondike III III Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser PG&E/PSE/EWEB/BPA Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Modeling early galaxies using radiation hydrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift ... Keywords: astrophysics, modeling, visualization

Joseph A. Insley; Rick Wagner; Robert Harkness; Daniel R. Reynolds; Michael L. Norman; Mark Hereld; Eric C. Olson; Michael E. Papka; Venkatram Vishwanath

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The IMPROVE-1 Storm of 12 February 2001. Part III: Sensitivity of a Mesoscale Model Simulation to the Representation of Snow Particle Types and Testing of a Bulk Microphysical Scheme with Snow Habit Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model simulation of a wide cold-frontal rainband observed in the Pacific Northwest during the Improvement of Microphysical Parameterization through Observational Verification Experiment (IMPROVE-1) field study was used to test the ...

Christopher P. Woods; Mark T. Stoelinga; John D. Locatelli

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Those early days as we remember them (Part III) - Met Lab & Early...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the head engineers at DuPont for the Hanford reactors told me there was no future in atomic energy. A lot of people did go out and look for other jobs. Of the five in our...

60

Shiloh III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh III Facility Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Montezuma Hills Coordinates 38.1550771°, -121.7336226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1550771,"lon":-121.7336226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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61

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco III Minco III Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco III Facility Minco III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Minco OK Coordinates 35.35444115°, -98.13928127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.35444115,"lon":-98.13928127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Barnes County ND Coordinates 47.135175°, -97.935219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.135175,"lon":-97.935219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Early Career Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Early Career Research Program Early Career Research Program Overview Divisional Points of Contact Office of Science Early Career Website Important Dates Links and...

64

Field test of a generic method for the sampling and analysis of halogenated hydrocarbons listed in title III of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. Report for January 1992-December 1993  

SciTech Connect

To validate a new source test method for EPA use, the performance of the sampling and analytical methodology for the chemicals of interest must be established and demonstrated through field tests at sources similar to those of interest. Validation studies for measuring volatile and semi-volatile halogenated organics were undertaken in two different studies. Repeated sampling runs of the Volatile Organic Sample Train (VOST; SW-846 Sampling Method 0030 with Analytical Method 5041) and Semi-Volatile Organic Sample Train (Semi-VOST; SW-846 Method 0010 with Analytical Method 8270) were collected at two source locations. Quadruple sampling trains were used in each run, with two of the trains being spiked with standards. For the VOST method, the results of the two field studies were consistent with laboratory tests. For the Semi-VOST method, consistent results were obtained in the laboratory study and one of the field tests. At the second field site, the Semi-VOST data were inadequate because of problems encountered in preparation of the samples for analysis.

McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Rice, J.; Merrill, R.G.; Jackson, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Microsoft Word - JAS-Williston Basin Demo Test.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP DEMONSTRATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase III Contacts: DOENETL Project Mgr. Name...

66

Separation of actinide(III) from lanthanide(III) by thermo-sensitive gel co-polymerized with TPPEN derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) was examined by the thermal-swing extraction technique using a thermo-sensitive gel, poly-N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPA) co-polymerized with a TPEN derivative, N,N,N',N'- tetrakis(4-propenyl-oxy-2-pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN). The separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) was observed in the swollen state of gel (5 deg. C) and the separation factor of Am(III) was evaluated as about 18 at pH 5.2. More than 90% of Am(III) extracted into the gel was released by the volume phase transition of gel from the swollen state (5 deg. C) to the shrunken one (40 deg. C). The repetition test for the thermal swing extraction of a soft metal ion, Cd(II), which was used as a substitute of Am(III), was carried out and the extraction and release of Cd(II) were repeated three times stably under the thermal-swing operation between 5 deg. C and 40 deg. C. The radiation effect of gel on the extraction of Am and Eu was tested by the irradiation of {gamma}-ray (10 kGy) and the long-term adsorption of {alpha}-emitter ({sup 244}Cm). The TPPEN-NIPA gel sustained no damage by these radiation tests. These results suggest that the thermal-swing extraction technique is applicable to the MA partitioning process indispensable for the establishment of P and T technology. (authors)

Takeshita, Kenji; Fugate, Glenn [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsumura, Tatsuro [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaragi, 319-1195 (Japan); Nakano, Yoshio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan); Mori, Atsunori; Fukuoka, Sachio [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: III: YBCO Conductor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: Session III: YBCO Conductor Development. Sponsored by: Jt: EMPMD/SMD Superconducting Materials...

68

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta III Alta III Facility Alta III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

69

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

70

Extraction of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) from citrate medium by high molecular weight amines  

SciTech Connect

High molecular weight amines have been used for the extraction of citrate complexes of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III). The effect of different variables on extraction has been studied. The citrate species extracted in the organic phase have been proposed as ((RNH/sub 3//sup +/)/sub 3/) (M(Cit)/sub 2/)/sup 3 -/.

Jain, A.; Singh, O.V.; Tandon, S.N.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Potentiometric studies on mixed ligand complexes of La (III), Pr (III), and Nd (III) with nitrilotriacetic acid and mercapto acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to investigate the systems MAL (where M = La (III), Pr (III), or Nd (III), A = NTA, and L = TGA or TMEA) in order to observe the contribution of pi-interaction in the M-S bond.

Tandon, J.P.; Rana, H.S.; Sharma, M.K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session III: Processing, Microstructure and Properties. Sponsored by: MSD Flow & Fracture and Phase...

73

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

74

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

75

FCT Education: For Early Adopters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education: For Early Adopters on Twitter Bookmark FCT Education: For Early Adopters on Google Bookmark FCT Education: For Early Adopters on Delicious Rank FCT Education: For Early...

76

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts TRUPACT-III Quick Facts Please see below for TRUPACT-III fact sheet. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts More Documents & Publications EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement...

77

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Early Exploration - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Exploration Early Exploration About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

79

DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond  

SciTech Connect

An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Decameter Type III-Like Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

V. N. Melnik; A. A. Konovalenko; B. P. Rutkevych; H. O. Rucker; V. V. Dorovskyy; E. P. Abranin; A. Lecacheux; A. I. Brazhenko; A. A. Stanislavskyy

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute; Javier LLorca,...

82

PMP-III 2008: Travel - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PMP-III: Travel. For Thailand and Bangkok travel information, visit the Tourism Authority of Thailand. AIRORT TRANSPORTATION. Public metered taxi is the...

83

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

84

Those early days as we remember them (part I) - Met Lab and Argonne's Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History >Those early days as we remember them (Part I) History >Those early days as we remember them (Part I) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

85

Those early days as we remember them - Met Lab and Argonne's Early History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Early and Early History About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

86

Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

John Hale III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hale III John Hale III About Us John Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small disadvantaged, 8(a), women-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, and Historically Underutilized Business Zone businesses. He

88

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Washoe, Nevada Coordinates 40.5608387°, -119.6035495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5608387,"lon":-119.6035495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAM III PROJECT SAM III PROJECT Sandia National laboratories Prepared for: Project File Documentation Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 970009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of the Surface Area Modulation Downhole Telemetry System (SAM 111) at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The project encompassed the testing of a real-time wireless telemetry system in a simulated Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) environment. A Surface Area Modulation (SAM) technique demonstrated data transmission rates greater than present techniques, in a deployment mode which requires

90

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Designing CPV Receivers With Reliability: Early Evaluation of Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing CPV Receivers With Reliability: Early Evaluation of Components Objective Materials from power electronics industry must be proven when integrated in PV applications. Pre-qualification tests improves the receiver design and reliability. ANU microconcentrator test&design experience

92

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings...

94

Waverly III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waverly III Wind Farm Waverly III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly III Wind Farm Facility Waverly III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Waverly Light & Power Developer Waverly Light & Power Energy Purchaser Waverly Light & Power Location Waverly IA Coordinates 42.7241°, -92.4786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7241,"lon":-92.4786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (a) III (a) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (a) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenrock III Wind Farm Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenrock III Wind Farm Facility Glenrock III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser EnXco Location Converse WY Coordinates 43.0347917°, -105.8439737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0347917,"lon":-105.8439737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Those early days as we remember them (part V) - Met Lab and Argonne's Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V) V) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Promethean Boldness

100

Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Nestell, James E. [MPR Associates Inc.; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Sham, Sam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

THE FORMATION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM LOW-MASS POP III SEEDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes (BHs) in massive galaxies by z {approx} 7 is one of the great unsolved mysteries in cosmological structure formation. One theory argues that they originate from the BHs of Pop III stars at z {approx} 20 and then accrete at the Eddington limit down to the epoch of reionization, which requires that they have constant access to rich supplies of fuel. Because early numerical simulations suggested that Pop III stars were {approx}>100 M{sub Sun }, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds considered up to now were 100-300 M{sub Sun }. However, there is a growing numerical and observational consensus that some Pop III stars were tens of solar masses, not hundreds, and that 20-40 M{sub Sun} BHs may have been much more plentiful at high redshift. However, we find that natal kicks imparted to 20-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III BHs during formation eject them from their halos and hence their fuel supply, precluding them from Eddington-limit growth. Consequently, SMBHs are far less likely to form from low-mass Pop III stars than from very massive ones.

Whalen, Daniel J. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

103

Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Cost Considerations III: Cost Considerations Moderator: Dana Christensen Panelists: Phil Macey Paul Torcellini Rich von Luhrte NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Road to Net Zero Dana Christensen Deputy Laboratory Director Science & Technology RSF Workshop July 27-28, 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Managing Costs Paul Torcellini, PhD, PE Group Manager, Advanced Commercial Buildings Research Group Innovation for Our Energy Future 4 I II III IV Value Added 5 * Owner made tough decisions up-front * Set budget * Sought maximum value for that budget

105

Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kotzebue Wind Project III Kotzebue Wind Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.83716°, -162.556955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.83716,"lon":-162.556955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pomeroy III Wind Farm Pomeroy III Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pocahontas County IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

107

Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoney Corners III Stoney Corners III Facility Stoney Corners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209°, -85.275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.209,"lon":-85.275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Crystal Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Crystal Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Hancock/Winnebago Counties IA Coordinates 43.304401°, -93.824029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.304401,"lon":-93.824029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

AEO2008 Overview - Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Report :DOEEIA-0383(2008) Released Date: December 2007 Next Release Date: December 2008 (full report available early 2008) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)...

110

Early Education Services Family Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Education Services Family Handbook A Partnership in Caring Effective January 2013 Early an experience of trust, caring, understanding and learning for us all. This handbook provides important

California at Santa Cruz, University of

111

Early Education Services Family Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Education Services Family Handbook A Partnership in Caring Effective July 2012 Early an experience of trust, caring, understanding and learning for us all. This handbook provides important

California at Santa Cruz, University of

112

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview 3 AEO2014 Early Release Overview decade for the first time ...

113

III-Nitride Semiconductors for Photovoltaic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a band-structure method that includes bandgap correction, we study the chemical trends of the bandgap variation in III-V semiconductors and predict that the bandgap for InN is 0.85 0.1 eV. This result suggests that InN and its III-nitride alloys are suitable for photovoltaic applications. The unusually small bandgap for InN is explained in terms of the atomic energies and the bandgap deformation potentials. The electronic and structural properties of the nitrides and their alloys are also provided.

Wei, S. H.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our objective is to investigate the complexity of chromium biogeocycling. Our results clearly support more complexity. In short, the chromium cycle is not as simple as the conversion between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in inorganic forms. We have obtained more evidence to prove the formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes from microbial reduction of Cr(VI). The complexes are relatively stable due to the slow ligand exchange of Cr(III). However, some microorganisms can consume the organic ligands and release Cr(III), which then precipitates. Efforts are being made to characterize the organo-Cr(III) complexes and investigate their behavior in soil. Progress and efforts are summarized for each task. Task 1. Production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by selected microorganisms A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by culturing in both growth and non growth media containing 4 mg/L of Cr(VI); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram-positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. Purifications of the soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes produced by Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Rhodococcus sp., and D. vulgaris Hildenborough were carried out. The culture supernatants were lyophilized and extracted first with methanol followed by water. The extracts were then analyzed for soluble Cr. The majority of the Cr(III) was present in the water-soluble fraction for all of the bacteria tested (data not shown), revealing a general phenomenon of soluble Cr(III) production. Cellulomonas sp. ES6 produced the highest amount of soluble Cr(III) (364 ppm) and D. vulgaris Hildenborough produced the least (143 ppm). Seventy eight percent of the soluble Cr(III) produced by Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1 was water soluble, while 45% was water soluble for the Cellulomonas sp. ES6. The water-soluble fractions were further purified by anion exchange chromatography. All soluble Cr(III) was bound to the anion exchange column. The bound organo-Cr(III) was eluted by gradient elution, (0.25M-2M) using ammonium acetate. Preliminary characterization confirmed the nature of organo-Cr(III) complexes. Further characterization of these species by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is in progress. Task 2. Demonstrate that chromate reduction produces organo-Cr(III) complexes with microbial cellular components. In the past year, further research on the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes has been completed. Formation of soluble complexes with cell free extracts as the organic portion has resulted in the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes, approximately 27% Cr(III) remained soluble after 14 days. In addition, complexes formed between individual organic components and Cr(III) have been tested for changes in solubility due to changes in pH.

Xun, Luying

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT. SNAP III THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP-III thermoelectric generator procedures power from the decay heat of 2100 curies of Po/sup 210/. This generator is to be used as a source of auxiliary power in a terrestrial satellite. For purposes of analysis, the satellite system postulated is launched from the Pacific Missile Bange into a 275- statute mile polar orbit with an orbital lifetime of about 1 year. Po/sup 210/ is an alpha emitter having a half life of 138 days and alpha and gamma decay energies of 5.3 and 0.8 mev, respectively. It is a natural component of the earth's crust, as a member of the uranium disintegration series. Sampling of polonium in the biosphere was conducted specifically for this program to determine background radiation levels. Since the fuel is primarily an alpha emitter, there is no direct radiation problem. An analysis was performed to determine the ability of the fuel container to withstand the various thermal, mechanical, and chemical forces imposed upon the generator by vehicle failures. Where theoretical analysis was impossible and experimental evidence was desired, capsules and generators were tested under simulated missile-failure conditions, Thus, the safety limits of SNAP-III in a satellite application were defined. SNAP-III is designed to be aerothermodynamically consumed on reentry into the earth's atmosphere so that the polonium will be dispersed as aerosols in the upper stratosphere. Since heating rates will be lower for aborts occurring prior to orbiting, 65 abort cases have been considered to define the general consequences of vehicle failures. The spatial and temporal relations of vehicle aborts are summarized in cartographic and tabular form. (auth)

Hagis, W.; Dix, G.P.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

117

FFTF utilization for irradiation testing  

SciTech Connect

FFTF utilization for irradiation testing is beginning. Two Fuels Open Test Assemblies and one Vibration Open Test Assembly, both containing in-core contact instrumentation, are installed in the reactor. These assemblies will be used to confirm plant design performance predictions. Some 100 additional experiments are currently planned to follow these three. This will result in an average core loading of about 50 test assemblies throughout the early FFTF operating cycles.

Corrigan, D.C.; Julyk, L.J.; Hoth, C.W.; McGuire, J.C.; Sloan, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Kainz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods: All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results: Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is

Wolfgang Kainz; Franois Alesch; Dulciana Dias; Chan Open Access

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE September 21, 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PILOT INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE TESTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Summary ....................................................................................................................................................... 2 Results...........................................................................................................................................................

120

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 000521 & 000519...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel) [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Post Combustion Test Bed Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assessment methodology and slip-stream testing platform enables the comprehensive early-stage evaluation of carbon capture solvents and sorbents utilizing a breadth of laboratory experimental capability as well as a testing platform at a nearby 600 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant.

Cabe, James E.; King, Dale A.; Freeman, Charles J.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low dose irradiation of the early vertebrate embryo and early onset of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

irradiation of the early vertebrate embryo and early onset of irradiation of the early vertebrate embryo and early onset of tissue aging Lingling Ding Georgia Health Sciences University Abstract There is considerable overlap between cellular and molecular changes that occur in response to low doses of ionizing radiation and those that occur during aging. Both processes are characterized by accumulation of persistent DNA damage (“wear and tear” on the genome), persistent oxidative stress, and depletion of stem/progenitor cells, leading to loss of repair and regenerative capacity. Here we test a hypothesis that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation accelerates normal, aging-related tissue changes. The work was performed using a small, genetically tractable vertebrate model organism, the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Medaka have a

124

New Constraints on the Early Expansion History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic microwave background measurements have pushed to higher resolution, lower noise, and more sky coverage. These data enable a unique test of the early universe's expansion rate and constituents such as effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom and dark energy. Using the most recent data from Planck and WMAP9, we constrain the expansion history in a model independent manner from today back to redshift z=10^5. The Hubble parameter is mapped to a few percent precision, limiting early dark energy and extra relativistic degrees of freedom within a model independent approach to 2-16% and 0.71 equivalent neutrino species respectively (95% CL). Within dark radiation, barotropic aether, and Doran-Robbers models, the early dark energy constraints are 3.3%, 1.9%, 1.2% respectively.

Hojjati, Alireza; Samsing, Johan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b) b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

126

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apollo Energy III LLC Apollo Energy III LLC Place Delaware, Delaware Product The company owns and operates a landfill gas to liquiefied natural gas production facility. Coordinates 39.145271°, -75.418762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.145271,"lon":-75.418762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

127

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, ASME, 2012, Reference.

D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect

The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

Kevin G. DeWall

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

131

Low dose irradiation of the early vertebrate embryo and early...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

irradiation of the early vertebrate embryo and early onset of tissue aging Lingling Ding 1,2 , Xuan Zheng 1,3 , Wendy W. Kuhne 4 , David E. Hinton 5 , Jeffrey R. Lee 6 , and...

132

Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIIE PAT3 OF C R O IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS A B K A. A. Benson andin the early products of photosynthesis, we Stepka, W. , inP THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. 111. BY A. A. Benson

Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

INPUT VALIDATION TESTING: A SYSTEM LEVEL, EARLY LIFECYCLE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnston '12, chelsea Karpenko '12, Lauriane rougeau '13 and catherine White '12. Johnston was a member, a maintenance mechanic and material handler at Cornell for 30 years who served in many roles, including presi

Offutt, Jeff

134

Early Test Facilities and Analytic Methods for Radiation Shielding  

SciTech Connect

This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting held in Chicago, Illinois on November 15 20,1992. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction, which occurred, not coincidentally, in Chicago. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting.

Ingersoll, D.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Early Warning Capabilities for Firefighters: Testing of Collapse ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... before ignition and continued through the collapse of the roof at 426 ... in the index indicate changes in structural stability, whereas flat regions are ...

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine trends in trivalent lanthanide [Ln(III)] sorption to quartz surface SiOH0 and SiO- sites across the 4f period. Complementary laser induced fluorescence studies examined Eu(III) sorption to quartz at varying ionic strength such that the surface sorbed species could be extrapolated at zero ionic strength, the conditions under which the simulations are performed. This allowed for direct comparison of the data, enabling a molecular understanding of the surface sorbed species and the role of the ion surface charge density upon the interfacial reactivity. Thus, this combined theoretical and experimental approach aids in the prediction of the fate of trivalent radioactive contaminants at temporary and permanent nuclear waste storage sites. Potential of mean force molecular dynamics, as well as simulations of pre-sorbed Ln(III) species agrees with the spectroscopic study of Eu(III) sorption, indicating that strongly bound inner-sphere complexes are formed upon sorption to an SiO- site. The coordination shell of the ion contains 6-7 waters of hydration and it is predicted that surface OH groups dissociate from the quartz and bind within the inner coordination shell of Eu(III). Molecular simulations predict less-strongly bound inner2 sphere species in early lanthanides and more strongly bound species in late lanthanides, following trends in the ionic radius of the 4f ions. The participation of surface dissociated OHgroups within the inner coordination shell of the Ln(III) ion is, however, consistent across the series studied. Sorption to a fully protonated quartz surface is not predicted to be favorable by any Ln(III), except perhaps Lu.

Kuta, Jadwiga; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wang, Zheming; Jiang, Siduo; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chesapeake Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to NVLAP at: NVLAP@nist.gov. Personal Body Armor Testing. ... 7 Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor, Section 7, Ballistic Test Methods. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Structural Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers many benefits to wind turbine companies. NWTC includes a new high bay large enough to test any blade expected during the next 5 years. (There are four test bays.) In 1995, NWTC developed a saphisticated data acquisition system, known as the Blade Structural Testing Real-time Acquisition Interface Network (BSTRAIN), to monitor structural testing through 24-hour continuous video surveillance. NWTC recommends ultimate static-strength and fatigue testing, with nondestructive testing in some cases (vibrational testing is covered in a separate information sheet).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number Marks [9] 1. Let A = f1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 10; 11 that (A; #22;) is a poset. (this question continues...) #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {2{ Test 2, Fall 2001(s)? iii. minimum element(s)? iv. minimal element(s)? #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {3{ Test 2, Fall 2001 [4

deYoung, Brad

140

A study of residual Cesium 137 contamination in southwestern Utah soil following the nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site in the 1950's and 1960's.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location for at least 100 above ground Nuclear Weapons tests during the 1950's and early 1960's. Radioactive fallout (more)

[No author

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Biermann Battery in Cosmological MHD Simulations of Population III Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of the first self-consistent three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamical simulations of Population III star formation including the Biermann Battery effect. We find that the Population III stars formed including this effect are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those from hydrodynamics-only (non-MHD) cosmological simulations. We observe peak magnetic fields of ~10^-9 G in the center of our star-forming halo at z ~ 17.55. The magnetic fields created by the Biermann Battery effect are predominantly formed early in the evolution of the primordial halo at low density and large spatial scales, and then grow through compression and by shear flows. The fields seen in this calculation are never large enough to be dynamically important (with beta >= 10^{15} at all times), and should be considered the minimum possible fields in existence during Population III star formation, and may be seed fields for the stellar dynamo or the magnetorotational instability at hi...

Xu, Hao; Collins, David C; Norman, Michael L; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Biermann Battery in Cosmological MHD Simulations of Population III Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of the first self-consistent three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamical simulations of Population III star formation including the Biermann Battery effect. We find that the Population III stars formed including this effect are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those from hydrodynamics-only (non-MHD) cosmological simulations. We observe peak magnetic fields of ~10^-9 G in the center of our star-forming halo at z ~ 17.55. The magnetic fields created by the Biermann Battery effect are predominantly formed early in the evolution of the primordial halo at low density and large spatial scales, and then grow through compression and by shear flows. The fields seen in this calculation are never large enough to be dynamically important (with beta >= 10^{15} at all times), and should be considered the minimum possible fields in existence during Population III star formation, and may be seed fields for the stellar dynamo or the magnetorotational instability at higher densities and smaller spatial scales.

Hao Xu; Brian W. O'Shea; David C. Collins; Michael L. Norman; Hui Li; Shengtai Li

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later Operable Unit III documents and Operable Units I and II post-Record of Decision documents are located in the Information Repository. Complete copies of the records are located at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503, and at the Monticello Field Office, 1665 S. Main Street,

145

Test Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel method for measuring the degree to which a set of test cases executes a given program in diverse ways with respect to the two fundamental programming concepts: control and data. Test Diversity is a method for measuring the variety of software control flow and data flow, comprising of four new measures: conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation of diversity, and test orthogonality. These closely-related measures could be used to evaluate the test effectiveness and the test-effort distribution of a test suite. The Diversity Analyzer is a novel industrial-strength testing tool that can currently perform diversity analysis on software written in C/C++/C#/VB in Windows and.NET environments. The Diversity Analyzer is used to evaluate the fault-detection effectiveness of Test Diversity on various types of industrial projects. Key Words: testing tools, verification, theory, experimentation, conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation,

Borislav Nikolik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

147

Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III - Permitting and Initial Development III - Permitting and Initial Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase III: Permitting and Initial Development GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

148

Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Revise TRUPACT-III Management Language * Revise Procedure Reference for the Bolting Station in Table...

149

Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

Tjandra, Meiliana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SunShot Initiative: Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions...

151

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

152

The Universe Adventure - Early Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Models of the Universe Ready for Blast-off Space exploration missions contribute greatly to our understanding of the Universe. With our new understanding of the fundamental...

153

Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 3.0 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2A 2.6 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2B c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout disposed to date Not Applicable 1.4 x 10 4 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L

154

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

155

Notices III. Summary of Public Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32 Federal Register 32 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 246 / Friday, December 21, 2012 / Notices III. Summary of Public Comments Received and Agency Response to Comments During the public comment period provided, EPA received no comments in response to the September 26, 2012 Federal Register notice announcing the Agency's receipt of the requests for voluntary cancellation and termination of all uses of products listed in Table 1 of Unit II. IV. Cancellation Order Pursuant to FIFRA section 6(f), EPA hereby approves the requested cancellation and termination of all uses of halofenozide registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. Accordingly, the Agency hereby orders that the product registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. are canceled and all uses of halofenozide are terminated. The

156

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

157

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

158

Study Protocol: Phase III single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the randomisation sequence, and contributed to revising the paper. PM co-designed Phase III (economic evaluation), co-applied for funding, and contributed to revising the paper. JG was the research associate during the first half of the Phase III RCT and led... studies of breath- lessness interventions had focused on patients with malignancies. Funding was sought for a Phase II trial with patients with malignancies but was unsuccessful. Thus the methods outlined here for Phase III have not been tested on patients...

Farquhar, Morag C; Prevost, A Toby; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J; Gray, Jennifer; Brafman-Kennedy, Barbara; Booth, Sara

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from performance tests of a Laser Tech Group (LTG) Lightwise tunable diode laser (TDL) monitor at the University of CaliforniaRiverside's laboratory test facility. More stringent nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx)-control mandates for coal-fired boilers have engendered broad-based deployment of post-combustion NOx control systems. It is possible to increase NOx reductions early in the catalyst life cycle through increased reagent injection, with a concomitant increase in ammonia (NH3) ...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

Part III Chapter 6: Fluid flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... size can be very small, making it possible to predict properties from core material not suited for laboratory testing (eg, drill cuttings, sidewall core ...

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MITG test procedure and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

AEO2013 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Early Release Overview 3 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. This early release focuses on the AEO2013 Reference case, which provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2013 is released in early 2013, exploring key uncertainties in the Reference case. Major highlights in the AEO2013 Reference case include:

163

Build Your Own Pentium III PC, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Build your own Pentium III PC and save a bundle!Why pay big bucks for a Pentium III system when legendary build-it-yourself guru Aubrey Pilgrim can help you construct one at home for a fraction of dealer prices? In Build Your Own Pentium ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

III-Nitride LEDs with photonic crystal structures.  

SciTech Connect

Electrical operation of III-Nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic crystal structures is demonstrated. Employing photonic crystal structures in III-Nitride LEDs is a method to increase light extraction efficiency and directionality. The photonic crystal is a triangular lattice formed by dry etching into the III-Nitride LED. A range of lattice constants is considered (a {approx} 270-340nm). The III-Nitride LED layers include a tunnel junction providing good lateral current spreading without a semi-absorbing metal current spreader as is typically done in conventional III-Nitride LEDs. These photonic crystal III-Nitride LED structures are unique because they allow for carrier recombination and light generation proximal to the photonic crystal (light extraction area) yet displaced from the absorbing metal contact. The photonic crystal Bragg scatters what would have otherwise been guided modes out of the LED, increasing the extraction efficiency. The far-field light radiation patterns are heavily modified compared to the typical III-Nitride LED's Lambertian output. The photonic crystal affects the light propagation out of the LED surface, and the radiation pattern changes with lattice size. LEDs with photonic crystals are compared to similar III-Nitride LEDs without the photonic crystal in terms of extraction, directionality, and emission spectra.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Sigalas, M. M. (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA); Epler, J. E. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Krames, M. R. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Li, D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Shagam, M. (Boston University, Boston, MA); Gardner, N. F. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Wierer, Jonathan J. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

TESTING TECHNIQUE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cooling bath should ... When testing super-high energy level specimens ... upon the resolution of the scale or readout device at the low end and the ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Test Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the robot, operator control unit (OCU), payload, and batteries Tools needed ... this test method is to quantitatively evaluate the battery capacity per ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Engineer, design construct, test, and evaluate a pressurized fluidized-bed pilot plant using high-sulfur coal for production of electric power: Phase I. Preliminary engineering; Phase II. Final design; Phase III. Construction. Annual report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The extended test program on the SGT/PFB Technology Unit, previously placed in operation, was completed. Total operating time is 3378 which includes 2681 h burning coal and 1205 h total turbine engine operation. Significant performance and operational milestones, completed during the past year, included: over 2000 h on candidate heat exchanger tube materials at design temperature during which durability of iron-base alloy for PFB heat exchanger tubes was demonstrated; generated electric power with gas turbine operating on PFB coal combustion gas for 1000 h with no appreciable erosion or corrosion of turbine rotor blades and stator vanes; evaluated and improved hot gas cleanup system during which mean particle size of 1.3 Microns and a loading of 0.054 grains/Scf was achieved; and durability of hot/ash solids lock hopper valves for over 1000 h without leakage and stellite coated butterfly gas valve operating successfully for over 900 h in a highly erosive environment was demonstrated. Details of materials evolutions and corrosion rates, component performances and gaseous emission levels are presented.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

169

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

170

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

171

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU`s) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU's) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bed expansion crucible tests  

SciTech Connect

The Am/Cm program will vitrify the americium and curium currently stored in F-canyon. A batch flowsheet has been developed (with non-radioactive surrogate feed in place of the F-canyon solution) and tested full-scale in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) facility at TNX. During a normal process run, a small bed expansion occurs when oxygen released from reduction of cerium (IV) oxide to cerium (III) oxide is trapped in highly viscous glass. The bed expansion is characterized by a foamy layer of glass that slowly expands as the oxygen is trapped and then dissipates when the viscosity of the foam becomes low enough to allow the oxygen to escape. Severe bed expansions were noted in the 5-inch CIM when re-heating after an interlock during the calcination phase of the heat cycle, escaping the confines of the melter vessel. In order to better understand the cause of the larger than normal bed expansion and to develop mitigating techniques, a series of three crucible tests were conducted.

Stone, M.E.

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

ACOUSTICAL TESTING SERVICES TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IEC 60704-2-3 Household and similar electrical appliances - Test code for ... noise emitted and structure-borne vibration induced by small air- moving ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The early release provides a basis for the examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or possible technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2014 is released in 2014, exploring key

178

AEO2012 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2012 Early Release Overview Total U.S. consumption of liquid fuels, including both fossil fuels and biofuels, grows from 37.2 quadrillion Btu (19.2 million barrels per day)...

179

Early lunar geology and geophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite a number of human and robotic missions to the Moon, there are still important unanswered questions about its early evolution, and how it came to be the object we observe today. Here we use observational, experimental, ...

Garrick-Bethell, Ian, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Group III-selenides: new silicon compatible semiconducting materials for phase change memory applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project investigates a series of III-Selenide materials (III xSey), where III=Al, Ga and In, through study of the interacting chemical, kinetic and structural constraints (more)

Lu, Chih-Yuan, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

182

test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test test test test More Documents & Publications Software Testing Checklist February2GuidanceMemorandum.pdf Site Transition Plan Guidance...

183

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Test plan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3.0 TEST PLAN METHODOLOGY 8. 3.1 Assumptions 8. 3.2 Methodology 8. 4.0 COMMENTS ON INITIAL VIEW OF THE DATA 16 1.0 INTRODUCTION. EIA tasked Allied ...

186

Heard Island global warming test  

SciTech Connect

In late January and early February 1991, an international team will conduct an experiment to test the possibility of measuring global warming in the world's oceans. The goal is to provide early indications of warming caused by the so-called greenhouse effect, the atmospheric buildup of CO{sub 2} and other gases. The method is based on the principle that acoustic energy travels through water between a source and receiver at a speed determined primarily by the water temperature. Thus acoustic travel time can be used as a temperature gauge. The idea is an outgrowth of suggestions made by Professor Walter Munk of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Professor Carl Wunsch of MIT in the early 1980s to use long-range underwater acoustic transmissions to measure changes in the heat content of the oceans.

Spindel, R.C. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA Regulations, the last version appeared in the Federal Register of Friday, December 21,1984 (49 FR 49754). Note: The specfic contact information is outdated and should not be used for consultation or outreach. Appendix I - Federal and Federal-State Agency NEPA Contacts Appendix II - Federal and Federal- State Agencies With Jurisdiction by Law or Special Expertise on Environmental Quality Issues Appendix III - Federal and Federal-State Agency Offices for

189

Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (EUI) Wind Farm III (EUI) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Energy Unlimited Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157583013418°, -115.63876390457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157583013418,"lon":-115.63876390457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Facility Pyron (Roscoe III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Near Roscoe TX Coordinates 32.354161°, -100.344825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.354161,"lon":-100.344825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II & III II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.839104°, -162.556894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.839104,"lon":-162.556894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV cell-and then worked with industry to develop the industry-standard GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge) technology. III-V multijunction cells, which address both space and terrestrial power needs, have achieved the highest energy conversion efficiencies of all PV cells, with the current record exceeding 40%.

194

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin- phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility General Information Name GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility Facility GEM Resources III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 3300 East Evan Hewes Highway Location Holtville, California Zip 92250 Coordinates 32.776035405529°, -115.26321172714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.776035405529,"lon":-115.26321172714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Creek III Wind Farm Panther Creek III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek III Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location TX Coordinates 31.9685988°, -99.9018131° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9685988,"lon":-99.9018131,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs....

198

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Weatherization program in Region III: a management study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Weatherization Program, which uses Federal funds and job training program employees to weatherize the homes of low-income homeowners, was examined in the five states of Federal Region III (Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia).

Baldwin, F.D.; Kinney, L.F.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates Speaker(s): Connie Chang-Hasnain Date: February 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location:...

202

Early Science Program | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Science Program The goals of the Early Science Program (ESP) were to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira, and to solidify libraries and...

203

Performance and Reliability of Multijunction III-V Modules for Concentrator Dish and Central Receiver Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 15 years, Solar Systems have developed a dense array receiver PV technology for 500X concentrator reflective dish applications. This concentrator PV technology has been successfully deployed at six different locations in Australia, counting for more than 1 MWp of installed peak power. A new Multijunction III-V receiver to replace the current silicon Point-Contact solar cells has recently been developed. The new receiver technology is based on high-efficiency (>32%) Concentrator Ultra Triple Junction (CUTJ) solar cells from Spectrolab, resulting in system power and energy performance improvement of more than 50% compared to the silicon cells. The 0.235 m{sup 2} concentrator PV receiver, designed for continuous 500X operation, is composed of 64 dense array modules, and made of series and parallel-connected solar cells, totaling approximately 1,500 cells. The individual dense array modules have been tested under high intensity pulsed light, as well as with concentrated sunlight at the Solar Systems research facility and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's High Flux Solar Furnace. The efficiency of the dense array modules ranges from 30% to 36% at 500X (50 W/cm{sup 2}, AM1.5D low AOD, 21C). The temperature coefficients for power, voltage and current, as well as the influence of Air Mass on the cell responsivity, were measured. The reliability of the dense array multijunction III-V modules has been studied with accelerated aging tests, such as thermal cycling, damp heat and high-temperature soak, and with real-life high-intensity exposure. The first 33 kWp multijunction III-V receiver was recently installed in a Solar Systems dish and tested in real-life 500X concentrated sunlight conditions. Receiver efficiencies of 30.3% and 29.0% were measured at Standard Operating Conditions and Normal Operating Conditions respectively.

Verlinden, P. J.; Lewandowski, A.; Bingham, C.; Kinsey, G. S.; Sherif, R. A.; Laisch, J. B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and

205

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Phase III FactSheet _09-08_ _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRCSP Large Scale CO2 Storage in the Mount Simon Reservoir 1 MRCSP Large Scale CO2 Storage in the Mount Simon Reservoir 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42589 DOE/NETL Project Manager: Lynn Brickett, Lynn.Brickett@NETL.DOE.GOV Submitted by Battelle September 2008 MRCSP Phase III Large Scale Geologic Injection Test Principal Investigator Dave Ball, Battelle (614)-424-4901; balld@battelle.org) Test Location Primary Site: The Andersons Marathon Ethanol (TAME) Plant, Greenville, Ohio. Optional Site: Duke IGCC plant, Edwardsport, Indiana Amount and Source of CO 2 Primary Site: 1,000,000 tons CO 2 over 4 years. Source, TAME Ethanol Plant Optional Site: 2,000,000 tons CO 2 over 4 years. Source, Duke IGCC

206

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trial 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993. Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test orI C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Testing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A stellar relic from the early Milky Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the most metal-deficient stars reflects the composition of the gas from which they formed. These old stars provide crucial clues to the star formation history and the synthesis of chemical elements in the early Universe. They are the local relics of epochs otherwise observable only at very high redshifts; if totally metal-free (``population III'') stars could be found, this would allow the direct study of the pristine gas from the Big Bang. Earlier searches for such stars found none with an iron abundance less than 1/10,000 that of the Sun, leading to the suggestion that low-mass stars could only form from clouds above a critical iron abundance. Here we report the discovery of a low-mass star with an iron abundance as low as 1/200,000 of the solar value. This discovery suggests that population III stars could still exist, that is, that the first generation of stars also contained long-lived low-mass objects. The previous failure to find them may be an observational selection effect.

Norbert Christlieb; Michael S. Bessell; Timothy C. Beers; Bengt Gustafsson; Andreas Korn; Paul S. Barklem; Torgny Karlsson; Michelle Mizuno-Wiedner; Silvia Rossi

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

210

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy...

211

Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yongliang, Xiong [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reliability testing of active SDHW components. Part III. Development of a fault detection system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a fault detection system developed for solar domestic hot water systems that will assist the homeowner and repairman in detecting major operational faults with the system. A study by the Florida Solar Energy Center showed that most homeowners were unaware of how well their systems were operating. With this need in mind, we developed a system that will detect and display circulation failures, nighttime circulation, freeze protection failure, and overheating protection failure. Cost of the unit using retail prices for components is less than $55.00 (1985 $), excluding the sensors. Fault detection systems are necessary, since it is difficult for homeowners to know the status of their system. Our device is sufficiently developed for industry to use, although further development of some of the sensors and some cost reduction is necessary.

Farrington, R.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora Connor Randall,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the maximum load is used in instrumented inden- tation analysis, as discussed by Oliver and Pharr,3 for obtain and distance are monitored by transducers, which are then analyzed through OSTEOPROBE IITM software. Each cycle and to minimize the effect of the remaining creep during the linear decrease in load. This type of hold

Hansma, Paul

214

Those early days as we remember them (part II) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

215

The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ~0.4 to ~0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for gamma-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 1E-8 pb to be probed.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; K. Lyons; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; R. Taylor; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Evaluate past and ongoing enhanced oil-recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela, annex III. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report III-1  

SciTech Connect

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex III - Evaluate Past and Ongoing Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex III has separated this portion of the coopertive energy research and development effort into four tasks for study. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist the decision maker in the best timing and method for his EOR project. If a method can be developed to predict production based on certain known reservoir parameters, the producer will be able to make more accurate decisions. Accurate predictive models can be developed if a larger data base with enough data on varied reservoirs and processes is compiled. Statistical algorithms can be developed, tested, and verified with actual production data. New data can be used to recalibrate the models for improved accuracy. The developed models can then be used to evaluate current or anticipated EOR projects.

Ward, D.C.; Garcia, J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microgrid Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Early English Books on microfilm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

search term in one box, or two if you are combining or excluding terms. You can leave the Search Three. In the next search box, enter the words early english books. Leave the other defaults alone. Now access the catalog (libcat.wichita.edu), change the default to Advanced Search: Step Two. Place your

219

test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test test test test More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution...

220

Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

Kim, Tae-Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoo-Hyung [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang-Sik [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Kun [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Shin, E-mail: jayslee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Study at Ambient and High Pressure Diane E. Cabelli, James F. Wishart, Jerzy Holcman, Martin Meier, and Rudi van Eldik J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5131-5136 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction between OH radicals and [CuII(P2O7)2(H2O) 2]6- results in the formation of a Cu(III) complex. No reaction is observed with N3· or Br2·-, whereas SO4·- initiates the same steps as seen with ·OH. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves a ligand interchange or H · atom abstraction process. The Cu(III) complex undergoes a rapid first-order reaction, probably loss of a P2O74- chelate, followed by addition of OH- (pKOH ~ 10) to yield a Cu(III) complex that is predominantly hydroxylated

222

Qualification of CASMO5 / SIMULATE-3K against the SPERT-III E-core cold start-up experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SIMULATE-3K is a three-dimensional kinetic code applicable to LWR Reactivity Initiated Accidents. S3K has been used to calculate several international recognized benchmarks. However, the feedback models in the benchmark exercises are different from the feedback models that SIMULATE-3K uses for LWR reactors. For this reason, it is worth comparing the SIMULATE-3K capabilities for Reactivity Initiated Accidents against kinetic experiments. The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III was a pressurized-water, nuclear-research facility constructed to analyze the reactor kinetic behavior under initial conditions similar to those of commercial LWRs. The SPERT III E-core resembles a PWR in terms of fuel type, moderator, coolant flow rate, and system pressure. The initial test conditions (power, core flow, system pressure, core inlet temperature) are representative of cold start-up, hot start-up, hot standby, and hot full power. The qualification of S3K against the SPERT III E-core measurements is an ongoing work at Studsvik. In this paper, the results for the 30 cold start-up tests are presented. The results show good agreement with the experiments for the reactivity initiated accident main parameters: peak power, energy release and compensated reactivity. Predicted and measured peak powers differ at most by 13%. Measured and predicted reactivity compensations at the time of the peak power differ less than 0.01 $. Predicted and measured energy release differ at most by 13%. All differences are within the experimental uncertainty. (authors)

Grandi, G.; Moberg, L. [Studsvik Scandpower, Inc., 504 Shoup Ave, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Experimental measurement of the persistence of permeability reduction in porous media treated with xanthan/Cr(III) gel systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a series of long-term experiments that was conducted to determine the persistence of flow resistance in unconsolidated sandpacks treated with xanthum/Cr(III) gels. Gels were prepared with 2,000 ppm xanthum and Cr(III) concentrations from 25 to 200 ppm. These systems exhibit various degrees of swelling or syneresis. The experiments were conducted by first allowing a gel to set up in a sandpack and then continuously flushing the sandpack with brine for up to 4 months at a constant pressure drop of 13.3 psi/ft. Flow rate was monitored to calculate permeability changes with time. Flow experiments indicated that the measurement of swelling and syneresis in bulk-gel tests is not a good predictor of gel response in unconsolidated sandpacks. Excellent permeability reduction was obtained in sandpacks when gels that exhibited 35% to 60% reduction in volume in bulk tests owing to syneresis were used. Gels were most effective at retaining flow resistance in the range of 35 to 75 ppm Cr(III), where the sandpacks regained {lt} 0.1% of their original 4,000 md permeability during the experiments. These observations were supported by experiments in which the pH of the injected brine was varied between 3.0 and 6.5. The swelling tests on the bulk gel indicated that permeability would decrease as pH increased and would increase as pH decreased.

Eggert, R.W. Jr.; Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W. (Univ. of Kansas (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

H1616 Supplemental Compliance Test Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories designed the H1616 container for transport of Type B quantities of radioactive materials. During the most recent recertification cycle, questions were raised concerning the ability of drum type containers with locking rings to survive the hypothetical accident sequence when the puncture test was oriented to specifically attack the locking ring. A series of tests has been performed that conclusively demonstrates that the specially designed locking ring on the H1616 performs adequately in this environment. -2- Robert E. Glass WMD Container Systems Department Sandia National Laboratories Table of Contents I. REFERENCES ................................................................................................................. 4 II. INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 4 III. ORDER OF EVENTS................................................................................

Glass Wmd Container; R. E. Glass; R. E. Glass

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Grand Ridge III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser AEP-Appalachian Power Location La Salle County IL Coordinates 41.15496°, -88.750234° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.15496,"lon":-88.750234,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

SEGS III Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Solar Power Plant III Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS III Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 35.021632311687°, -117.56598472595° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.021632311687,"lon":-117.56598472595,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Klondike III I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III I Wind Farm Klondike III I Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

231

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be leveraged by more than $2.2 billion in private capital cost share as part of the third round of the Department's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The selections demonstrate technologies that: make progress toward a target CO2 capture efficiency of 90 percent;

232

Foote Creek Rim III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWestM&N Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Carbon County WY Coordinates 41.643488°, -106.198876° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.643488,"lon":-106.198876,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners III Wind Farm Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Absorption spectrophotometric characterization of Sm(II), Sm(III), and Sm(II/III) bromides and Sm(III) oxybromide in the solid state  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption spectra obtained from SmBr/sub 3/, SmBr/sub 2/, and Sm0Br were used in identifying the samarium species in several mixed-valence Sm(II/III) compounds produced by H/sub 2/ reduction of SmBr/sub 3/. The nature of the absorption of Sm0Br made it possible to detect even traces of Sm0Br in the Sm bromides.

Wood, A.B.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Haschke, J.M.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Toward a National Standards Strategy Conference Report III" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In selected proceedings during the early years, CPSC ... And we do so in the most objective ... know, Consumers Union does not accept outside ...

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1  

SciTech Connect

We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cresci, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Quirrenbach, Andreas [ZAH, Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pasquali, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Department of Astronomy, 351 Tate Laboratory of Physics, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Aflatoxin Test Kit Laboratory Proficiency Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab proficiency testing for Aflatoxin test kit to determine Total Aflatoxins.Samples include Peanut Paste, Corn Meal, Milk. Aflatoxin Test Kit Laboratory Proficiency Testing Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists

239

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm Facility Sweetwater Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Catamount Developer DKRW/Babcock & Brown/Catamount Energy Purchaser CPS Energy/Austin Energy Location Sweetwater TX Coordinates 32.368084°, -100.333722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.368084,"lon":-100.333722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name East Winds (formerly Altech III) Wind Farm Facility East Winds (formerly Altech III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Nichimen America Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

243

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

244

Lithography scaling issues associated with III-V MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we investigate fabrication issues associated with scaling down the gate length and source drain contact separation of a III-V MOSFET. We used high resolution electron-beam lithography and lift-off for gate and ohmic contact patterning to ... Keywords: E-beam, GaAs, Lift-off, MOSFET, PMMA, Resist thickness variation

O. Ignatova; S. Thoms; W. Jansen; D. S. Macintyre; I. Thayne

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

246

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

247

Center Late Opening or Early Closing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Center Late Opening or Early Closing - Inclement Weather or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

Test Purpose Generation for Timed Protocol Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test purposes are requirements, usually constructed by hand, which aim at testing critical properties on implementations. These ones are then used by testing methods to generate test cases. Writing them manually is a heavy task, this is why we propose ... Keywords: Timed protocols, conformance testing, test purpose, testability

Sbastien Salva; Antoine Rollet

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in that those glasses that were found to contain nepheline after the centerline canister cooled (ccc) heat treatment generally had normalized release values that were greater than their quenched counterparts on a statistically significant basis. The current nepheline discriminator as implemented at the DWPF was shown to continue to work well in predicting nepheline prone glass compositions. A main objective of this study was to identify any compositional regions where conservatism in the current nepheline discriminator was preventing access to those regions that would otherwise be acceptable for DWPF processing by the PCCS models. Four glasses (based on the measured compositions) were identified through this study that met those criteria. However, a review of the individual compositions of these glasses revealed no clear trends that might indicate a driver for suppression of nepheline. Another objective of this study was to evaluate an alternative nepheline discriminator model developed using theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. Unfortunately this new model, in its current state, was unsuccessful in predicting nepheline crystallization in the glass compositions selected for this study. It is recommended that the data collected in this study be incorporated into the new model for further refinement.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Those early days as we remember them (part VIII) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VIII) VIII) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

251

Leaching Behavior of Cr(III) in Stabilized/Solidified Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching behavior of chromium was studied using batch leaching tests, surface complexation modeling and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. A contaminated soil sample containing 1330 mg-Cr kg{sup -1} and 25 600 mg-Fe kg{sup -1} of dry soil was stabilized/solidified (S/S) with 10% cement, 25% cement, 10% lime and a mixture of 20% flyash and 5% lime. The XANES analysis showed that Cr(III) was the only Cr species in untreated soil and S/S-treated samples. The leachate Cr concentration determined using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was reduced from 5.18 mg l{sup -1} for untreated soil to 0.84 mg l{sup -1} for the sample treated with 25% cement. The Cr leachability in untreated and treated soil samples decreased dramatically as the pH increased from 3 to 5, remained at similar levels in the pH range between 5 and 10.5, and further decreased at pH > 10.5. Modeling results indicated that the release of Cr(III) was controlled by adsorption on iron oxides at pH 10.5.

Jing,C.; Liu, S.; Korfiatis, G.; Meng, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance  

SciTech Connect

One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous ammonium thiocyanate by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate and related compounds  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior and separation factors of Am(III) and Eu(III) from low acid ammonium thiocyanate solutions were studied using dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and related compounds. It was found that very dilute (<0.1 M) solutions of ammonium thiocyanate were sufficient to allow quantitative extraction of Am(III) with DHDECMP. Significant differences between DHDECMP and dibutylbutylphosphonate (DB(BP)) in the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from thiocyanate were found and indicate chelation is occurring with DHDECMP, unlike the situation in the low acid lithium nitrate system. Infrared spectroscopy of the extracted complexes of La(III) and extraction studies with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP), dihexyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDIBCMP), and di-(2-ethylbutyl)-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DEBDECMP) confirm that chelation occurs with thiocyanate complexes of Am(III) and Eu(III). Separation factors, ..cap alpha.., for Am(III) and Eu(III) were the lowest with DB(BP) (..cap alpha.. = 5.84) and the highest with DHDIBCMP (..cap alpha.. = 10.8).

Muscatello, A.C.; Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

RecQ helicase stimulates both DNA catenation and changes in DNA topology by topoisomerase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Activity of RecQ Helicase and Topo III 28. DiGate,2003 Printed in U.S.A. RecQ Helicase Stimulates Both DNA95616 Together, RecQ helicase and topoisomerase III (Topo

Harmon, Frank G; Brockman, Joel P; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

Patel, Chintan

256

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

Stowell, Michael

257

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Oak Creek Energy Systems Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Oak Creek Energy Systems Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oak Creek Energy Systems Developer Oak Creek Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility McNeilus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner G. McNeilus Developer G. McNeilus Energy Purchaser Dairyland Power /Alliant Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.673251°, -92.665436° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.673251,"lon":-92.665436,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

262

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

263

Top of Iowa III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Top of Iowa III Wind Farm Facility Top of Iowa III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Madison Gas & Electric Developer Midwest Renewable Energy Projects Energy Purchaser Madison Gas & Electric Location Worth County IA Coordinates 43.361088°, -93.294282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.361088,"lon":-93.294282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Ridgetop Energy Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.1317°, -118.451° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1317,"lon":-118.451,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

III-V/Silicon Lattice-Matched Tandem Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. To accomplish this, we have developed techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.; McMahon, W.; Romero, M.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Norman, A.; Duda, A.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

AEO2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Early Release Overview December 2009 Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO- 2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and com- pared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 2009 1 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties in- herent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market trans- formation, or active changes in legislation, the refer- ence case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is re- leased in order to gain perspective on how variations

269

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

271

Freezing Out Early Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological model of dark energy that tracks the baryonic and cold dark matter at early times but resembles a cosmological constant at late times is explored. In the transition between these two regimes, the dark energy density drops rapidly as if it were a relic species that freezes out, during which time the equation of state peaks at +1. Such an adjustment in the dark energy density, as it shifts from scaling to potential-domination, could be the signature of a trigger mechanism that helps explain the late-time cosmic acceleration. We show that the non-negligible dark energy density at early times, and the subsequent peak in the equation of state at the transition, leave an imprint on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy pattern and the rate of growth of large scale structure. The model introduces two new parameters, consisting of the present-day equation of state and the redshift of the freeze-out transition. A Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis of a ten-dimensional parameter space is performed to compare the model with pre-Planck cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and supernova data and measurements of the Hubble constant. We find that the transition described by this model could have taken place as late as a redshift z~400. We explore the capability of future cosmic microwave background and weak lensing experiments to put tighter constraints on this model. The viability of this model may suggest new directions in dark-energy model building that address the coincidence problem.

Jannis Bielefeld; W. L. Kimmy Wu; Robert R. Caldwell; Olivier Dore

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electronic structure of BAs and boride III-V alloys  

SciTech Connect

Boron arsenide, the typically ignored member of the Group-III--V arsenide series BAs-AlAs-GaAs-InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its {Gamma} conduction-band minimum is p-like ({Gamma}{sub 15}), not s-like ({Gamma}{sub 1c}), it has an X{sub 1c}-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong s--s repulsion in BAs relative to most other Group-III--V compounds. We find unexpected valence-band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence-band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAs-GaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small ({approx}3.5 eV) and composition-independent band-gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap; (ii) boron ''semilocalized'' states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaN-GaAs alloys); and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies that are smaller than in GaN-GaAs alloys. The unique features of boride Group-III--V alloys offer new opportunities in band-gap engineering.

Hart, Gus L. W.; Zunger, Alex

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electronic structure of BAs and boride IIIV alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron arsenide, the typically-ignored member of the IIIV arsenide series BAsAlAsGaAs InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its ? conduction band minimum is p-like (?15), not s-like (?1c), it has an X1c-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong ss repulsion in BAs relative to most other IIIV compounds. We find unexpected valence band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAsGaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small (?3.5 eV) and composition-independent band gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap (ii) boron semi-localized states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaNGaAs alloys), and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies which are smaller than in GaNGaAs alloys. The unique features of boride IIIV alloys offer new opportunities in band gap engineering. I.

Gus L. W. Hart; Alex Zunger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lamar Wind Energy Project III Lamar Wind Energy Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project III Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Arkansas River Power Authority Developer Arkansas River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Arkansas River Power Authority Location Prowers County CO Coordinates 38.0326°, -102.532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0326,"lon":-102.532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT---III TRUPACT---III Q uick F acts Cask: TRUPACT---III Manufacturer: ABW Certification: U.S. N uclear R egulatory C ommission C ertificate N umber 9 305 General D escription: A r ectangular c ontainer u sed t o t ransport t ransuranic w aste i n a S tandard L arge B ox 2 (SLB2) b y h ighway t rucks. T he p ackaging i s s ingle---contained a nd c omprised o f i nner and o uter s tainless s teel p lates a nd p olyurethane f oam t o p rotect a gainst p otential punctures a nd f ire d anger. A n o verpack c over i s d esigned t o p rotect t he c losure l id. Package T ype: B Gross W eight: Package ( maximum a llowable l oaded w ith c ontents): 55,116 l bs. Expected w eight: 49,000 l bs. Approximate E mpty P ackage: 43,630 l bs. Maximum P ayload W eight: 11,486 l bs. Overall D imensions: Outer w idth o f c ontainer: 8.2 f eet Height

278

Specific DNA cleavage mediated by [SalenMn(III)][sup +  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of [SalenMn(III)][sup +] and a terminal oxidant affords efficient and specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in regions rich in A:T base pairs. Metal complexes of the tetradentate chelating ligands Salen (Salen = N,N[prime]-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) have been part of the inorganic chemistry literature for several decades. The cationic manganese(III) complex [SalenMn(III)][sup +] (1) is an efficient catalyst for the epoxidation of olefins with terminal oxidants such as iodosylbenzene. 1 also catalyzes oxidative C-H bond activation. The flat, crescent shape of 1, its aromatic and cationic nature, and its ability to catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation are features shared in whole or in part by metal complexes which bind to DNA and cleave it via oxidative processes. These similarities prompted the authors to evaluate the DNA-cleaving properties of 1, and they now report that 1 mediates specific cleavage of right-handed double-helical DNA in a reaction requiring a terminal oxidant. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Gravert, D.J.; Griffin, J.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

Higgins, Kristin, E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D'Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office to conduct various types of energy storage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Testing FAQs HAVA Certification and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the marketplace, testing provides a vehicle for exchanging information ... For sellers (eg, manufacturers), testing can help to substantiate claims that ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Test Anxiety: A Test of Attentional Bias.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test anxiety is characterized by apprehension, panic, and ruminating thoughts of potential failure that are experienced during an exam situation. In a test conscious society, (more)

Lawson, Darla Jane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Full Report Release Date: Early Spring 2014 | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2014) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2014 full version will be released early Spring 2014. Download the AEO2014 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2014 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2014 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2013 Reference case

284

Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry Injection in Boiling Water Reactors: Impact on Fuel Performance and Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early injection of hydrogen during plant startup has been proposed to further mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To assess the effectiveness of early hydrogen water chemistry (EHWC), laboratory tests were performed under simulated BWR startup conditions at 200-400F in the absence of radiation with pre-oxidized stainless steel specimens treated with noble metals to simulate plant surfaces. The ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

285

EETD's Early Technological Successes-Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD's Early Technological Successes-Data Centers EETD's successes: data center energy efficiency November 2013 The 40th anniversary of the founding of the Environmental Energy...

286

Early Science Program Investigators Meeting | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through ambitious scientific computations enabled by the ALCF's Early Science Program (ESP). Investigators from each of the 16 ESP projects will overview their simulation...

287

Project: Early-Age Performance of Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the international workshop "Micro-structure, setting and aging of cement ... Solution Chemistry and Phase Evolution in Early-Age Concrete Materials ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

289

Heat pipe testing program test plan  

SciTech Connect

A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

Bienert, W.B.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

The evolution of CMB spectral distortions in the early Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) allows constraining episodes of energy release in the early Universe. In this paper we revisit and refine the computations of the cosmological thermalization problem. For this purpose a new code, called CosmoTherm, was developed that allows solving the coupled photon-electron Boltzmann equation in the expanding, isotropic Universe for small spectral distortion in the CMB. We explicitly compute the shape of the spectral distortions caused by energy release due to (i) annihilating dark matter; (ii) decaying relict particles; (iii) dissipation of acoustic waves; and (iv) quasi-instantaneous heating. We also demonstrate that (v) the continuous interaction of CMB photons with adiabatically cooling non-relativistic electrons and baryons causes a negative mu-type CMB spectral distortion of DI_nu/I_nu ~ 10^{-8} in the GHz spectral band. We solve the thermalization problem including improved approximations for the double Compton and Bremsstrahlung emissivities, as well as the latest treatment of the cosmological recombination process. At redshifts z injection because of (ii) and (iv) Pixie should allow to improve existing limits, while the CMB distortions caused by the other processes seem to remain unobservable with the currently proposed sensitivities and spectral bands of Pixie.

J. Chluba; R. A. Sunyaev

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optimization Online - Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2006 ... Test. Andrew Goldberg (goldberg ***at*** cs.wisc.edu). Abstract: Test. Keywords: Test. Category 1: Infinite Dimensional Optimization...

292

ECT-Test-Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECT-Test-Methods. A, B, C, D. 1, NVLAP ECT Test Method Selection List (updated 2013-12-02). 2, 3, Standard Category, Test ...

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

PNNI Routing Interoperability Tests)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The individual tests are written in TCL. There is a one for one correspondence between the tests in TCL and the tests described ...

294

Face Vendor Recognition Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FRVT 2002 consisted of two tests: the High ... goal of the Recognition Performance Test was to ... All systems were tested on a standardized database. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Healthcare Message Test Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a tool that creates a suite of test message instances ... to support an actor based testing framework and ... administer and analyze the results of the tests. ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

BESTEST Test Suites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESTEST Test Suites BESTEST (Building Energy Simulation TEST) is a method for testing, diagnosing, and validating the capabilities of building energy simulation programs. The...

297

USGv6 Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... their own list of tested products accessible ... items arising include soliciting test laboratories and ... participate in the USGv6 testing program, soliciting ...

2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tension-Compression Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tension-Compression Testing. ... version of the tension-compression test, to enable ... loading around draw-beads, where calibration tests must include ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Test Advising Framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test cases are represented in various formats depending on the process, the technique or the tool used to generate the tests. While different test case (more)

Wang, Yurong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Directed Test Suite Augmentation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those elements. (more)

Xu, Zhihong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Model tests of OTEC-1: test of HMB with and without cold water pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1977, ERDA began an extensive study of various factors which could effect the early design and deployment of OTEC-1, a test platform for evaluation of one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC heat exchangers. The platform was to consist of the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB) and a 3000 foot deep cold water pipe (CWP). One of the factors to be considered was the motions of the HMB and the motions, loads and stresses of the CWP. Several theoretical methods, including one developed at HYDRONAUTICS, Incorporated were to be used to predict motions and CWP loads and stresses. There existed, however, no model tests or other validation of these theoretical methods. The lack of any validation of the theoretical methods was of some concern as early studies indicated that high CWP bending stresses, in particular, could represent a significant design problem. In early May 1977, HYDRONAUTICS proposed to carry out model tests of a one-fiftieth scale model of the HMB with several CWP models representing relatively rigid (steel) and flexible (glass reinforced plastic GRP) CWP's. This proposal was accepted by ERDA, and the model tests were carried out during June 1977. Preliminary results were provided to ERDA during June and July 1977. This report describes the work carried out and presents and discusses the results, including a comparison of measured and predicted results.

Sheldon, L. R.; Barr, R. A.; O'Dea, J. F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(IV) with Arsenazo III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric procedure was developed for determining U(IV) in the presence of U(VI) by forming a colored complex with Arsenazo III in 4M HCl. The results compare satisfactorily with U(IV) determinations by ceric titration. Total uranium can be determined after reduction of U(VI) with metallic zinc. The concentration range for the absorbance cell solution is 0 to 2 ..mu..g U(IV)/mL. Other tetravalent ions, such as thorium, zirconium, hafnium, plutonium, and neptunium, will interfere.

Baumann, E.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Safe testing nuclear rockets economically  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

Howe, S. D. (Steven D.); Travis, B. J. (Bryan J.); Zerkle, D. K. (David K.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test. Description/Summary: ... Details. Type of software: Virtual concrete electrical conductivity test. Authors: ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Standards Testing Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Group Leader Information Technology Laboratory Software and ... in collaboration with health IT stakeholders ... a variety of testing services: The testing ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Special Tests for Thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special Tests for Thermometry. ... Proficiency-test artifacts (eg SPRTs); Bridge certification; Evaluation of prototype thermometric devices. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Laboratory Corrosion Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Laboratory corrosion tests...Salt spray test NaCl solution Ocean climate Acetic acid salt spray test NaCl + CH 3 COOH Salted roads Copper-accelerated acetic acid salt spray test As in acetic acid salt spray test As in acetic acid salt spray test, but more aggressive Immersion tests Artificial sweat test ? Wearing of decorative...

312

Home Smoke Alarm Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... alarm technologies in a controlled laboratory test ... arrangements and maximize the test instrumentation. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Statistical Inference: Hypothesis Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Statistical Inference: Hypothesis Test GOG 502/PLN 504 Youqin Huang 1 Review: The Z t ( )± Today's topic: Hypothesis Tests What is hypothesis test? Elements, steps, types of hypothesis test Significance test for a mean Small vs. large sample Significance test for proportion GOG 502/PLN 504 Youqin

Huang, Youqin

314

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) IN THE SECONDARY WASTE STREAM OF THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the laboratory results of RPP-PLAN-35958, Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome (VI) to Chrome (III) in the Secondary Waste Stream With the exception of the electrochemical corrosion scans, all work was carried out at the Center for Laboratory Science (CLS) located at the Columbia Basin College. This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel.

DUNCAN JB; GUTHRIE MD

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Search for Untriggered GRB Afterglows with ROTSE-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for untriggered gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment-III (ROTSE-III) telescope array. This search covers observations from September 2003 to March 2005. We have an effective coverage of 1.74 deg^2 yr for rapidly fading transients that remain brighter than ~ 17.5 magnitude for more than 30 minutes. This search is the first large area survey to be able to detect typical untriggered GRB afterglows. Our background rate is very low and purely astrophysical. We have found 4 previously unknown cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 1 new flare star. We have not detected any candidate afterglow events or other unidentified transients. We can place an upper limit on the rate of fading optical transients with quiescent counterparts dimmer than ~ 20th magnitude at a rate of less than 1.9 deg^-2 yr-1 with 95% confidence. This places limits on the optical characteristics of off-axis (orphan) GRB afterglows. As a byproduct of this search, we have an effective ~ 52 deg^2 yr of coverage for very slowly decaying transients, such as CVs. This implies an overall rate of outbursts from high galactic latitude CVs of 0.1 deg^2 yr^-1.

E. S. Rykoff; F. Aharonian; C. W. Akerlof; K. Alatalo; M. C. B. Ashley; T. Guver; D. Horns; R. L. Kehoe; U. Kiziloglu; T. A. McKay; M. Ozel; A. Phillips; R. M. Quimby; B. E. Schaefer; D. A. Smith; H. F. Swan; W. T. Vestrand; J. C. Wheeler; J. Wren; S. A. Yost

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and LessonsLearned  

SciTech Connect

Initiated in 1992, the DECOVALEX project is an international collaboration for advancing the understanding and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in geologic systems. The project has made important scientific achievements through three stages and is progressing in its fourth stage. It has played a key role in the development of mathematical modeling and in situ testing of coupled THM processes in fractured rock and buffer/backfill materials, a subject of importance for performance assessment of radioactive waste geologic repositories. This paper summarizes studies under the most recent stage of the project, DECOVALEX III (2000-2003). These studies include those of two major field experiments: (a) the FEBEX experiment at Grimsel, Switzerland, investigating coupled THM processes in a crystalline rock-bentonite system, and (b) the Drift Scale Test (DST) experiment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, investigating coupled THM processes in unsaturated tuff. These are two of the largest multiyear heater tests undertaken to date for the study of coupled THM processes in geological systems. In addition, three so-called benchmark tests are also studied to evaluate the impact of coupled THM processes under different scenarios and geometries. Within the DECOVALEX project, multiple research teams participated in each of the studies, using different approaches and computer codes. Comparisons of results have provided insight into coupled THM processes, which in turn has stimulated further development of our modeling capabilities. Lessons learned from these studies are discussed. The scientific advances and enhanced insight gained through this kind of international cooperation illustrate the effectiveness of the DECOVALEX project.

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS SUMMARY DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

Dissolution of salt from Type III/IIIA waste tanks at the Savannah River Site may create solutions with inhibitor concentrations below those currently required (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) per the Corrosion Control Program for high nitrate salt solutions (5.5 to 8.5M NO{sub 3}{sup -}). An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of grade A537 carbon steel for waste simulants containing 4.5-8.5M NaNO{sub 3} with maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2}. These maximum inhibitor concentrations used in this program are at a reduced level from those currently required. Current requirements were initially established for the Types I, II and IV tanks made of A285 carbon steel. The experimental program involved corrosion testing to evaluate the pitting and stress corrosion stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the Type III/IIIA waste tank materials. The program was conducted in two phases; the results of the first phase were reported previously (WSRC-STI-2006-00029). In this second phase, the corrosion specimens were modified to represent the 'as-fabricated' condition of the tank wall, and included specimens with mill scale, ground welds and stress-relief heat treatments. The complete description of the corrosion testing and the results are reported herein. The collective corrosion test results for A537 carbon steel in high nitrate waste simulants (4.5 - 8.5M) with the maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2} were as follows: (1) In long-term non-polarized U-bend testing, heat treatment, similar to the waste tank stress relief regime, reduced the incidence of cracking over the 18-month test period. Vapor space SCC was found to initiate on non-heat treated U-bend coupons. (2) In polarized U-bend testing, cracking occurred on U-bend coupons that had welds prepared similar to those in the waste tanks, i.e. ground and heat treated. (3) In electrochemical testing, pitting occurred on all coupons independent of heat treatment, inhibitor concentration, temperature, surface preparation, or welding. (4) In slow strain rate testing, cracking occurred on samples tested in solutions containing up to the maximum inhibitor concentration. The primary conclusion derived from this experimental program is that A537 carbon steel exposed to high nitrate (> 5.5M) solutions at inhibitor levels below the current specifications (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) are susceptible to localized corrosion in the form of pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Long-term storage (e.g., greater than 100 days) of dissolved salt solutions not meeting the current inhibitor specifications for high nitrate salt chemistries in Type III waste tanks shall be avoided. Short term storage (e.g., less than 100 days) at low temperatures (e.g., less than 50 C) in these tanks is permissible for waste removal purposes. The stress relief process reduces the risk of SCC in the Type III waste tanks. On the other hand, the current inhibitor specifications should be strictly followed for the Type I, II and IV waste chemistry to prevent initiation of localized corrosion mechanisms. These tanks were not stress relieved and are more susceptible to SCC.

Mickalonis, J.; Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

The He II Fowler lines and the O III and N III Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new measure of reddening (E$_{(B-V)}$$\\sim$0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the $\\ion{He}{ii}$ Fowler (n$\\to$3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of n$_H$ from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-$\\alpha$ line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative $\\ion{O}{iii}$ intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new $\\ion{O}{iii}$ Bowen lines near $\\lambda$ 2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the $\\ion{N}{iii}$ $\\lambda$ 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d $^2D_{5/2}$ and 3d $^2D_{3/2}$ levels of $\\ion{N}{iii}$. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and $\\ion{N}{iii}$ near $\\lambda$ 374 and show that the observed $\\ion{N}{iii}$ line ratios and intensities can be explained in terms of line fluorescence by the three resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ at $\\lambda$$\\lambda$ 374.432, 374.162 and 374.073 under optically thick conditions.

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

RHIC Sextant Test -- Physics and performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents beam physics and machine performance results of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Sextant and AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line during the Sextant Test in early 1997. Techniques used to measure both machine properties (difference orbits, dispersion, and beamline optics) and beam parameters (energy, intensity, transverse and longitudinal emittances) are described. Good agreement was achieved between measured and design lattice optics. The gold ion beam quality was shown to approach RHIC design requirements.

Wei, J.; Fischer, W.; Ahrens, L. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Synthesis and Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted N4-Tetradentate Ligands for Implementation in An(III)/Ln(III) Separations  

SciTech Connect

The previous literature demonstrates that donor atoms softer than oxygen are effective for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) from trivalent actinides (An(III)) (Nash, K.L., in: Gschneider, K.A. Jr., et al. (eds.) Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, vol. 18-Lanthanides/Actinides Chemistry, pp. 197-238. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1994). It has also been shown that ligands that 'restrict' their donor groups in a favorable geometry, appropriate to the steric demands of the cation, have an increased binding affinity. A series of tetradentate nitrogen containing ligands have been synthesized with increased steric 'limits'. The pK a values for these ligands have been determined using potentiometric titration methods and the formation of the colored copper(II) complex has been used as a method to determine ligand partitioning between the organic and aqueous phases. The results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted amine ligands are encouraging, but the results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted diimines indicate that these ligands are unsuitable for implementation in a solvent extraction system due to hydrolysis.

Mark D. Ogden; G. Patrick Meier; Kenneth L. Nash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Association Conference Transportation Association Conference Vancouver, Canada December 2005 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort U.S. Department of Energy - FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity INL/CON-05-00964 Presentation Outline * Background & goals * Testing partners * Hybrid electric vehicle testing - Baseline performance testing (new HEV models) - 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) - Benchmark data: vehicle & battery performance, fuel economy, maintenance & repairs, & life-cycle costs * WWW information location Background * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - part of the

325

Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers has invented the first vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technology yielding III-V photovoltaics. The photovoltaics ...

327

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schrder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

328

G Subject: Implementation of Division B, Title III, Title V and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Division B, Title III, Title V and Division C Title VII, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-74 References: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012,...

329

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

331

THE EARLY ANTIPROTON WORK [Nobel Lecture  

SciTech Connect

Early work on the antiproton, particularly that part which led to the first paper on the subject, is described. Conclusions that can be drawn purely from the existence of the antiproton are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Chamberlain, O.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2013 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Release Schedule: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2013) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2013 will be released between April 15 and May 2. See release schedule. . Download the AEO2013 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2013 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2013 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2012 Reference case

333

Haptic holography : an early computational plastic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation introduces haptic holography, a combination of computational modeling and multimodal spatial display, as an early computationalplastic In this work, we combine various holographic displays with a force ...

Plesniak, Wendy J. (Wendy Jean)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A technique for early software reliability prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In early developmental stages of software, failure data is not available to determine the reliability of software. But developers need reliability prediction for quality assessment and resource planning. We propose a model based on Reliability Block ...

Rakesh Tripathi; Rajib Mall

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Isocurvature Fluctuations Induce Early Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early reionisation of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarisation results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star formation if extreme assumptions are made about the efficiency and nature of early reionisation. We develop an alternative hypothesis that invokes an additional component of a non-scale-free isocurvature power spectrum together with the scale-free adiabatic power spectrum for inflation-motivated primordial density fluctuations. Such a component is constrained by the Lyman alpha forest observations, can account for the small-scale power required by spectroscopic gravitational lensing, and yields a source of early star formation that can reionise the universe at z~20 yet becomes an inefficient source of ionizing photons by z~10, thereby allowing the conventional adiabatic fluctuation component to reproduce the late thermal history of the intergalactic medium.

Naoshi Sugiyama; Saleem Zaroubi; Joseph Silk

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Design Guide for Early-Market Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early-Market Electrochromic Windows Early-Market Electrochromic Windows Title A Design Guide for Early-Market Electrochromic Windows Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59950 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Stephen E. Selkowitz, Robert D. Clear, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Joseph H. Klems, Luis L. Fernandes, Gregory J. Ward, Vorapat Inkarojrit, and Mehry Yazdanian Call Number LBNL-59950 Abstract Switchable variable-tint electrochromic windows preserve the view out while modulating transmitted light, glare, and solar heat gains and can reduce energy use and peak demand. To provide designers objective information on the risks and benefits of this technology, this study offers data from simulations, laboratory tests, and a 2.5-year field test of prototype large-area electrochromic windows evaluated under outdoor sun and sky conditions. The study characterized the prototypes in terms of transmittance range, coloring uniformity, switching speed, and control accuracy. It also integrated the windows with a daylighting control system and then used sensors and algorithms to balance energy efficiency and visual comfort, demonstrating the importance of intelligent design and control strategies to provide the best performance. Compared to an efficient low-e window with the same daylighting control system, the electrochromic window showed annual peak cooling load reductions from control of solar heat gains of 19-26% and lighting energy use savings of 48-67% when controlled for visual comfort. Subjects strongly preferred the electrochromic window over the reference window, with preferences related to perceived reductions in glare, reflections on the computer monitor, and window luminance. The EC windows provide provided the benefit of greater access to view year-round. Though not definitive, findings can be of great value to building professionals.

337

Upgrading railroad test track, Pueblo, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The railroad test track (RTT) at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colo., was constructed in the early 1970s to support high-speed testing of new railroad rolling stock. Through the years it has been used to test a wide range of railroad passenger and freight cars and locomotives. Now, 20 years later, a new high-speed train set is being procured by Amtrak for service in the improved Northeast Corridor. The test facilities at Pueblo will play an important role in acceptance and safety testing of new high-speed train sets in the US. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) commissioned a study to review the existing condition of the test track and to make recommendations as to possible improvement options so that the facility would be able to test current and future generations of high-speed rail equipment. This paper describes the condition of the test track and explores ways in which it may be modified to accommodate the testing of high-speed train technologies in the near future and into the next century.

Briggs, K. III; Chamberlain, K. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas, Inc., Boston, MA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ZiaTest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trinity-NERSC8-RFP NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method for MPI startup that is intended to...

339

The Turing Test*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turing's test has been much misunderstood. Recently unpublished material by Turing casts fresh light on his thinking and dispels a number of philosophical myths concerning the Turing test. Properly understood, the Turing test withstands objections that ...

B. Jack Copeland

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Test Summary Test More Documents & Publications Evaluation Report: OAS-M-12-01 Evaluation Report: OAS-M-11-01 Evaluation Report: OAS-L-13-01...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ZiaTest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method for MPI startup that is intended to provide a realistic assessment of both launch and wireup...

342

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) -...

343

Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 42.099444444444°, -113.38222222222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.099444444444,"lon":-113.38222222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

345

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

346

KT Monograph Section D5 Pottery Data - Level III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#7;1#7;#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;Libation arm#7;#7;#7;#7;2#7;28#7;34#7;#7;4#7;#7;Trefoil rim#7;#7;2#7;#7;9#7;4#7;9#7;2#7;1#7;#7;Pilgrim flask#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;#7;2#7;#7;Spindle bottle#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;#7;1#7;1#7;#7;#7;#7... overhanging rim 2 1 1 Libation arm 2 28 34 4 Trefoil rim 2 9 4 9 2 1 Pilgrim flask 1 2 Spindle bottle 1 1 Table D5:1 - Sherd counts for Level III by phase. These figures are taken from the following units: 1376, 1417, 1421, 1428, 1428, 1436, 4001, 4004, 4010...

Hansen, C; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cellulose hydrolysis in evolving substrate morphologies III: Timescale analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis Hydrolysis in Evolving Substrate Morphologies III: Time-Scale Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Computational Systems Biology Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 11 December 2009; revision received 4 May 2010; accepted 10 May 2010 Published online 1 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22814 ABSTRACT: We present a time-scale analysis for the enzy- matic hydrolysis of solid cellulosic substrates,

348

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous Waste Bureau Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.nmenv.state.nm.us  DAVE MARTIN Secretary RAJ SOLOMON, P.E. Deputy Secretary CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED January 21, 2011 Edward Ziemianski, Acting Manager Farok Sharif, President Carlsbad Field Office Washington TRU Solutions LLC Department of Energy P.O. Box 2078 P.O. Box 3100 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-5608 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs. Ziemianski and Sharif: On September 20, 2010, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received a

349

CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i5W 95.5 L' i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

350

Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

351

ICP dry etching of III-V nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN, AlN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was investigated in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of dc bias, and ICP power. The etch rates were generally quite low, as is common for III-nitrides in CH{sub 4} based chemistries. The etch rates increased with increasing dc bias. At low rf power (150 W), the etch rates increased with increasing ICP power, while at 350 W rf power, a peak was found between 500 and 750 W ICP power. The etched surfaces were found to be smooth, while selectivities of etch were {le} 6 for InN over GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN under all conditions.

Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Charge exchange measurements on the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two passive charge exchange analyzers were installed on the Doublet III tokamak. Both were of the E parallel B type, permitting H-D discrimination by mass. Deuterons with energies up to about 90 keV could be observed at the highest spectrometer magnetic fields available. Beam injection energy on Doublet III was typically 75 keV. One of the analyzers could scan across the beam injection angle of approximately 27/sup 0/ at the magnetic axis, while the other analyzer observed parallel neutral flux across nearly the entire cross section from about 10 cm inside the limiter to tangency radii of about 85 cm, intersecting the centerpost. Beam injection was angled toward the direction of positive plasma current and co-going particles were generally observed by both analyzers. When neutral beam power was increased in steps, generally the observed fast neutral flux did not increase proportionally at higher power levels. In addition, the parallel analyzer in a few cases showed evidence for a fast particle loss at a single energy, with the distribution function being filled in from higher and lower energies. Flux bursts were observed in synchronism with limiter H/sub ..cap alpha../ spikes at the low energy range of the parallel analyzer. The perpendicular analyzer, observing fast particles near their injected pitch angle, detected bursts at all energies, with especially pronounced correlation with H/sub ..cap alpha../ activity at high energies. When fishbone activity was seen magnetically, simultaneous bursts were often, but not always, observed on the perpendicular analyzer, but were never seen on the parallel instrument.

Lohr, J.; Armentrout, C.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Acceptance Test Refactoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In Executable Acceptance Test Driven Development, acceptance tests represent the requirements of a software system. As requirements change over time, the acceptance tests have to be updated and maintained. This process can be time-consuming and risky as acceptance tests lack the regression safety net that production code has. Refactoring of acceptance tests is used to keep the fixtures and the acceptance test definitions consistent.

Heiko Ordelt; Frank Maurer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Testing Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports NEVAmerica Baseline Performance Testing Summaries A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is defined as a "low-speed vehicle" (LSV) by the National Highway Traffic...

357

High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrator Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrators project seeks to provide new photovoltaic cells for Concentrator Photovoltaics (CPV) Systems with higher cell efficiency, more favorable temperature coefficients and less sensitivity to changes in spectral distribution. The main objective of this project is to provide high efficiency III-V solar cells that will reduce the overall cost per Watt for power generation using CPV systems.This work is focused both on a potential near term application, namely the use of indium arsenide (InAs) QDs to spectrally "tune" the middle (GaAs) cell of a SOA triple junction device to a more favorable effective bandgap, as well as the long term goal of demonstrating intermediate band solar cell effects. The QDs are confined within a high electric field i-region of a standard GaAs solar cell. The extended absorption spectrum (and thus enhanced short circuit current) of the QD solar cell results from the increase in the sub GaAs bandgap spectral response that is achievable as quantum dot layers are introduced into the i-region. We have grown InAs quantum dots by OMVPE technique and optimized the QD growth conditions. Arrays of up to 40 layers of strain balanced quantum dots have been experimentally demonstrated with good material quality, low residual stain and high PL intensity. Quantum dot enhanced solar cells were grown and tested under simulated one sun AM1.5 conditions. Concentrator solar cells have been grown and fabricated with 5-40 layers of QDs. Testing of these devices show the QD cells have improved efficiency compared to baseline devices without QDs. Device modeling and measurement of thermal properties were performed using Crosslight APSYS. Improvements in a triple junction solar cell with the insertion of QDs into the middle current limiting junction was shown to be as high as 29% under one sun illumination for a 10 layer stack QD enhanced triple junction solar cell. QD devices have strong potential for net gains in efficiency at high concentration.

Hubbard, Seth

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Test Request LTFY-2  

SciTech Connect

This test request defines pre-test data for the irradiation of enriched yttrium-uranium hydride samples in the LITR C-48 facility.

1964-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Overview of Conformance Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... require not just one test per error but one test per possible permutation of errors. ... to maximize automation and minimize human intervention. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OMB MPI Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OMB MPI Tests OMB MPI Tests Description The Ohio MicroBenchmark suite is a collection of independent MPI message passing performance microbenchmarks developed and written at The...

362

PRACTICAL COMBINATORIAL TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... boot-up. The initial test configuration (Figure 14) was drawn from the library of pre-computed sequence tests. Some changes ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

PNGV battery test manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual defines a series of tests to characterize aspects of the performance or life cycle behavior of batteries for hybrid electric vehicle applications. Tests are defined based on the Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) program goals, although it is anticipated these tests may be generally useful for testing energy storage devices for hybrid electric vehicles. Separate test regimes are defined for laboratory cells, battery modules or full size cells, and complete battery systems. Some tests are common to all three test regimes, while others are not normally applicable to some regimes. The test regimes are treated separately because their corresponding development goals are somewhat different.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Robotics Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5000 square foot) high bay, holding most of the test methods; ... to help engineers view robot performance remotely and for recording testing events. ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Fiat 500 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

366

Iris Device Qualification Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Device Qualification Test (IDQT). July 15, 2013 - Slides from Workshop. Slides that give the detailed technical approach toward the IDQT tests are ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Nissan Altima Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle...

368

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

369

NREL: Wind Research - Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Photo of a large wind turbine blade sticking out of the structural testing laboratory; it is perpendicular to a building at the National Wind Technology Center. A...

370

Why Test Suites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the marketplace, testing provides a vehicle for exchanging information ... For sellers (eg, manufacturers), testing can help to substantiate claims that ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

372

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

373

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop...

374

NVLAP Biometrics Testing LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reserves the right to update, modify or rename the set of test methods associated with any scope of accreditation. Proficiency Testing Requirements. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Incorporating safety risk in early system architecture trade studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ideally, safety should be a part of the early decision making used in conceptual system design. However, effectively evaluating safety risk3 early enough to inform the early trade studies is not possible with current ...

Dulac, Nicholas

376

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of injuries caused by flame/flash burns[23, 24]. OtherDeep partial IIb Deep III Flame, chemical, electrical, hotliquids with high viscosity Flame, electrical, chemical,

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; May 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range. CAU 489 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996.

Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Those early days as we remember them (Part VII) - Met Lab & Early Argonne History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VII | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory VII | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory 1/7 Those early days as we remember them Part VlI Norman Hilberry, director of Argonne National Laboratory (seated) and Dean E. Dalquest (standing), superintendent of the laboratory's Graphic Arts division. They are examining an historic galvanometer recording of the fluctuation in a neutron density in Chicago Pile No.

379

Those early days as we remember them (Part V) - Met Lab & Early Argonne History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory V | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory 1/3 Those early days as we remember them Part V Farrington Daniels Professor Emeritus of Chemistry The University of Wisconsin Editor's note: Dr. Farrington Daniels was Director of the Metallurgical Laboratory when it became Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. At that time he returned to his chemistry professorship at the University of

380

A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2012 A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease It as a functional test for people at high risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United for enhancing auscultation (listening to heart sounds). Her husband, Robert Guion, was a convenient, good

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The participatory potential of early cinema: a reexamination of early projected films.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines the formal qualities and historic context of three early films produced for the Edison Manufacturing Company by James White and Frederick Blechynden (more)

Daniel, Jessica A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Interconnect Design and Reliability in Electronic Packages III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 400 test vehicles were assembled using ceramic and plastic BGAs, LCCs, .... still draws big attention among the electronic package manufacturers.

383

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Complexation Studies of Bidentate Heterocyclic N-Donor Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect

A new bidentate nitrogen donor complexing agent that combines pyridine and triazole functional groups, 2-((4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)pyridine (PTMP), has been synthesized. The strength of its complexes with trivalent americium (Am3+) and neodymium (Nd3+) in anhydrous methanol has been evaluated using spectrophotometric techniques. The purpose of this investigation is to assess this ligand (as representative of a class of similarly structured species) as a possible model compound for the challenging separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides. This separation, important in the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles, is best achieved through the agency of multidentate chelating agents containing some number of nitrogen or sulfur donor groups. To evaluate the relative strength of the bidentate complexes, the derived constants are compared to those of the same metal ions with 2,2*-bipyridyl (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), and 2-pyridin-2-yl-1H-benzimidazole (PBIm). At issue is the relative affinity of the triazole moiety for trivalent f element ions. For all ligands, the derived stability constants are higher for Am3+ than Nd3+. In the case of Am3+ complexes with phen and PBIm, the presence of 1:2 (AmL2) species is indicated. Possible separations are suggested based on the relative stability and stoichiometry of the Am3+ and Nd3+ complexes. It can be noted that the 1,2,3-triazolyl group imparts a potentially useful selectivity for trivalent actinides (An(III)) over trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)), though the attainment of higher complex stoichiometries in actinide compared with lanthanide complexes may be an important driver for developing successful separations.

Ogden, Mark; Hoch, Courtney L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and...

386

Green Power Marketing in Retail Competition: An Early Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing in Retail Competition: An Early Assessment Title Green Power Marketing in Retail Competition: An Early Assessment Publication Type Report Year of Publication...

387

Early Stage R&D Available for Partnerships - Energy Innovation ...  

Bookmark Early Stage R&D Available for Partnerships - Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Early Stage R&D Available for Partnerships ...

388

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today February 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis...

389

Advanced empirical testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's industrial applications, we see that knowledge systems are successfully implemented. However, critical domains require the elaborate and thoughtful validation of the knowledge bases before the deployment. Empirical testing, also known as regression ... Keywords: Evaluation, Knowledge quality, Quality measures, Regression testing, Test cases, Test visualization, Validation, Verification

Joachim Baumeister

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Kinetics of Chromium(III) Oxidation by Manganese(IV) Oxides Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This represents the first study to determine the chemical kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on Mn-oxides. The results focusing on the "chemical" kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on manganese oxides, i.e., the initial rates of Obtaining and Analyzing Kinetic Data. In Rates of Soil Chemical Processes, Sparks, D. L., Suarez, D. L., Eds

Sparks, Donald L.

391

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques Q.H. FAN,, , X.L. TAN, , J.X. LI , X.K. WANG* , W.S. WU* , G. Montavon&* Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

Yost, Fred (Cedar Crest, NM); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Short, Bruce (Beverly, MA); Giversen, Terri (Beverly, MA); Reed, Jimmy R. (Austin, TX)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, 37: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect the Heartland Wind, LLC, proposed Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project in Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota, to DOE's Western Area Power Administration transmission system. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 29, 2012 EIS-0437: Notice of Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, SD

396

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lauren Milone lauren.milone@em.doe.gov 301-903-3731 Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the first shipment of transuranic waste using the newly approved shipping package known as the TRUPACT-III safely arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The shipment, which originated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, arrived at WIPP on August 25. The new shipping package - the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 3 or TRUPACT-III - allows the Department to package and ship large-sized transuranic waste in a single box that would otherwise

397

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant First TRUPACT-III Shipment Arrives Safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lauren Milone lauren.milone@em.doe.gov 301-903-3731 Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the first shipment of transuranic waste using the newly approved shipping package known as the TRUPACT-III safely arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The shipment, which originated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, arrived at WIPP on August 25. The new shipping package - the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 3 or TRUPACT-III - allows the Department to package and ship large-sized transuranic waste in a single box that would otherwise

398

Overview of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Air Pollutant Early Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Under provision of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Title III, the EPA has proposed a regulation (Early Reduction Program) to allow a six-year compliance extension from Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for sources that voluntarily reduce emissions of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) by 90% or more (95% or more for particulates) from a base year of 1987 or later. The emission reduction must be made before the applicable MACT standard is proposed for the source category or be subject to an enforceable commitment to achieve the reduction by January 1, 1994 for sources subject to MACT standards prior to 1994. The primary purpose of this program is to encourage reduction of HAPs emissions sooner than otherwise required. Industry would be allowed additional time in evaluating emission reduction options and developing more cost-effective compliance strategies, although, under strict guidelines to ensure actual, significant and verifiable emission reductions occur.

Laznow, J. (International Technology Corp., Durham, NC (United States)); Daniel, J. (International Technology Corp., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey of the Solar neighbourhood III. Improved distances, ages, and kinematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ages, chemical compositions, velocity vectors, and Galactic orbits for stars in the solar neighbourhood are fundamental test data for models of Galactic evolution. We aim to improve the accuracy of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey data by implementing the recent revision of the Hipparcos parallaxes. The new parallaxes yield improved astrometric distances for 12,506 stars in the GCS. We also check the GCS II scales of T_eff and [Fe/H] and find no need for change. Introducing the new distances, we recompute M_V for 16,086 stars, and U, V, W, and Galactic orbital parameters for the 13,520 stars that also have radial-velocity measurements. We also recompute stellar ages from the Padova stellar evolution models used in GCS I-II, using the new values of M_V, and compare them with ages from the Yale-Yonsei and Victoria-Regina models. Finally, we compare the observed age-velocity relation in W with three simulated disk heating scenarios to show the potential of the data. With these revisions, the basic data for the GCS stars should now be as reliable as is possible with existing techniques. Further improvement must await consolidation of the T_eff scale from angular diameters and fluxes, and the Gaia trigonometric parallaxes. We discuss the conditions for improving computed stellar ages from new input data, and for distinguishing different disk heating scenarios from data sets of the size and precision of the GCS.

J. Holmberg; B. Nordstrm; J. Andersen

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Manka, C. [Space Plasma Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the alternate constructed power system. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the alternate constructed power system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guidelines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility. This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) does not include evaluation of surface electrical construction support facilities used to provide temporary construction power where the intent to remove such facilities when construction is completed such as tent storage buildings, shop buildings, fuel storage area etc. Furthermore, this TER does not include the extension of the existing overhead power lines to the booster pump station that was designed, installed, and is maintained by Nevada Test Site (NTS).

W.J. REED

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Early Detection Saves Lives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Early Detection Saves Lives Early Detection Saves Lives Early Detection Saves Lives September 20, 2012 - 2:39pm Addthis What does this mean for me? It can save your life. It can save the life of someone you love. The Worker Health Protection Program (WHPP) is the DOE's Former Worker Medical Screening Program at 13 DOE sites. WHPP provides free medical evaluations for selected occupational diseases every three years to eligible former DOE workers under a national medical protocol established by the DOE. WHPP is funded by the DOE and is operated by a consortium of the City University of New York, the United Steelworkers, and the Atomic Trades & Labor Council in association with clinical facilities in communities near DOE sites. The sites covered under WHPP include the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National

405

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year. March 8, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

406

Detailed Test Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Test Information Detailed Test Information EPA tests vehicles by running them through a series of driving routines, also called cycles or schedules, that specify vehicle speed for each point in time during the laboratory tests. For 2007 and earlier model year vehicles, only the city and highway schedules were used. Beginning with 2008 models, three additional tests will be used to adjust the city and highway estimates to account for higher speeds, air conditioning use, and colder temperatures. Note: EPA has established testing criteria for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids that are slightly different than those for conventional vehicles. New Tests City Highway High Speed Air Conditioning Cold Temperature Detailed Comparison EPA Federal Test Procedure (City Schedule): Shows vehicle speed (mph) at each second of test

407

Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Testing (BeLPT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

METRIC METRIC DOE-SPEC-1142-2001 April 2001 DOE SPECIFICATION BERYLLIUM LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION TESTING (BeLPT) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-SPEC-1142-2001 iii CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD..........................................................................................v

408

CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated N0.63' 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, kfC900

409

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

410

Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commodity Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 464 490 49 518 1,521 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 89 236 1 209 539 Residual Fuel Oil 26 18 11 16 469 540 Still Gas 13,838 50,328 108,359 8,694 38,875 220,094 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 528 166 694 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 9,003 17,611 42,614 2,852 12,416 84,496 Natural Gas (million cubic feet) 38,347 143,702 474,359 26,971 159,849 843,228 Coal (thousand short tons) 30 0 0 0 0 30 Purchased Electricity (million kWh) 2,355 11,892 23,255 2,003 5,130 44,635 Purchased Steam (million pounds) 3,849 12,723 88,922 1,439 14,426 121,359 Other Products 40 47 677 67 1,141 1,972

411

Concentration of Actinides in Plant Mounds at Safety Test Nuclear Sites in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around large shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. Believed to be an important factor in their formation, the shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, {sup 241}Am, and U in plant mounds at safety test sites. The NAEG studies found concentrations of these contaminants to be greater in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. For example, at Project 57 on the NTTR, it was estimated that 15 percent of the radionuclide inventory of the site was associated with shrub mounds, which accounted for 17 percent of the surface area of the site, a ratio of inventory to area of 0.85. At Clean Slate III at the TTR, 29 percent of the inventory was associated with approximately 32 percent of the site covered by shrub mounds, a ratio of 0.91. While the total inventory of radionuclides in intershrub areas was greater, the ratio of radionuclide inventory to area was 0.40 and 0.38, respectively, at the two sites. The comparison between the shrub mounds and adjacent desert pavement areas was made for only the top 5 cm since radionuclides at safety test sites are concentrated in the top 5 cm of intershrub areas. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with the shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. As part of its Environmental Restoration Soils Subproject, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has proposed that the majority of its contaminated soil 'Corrective Action Units', including the safety test sites, be closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls. The concentration of actinides in the shrub mounds has important implications for postclosure management of the safety test sites. Because resuspension factors at safety test sites can be three to four orders-of-magnitude higher than soil sites associated with atmospheric tests where criticality occurred, the shrub mounds are an important factor in stabilization of actinide contaminants. Loss of shrubs associated with mounds from fire or plant die-back from drought could cause radionuclides at these sites to become more prone to suspension and water erosion until the sites are stabilized. Alternatively, although shrub mounds are usually composed of predominantly fine sand size particles, smaller silt and clay size particles in them are often high in CaCO{sub 3} content. The CaCO{sub 3} may act as a cementing agent to limit erosion of the shrub mounds even if the vegetation cover is temporarily lost.

David S. Shafer; Jenna Gommes

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

ECN Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1991-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S. from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The InstalledMW No. Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installedbuilding-integrated, tracking, non-tracking, crystalline,

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil...

416

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

417

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

418

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing (LPP), Aflatoxin, Aflatoxin Test Kit, Peanut Paste and Corn Meal, Biodiesel Feedstock, Cholesterol, Cottonseed, Cottonseed Oil, Edibile Fat, Feed Microscopy, Fish Meal, Fumonisin, Gas Chromatography, Gentically Modified Organism, G

419

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

420

I/O Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IO TEST is intended as a hardware testing and debugging aid for use with the PDP-6 and its associated input multiplexer (analog to digital converter) and output multiplexer (digital to analog converter). While all characters ...

Beeler, Michael

1967-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Test Example - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 10, 2000 ... A Test Example. Consider A:=21/6+31/5. The advantage of picking a simple algebraic number for our test is that we can easily precompute the...

422

Overview of the ALCF Early Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALCF Early Science Program ALCF Early Science Program Timothy J . W illiams Argonne L eadership C ompu2ng F acility 2013 M iraCon W orkshop Wednesday 3 /4/2013 Session: 3 :45---4:30pm 2 § 16 projects - Large t arget a lloca-ons - Postdoc § Proposed r uns b etween M ira a cceptance a nd start of producCon § 2 billion core---hours to burn in a few months First in Mira Queue: Early Science Program h3p://esp.alcf.anl.gov 3 § MoCvaCons f or E SP: - Prepare k ey a pplica-ons f or t he a rchitecture a nd s cale o f M ira - Solidify l ibraries a nd i nfrastructure - Iden-fy s ystem p roblems § 16 Early Science projects were chosen based on computaConal and scienCfic reviews. § The p rojects h ave a r unning s tart f or d elivery o f e xciCng n ew s cience - Postdocs w ere a ssigned t o t he p rojects - ALCF

423

Early Science Instruction Addressing Fundamental Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary Early Science Instruction Addressing Fundamental Issues David Klahr Carnegie Mellon (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 4. Child psychology in practice (6th ed.). New York acquisition in foundational domains. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) & D. Kuhn & R.S. Siegler (Vol. Eds.), Handbook

Klahr, David

424

Toward Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our long term research goal is to develop a fully automated, image-based diagnostic system for early diagnosis of pulmonary nodules that may lead to lung cancer. In this paper, we focus on generating new probabilistic models for the estimated growth ...

Ayman El-Baz; Georgy Gimel'Farb; Robert Falk; Mohamed Abou El-Ghar; Sabrina Rainey; David Heredia; Teresa Shaffer

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A new perspective on early cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new perspective on early cosmology based on Loop Quantum Gravity. We use projected spinnetworks, coherent states and spinfoam techniques, to implement a quantum reduction of the full Kinematical Hilbert space of LQG, suitable to describe inhomogeneous cosmological models. Some preliminary results on the solutions of the Scalar constraint of the reduced theory are also presented.

Emanuele Alesci

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Intermediate States of Ribonuclease III in Complex with Double-Stranded RNA  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) can affect RNA structure and gene expression in either of two ways: as a processing enzyme that cleaves double-stranded (ds) RNA, or as a binding protein that binds but does not cleave dsRNA. We previously proposed a model of the catalytic complex of RNase III with dsRNA based on three crystal structures, including the endonuclease domain of RNase III with and without bound metal ions and a dsRNA binding protein complexed with dsRNA. We also reported a noncatalytic assembly observed in the crystal structure of an RNase III mutant, which binds but does not cleave dsRNA, complexed with dsRNA. We hypothesize that the RNase III {center_dot} dsRNA complex can exist in two functional forms, a catalytic complex and a noncatalytic assembly, and that in between the two forms there may be intermediate states. Here, we present four crystal structures of RNase III complexed with dsRNA, representing possible intermediates.

Gan, Jianhua; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua (NIH)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

Recovery of Cr(III) from tannery spent chrome liquor for reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper embodies details on the extraction behavior of Cr(III) along with Al(III), Fe(III), Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from hydrochloric acid media employing the Cyanex 301-toluene system. All of these metals, except Cr(III), Mg(II), and Mn(II), are extracted into the organic phase. This property of the extractant has been used to separate Cr(III) from the binary mixtures. The partition data have been extended onto spent chrome liquor, and this waste has been treated in such a manner so that it becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. The hydrolytic stability and recycling capacity has been reported. Because the concentration of Cr(III) in the waste is much lower than that required for chromium depositions in Cr(III) plating baths, a concentration step using MgO as a precipitating agent has been appended. To summarize, this paper envisages a new approach to tannery waste management that focuses on treating spent chrome liquors using a solvent extraction technique in such a manner that the waste becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. This would not only help abate pollution but also recover the metal in a pure form.

Khwaja, A.R.; Singh, R.; Tandon, S.N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Check for peroxides every 6 months. opened test 1 test 2 test 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Check for peroxides every 6 months. opened test 1 test 2 test 3 date initials Check for peroxides every 6 months. opened test 1 test 2 test 3 date initials Check for peroxides every 6 months. Test strips can be obtained from EH&S, 5-8200 opened test 1 test 2 test 3 date initials Check for peroxides

Manning, Sturt

429

Combinatorial Test Coverage Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Statement coverage: This is the simplest of coverage criteria the percentage of statements exercised by the test set. ...

430

Personal Body Armor Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Personal Body Armor Testing. In 2006, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) National ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Testing EIA Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Interviews Without Debriefings Respondents do not see the questionnaire prior to the interview Structured protocol Test question wording and interpretation ...

432

Advance Testing Company Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conductivity of Saturated Porous Materials Using a Flexible Wall Permeameter. ... Practice for the Accreditation of Testing Agencies for Unit Masonry. ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

Seattle Asbestos Test Bellevue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seattle Asbestos Test Bellevue. NVLAP Lab Code: 200876-0. Address and Contact Information: 12727 Northup Way, Suite ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Seattle Asbestos Test, LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seattle Asbestos Test, LLC. NVLAP Lab Code: 200768-0. Address and Contact Information: 19701 Scriber Lake Road, Suite ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

435

Retlif Testing Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of radio disturbance characteristics of electrical motor-operated and ... and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment - Section 15 - Magnetic Effect. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

Computer Forensics Tool Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer Forensics Tool Testing (CFTT). Summary: For more information, visit: http://www.cftt.nist.gov/. There is a critical ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Control of Test Conduct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Control of Test Conduct Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett P....

438

Coaxial test fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to arrangements for performing electrical tests on contact material samples, and in particular for testing contact material test samples in an evacuated environment under high current loads. Frequently, it is desirable in developing high-current separable contact material, to have at least a preliminary analysis of selected candidate conductor materials. Testing of material samples will hopefully identify materials unsuitable for high current electrical contact without requiring incorporation of the materials into a completed and oftentimes complex structure.

Praeg, W.F.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

440

Security Resiliency Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accepted practice within the electric sector is to pre-stage and test equipment before deployment. Verification of functionality, operating parameters, and interoperability of equipment to be deployed can often be incorporated into predeployment testing. This testing may also support the selection of features responsible for the security of the host equipment. However, some security features and many aspects of resiliency testing may require activation, interaction, and interoperability with an ...

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iii early test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cryptographic and Security Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Cryptographic and Security Testing. ... TX. atsec information security corporation, Austin, TX [200658- 0] VA. ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

442

HEALTHCARE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test reports created for validation purposes and submitted to the certification body, the ... CHP Certified Health Information Technology Products List ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

444

Pig shipping container test sequence  

SciTech Connect

This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

Adkins, H.E. Jr.

1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Testing hypergraph colorability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of testing properties of hypergraphs. The goal of property testing is to distinguish between the case whether a given object has a certain property or is "far away" from the property. We prove that the fundamental problem of l-colorability ... Keywords: hypergraph algorithms, hypergraph coloring, hypergraphs, property testing

Artur Czumaj; Christian Sohler

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Quasi-random testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-random sequences, also known as low-discrepancy or low-dispersion sequences, are sequences of points in an n-dimensional unit hypercube. These sequences have the property that points are spread more evenly throughout the cube than random point ... Keywords: adaptive random testing, automated testing, low-discrepancy sequence, quasi-random sequence, random testing

Tsong Yueh Chen; Robert Merkel

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

BOOMER KD

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

CORRTEX Diagnostic Deployment for the SPE-III experiment, 24 July 2012: Fielding Report and Preliminary Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs Time Experiments (CORRTEX) diagnostic system was deployed for the third explosives test in the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) sequence to monitor and verify several conditions of the experiment including the detonation velocity of the explosive package and functioning of explosive initiators. Six distance-marked coaxial cables were installed on the SPE-III explosives canister, and key locations documented through along-cable length measurements and photography. CORRTEX uses electrical-pulse time-domain reflectometry to continuously record the two-way transit time (TWTT) of the cables. As the shock front of the detonation advances, the coaxial cable is shorted or destroyed, and the resulting TWTT also decreases. Interpretation of these changes as a function of TWTT can be converted to positional measurements using known parameters of the cables.

Sandoval, Thomas D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lessons Learned from Early Microelectronics Production at Sandia National Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1980s Sandia designed, developed, fabricated, tested, and delivered hundreds of thousands of radiation hardened integrated circuits (IC) for use in weapons and satellites. Initially, Sandia carried out all phases, design through delivery, so that development of next generation ICs and production of current generation circuits were carried out simultaneously. All this changed in the mid-eighties when an outside contractor was brought in to "produce" ICs that Sandia developed, in effect creating a crisp separation between development and production. This "partnership" had a severe impact on operations, but its more damaging effect was the degradation of Sandia's microelectronics capabilities. This report outlines microelectronics development and production in the early eighties and summarizes the impact of changing to a separate contractor for production. This record suggests that low volume production be best accomplished within the development organization. 4 Contents Su...

Weaver Microelectronics Technologies; H. T. Weaver

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Those early days as we remember them (Part VI) - Met Lab & Early Argonne History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VI | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory VI | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory 1/2 Those early days as we remember them Part Vl Lester C. Furney (second from right), who formerly handled public relations at Argonne and is author of the article below, is pictured here in February 1956 with (l to r) Major General D. J. Keirn, Major General James McCormack, Jr. (Ret.), and Lt. General James H. Doolittle (Ret.) during a

451

Toroidal simulation magnet tests  

SciTech Connect

A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly. (auth)

Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

453

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to a total dose of 3.95 x 10{sup 6} R, indicated little to no affect on the performance of the material to remove Sr and actinides. Previous testing established that mMST releases oxygen gas during the synthesis, and continues to off-gas during storage post synthesis. The post-synthesis gas release rate was measured under several conditions, including varying the pH of the wash water and at elevated temperature (49 C, typical of bounding summertime storage without air conditioning). Results indicated that a high pH (basic) wash reduced the initial gas release rate, but after 2 days the release rates from all different pH washed samples were not statistically different. The gas release rate at 49 C, a temperature at which the material may be exposed to during shipping and storage, was consistently about 2.5 times higher than the rate at room temperature. All gas release results indicated that vented containers would be necessary for shipping and storage of large quantities of material. Suspension of sorbate-loaded solids into diluted solutions representing intermediate and final stages of washing for 24-hours revealed no evidence of desorption of Sr, Pu or Np from the mMST solids. Based on the results of the Phase III testing as well as that from earlier studies (Phases I and II), SRNL researchers recommend adopting the use of the mMST material for the removal of strontium and actinides from the SRS HLW supernatant liquids in the Actinide Removal Process and Salt Waste Processing Facility. Given the decrease in Sr and Pu removal performance for the mMST having an age of 4 years and 8 months, we recommend that mMST be used within 30 months of production. Furthermore we recommend that DOE provide funding to conduct pilot-scale testing of the mixing and settling characteristics of the mMST and impact, if any, on the generation of hydrogen during processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

456

RMOTC - Testing - Geothermal  

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Geothermal Testing Geothermal Testing Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. With the existing geologic structure at RMOTC, promising potential exists for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) testing. The field also has two reliable water resources for supporting low-temperature geothermal testing.

457

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

Gonsalves, J.M.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

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Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

459

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. Phase I Task 6 activities of Preliminary Site Analysis were documented and reported as a separate Topical Report on February 2003. Most of the other technical activities were on hold pending on DOE's announcement of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) awards. WMPI was awarded one of the CCPI projects in late January 2003 to engineer, construct and operate a first-of-kind gasification/liquefaction facility in the U.S. as a continued effort for the current WMPI EECP engineering feasibility study. Since then, project technical activities were focused on: (1) planning/revising the existing EECP work scope for transition into CCPI, and (2) ''jump starting'' all environmentally related work in pursue of NEPA and PA DEP permitting approval.

John W. Rich

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z