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1

TEMPEST II--A NEUTRON THERMALIZATION CODE  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST II neutron thermalization code in Fortran for IBM 709 or 7090 calculates thermal neutron flux spectra based upon the Wigner-Wilkins equation, the Wilkins equation, or the Maxwellian distribution. When a neutron spectrum is obtained, TEMPEST II provides microscopic and macroscopic cross section averages over that spectrum. Equations used by the code and sample input and output data are given. (auth)

Shudde, R.H.; Dyer, J.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table A2-12, p. B2-1....

4

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table 4-1, p. 4-4; and...

5

Thermal Power Systems, Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver Technology Project. Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 1978. Volume II. Detailed report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal or electrical power from the sun's radiated energy through Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver technology is the goal of this Project. The energy thus produced must be economically competitive with other sources. This Project supports the industrial development of technology and hardware for extracting energy from solar power to achieve the stated goal. Present studies are working to concentrate the solar energy through mirrors or lenses, to a working fluid or gas, and through a power converter change it to an energy source useful to man. Rankine-cycle and Brayton-cycle engines are currently being developed as the most promising energy converters for our near future needs. Accomplishments on point-focusing technology in FY 1978 are detailed.

Not Available

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Title Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Publication Type...

7

Thermal Barrier Coating Systems II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2009... on the application requirements and not on substrate physical properties such as thermal expansion rate Esp. within the same class of alloys.

8

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Typical Commercial Building Thermal Energy Distribution Design Load Intensities (Watts per SF) Distribution System Fans Other Central System Supply Fans Cooling Tower Fan Central System Return Fans Air-Cooled Chiller Condenser Fan 0.6 Terminal Box Fans 0.5 Exhaust Fans (2) Fan-Coil Unit Fans (1) Condenser Fans 0.6 Packaged or Split System Indoor Blower 0.6 Pumps Chilled Water Pump Condenser Water Pump Heating Water Pump Note(s): Source(s): 0.1 - 0.2 0.1 - 0.2 1) Unducted units are lower than those with some ductwork. 2) Strong dependence on building type. BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II:Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table 3-1, p. 3-6. 0.3 - 1.0 0.1 - 0.3 0.1 - 0.4

9

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

10

Potential benefits of distributed PCM thermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the benefits of passive thermal storage by means of phase change material (PCM) distributed throughout the wall and ceiling surfaces of a building, as would occur if the wallboard were impregnated with PCM. Surface heat transfer is expected to be adequate for thermal storage capacity up to 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ of surface area. Sums of daily energy balances during the heating season indicate that use of PCM-impregnated wallboard with a 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ capacity would provide adequate storage for direct gain systems with the largest practical window area in Denver, Boston, and Fort Worth. It is shown that distributed PCM thermal storage offers the opportunity to obtain several ton-hours of ventilative cooling per night throughout much of the US during July. 17 refs., 9 figs.

Neeper, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR THERMAL DISTRIBUTION STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

This report details development paths for advanced versions of ASHRAE Standard 152, Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Efficiency. During the course of conversations within the ASHRAE committee responsible for developing the standard (SPC152P), three areas of development for Standard 152 were proposed: (1) extend the scope of the standard to include thermal comfort variables; (2) extend the scope of the standard to include small commercial buildings; and (3) improve the existing standard with respect to accuracy and economy of effort. Research needs associated with each of the three options are identified.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Progress in solar thermal distributed receiver technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author reports the status of research on distributed receivers, which are solar thermal collectors which concentrate sunlight on an absorber and do not employ the central receiver concept. Point-focusing collectors such as the parabolic dish, line-focusing collectors such as the parabolic trough, and the fixed-mirror distributed-focus of hemispheric bowl collectors are the most common receivers. Following an overview of fundamental principals, there is a description of several installations and of the organic Rankine Cycle engine and the Solarized Automotive Gas Turbine projects. Future development will explore other types of power cycles, new materials, and other components and designs. 5 references, 6 figures.

Leonard, J.A.; Otts, J.V.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G. Hannah, S. Christe,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G distribution of RHESSI flares and compare it to previous thermal energy distributions of transient events. We flares down to nanoflares. The fre- quency distribution of the energy in these events has been studied

California at Berkeley, University of

14

Modeling and Optimizing the Thermal Stress Distribution in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for Materials Science & Technology 2012 ... Presentation Title, Modeling and Optimizing the Thermal Stress Distribution in a Plasma Spray System for ... and analyzed for an applied thermal load in COMSOL® Multiphysics®.

15

Obtaining a bimodal grain size distribution via thermal means  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Obtaining a bimodal grain size distribution via thermal means ... manipulating thermal history, a family of bimodal grain size distributions may be formed. ... Mild Carbon Steel Quenche in Coconut Water, Fresh urine, Nigerian unadultrated up-wine, ... Multi-scale modeling of phase transformations in steels.

16

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

17

Predicting the distribution of thermal comfort votes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing occupant comfort and minimizing energy costs are two challenging tasks in the efficient operation of any office building. Often these objectives cannot be achieved simultaneously which asks for methods that resolve this trade-off in the best ... Keywords: decision support systems, intelligent systems, thermal comfort

Anika Schumann; Nic Wilson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Proceedings of the 1992 DOE-industry thermal distribution conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of the conference was thermal distribution in small buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment in which the heat or cooling is produced to the building spaces in which it is used. The small buildings category is defined to include single-family residential and multifamily and commercial buildings with less than 10,000 ft{sup 2} floor area. The 1992 DOE-Industry Thermal Distribution Conference was conceived as the beginning of a process of information transfer between the DOE and the industries having a stake in thermal distribution systems, whereby the DOE can make the industry aware of its thinking and planned directions early enough for changes to be made, and whereby the industries represented can provide this input to the DOE on a timely and informed basis. In accordance with this, the objectives of the Conference were: To present--to a representative group of researchers and industry representative--the current industry thinking and DOE's current directions for research in small-building thermal distribution. To obtain from industry and the research community a critique of the DOE priorities and additional ideas concerning how DOE can best assist the industry in promoting energy conservation in thermal distribution systems.

Andrews, J.W. (ed.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Proceedings of the 1992 DOE-industry thermal distribution conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of the conference was thermal distribution in small buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment in which the heat or cooling is produced to the building spaces in which it is used. The small buildings category is defined to include single-family residential and multifamily and commercial buildings with less than 10,000 ft{sup 2} floor area. The 1992 DOE-Industry Thermal Distribution Conference was conceived as the beginning of a process of information transfer between the DOE and the industries having a stake in thermal distribution systems, whereby the DOE can make the industry aware of its thinking and planned directions early enough for changes to be made, and whereby the industries represented can provide this input to the DOE on a timely and informed basis. In accordance with this, the objectives of the Conference were: To present--to a representative group of researchers and industry representative--the current industry thinking and DOE`s current directions for research in small-building thermal distribution. To obtain from industry and the research community a critique of the DOE priorities and additional ideas concerning how DOE can best assist the industry in promoting energy conservation in thermal distribution systems.

Andrews, J.W. [ed.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Correcting Thermal Distribution Problems for a Large University Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University main campus in College Station consists of 114 buildings served by two central plants. The two main campus loops are more than 50 years old with a total piping length for each loop in excess of 13 miles. The main campus has long had a problem with thermal distribution to the 114 buildings served by the central plants. Pressure problems were encountered in the chilled water and hot water distribution system during peak demand periods. The differential pressure between supply and return headers at buildings far from the central plants was negative, in the middle area was neutral, and close to the plant was positive. Various modifications were performed over the years without completely solving this problem. Discovering the real cause could help improve the thermal distribution and help determine how to best operate the system. This paper presents the causes and recommendations for the correction of the thermal distribution problems, which include not only malfunctioning automatic building hydraulic controls, but also some building hydraulic configurations themselves. Based on the findings, the thermal distribution problems will be solved by repairing the controls and retrofitting building hydraulic configurations as needed.

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

22

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 Thermal Distribution Design Load and Electricity Intensities, by Building Activity Education 0.5 1.3 Food Sales 1.1 6.4 Food Service 1.5 6.4 Health Care 1.5 5.6 Lodging 0.5 1.9...

23

Quantum Gibbs distribution from dynamical thermalization in classical nonlinear lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study numerically time evolution in classical lattices with weak or moderate nonlinearity which leads to interactions between linear modes. Our results show that in a certain strength range a moderate nonlinearity generates a dynamical thermalization process which drives the system to the quantum Gibbs distribution of probabilities, or average oscillation amplitudes. The effective dynamical temperature of the lattice varies from large positive to large negative values depending on energy of initially excited modes. This quantum Gibbs distribution is drastically different from usually expected energy equipartition over linear modes corresponding to a regime of classical thermalization. Possible experimental observations of this dynamical thermalization are discussed for cold atoms in optical lattices, nonlinear photonic lattices and optical fiber arrays.

Leonardo Ermann; Dima L. Shepelyansky

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

SciTech Connect

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

27

Spin and the Thermal Equilibrium Distribution of Wave Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a quantum system $S$ weakly interacting with a very large but finite system $B$ called the heat bath, and suppose that the composite $S\\cup B$ is in a pure state $\\Psi$ with participating energies between $E$ and $E+\\delta$ with small $\\delta$. Then, it is known that for most $\\Psi$ the reduced density matrix of $S$ is (approximately) equal to the canonical density matrix. That is, the reduced density matrix is universal in the sense that it depends only on $S$'s Hamiltonian and the temperature but not on $B$'s Hamiltonian, on the interaction Hamiltonian, or on the details of $\\Psi$. It has also been pointed out that $S$ can also be attributed a random wave function $\\psi$ whose probability distribution is universal in the same sense. This distribution is known as the "Scrooge measure" or "Gaussian adjusted projected (GAP) measure"; we regard it as the thermal equilibrium distribution of wave functions. The relevant concept of the wave function of a subsystem is known as the "conditional wave function". In this paper, we develop analogous considerations for particles with spin. One can either use some kind of conditional wave function or, more naturally, the "conditional density matrix", which is in general different from the reduced density matrix. We ask what the thermal equilibrium distribution of the conditional density matrix is, and find the answer that for most $\\Psi$ the conditional density matrix is (approximately) deterministic, in fact (approximately) equal to the canonical density matrix.

Viraj Pandya; Roderich Tumulka

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook, Volume II: Advanced Concepts in Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineering Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume I contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the steam power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Vol...

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Thermal decay in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems: Fundamentals and influence on system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inc. , 2004. ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook, Chapter 14,distribution (UFAD) systems: Fundamentals and influence onwas used to explain the fundamentals of thermal decay, to

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Computer code input for thermal hydraulic analysis of Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The input files to the P/Thermal computer code are documented for the thermal hydraulic analysis of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Title II design analysis.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Simulation of thermal plant optimization and hydraulic aspects of thermal distribution loops for large campuses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following an introduction, the author describes Texas A&M University and its utilities system. After that, the author presents how to construct simulation models for chilled water and heating hot water distribution systems. The simulation model was used in a $2.3 million Ross Street chilled water pipe replacement project at Texas A&M University. A second project conducted at the University of Texas at San Antonio was used as an example to demonstrate how to identify and design an optimal distribution system by using a simulation model. The author found that the minor losses of these closed loop thermal distribution systems are significantly higher than potable water distribution systems. In the second part of the report, the author presents the latest development of software called the Plant Optimization Program, which can simulate cogeneration plant operation, estimate its operation cost and provide optimized operation suggestions. The author also developed detailed simulation models for a gas turbine and heat recovery steam generator and identified significant potential savings. Finally, the author also used a steam turbine as an example to present a multi-regression method on constructing simulation models by using basic statistics and optimization algorithms. This report presents a survey of the author??s working experience at the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University during the period of January 2002 through March 2004. The purpose of the above work was to allow the author to become familiar with the practice of engineering. The result is that the author knows how to complete a project from start to finish and understands how both technical and nontechnical aspects of a project need to be considered in order to ensure a quality deliverable and bring a project to successful completion. This report concludes that the objectives of the internship were successfully accomplished and that the requirements for the degree of Degree of Engineering have been satisfied.

Chen, Qiang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Heat Pump Thermal Distribution Systems, Volumes 1 and 2: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal distribution system significantly affects the first cost and the operating cost of heat pumps. A detailed study has identified central and zoned systems that promise performance and cost benefits. This report discusses the thermal distribution system's applicability to air-source, ground-coupled, nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture and dual-fuel heat pumps.

1990-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Solar thermal small power systems study, program summary report. Phase II: study results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II Study of small solar power systems (SSPS) has been structured to determine conditions under which SSPS can be cost-effective sources of electric power in the US in the period 1985 to 2015. An extensive data base, which provides a discrete identification of all utility and industrial electric generating units up to and including 10 MW/sub e/ in rated capacity, has been prepared. This data base defines the market for which comparative evaluations are made of SSPS and alternative fossil-fueled power plants. The market penetration of SSPS is determined and the effect of economic incentives on accelerating the penetration is evaluated. The solar electric power system is evaluated as either a complete replacement for existing conventional electric power systems or as a repowering installation for boilers supplying steam to turbine-driven generators. The cost data used in the market penetration analysis are for a central receiver-type of small solar theral power system. While the market penetration discussed herein is for this type of SSPS, the sensitivity data in the report can be used to determine the market penetration of other types of solar thermal power systems (e.g., point focus distributed receiver) with different system costs.

Lapedes, D.E.; Munjal, P.K.; Sitney, L.R.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. ASHRAE/DOE/BTECC/CIBSE Thermal Performance of theProc. ASHRAE/DOE/BTECC/CIBSE Thermal Performance of the

Walker, Iain; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A consideration of cycle selection for meso-scale distributed solar-thermal power .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic aspects of 12.5 kW residential solar-thermal power generating systems suitable for distributed, decentralized power generation paradigm are presented in this thesis. The… (more)

Price, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A prototype data archive for the PIER "thermal distribution systems in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A prototype data archive for the PIER "thermal distribution systems in A prototype data archive for the PIER "thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings" project Title A prototype data archive for the PIER "thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings" project Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-54191 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Brian V. Smith, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Skylar A. Cox Date Published 01/2004 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract A prototype archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings was developed and pilot tested. While the pilot demonstrated the successful development of the data archive prototype, several questions remain about the usefulness of such an archive. Specifically, questions on the audience, frequency of use, maintenance, and updating of the archive would need to be addressed before this prototype is taken to the next level.

38

Effect of radial power distribution on MITR-II fuel element and control blade worth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary has been prepared to document and discuss several effects on fuel element and control blade reactivity worths that occur due to changes in the radial power distribution of the 5-MW(t) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). These results were obtained from reactor physics measurements and core power distribution calculations made during the past decade.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Lanning, D.D.; Clark, L.L. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermal distributions in stellar plasmas, nuclear reactions and solar neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of nuclear reactions in stellar plasma is reviewed with special emphasis on the importance of the velocity distribution of ions. Then the properties (density and temperature) of the weak-coupled solar plasma are analysed, showing that the ion velocities should deviate from the Maxwellian distribution and could be better described by a weakly-nonexstensive (|q-1|solar neutrino fluxes, and on the pp neutrino energy spectrum, and analyse the consequences for the solar neutrino problem.

M. Coraddu; G. Kaniadakis; A. Lavagno; M. Lissia; G. Mezzorani; P. Quarati

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Dynamical and thermal descriptions in parton distribution functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We suggest a duality between the standard (dynamical) and statistical distributions of partons in the nucleons. The temperature parameter entering into the statistical form for the quark distributions is estimated. It is found that this effective temperature is practically the same for the dependence on longitudinal and transverse momenta and, in turn, it is close to the freeze-out temperature in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

Cleymans, J., E-mail: Jean.Cleymans@uct.ac.za [University of Cape Town, UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics (South Africa); Lykasov, G. I., E-mail: lykasov@jinr.ru; Sorin, A. S., E-mail: sorin@theor.jinr.ru; Teryaev, O. V., E-mail: teryaev@theor.jinr.ru [JINR (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law.

F. V. Prigara

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law. There is an inversion of the high energy level population at sufficiently high temperatures.

F. V. Prigara

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

RESOLVING THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE DISCREPANCIES IN H II REGIONS AND PLANETARY NEBULAE: {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What is worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H II regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a '{kappa}-distribution' for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in solar system plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H II regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from H II regions and PNe, it appears that {kappa} {approx}> 10 is sufficient to encompass nearly all objects. We argue that the kappa-distribution offers an important new insight into the physics of gaseous nebulae, both in the Milky Way and elsewhere, and one that promises significantly more accurate estimates of temperature and metallicity in these regions.

Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S., E-mail: david@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd., Weston ACT 2611 (Australia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

CAT II--AN IBM 7090 CODE FOR PREDICTING THERMAL AND HYDRAULIC TRANSIENTS IN AN OPEN-LATTICE CORE  

SciTech Connect

CAT II is a digital computer code designed specifically to predict the thermal and hydraulic performance of rod type, open-channel reactor cores. The code is primarily intended for calculating thermal and hydraulic transients associated with a loss of coolant flow accident, although it has also been used extensively for steady state calculations. (auth)

Sandberg, R.O.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Software optimization for performance, energy, and thermal distribution: Initial case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an initial step in our Green Software research, this paper investigates whether software optimization at the application level can help achieve higher energy efficiency and better thermal behavior. We use both direct measurements and modeling to quantify ... Keywords: system-level energy consumption, software optimization, performance-energy-thermal distribution, green software, energy efficiency, power estimator, multicore systems, regressing measurements, custom-designed suite, microbenchmarks, software tuning, scalability, parallel application

M. A. Khan; C. Hankendi; A. K. Coskun; M. C. Herbordt

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Software Optimization for Performance, Energy, and Thermal Distribution: Initial Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Optimization for Performance, Energy, and Thermal Distribution: Initial Case Studies Md and modeling to quantify power, energy and temperature for a given software method. The infrastructure includes two case studies. In the first one, we use software tuning for improving the scalability and energy

Coskun, Ayse

48

Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

Crane, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Partial- and whole-body thermal sensation and comfort, Part II: Non-uniform environmental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and right hand cooling Journal of Thermal Biology 31, 60 –body part cooling and recovery Journal of Thermal Biologythermal sensation is affected differently by the cooling of

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Experimental power density distribution benchmark in the TRIGA Mark II reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to improve the power calibration process and to benchmark the existing computational model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Josef Stefan Inst. (JSI), a bilateral project was started as part of the agreement between the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA) and the Ministry of higher education, science and technology of Slovenia. One of the objectives of the project was to analyze and improve the power calibration process of the JSI TRIGA reactor (procedural improvement and uncertainty reduction) by using absolutely calibrated CEA fission chambers (FCs). This is one of the few available power density distribution benchmarks for testing not only the fission rate distribution but also the absolute values of the fission rates. Our preliminary calculations indicate that the total experimental uncertainty of the measured reaction rate is sufficiently low that the experiments could be considered as benchmark experiments. (authors)

Snoj, L.; Stancar, Z.; Radulovic, V.; Podvratnik, M.; Zerovnik, G.; Trkov, A. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Barbot, L.; Domergue, C.; Destouches, C. [CEA DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry laboratory Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and end of the cooling periods for both thermal perturbationduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal andduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal and

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Point and interval estimation for the two-parameter Birnbaum-Saunders distribution based on Type-II censored samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum likelihood estimators, based on Type-II censored samples, of a two-parameter Birnbaum-Saunders distribution are discussed. We propose a simple bias-reduction method to reduce the bias of the maximum likelihood estimators. We also discuss ... Keywords: Asymptotic distribution, Bias-corrected estimator, Confidence interval, Monte Carlo EM-algorithm, Monte Carlo simulation, Probability coverage

H. K. T. Ng; D. Kundu; N. Balakrishnan

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ANALYSIS OF TWO SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD H II REGIONS CONSIDERING THERMAL INHOMOGENEITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATIONS OF EXTRAGALACTIC CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES  

SciTech Connect

We present long-slit spectrophotometry considering the presence of thermal inhomogeneities (t{sup 2}) of two H II regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): NGC 456 and NGC 460. Physical conditions and chemical abundances were determined for three positions in NGC 456 and one position in NGC 460, first under the assumption of uniform temperature and then allowing for the possibility of thermal inhomogeneities. We determined t{sup 2} values based on three different methods: (1) by comparing the temperature derived using oxygen forbidden lines with the temperature derived using helium recombination lines (RLs), (2) by comparing the abundances derived from oxygen forbidden lines with those derived from oxygen RLs, and (3) by comparing the abundances derived from ultraviolet carbon forbidden lines with those derived from optical carbon RLs. The first two methods averaged t{sup 2} = 0.067 {+-} 0.013 for NGC 456 and t{sup 2} = 0.036 {+-} 0.027 for NGC 460. These values of t{sup 2} imply that when gaseous abundances are determined with collisionally excited lines they are underestimated by a factor of nearly two. From these objects and others in the literature, we find that in order to account for thermal inhomogeneities and dust depletion, the O/H ratio in low-metallicity H II regions should be corrected by 0.25-0.45 dex depending on the thermal structure of the nebula or by 0.35 dex if such information is not available.

Pena-Guerrero, Maria A.; Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz, Maria Teresa, E-mail: guerrero@astroscu.unam.mx, E-mail: antonio@astroscu.unam.mx, E-mail: peimbert@astroscu.unam.mx, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla Postal 36D, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

AA3, Photoluminescence and Thermal Carrier Activation in Type-II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnTe/ZnSe quantum structures provide such a type-II band alignment, along with favorable energy transitions for efficient solar energy conversion. In this work ...

56

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and installed DG equipment (PV, solar thermal, natural gas5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal price run; and 6. aenergy sources such as PV or solar thermal. However, this

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

Abe Lederman

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

Numerical calculation of thermal field distribution in oil immersed power transformer: a comparison of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarise a few computational methods and engineering models proposed for transformer thermal analysis and the accurate prediction of transformer thermal characteristics. The paper presents different approach for numerical calculation of thermal ... Keywords: hot-spot temperature, numerical calculation, power transformer, thermal field

Vlado Madzarevic; Izudin Kapetanovic; Majda Tesanovic; Mensur Kasumovic

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix II: supporting data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trade studies, calculations, and reports which provide the rationale for design conclusions for the 10 MWe OTEC power system are presented in this volume. These appendices include: (1) system design and optimization model; (2) system off-design performance computer model; (3) seawater system dynamics; (4) system mechanical design studies; (5) electrical design studies; (6) structural design studies; (7) tube cleaner design report and proposed brush test program; (8) heat exchangers: mechanical design; (9) heat exchangers: thermal hydraulic computer model; (10) heat exchangers: manufacturing flow plan; (11) heat exchangers: installation and removal procedures; (12) heat exchangers: stainless steel conceptual design; (13) heat exchangers: cost studies; (14)heat exchangers: materials selection and corrosion; and (15) heat exchangers: quality assurance. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N. Zhou, “Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery andattractiveness of distributed generation with storage. Thecosts for distributed generation (DG) investments. The

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,and J.L. Edwards, “Distributed Energy Resources CustomerN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources On-Site

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solar-thermal technology. Annual technical progress report FY 1981. Volume II. Technical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

After a brief description of the Solar Thermal Technology Program, its goals, objectives, and benefits, progress is reported in the five technologies addressed by the program: central receiver, parabolic dish, parabolic trough, hemispherical bowl, and salt-gradient solar ponds. Component technology development and systems experiments and analyses are reported for the central receiver, parabolic dish, and parabolic trough concepts. Also reported are test programs at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Parabolic Dish Test Site support to dish development, and experiments at test facilities supporting parabolic trough program. Research on hemispherical bowl and salt-gradient solar ponds is briefly summarized, including the Crosbyton Solar Power Project (hemispherical bowl) and the Salton Sea Project (solar pond). Also reported are research and advanced development efforts in materials research, fuels and chemicals, and applied thermal research, and supporting programs, including the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users Association activities, environmental control studies, and solar thermal insolation assessment. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Utility rate structures and distributed thermal energy storage: a cost/benefit analysis. Basic research report, October 1978-February 1979  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines three alternative methods by which electric utilities might take advantage of distributed thermal energy storage to smooth out their load profiles. These three methods are: time-specific rates, time-invariant rates with subsidized storage, and direct load controls. The optimal form of each of these policies is determined, and formulas indicating the relative desirability of each policy are developed.

Koening, E.F.; Cambel, A.B.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a nanocomposite material consisting of a eutectic of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate and 1% by mass alumina nanoparticles. The material was subjected to thermal cycling in a stainless steel tube using a temperature controlled furnace. After thermal cycling, the stainless steel tube was sectioned into three equal parts – top, middle and bottom. Composite material samples were taken from the central region and near the wall region of each section. The specific heat of this material in the temperature range of 290°C-397°C was measured using the Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC) method. The concentration of alumina nanoparticles in this material was measured using neutron activation analysis. The average specific heat of the uncycled material was found to be 1.37 J/g°C.The average specific heat of the thermally cycled material was between 1.7-2.1 J/g°C. It was found that the concentration of the nanoparticle varied along the height of the sample tube. The nanoparticles tended to settle towards the bottom of the tube with thermal cycling. There was also migration of nanoparticles towards the wall of the sample tube with thermal cycling. Despite these gross movements of nanoparticles, there was no significant change in the specific heat of the nanocomposite due to thermal cycling.

Shankar, Sandhya

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DOE solar-thermal-energy program on-line budget analysis, 1983. Task II report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview is presented of the FY 1983 solar thermal energy budget. Recent trends are considered to comment on the transition to a new set of solar policy directives emanating from the Reagan Administration. The industry recommended budget is compared with those developed by the House and Senate Appropriations Committees. A budget allocation suggested by the solar thermal Technical Program Integrator at Sandia Laboratory, Livermore, California, is also reviewed with regard to balance among the technologies being developed and assignment of responsibility among the government institutions carrying out the program.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

68

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part II: local comfort of individual body parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3943. [20] Hensel H, Thermal sensation and thermoreceptors1982. [21] Attia M. Thermal pleasantness and temperatureCabanac M. The perception of thermal comfort. International

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

72

Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with homogeneous thermal properties, to invert cooling data.thermal simulations of DTPS testing showing modeled coolingand cooling. The match between measured and modeled thermal

Freifeld, B.M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant. Phase II. Planning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various considerations related to the Phase II schedules, material control and personnel training required to effectively implement the program are presented. The flow charts and schedules required to accomplish fabrication, installation, checkout, and personnel training to support the Pilot Plant schedule are identified. The planning addresses receiving, storage and shipment of raw materials, subassemblies, component, subsystems, and complete assemblies. The vendor activities and the major Martin Marietta facilities are included. These are the Mirror Assembly activities at Pueblo, Colorado and the heliostat assembly and installation activities at the Barstow-Daggett Airport and the solar plant. (LEW)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A prototype data archive for the PIER 'thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings' project  

SciTech Connect

A prototype archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings was developed and pilot tested. While the pilot demonstrated the successful development of the data archive prototype, several questions remain about the usefulness of such an archive. Specifically, questions on the audience, frequency of use, maintenance, and updating of the archive would need to be addressed before this prototype is taken to the next level.

Diamond, Rick C.; Wray, Craig P.; Smith, Brian V.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Matson, Nance E.; Cox, Skylar A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Performance study of a thermal-envelope house: Phase II. Cooling performance. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal envelope house is shown to perform much better than conventional houses without mechanical refrigeration and better than one would expect from most passively cooled houses in the hot-humid climate of Georgia. Peak temperatures inside the house were 8 to 15/sup 0/F below peak ambient temperatures. Peak inside temperature measured during the test period was 80/sup 0/F with an outside ambient peak of 93/sup 0/F. Air flow rates within the envelope were less than 1 ft/sec even when the attic fan was operating. The earth cooling tubes provided noticeable sensible cooling to the house. Exit temperatures from the cooling tubes were between 72 to 76/sup 0/F, depending upon the air velocity through the tubes. The thermal chimney performed poorly as an air mover, especially when used to induce flow through the earth cooling tubes. The performance of the earth cooling tube could be improved by using the attic fan to increase the air flow through the cooling tubes and to insure it flowed in the cooling tube, through the envelope and out the thermal chimney. Being an exhaust fan, the attic fan created a negative pressure in the house. While this increased air flow through the cooling tubes, it also increased air infiltration through the building shell, thus increasing load. The humidity level within the living space remains relatively high year-round due to low rates of air infiltration and water vapor transmission through the building skin. The problem is aggravated during the summer by the introduction of cool moist air from the cooling tubes to the envelope and frequently to the inner space. While the cooling tubes are able to reduce the sensible load, and they are incapable of significantly reducing humidity or latent loads. This results in relatively comfortable air temperatures but uncomfortable humidities within the living space.

Akridge, J.M.; Benton, C.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Test procedures and protocols: Their relevance to the figure of merit for thermal distribution systems. Volume 1: Informal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual framework is developed that categorizes measurement protocols for forced-air thermal distribution systems in small buildings. This framework is based on the distinction between two generic approaches. The {open_quote}system-comparison{close_quote} approach seeks to determine, via a pair of whole-house energy-use measurements, the difference in energy use between the house with the as-found duct system and the same house with no energy losses attributable to the thermal distribution system. The {open_quote}component loss-factor{close_quote} approach identifies and measures the individual causes of duct losses, and then builds up a value for the net overall duct efficiency, usually with the help of computer simulation. Examples of each approach are analyzed and related to a proposed Figure of Merit for thermal distribution systems. This Figure of Merit would serve as the basis for a Standard Method of Test analogous to those already in place for furnaces, boilers, air conditioners, and heat pumps.

Andrews, J.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Radiation Algorithm with Correlated-k Distribution. Part I: Local Thermal Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation scheme is proposed that uses the correlated-k distribution (CKD) method. The definition of the k-distribution function, the transformation between frequency space and k space, and the upper limit of the absorption coefficient in ...

J. Li; H. W. Barker

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a high-contains also heat for absorption chillers, and therefore,storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Results of a field test of heating system efficiency and thermal distribution system efficiency in a manufactured home  

SciTech Connect

A two-day test using electric coheating was performed on a manufactured home in Watertown, New York. The main objective of the test was to evaluate planned procedures for measuring thermal distribution system efficiency. (Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork or piping used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment that produces it to the building spaces in which it is used.) These procedures are under consideration for a standard method of test now being prepared by a special committee of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The ability of a coheating test to give a credible and repeatable value for the overall heating system efficiency was supported by the test data. Distribution efficiency is derived from system efficiency by correcting for energy losses from the equipment. Alternative means for achieving this were tested and assessed. The best value for system efficiency in the Watertown house was 0.53, while the best value for distribution efficiency was 0.72.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kinney, L.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Retrieval of Composition and Size Distribution of Stratospheric Aerosols with the SAGE II Satellite Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SAGE II satellite system was launched on 5 October 1984. It has seven radiometric channels and is beginning to provide water vapor, NO2, and O2 concentration profiles and aerosol extinction profiles at a minimum of three wavelengths. In ...

Glenn K. Yue; M. P. McCormick; W. P. Chu

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Distribution and chemical analyses of thermal springs in Alaska. [Data compilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in geothermal systems as potential sources of energy has been increasing in the past decade. Thermal or hot springs commonly occur as surface manifestation of geothermal systems. One of the first steps in evaluating the potential of such systems is the compilation of an inventory of known thermal springs and available chemical data. The only previous such compilation in Alaska has been by Waring (1917) who listed 75 known hot springs and 22 chemical analyses; a later world-wide summary by Waring (1965), which included Alaska, listed a total of 79 thermal springs. These publications, both now out of print, are excellent summaries of known thermal springs as of about 1963. In the last 10 years, however, previously unreported occurrences of thermal springs have been published in various geologic reports and topographic maps and additional chemical analyses are now available. The purpose of this compilation, therefore, is to supplement Waring's earlier reports with the more recent data. In a few cases springs reported by Waring have been deleted since later work has cast doubt on their existence. Only those springs whose temperatures are significantly (i.e., 15 to 20/sup 0/C) above mean annual surface temperature have been included in this compilation.

Miller, T.P. (comp.)

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. II. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MODEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model 'Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops' (EBTEL) proposed by Klimchuk et al., which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating, especially impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modeling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region (TR) and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of the TR to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. The new features in EBTEL are important for accurate tracking of, in particular, the density. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad) with generally good agreement. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (1) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function, (2) extensive parameter surveys, and (3) situations where the modeling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems, forthcoming 2008. Microgrid Symposium. Held atand carbon emissions, a microgrid’s distributed energyIn this paper, a microgrid is defined as a cluster of

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part II: local comfort of individual body parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to local heating and cooling [18,19], thermal sensation andbody heating and cooling. Journal of Thermal Biology 2004;b. pelvis cooling or heating c. thermal comfort scale Figure

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Modification of Joint Size-Charge Distribution in Rain. Part II: Computations Involving Partial Coalescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Raindrop collisional breakup is included in a model of joint size-charge distribution development. Consistent with experimental observations the model includes a finite filament (joining separating drops) that upon rupture produces charged ...

S. G. Bradley; C. D. Stow

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Generation of Moist Potential Vorticity in Extratropical Cyclones. Part II: Sensitivity to Moisture Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of different moisture distributions on the generation of moist potential vorticity (MPV) in extratropical cyclones are examined by numerical simulations. These sensitivity experiments show that low-level negative MPV generation ...

Han-Ru Cho; Zuohao Cao

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Advection–Diffusion Problem for Stratospheric Flow. Part II: Probability Distribution Function of Tracer Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of the study of the advection–diffusion problem for stratospheric flow, and deals with the probability distribution function (PDF) of gradients of a freely decaying passive tracer. Theoretical arguments are reviewed ...

Yongyun Hu; Raymond T. Pierrehumbert

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Kurucz model energy distributions: a comparison with real stars. II. Metal-deficient stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy distributions of synthetic spectra for Kurucz model atmospheres are compared with observed energy distributions of metal-deficient stars of the blue horizontal-branch (BHB), F-G-K subdwarf (SD) and G-K giant (MDG) types. The best coincidence of the synthetic and observed energy curves is found for BHB stars. The largest differences are found in the ultraviolet wavelengths for subdwarfs and cool MDGs. The influence of errors of effective temperatures, gravities and metallicities is estimated.

V. Straizys; R. Lazauskaite; G. Valiauga

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Visible and dark matter in M 31 - II. A dynamical model and dark matter density distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper we derive the density distribution of dark matter (DM) in a well-observed nearby disc galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy. From photometrical and chemical evolution models constructed in the first part of the study (Tamm, Tempel & Tenjes 2007 (arXiv:0707.4375), hereafter Paper I) we can calculate the mass distribution of visible components (the bulge, the disc, the stellar halo, the outer diffuse stellar halo). In the dynamical model we calculate stellar rotation velocities along the major axis and velocity dispersions along the major, minor and intermediate axes of the galaxy assuming triaxial velocity dispersion ellipsoid. Comparing the calculated values with the collected observational data, we find the amount of DM, which must be added to reach an agreement with the observed rotation and dispersion data. We conclude that within the uncertainties, the DM distributions by Moore, Burkert, Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) and the Einasto fit with observations nearly at all distances. The NFW and Einasto density distributions give the best fit with observations. The total mass of M 31 with the NFW DM distribution is 1.19*10^12 M_sun, the ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass is 10.0. For the Einasto DM distribution, these values are 1.28*10^12 M_sun and 10.8. The ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass inside the Holmberg radius is 1.75 for the NFW and the Einasto distributions. For different cuspy DM distributions, the virial mass is in a range 6.9-7.9*10^11 M_sun and the virial radius is ~150 kpc. The DM mean densities inside 10 pc for cusped models are 33 and 16 M_sun pc^-3 for the NFW and the Einasto profiles, respectively. For the cored Burkert profile, this value is 0.06 M_sun pc^-3.

Elmo Tempel; Antti Tamm; Peeter Tenjes

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Distribution Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method Preprint Michael Kuss, Tony Markel, and William Kramer Presented at the 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Shenzhen, China November 5 - 9, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5400-48827 January 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

94

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols II: Particle Size Distributions as a Function of Time  

SciTech Connect

The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing depleted uranium from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluated particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using beta spectrometry, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements was quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 um and a large size mode between 2 and 15 um. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 um shortly after perforation to around 1 um at the end of the 2-hr sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nonlocal approach to the analysis of the stress distribution in granular systems. II. Application to experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ceramic compacts has been limited to simplified physical arguments concerning the transmission of stress within a compact, and 2 direct mapping of the den- sity distribution within a compact. The first approach is exemplified by the work of Kamm, Steinberg, and Wulff 7 who placed a thin lead grid into a cylindrical copper

Kenkre, V.M.

96

Visible and dark matter in M 31 - II. A dynamical model and dark matter density distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper we derive the density distribution of dark matter (DM) in a well-observed nearby disc galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy. From photometrical and chemical evolution models constructed in the first part of the study (Tamm, Tempel & Tenjes 2007 (arXiv:0707.4375), hereafter Paper I) we can calculate the mass distribution of visible components. In the dynamical model we calculate stellar rotation velocities along the major axis and velocity dispersions along the major, minor and intermediate axes of the galaxy. Comparing the calculated values with the collected observational data, we find the amount of DM, which must be added to reach an agreement with the observed rotation and dispersion data. We conclude that within the uncertainties, the DM distributions by Moore, Burkert, isothermal, Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) and Navarro et al. 2004 (N04) fit with observations. The NFW and N04 density distributions give the best fit with observations. The total mass of M 31 with the NFW DM distributio...

Tempel, Elmo; Tenjes, Peeter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory. (author)

Ko, Y.-C. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hu, L.-W. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: lwhu@mit.edu; Olson, Arne P.; Dunn, Floyd E. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU.  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory.

Ko, Y. C.; Hu, L. W.; Olson, A. P.; Dunn, F. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; MIT

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electric co-heating in the ASHRAE standard method of test for thermal distribution efficiency: Test results on two New York State homes  

SciTech Connect

Electric co-heating tests on two single-family homes with forced-air heating systems were carried out in March 1995. The goal of these tests was to evaluate procedures being considered for incorporation in a Standard Method of Test for thermal distribution system efficiency now being developed by ASHRAE. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the building equipment that produces this thermal energy to the spaces in which it is used. Furthering the project goal, the first objective of the tests was to evaluate electric co-heating as a means of measuring system efficiency. The second objective was to investigate procedures for obtaining the distribution efficiency, using system efficiency as a base. Distribution efficiencies of 0.63 and 0.70 were obtained for the two houses.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Birmingham-CfA cluster scaling project - II. Mass composition and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the spatial distribution of the baryonic and non-baryonic mass components in a sample of 66 virialized systems. We have used X-ray measurements to determine the deprojected temperature and density structure of the intergalactic medium and have employed these to map the underlying gravitational potential. In addition, we have measured the deprojected spatial distribution of galaxy luminosity for a subset of this sample, spanning over 2 decades in mass. With this combined X-ray/optical study we examine the scaling properties of the baryons and address the issue of mass-to-light (M/L) ratio in groups and clusters of galaxies. We measure a median mass-to-light ratio of 249 h70 M/L (solar) in the rest frame B_j band, in good agreement with other measurements based on X-ray determined masses. There is no trend in M/L with X-ray temperature and no significant trend for mass to increase faster than luminosity: M \\propto \\L_{B,j}^{1.08 +/- 0.12}. This implied lack of significant variation in star format...

Sanderson, A J R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MULTIPLICITY AND PERIOD DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION II FIELD STARS IN SOLAR VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a sample of 223 F, G, and early K metal-poor subdwarfs ([m/H] 0.''2 yr{sup -1}) at distances of up to 250 pc from the Sun. By means of our own speckle interferometric observations conducted on the 6 m Bolshoi Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the spectroscopic and visual data taken from the literature, we determine the frequency of binary and multiple systems in this sample. The ratio of single, binary, triple, and quadruple systems among 221 primary components of the sample is 147:64:9:1. We show that the distribution of orbital periods of binary and multiple subdwarfs is asymmetric in the range of up to P = 10{sup 10} days, and has a maximum at P = 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days, which differs from the distribution, obtained for the thin disk G dwarfs. We estimated the number of undetected companions in our sample. Comparing the frequency of binary subdwarfs in the field and in the globular clusters, we show that the process of halo field star formation by the means of destruction of globular clusters is very unlikely in our Galaxy. We discuss the multiplicity of old metal-poor stars in nearby stellar streams.

Rastegaev, D. A., E-mail: leda@sao.r [Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS, Nizhnij Arkhyz 369167 (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Birmingham-CfA cluster scaling project - II. Mass composition and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the spatial distribution of the baryonic and non-baryonic mass components in a sample of 66 virialized systems. We have used X-ray measurements to determine the deprojected temperature and density structure of the intergalactic medium and have employed these to map the underlying gravitational potential. In addition, we have measured the deprojected spatial distribution of galaxy luminosity for a subset of this sample, spanning over 2 decades in mass. With this combined X-ray/optical study we examine the scaling properties of the baryons and address the issue of mass-to-light (M/L) ratio in groups and clusters of galaxies. We measure a median mass-to-light ratio of 224 h70 M/L (solar) in the rest frame B_j band, in good agreement with other measurements based on X-ray determined masses. There is no trend in M/L with X-ray temperature and no significant trend for mass to increase faster than luminosity: M \\propto \\L_{B,j}^{1.08 +/- 0.12}. This implied lack of significant variation in star formation efficiency suggests that gas cooling cannot be greatly enhanced in groups, unless it drops out to form baryonic dark matter. Correspondingly, our results indicate that non-gravitational heating must have played a significant role in establishing the observed departure from self-similarity in low mass systems. The median baryon fraction for our sample is 0.162 h70^{-3/2}, which allows us to place an upper limit on the cosmological matter density, Omega_m agreement with the latest results from WMAP. We find evidence of a systematic trend towards higher central density concentration in the coolest haloes, indicative of an early formation epoch and consistent with hierarchical formation models.

A. J. R. Sanderson; T. J. Ponman

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Efficient Low-Lift cooling with Radiant Distribution, Thermal Storage and Variable-Speed Chiller Controls  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Program goal is to develop cost-effective technologies and building practices that will enable the design and construction of net-zero energy buildings by 2025. To support this goal, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated an integrated technology that through utilization of synergies between emerging heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems can significantly reduce energy consumption in buildings. This set consists of thermal storage, dedicated outdoor air system, radiant heating/cooling with a variable speed low-lift-optimized vapor compression system. The results show that the low-lift cooling system provides significant energy savings in many building types and climates locations. This market represents well over half of the entire U.S. commercial building sector. This analysis shows that significant cooling system efficiency gains can be achieved by integrating low-lift cooling technologies. The cooling energy savings for a standard-performance building range from 37% to 84% and, for a high-performance building, from -9% to 70%.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, Peter; Wang, Weimin; Fernandez, Nicholas

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Dual Path HVAC System Demonstration in School: Leveraging Thermal Energy Storage and Cold Air Distribution to Enhance System Perform ance in a Florida Elementary School  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on a novel dual-path, low-temperature air distribution system demonstrated in a Florida elementary school. This system addresses high humidity levels and indoor air quality problems normally found in schools due to their large ventilation requirements, especially in humid climates. The dual-path system is also integrated with synergistic use of thermal energy storage and low-temperature air distribution, reduced energy use, and initial cost. The field data confirmed that the system ...

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Spatial Distribution of -Crystals in Metallocene-Made Isotactic Polypropylene Crystallized under Combined Thermal and Flow Fields  

SciTech Connect

The present Article reports the relationships between molecular orientation, formation, and spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystals in metallocene-made isotactic polypropylene (m-iPP) samples prepared by two industrial processes: conventional injection molding (CIM) and oscillatory shear injection molding (OSIM), in which combined thermal and flow fields typically exist. In particular, spatial distributions of crystallinity, fraction of {gamma}-crystal (f{gamma}) with respect to {alpha}-crystal, and lamella-branched shish-kebab structure in the shaped samples were characterized by synchrotron two-dimensional (2D) wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results showed that the crystallinity in any given region of OSIM samples was always higher than that of CIM samples. The value of f{gamma} increased monotonously from skin to core in CIM samples, whereas the corresponding f{gamma} increased nonmonotonically in OSIM samples. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystal in OSIM samples can be explained by the epitaxial arrangement between {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal in a lamella-branched shish-kebab structure. In the proposed model, the parent lamellae of {alpha}-crystal provide secondary nucleation sites for daughter lamellae of {alpha}-crystal and {gamma}-crystal, and the different content of parent lamellae results in varying amounts of {gamma}-crystal. In OSIM samples, the smallest parent-daughter ratio ([R] = 1.38) in the core region led to the lowest fraction of {gamma}-crystal (0.57), but relatively higher {gamma}-crystal content (0.69) at 600 and 1200 {micro}m depth of the samples (corresponding to [R] of 4.5 and 5.8, respectively). This is consistent with the proposed model where more parent lamellae provide more nucleation sites for crystallization, thus resulting in higher content of {gamma}-crystal. The melting behavior of CIM and OSIM samples was studied by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The observed double-melting peaks could be explained by the melting of {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal of the shaped samples. The f{gamma} distribution calculated from the relative areas of the peaks in the DSC scans was also consistent with the WAXD results.

Wang, Y.; Pan, J; Mao, Y; Li, Z; Li, L; Hsiao, B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. II. REWRITING THE THERMAL HISTORY OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The universe is opaque to extragalactic very high energy gamma rays (VHEGRs, E > 100 GeV) because they annihilate and pair produce on the extragalactic background light. The resulting ultrarelativistic pairs are commonly assumed to lose energy primarily through inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, reprocessing the original emission from TeV to GeV energies. In Broderick et al., we argued that this is not the case; powerful plasma instabilities driven by the highly anisotropic nature of the ultrarelativistic pair distribution provide a plausible way to dissipate the kinetic energy of the TeV-generated pairs locally, heating the intergalactic medium (IGM). Here, we explore the effect of this heating on the thermal history of the IGM. We collate the observed extragalactic VHEGR sources to determine a local VHEGR heating rate. Given the pointed nature of VHEGR observations, we estimate the correction for the various selection effects using Fermi observations of high- and intermediate-peaked BL Lac objects. As the extragalactic component of the local VHEGR flux is dominated by TeV blazars, we then estimate the evolution of the TeV blazar luminosity density by tying it to the well-observed quasar luminosity density and producing a VHEGR heating rate as a function of redshift. This heating is relatively homogeneous for z {approx}history of the IGM. Due to the homogeneous nature of the extragalactic background light, TeV blazars produce a uniform volumetric heating rate. This heating is sufficient to increase the temperature of the mean density IGM by nearly an order of magnitude, and at low densities by substantially more. It also naturally produces the inverted temperature-density relation inferred by recent observations of the high-redshift Ly{alpha} forest, a feature that is difficult to reconcile with standard reionization models. Finally, we close with a discussion on the possibility of detecting this hot low-density IGM suggested by our model either directly or indirectly via the local Ly{alpha} forest, the Comptonized CMB, or free-free emission, but we find that such measurements are currently not feasible.

Chang, Philip; Broderick, Avery E.; Pfrommer, Christoph, E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: pchang@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal Structure of the Mesopause Region (80–105 km) at 40°N Latitude. Part II: Diurnal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium wind/temperature lidar measurements taken throughout the diurnal and annual cycles at Urbana, Illinois (40°N, 88°W), from February 1996 through January 1998 are used to characterize the seasonal behavior of solar thermal tides in the ...

Robert J. States; Chester S. Gardner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experimental Study of an Artificial Thermal Plume in the Boundary Layer. Part II: Some Aspects of the Plume Thermodynamical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some aspects of the mean and turbulent structures of artificial thermal plumes in the boundary layer (BL) are presented. This analysis is based mainly on measurements with an instrumented aircraft. As initial conditions for plume rise, the ...

J. Noilhan; B. Bénech; G. Letrenne; A. Druilhet; A. Saab

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239{sup Pu} induced by thermal neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons ({nu}(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation {sigma}{sub E}*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass ({sigma}{sub E}(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence {sigma}{sub E}*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

Montoya, M. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru); Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Venezuela Cdra 34, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima 1 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

113

Explorer-II: Wireless Self-Powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains  

SciTech Connect

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design, field-trial and Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) sensor evaluation program for the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The resulting robot-train system with CAD renderings of the individual modules. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and recovery of the system using custom fittings and a (to be developed) launch-chamber/-tube. The battery modules are used to power the system, by providing power to the robot's bus. The support modules perform the functions of centration for the rest of the train as well as odometry pickups using incremental encoding schemes. The electronics architecture is based on a distributed (8-bit) microprocessor architecture (at least 1 in ea. module) communicating to a (one of two) 32-bit SBC, which manages all video-processing, posture and motion control as well as CAN and wireless communications. The operator controls the entire system from an off-board (laptop) controller, which is in constant wireless communication with the robot train in the pipe. The sensor modules collect data and forward it to the robot operator computer (via the CAN-wireless communications chain), who then transfers it to a dedicated NDE data-storage and post-processing computer for further (real-time or off-line) analysis. The prototype robot system was built and tested indoors and outdoors, outfitted with a Remote-Field Eddy Current (RFEC) sensor integrated as its main NDE sensor modality. An angled launcher, allowing for live launching and retrieval, was also built to suit custom angled launch-fittings from TDW. The prototype vehicle and launcher systems are shown. The complete system, including the in-pipe robot train, launcher, integrated NDE-sensor and real-time video and control console and NDE-data collection and -processing and real-time display, were demonstrated to all sponsors prior to proceeding into final field-trials--the individual components and setting for said acceptance demonstration are shown. The launcher-tube was also used to verify that the vehicle system is capable of operating in high-pressure environments, and is safely deployable using proper evacuating/purging techniques for operation in the po

Carnegie Mellon University

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Distribution:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JAN26 19% JAN26 19% Distribution: OR00 Attn: h.H.M.Roth DFMusser ITMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIw(2) Hsixele SRGustavson, Document rocm Formal file i+a@mmm bav@ ~@esiaw*cp Suppl. file 'Br & Div rf's s/health (lic.only) UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAB MATERIAL LICENSE pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, P&t 70, "Special Nuclear Material Reg)llatiqm," a license is hereby issued a$hortztng the licensee to rekeive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear mat&ial for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to per&s authorized to receive it in accordance with the regula,tions in said Part.

115

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

What`s new in building energy research: Thermal distribution technology. DOE looks at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy takes a look at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program...........................................................................................................................11 #12;Table of Contents California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook ii 2.5 Surface

120

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

Loferski, J.J. (ed.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of {sup 235}U  

SciTech Connect

The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions.

Montoya, M. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru); Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Venezuela Cdra 34, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima 1 (Peru); Saetone, E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix I: specifications and drawings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the specifications and drawings prepared in support of the preliminary design of a 10MWe OTEC power system using enhanced plate type heat exchangers. Included are: (1) the specification tree; (2) system specification; (3) 10 MWe heat exchangers; (4) nitrogen storage, conditioning and supply subsystem specification; (5) ammonia storage, conditioning and supply specification; (6) electrical power distribution and control subsystem specification; (7) equipment valves, instruments and live lists and specifications; (8) drawing tree; (9) drawing package; and (10) 0.2 MWe test articles procurement specifications. (WHK)

Pearson, R.O.

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Predictions of thermal comfort and pollutant distributions for a thermostatically-controlled, air-conditioned, partitioned room: Numerical results and enhanced graphical presentation  

SciTech Connect

An index of local thermal comfort and pollutant distributions have been computed with the TEMPEST computer code, in a transient simulation of an air-conditioned enclosure with an incomplete partition. This complex three-dimensional air conditioning problem included forced ventilation through inlet veins, flow through a partition, remote return air vents, and infiltration source, a pollutant source, and a thermostatically controlled air conditioning system. Five forced ventilation schemes that varied in vent areas and face velocities were simulated. Thermal comfort was modeled as a three-dimensional scalar field dependent on the fluid velocity and temperature fields; where humidity activity levels, and clothing were considered constants. Pollutants transport was incorporated through an additional constituent diffusion equation. Six distinct graphic techniques for the visualization of the three-dimensional data fields of air velocity, temperature, and comfort index were tested. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

White, M.D.; Eyler, L.L.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sulfur distribution in the oil fractions obtained by thermal cracking of Jordanian El-Lajjun oil Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the thermal cracking process of the El-Lujjan oil shale showed that the yield of oil was around 12 wt of the boiling point for different distillate fractions. Sulfur in Jordanian oil shale was found to be mainly the dominant phases in these fractions. q 2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction Oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

127

Numerical Investigation of Collision-Induced Breakup of Raindrops. Part II: Parameterizations of Coalescence Efficiencies and Fragment Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of numerically investigated binary collisions of 32 drop pairs presented in Part I of this study are used to parameterize coalescence efficiencies and size distributions of breakup fragments of large raindrops.

Winfried Straub; Klaus Dieter Beheng; Axel Seifert; Jan Schlottke; Bernhard Weigand

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Maximizing Real-Time Distribution of Wind-Electricity to Electrical Thermal Storage Units for Residential Space Heating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind-electricity is unpredictable in both intensity and duration. This thesis presents the design and implementation of Client-pull and Server-push architectures for the distribution of wind-electricity… (more)

Barnes, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Indentation of a Punch with Chemical or Heat Distribution at Its Base into Transversely Isotropic Half-Space: Application to Local Thermal and Electrochemical Probes  

SciTech Connect

The exact solution to the coupled problem of indentation of the punch, subjected to either heat or chemical substance distribution at its base, into three-dimensional semi-infinite transversely isotropic material is presented. The entire set of field components are derived in terms of integrals of elementary functions using methods of the potential theory and recently obtained, by the authors, results for the general solution of the field equations in terms of four harmonic potential functions. The exact solution for the stiffness relations that relate applied force, total chemical diffusion/heat flux in the domain of the contact, with indenter displacement, temperature, or chemical substance distribution of diffusing species at the base, and materials' chemo/thermo-elastic properties are obtained in closed form and in terms of elementary functions. These results can be used to understand the image formation mechanisms in techniques such as thermal scanning probe microscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy

Karapetian, E. [Suffolk University, Boston; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hidden Error Variance Theory. Part II: An Instrument That Reveals Hidden Error Variance Distributions from Ensemble Forecasts and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, a model of the distribution of true error variances given an ensemble variance is shown to be defined by six parameters that also determine the optimal weights for the static and flow-dependent parts of hybrid error ...

Craig H. Bishop; Elizabeth A. Satterfield; Kevin T. Shanley

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Proceedings of thermal ecology II  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for fifty-one papers presented at the conference. An additional seven papers were presented for which abstracts appeared in previous issues of ERA. (HLW)

Esch, G.W.; McFarlane, R.W. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

HYDRONIC BASEBOARD THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH OUTDOOR RESET CONTROL TO ENABLE THE USE OF A CONDENSING BOILER.  

SciTech Connect

Use of condensing boilers in residential heating systems offers the potential for significant improvements in efficiency. For these to operate in a condensing mode the return water temperature needs to be about 10 degrees below the saturation temperature for the flue gas water vapor. This saturation temperature depends on fuel type and excess air and ranges from about 110 F to 135 F. Conventional baseboard hydronic distribution systems are most common and these are designed for water temperatures in the 180 F range, well above the saturation temperature. Operating strategies which may allow these systems to operate in a condensing mode have been considered in the past. In this study an approach to achieving this for a significant part of the heating season has been tested in an instrumented home. The approach involves use of an outdoor reset control which reduces the temperature of the water circulating in the hydronic loop when the outdoor temperature is higher than the design point for the region. Results showed that this strategy allows the boiler to operate in the condensing region for 80% of the winter heating season with oil, 90% with propane, and 95% with gas, based on cumulative degree days. The heating system as tested combines space heating and domestic hot water loads using an indirect, 40 gallon tank with an internal heat exchanger. Tests conducted during the summer months showed that the return water temperature from the domestic hot water tank heat exchanger is always below a temperature which will provide condensing operation of the boiler. In the field tests both the condensing boiler and the conventional, non-condensing boiler were in the test home and each was operated periodically to provide a direct performance comparison.

BUTCHER,T.A.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Retrieval of Thermal and Microphysical Variables in Observed Convective Storms. Part II: Sensitivity of Cloud Processes to Variation of the Microphysical Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrometeor content and thermal fields in a thunderstorm are estimated from a three-dimensional kinematic cloud model employing Doppler wind fields and parameterized microphysical processes. The sensitivity of the cloud model calculations to ...

Conrad L. Ziegler

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simulations of Mesoscale Circulations in the Center of the Iberian Peninsula for Thermal Low Pressure Conditions. Part II: Air-Parcel Transport Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the variability of air-parcel transport under similar summer thermal low pressure conditions over the Iberian Peninsula. Three-dimensional trajectories were estimated by means of the Topography Vorticity-Mode Mesoscale model. ...

Fernando Martín; Magdalena Palacios; Sylvia N. Crespí

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Numerical Experiments with a General Circulation Model Concerning the Distribution of Ozone in the Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed with a nine-layer quasi-geostrophic spectral model to simulate the distribution of ozone below 60 km. Experiment I included thermal and orographic forcing of the planetary-scale waves while Experiment II did not ...

R. J. Kurzeja; K. V. Haggard; W. L. Grose

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the application of thermal energy storage for off-peakbuildings that combine thermal energy ice storage with coldair distribution without thermal energy storage; and (3) TES

Bauman, F.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Efficient Low-Lift cooling with Radiant Distribution, Thermal Storage and Variable-Speed Chiller Controls Part II: Annual Energy Use and Savings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the potential cooling efficiency improvements to be gained by integrating radiant cooling, cool storage, and variable-speed compressor and transport motor controls.

Armstrong, Peter; Jiang, Wei; Winiarski, David W.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Norford, L. K.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Application and Verification of ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) to DOE-2-1e Simulation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes the application and verification of duct model on DOE 2.1e version 119 using ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems). It begins with a concept of duct model which is developed by ASHRAE and shows the application and the verification of the duct model to DOE 2.1e version 119 simulation program.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this "thermal mixing", the heating and cooling loadsyear) Cooling Plant Heating Plant Fans Total Thermal Tobllthermal distribution system includes the components that carry the heating and cooling

Franconi, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis  

SciTech Connect

An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The 1998 November 14 Occultation of GSC 0622-00345 by Saturn. II. Stratospheric Thermal Profile, Power Spectrum, and Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 1998 November 14, Saturn and its rings occulted the star GSC 0622-00345. The occultation latitude was 55.5 degrees S. This paper analyzes the 2.3 {\\mu}m light curve derived by Harrington & French. A fixed-baseline isothermal fit to the light curve has a temperature of 140 +/- 3 K, assuming a mean molecular mass of 2.35 AMU. The thermal profile obtained by numerical inversion is valid between 1 and 60 {\\mu}bar. The vertical temperature gradient is >0.2 K/km more stable than the adiabatic lapse rate, but it still shows the alternating-rounded-spiked features seen in many temperature gradient profiles from other atmospheric occultations and usually attributed to breaking gravity (buoyancy) waves. We conduct a wavelet analysis of the thermal profile, and show that, even with our low level of noise, scintillation due to turbulence in Earth's atmosphere can produce large temperature swings in light-curve inversions. Spurious periodic features in the "reliable" region of a wavelet amplitude spectrum can excee...

Harrington, Joseph; Matcheva, Katia; 10.1088/0004-637X/716/1/404

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Response of the SSM/I to the Marine Environment. Part II: A Parameterization of the Effect of the Sea Surface Slope Distribution on Emission and Reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a geometric optics model and the assumption of an isotropic Gaussian surface slope distribution, the component of ocean surface microwave emissivity variation due to large-scale surface roughness is parameterized for the frequencies and ...

Grant W. Petty; Kristina B. Katsaros

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geometric phase effects in H+O{sub 2} scattering. II. Recombination resonances and state-to-state transition probabilities at thermal energies  

SciTech Connect

The general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including geometric phase effects in accurate 3D quantum scattering calculations in hyperspherical coordinates is applied to low-energy (thermal) H+O{sub 2} collisions. The hybrid DVR/FBR (discrete variable representation/finite basis representation) numerical technique is used to obtain accurate surface function solutions which include geometric phase effects due to the {ital C}{sub 2{ital v}} conical intersection in HO{sub 2}. The relevant potential coupling and overlap matrices are constructed and a log-derivative matrix of solutions to the coupled-channel radial equations is propagated and transformed to obtain the scattering matrix {ital S}. The results for zero total angular momentum ({ital J}=0) show significant shifts in the resonance energies and lifetimes. Significant changes in the state-to-state transition probabilities are also observed. The results indicate that geometric phase effects must be included for H+O{sub 2} scattering even at low energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Kendrick, B.; Pack, R.T. [Theoretical Division (T-12, MS-B268), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Session II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... Thermal interface materials (TIMs) play a critical role in thermal management ... Titanium compacts were cold isostatically pressed to 100 ksi, and then .... The green samples, enclosed in Y2O3-powder thermal insulation, were ...

146

Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gabel and Andresen, HVAC Secondary Toolkil. Atlanta: ASHRAE,P_02 Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Designdesign and operation of the HVAC thermal distribution system

Franconi, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

149

Microphysical Interpretation of Multi-Parameter Radar Measurements in Rain. Part II: Estimation of Raindrop Distribution Parameters by Combined Dual-Wavelength and Polarization Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar reflectivity weighted mean axis ratio R¯ and the variance of the axis ratio distribution ?R2 of an ensemble of raindrops can be estimated from polarization radar measurements. If the shape function relating axis ratio to drop size is ...

A. R. Jameson

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Efficient Low-Lift Cooling with Radiant Distribution, Thermal Storage and Variable-Speed Chiller Controls Part I: Component and Subsystem Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

this paper develops component and subsystem models used to evaluat4e the performance of a low-lift cooling system with an air-colled chiller optimized for variable-speed and low-pressure-ratio operation, a hydronic radient distribution system, variable-speed transport miotor controls, and peak-shifting controls.

Armstrong, Peter; Jiang, Wei; Winiarski, David W.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Norford, L. K.; Willingham, ryan

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to meet the NDCX-II electrical power needs. 2. Buildingany supplementary electrical power distribution system. 2.three areas: 1. Electrical AC power distribution: Additional

Kwan, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TownScope II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

perspective. TownScope II combines a user-friendly graphical interface with powerful analysis tools. Thermal comfort, critical wind discomfort risk and perceptive qualities of...

153

Modeling the Loss Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on modeling and predicting the loss distribution for credit risky assets such as bonds and loans. We model the probability of default and the recovery rate given default based on shared covariates. We develop a new class of default ... Keywords: Basel II, default prediction, loss distribution, recovery rates

Sudheer Chava; Catalina Stefanescu; Stuart Turnbull

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect

To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

Not Available

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

156

IIS5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1) enabled/disabled, (1) Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager GUI: Right Click on Server > Properties > Home Directory tab > Read, Chapter 2 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

ISLSCP II Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISLSCP II The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project, Initiative II (ISLSCP II) Overview ISLSCP II Logo The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology...

159

Husimi distribution function and one-dimensional Ising model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Husimi distribution function for the one-dimensional Ising model is obtained. One-point and joint distribution functions are calculated and their thermal behaviour are discussed.

F. Kheirandish

2005-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

G. Grammer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)  

SciTech Connect

A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Commercial Thermal Distribution Systems FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Center for Environmental Design Research (CEDR Offerman of IEESF, and Graham Carter of Ove Arup, Cliff Federspiel and Nora Watanabe (CEDR) for their contributions to the CEDR project on fan research. #12;LBNL-44320 Disclaimer This document was prepared

165

IREX II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Z participants: Two output files 1. Template generation SDK Format ... December 21, 2009: Cumulative distribution functions of (best estimate) of pupil ...

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Balance of Power: Dynamic Thermal Management for Internet Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of Internet-based applications and their resulting multitier distributed architecture has changed the focus of design for large-scale Internet computing. Internet server applications execute in a horizontally scalable topology across hundreds ... Keywords: dynamic thermal management, thermal-load balancing, Internet data center, row-wise and regional thermal management, thermal policies

Ratnesh K. Sharma; Cullen E. Bash; Chandrakant D. Patel; Richard J. Friedrich; Jeffrey S. Chase

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

168

Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

NONE

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

The 2011 Acta Materialia Gold Medal Symposium: Nanoceramics II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Since Ag Nnao Plate(ANP) which is synthesized by a thermal growth method is completely flat(thickness <100nm) and narrow size distribution, ...

170

Distributed Energy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Distributed Energy Distributed Energy Distributed energy consists of a range of smaller-scale and modular devices designed to provide electricity, and sometimes also thermal energy, in locations close to consumers. They include fossil and renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, microturbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, combustion turbines, and steam turbines); energy storage devices (e.g., batteries and flywheels); and combined heat and power systems. Distributed energy offers solutions to many of the nation's most pressing energy and electric power problems, including blackouts and brownouts, energy security concerns, power quality issues, tighter emissions standards, transmission bottlenecks, and the desire for greater control over energy costs.

171

The physical mechanism of AdS instability and Holographic Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational falling in AdS has two characteristic properties \\cite{ohsin}: i) A thick shell becomes a thin shell. ii) Any shape become spherical. Such focusing character of AdS, for the collapse of dusts, leads to the rapid thermalization mechanism in strongly interacting system. For the collapse of a wave, it explains the cascade of energy to UV through repeated bounces, which has been extensively discussed in recent numerical works. Therefore the focusing is the physical mechanism of instability of AdS. Such sharp contrast between the dust and wave in collapse, together with the experimental observation of rapid thermalization, suggest that the initial condition of created particles in RHIC is in a state with random character rather than a coherent one. Two time scales, one for thermalization and the other for hydro-nization are defined and calculated in terms of the total mass density and energy distribution of the initial particles. We find $t_{th}\\sim (1-c_1/E^2)^{1/2}/T $ so that softer modes thermalize earlier. However, for hydro-nization, $t_{hyd} \\sim 1/E^{2/3}T^{1/3}$ therefore harder modes come earlier. We also show that near horizon limit of Dp brane solutions have similar focusing effect which is enough to guarantee the early thermalization.

Sang-Jin Sin

2013-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal ...  

An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance ...

176

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Distributed Generation Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental drivers are promoting the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Technology advances have produced new and improved distributed generation (DG) units that can be coupled with heat recovery hardware to create CHP systems. Performance characteristics vary considerably among DG options, and it is important to understand how these characteristics influence the selection of CHP systems that will meet both electric and thermal site loads.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Low-Complexity Message-Passing Algorithms for Distributed Computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed subgradient projection algorithm for convexnon-expansivity of the projection, and step (ii) followsr, let ? r denote the projection operator onto the span of {

Noorshams, Nima

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

180

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

3D thermal-aware floorplanner using a MOEA approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two of the major concerns in 3D stacked technology are heat removal and power density distribution. In our work, we propose a novel 3D thermal-aware floorplanner. Our contributions include:1.A novel multi-objective formulation to consider the thermal ... Keywords: 3D architecture, Evolutionary algorithm, Hot spots, Reliability, Temperature, Thermal-aware floorplan, Through silicon vias optimization

David Cuesta; José L. Risco-Martin; José L. Ayala; J. Ignacio Hidalgo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper ...

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument due to uncertainties in radiance-to-flux conversion from CERES Terra angular distribution models (ADMs) are evaluated ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; David R. Doelling

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

185

Equitable distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of distributing available resources occurs in a great variety of networks, each with peculiarities of its own. Coal from mines has to be distributed to central dumps and to small yards. Ice cream must be distributed only to refrigerated stores ...

John A. Gosden

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report  

SciTech Connect

The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Distribution Screening for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the deployment of renewable distributed generation increases, the need for traditional energy providers to interact with these resources increases. Detailed modeling and simulation of the distribution and distributed resources is a critical element to better analyze, understand and predict these interactions. EPRI has developed a tool for such analysis called OpenDSS. In addition, as part of the renewable integration program an applet was created for screening distributed generation (DG). This report ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cornell University Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort Thermal comfort in the CUSD home is a top priority for our team. Accordingly, we designed a redundant HVAC system that would carefully manage the comfort of our decathletes and guests throughout the competition and the life of the house. The CUSD home's HVAC system was optimized for Washington, DC, with the cold Ithaca climate in mind. Our design tools included a schematic energy-modeling interface called TREAT, which was built off of the SuNREL platform. TREAT was used to passively condition the space. Our schematic energy modeling helped us properly size window areas, overhangs, and building mass distribution. We used a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) package called AirPak, to refine our design. The home was modeled in both

190

Nanomaterials General II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Lithium-6 isotope has a significant thermal neutron cross-section and produces high energy charged particles on thermal neutron absorption.

191

Thermal D-branes States from Superstrings in Light-Cone Gauge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we are going to review a method to construct the thermal boundary states of the thermal string in the TFD approach. The class of thermal boundary states presented here is derived from the BPS D-branes of the type II GS superstrings.

Ion V. Vancea

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lighting system with heat distribution face plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distribution Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On September 24-26, 2012, the GTT presented a workshop on grid integration on the distribution system at the Sheraton Crystal City near Washington, DC.

195

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal Analysis and Stress Analysis of the Heat-Exchange Pipe Based on ANSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANSYS to be as a finite element analysis software has powerful features in thermal analysis and structural analysis. Based on ANSYS thermal analysis function, this paper selects SOLID90 unit, for thermal analysis on the heat-exchange pipe of heat exchanger ... Keywords: ANSYS, temperature distribution, stress distribution

Fenhua Li; Jian Xing; Yuan Liu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

Barnes, P.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

199

Cesium capsule thermal analysis  

SciTech Connect

Double-walled stainless steel capsules, produced by the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF), were designed to facilitate storage of radioactive cesium chloride (CsCl). The capsules were later determined to be a useful resource for irradiation facilities (IFs), and are currently being used at several commercial IFs. A capsule at one of these facilities recently failed, resulting in a release of the CsCl. A thermal analysis of a WESF capsule was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. In this analysis, parametric calculations demonstrates the impact that various parameters have on the temperature distribution within a capsule in a commercial irradiation facility. Specifically, the effect of varying the gas gap conductivity, the exterior heat sink temperatures, the exterior heat transfer distribution, the stainless steel emissivity, and the gamma heating rate were addressed. In addition, a calculation was performed to estimate the highest temperatures likely to have been encountered in one of these capsules. 8 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

Eyler, L.L.; Dodge, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Unclassified Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 1 Unclassified Distribution UNIVERSITY :OF CALIFORNU Radiation Lab oratory Contract No, W-7405-eng-48 THE DETECTION OF U T I F I C I B L L Y PRODUCED WOTOMESONS WITH COUNTERS *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sensitive interferometric video thermal wave imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of parallel thermal wave imaging is demonstrated in which the thermal wave image of a heated sample is converted into an optical phase image which is sensitively probed by a Twyman–Green interferometer. The sample is mounted onto an assembly of optical layers which acts as a temperature sensitive mirror.Heat conduction from the sample to this mirror results in a two?dimensional distribution of optical phase which is probed broadfield by the interferometer. The resulting transmission thermal wave image has characteristics analogous to those of photopyroelectric images. The interferogram produced in the interferometer may be recorded by videography

J. F. Power

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Special Distribution  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Special Distribution Special Distribution Issued: December 1977 ',, Radiological Survey and Decontamination of the Former Main Technical Area (TA-1) at Los Alamos, New Mexico Compiled by A. John Ahlquist Alan K. Stoker Linda K. Trocki c laboratory of, the University of California LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO 87545 An Alfirmdve Action/Equal Opportunity Employer ..-_- .-- .--.-. c T -,--... _ _._-r..l __,.. - .-,_.. ..- _._ -- .--. " . . _ . - . c- - . . . _ -. . _ . - . - . _ - - n - _ _~ ~_. __ _ ~~_ --..&e+ L.';; CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .._____ 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .._... _._ 2 I. BACKGROUND .............................................. 15

203

ISG X-Power Sources and SLED II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WG2: Power Sources and SLED II Chin, Tantawi, Vlieks 617 PM Joint Session with the structure group Discussions on breakdown studies RF distribution system for the 8-pack project...

204

The Interaction of Horizontal Eddy Transport and Thermal Drive in the Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of horizontal eddy motions and thermal drive in the stratosphere is investigated in equivalent barotropic calculations on the sphere. Eddy advection tends to homogenize the distribution of potential vorticity Q while thermal ...

Murry L. Salby; Rolando R. Garcia; Donal O'sullivan; Patrick Callaghan

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carbon Monoxide in type II supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared spectra of two type II supernovae 6 months after explosion are presented. The spectra exhibit a strong similarity to the observations of SN 1987A and other type II SNe at comparable epochs. The continuum can be fitted with a cool black body and the hydrogen lines have emissivities that are approximately those of a Case B recombination spectrum. The data extend far enough into the thermal region to detect emission by the first overtone of carbon monoxide. The molecular emission is modeled and compared with that in the spectra of SN 1987A. It is found that the flux in the CO first overtone is comparable to that found in SN 1987A. We argue that Carbon Monoxide forms in the ejecta of all type II SNe during the first year after explosion.

J. Spyromilio; B. Leibundgut; R. Gilmozzi

2001-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

A LUMPED-PARAMETER DYNAMIC MODEL OF A THERMAL REGENERATOR FOR FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation Mike He on the design of a Stirling engine for distributed solar thermal ap- plications. In particular, we design for experimentation. Stirling engines can have broad significance and technological advantages for distributed

Barth, Eric J.

207

The physical mechanism of AdS instability and Holographic Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational falling in AdS has two characteristic properties \\cite{ohsin}: i) A thick shell becomes a thin shell. ii) Any shape become spherical. Such focusing character of AdS, for the collapse of dusts, leads to the rapid thermalization mechanism in strongly interacting system. For the collapse of a wave, it explains the cascade of energy to UV through repeated bounces, which has been extensively discussed in recent numerical works. Therefore the focusing is the physical mechanism of instability of AdS. Such sharp contrast between the dust and wave in collapse, together with the experimental observation of rapid thermalization, suggest that the initial condition of created particles in RHIC is in a state with random character rather than a coherent one. Two time scales, one for thermalization and the other for hydro-nization are defined and calculated in terms of the total mass density and energy distribution of the initial particles. We find $t_{th}\\sim (1-c_1/E^2)^{1/2}/T $ so that softer modes thermali...

Sin, Sang-Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SOLERAS Program: engineering field test of a solar cooling system. Phase I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for selecting the engineering field test site and the building cooling requirements are described. Descriptions of the Phase I activities are presented and descriptions of the overall cooling system and its major subsystems and components are provided. The preliminary design analyses conducted to select collector/storage, chiller module and thermal distribution components; operating features and estimated system performance are included. Economic analyses and the results obtained are described including an assessment of the commercialization potential for the solar cooling system. Phase II activities are presented and detailed design, construction and installation features of the solar system at the test site are described. Testing documentation is provided by the checkout and acceptance tests and their results are described.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydrology and geochemistry of the uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming. Part II. History matching. [Mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

In Part I of this series of two reports the observed fluid potential and geochemical characteristics in and around the inactive uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming were presented. The prupose of the present work is to attempt to simulate field observations using mathematical models. The results of the studies have not only helped identify the physicochemical mechanisms govering contaminant migration around the inactive mill tailings pile in Riverton, but also have indicated the feasibility of quantifying these mechanisms with the help of newly developed mathematical models. Much work needs to be done to validate and benchmark these models. The history-matching effort on hand involves the mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the inactive uranium mill tailings. The simulation problem involves consideration of transient fluid flow and transient, reactive chemical transport in a variably saturated ground water system with time-dependent boundary conditions. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

Narasimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

214

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

215

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

218

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INL’s Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

219

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

220

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Optimization of central receiver concentrated solar thermal : site selection, heliostat layout & canting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, two new models are introduced for the purposes of (i) locating sites in hillside terrain suitable for central receiver solar thermal plants and (ii) optimization of heliostat field layouts for any terrain. ...

Noone, Corey J. (Corey James)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermally-Forced Mean Mass Circulations in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic approach to infer three-dimensional distribution of the thermally-forced, time-averaged horizontal mass and energy transport (Johnson and Townsend, 1981), which was previously applied in the Southern Hemisphere (Zillman, 1972), is ...

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Donald R. Johnson

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Cause of super-thermal electron heating during magnetotail reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present a candidate mechanism for the energization of super-thermal electrons during magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail. By analyzing in-situ measurements of electron distribution functions we characterize ...

Egedal-Pedersen, Jan

225

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gossiping in distributed systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchange of information between various nodes in a distributed network can be useful to utilize the available resources effectively. Gossiping algorithms can be used for this purpose. We begin with a survey of various gossiping schemes for different types of network topologies. Two types of gossiping techniques have traditionally been studied and used: (i) schemes in which there is an initiator to start the algorithm and (ii) sch emes without an initiator. These are again sub-divided into two classes: (i) each node knowing the entire graph of the network and (ii) each node knowing only its neighbors. In the schemes with an initiator, the leader initiates the algorithm and subsequently other nodes in the system participate in the algorithm when they are told to do so by a node which already participates in the algorithm. Assuming that each node knows only its neighbors, we propose and implement a gossiping scheme which can compromise message complexity with the time taken to reach consensus. This scheme assumes that one of the nodes is the initiator. We also propose a method for gossiping in an arbitrary graph without an initiator where nodes communicate asynchronously using timeouts.

Penubothu, Muralidhar V

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DISTRIBUTION CATEGORY  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTION CATEGORY DISTRIBUTION CATEGORY uc-11 I A W E N C E LIVERMORE IABORATORY University of Cahfmia/Livermore, California/94550 UCRL-52658 CALCULATION OF CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN AQUEOUS SOLUTION AND MINERALS: THE EQ3/6 - - SOFTWARE PACKAGE T. J. Wolery MS. date: February 1, 1979 . . - . . - . Tho rcpon rn prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United Stater Government. Seither Lhc Urutcd Stater nor the Umted Stater Department of Energy, nor any of their employees. nor any of their E O ~ ~ ~ B C I O I S . rubcontracton. o r their employees. makes any warranr)., exprcs or !mplwd. or assumes any legal liability or respanability io: the ~ c c u o c y . complctencn or uvfulneu of any miormarlon. apparatcr. product or p r o m s dtwlorcd. or r c p r e v n u that its UP would not infringe privately owned r

228

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

229

On the ratio X/Y for some elliptically symmetric distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distributions of the ratio X/Y are derived when (X,Y) has the elliptically symmetric Pearson-type II distribution, elliptically symmetric Pearson-type VII distribution and the elliptically symmetric Kotz-type distribution. Keywords: 33C90, 62E99, Elliptically symmetric distributions, Ratios of random variables

Saralees Nadarajah

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NIST STARR II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on board, a calibrated reference reflector, called a solar diffuser, is ... efficiently coupled to a monochromator, the tunable source power in STARR II ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Thermal $D$-Brane Boundary States from Green-Schwarz Superstrings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we thermalize the type II superstrings in the GS formulation by applying the TFD formalism. The thermal boundary conditions on the thermal Hilbert space are obtained from the BPS $D$-brane boundary conditions at zero temperature. We show that thermal boundary states can be obtained by thermalization from the BPS $D$-branes at zero temperature. These new states can be interpreted as thermal $D$-branes. Next, we discuss the supersymmetry breaking of the thermal string in the TFD approach. We identify the broken supersymmetry with the $\\epsilon$-transformation while the $\\eta$-transformation is preserved. Also, we compute the thermal partition function and the entropy of the thermal string.

Ion V. Vancea

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

235

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

237

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

238

Physics 5556 Solid State Physics, Part II Syllabus Spring 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 5556­ Solid State Physics, Part II Syllabus ­ Spring 2002 Instructor: Massimiliano Di subjects. The following sources are the most used: · Ashcroft and Mermin, "Solid State Physics" · Ziman, "Thermal Physics" · Madelung, "Introduction to Solid-State Theory" · Bassani and Pastori Parravicini

Di Ventra, Massimiliano

239

Bianchi type-II cosmological model: some remarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of Bianchi type-II (BII) cosmological model the behavior of matter distribution has been considered. It is shown that the non-zero off-diagonal component of Einstein tensor implies some severe restriction on the choice of matter distribution. In particular for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS BII) space-time it is proved that the matter distribution should be strictly isotropic if the corresponding matter field possesses only non-zero diagonal components of the energy-momentum tensor.

Bijan Saha

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

thermal_resistance_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "The NBS Line-Heat-Source Guarded Hot Plate for Thick Materials",FJ Powell and BG Rennex, Proceedings ASHRAE/DOE Conference - II, Atlanta ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PARS II FAQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

242

Portable Automated Mesonet II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portable Automated Mesonet II (PAM II) system was developed by NCAR to provide surface mesoscale data for the research needs of the atmospheric science community. The PAM system has 60 remote stations with planned growth to 300. In such a ...

Fred V. Brock; George H. Saum; Steven R. Semmer

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of ...

244

Mechanical Behavior II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Impact of Cooling Rate on Low Silver Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnect Board Level Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling Performance: ...

245

Potline Operation II: Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... With amperage creep, the cross-over busbars electrical insulation of this ... the hot conductors-to-cold supports differential thermal expansion.

246

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Theoretical investigation of thermophysical properties in two-temperature argon-helium thermal plasma  

SciTech Connect

The thermophysical properties of argon-helium thermal plasma have been studied in the temperature range from 5000 to 40 000 K at atmospheric pressure in local thermodynamic equilibrium and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Two cases of thermal plasma considered are (i) ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and (ii) excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The influence of electronic excitation and non-equilibrium parameter {theta} = T{sub e}/T{sub h} on thermodynamic properties (composition, degree of ionization, Debye length, enthalpy, and total specific heat) and transport properties (electrical conductivity, electron thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusion ratio) have been studied. Within the framework of Chapman-Enskog method, the higher-order contributions to transport coefficient and their convergence are studied. The influence of different molar compositions of argon-helium plasma mixture on convergence of higher-orders is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of different definitions of Debye length has also been examined for electrical conductivity and it is observed that electrical conductivity with the definition of Debye length (in which only electrons participate in screening) is less than that of the another definition (in which both the electrons and ions participate in screening) and this deviation increases with electron temperature. Finally, the effect of lowering of ionization energy is examined on electron number density, Debye length, and higher-order contribution to electrical conductivity. It is observed that the lowering of the ionization energy affects the electron transport-properties and consequently their higher-order contributions depending upon the value of the non-equilibrium parameter {theta}.

Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar (India); Singh, Gurpreet [Department of Physics, DAV College, Bathinda (India)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

251

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

Distribution Category:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- - Distribution Category: Remedial Action and Decommissioning Program (UC-70A) DOE/EV-0005/48 ANL-OHS/HP-84-104 ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 FORMERLY UTILIZED MXD/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE HARSHAW CHEMICAL COMPANY CLEVELAND. OHIO Prepared by R. A. Wynveen Associate Division Director, OHS W. H. Smith Senior Health Physicist C. M. Sholeen Health Physicist A. L. Justus Health Physicist K. F. Flynn Health Physicist Radiological Survey Group Health Physics Section Occupational Health and Safety Division April 1984 Work Performed under Budget Activity DOE KN-03-60-40 and ANL 73706 iii PREFACE AND EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This is one in a series of reports resulting from a program initiated

253

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

254

Parton distributions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-section for the virtual photon-proton interaction can be written in the factorized form ?(ep ? eX) = ? i CDISi (x, ?s(Q2))? fi(x,Q2) where Q2 is the photon virtuality, x = Q22m? , the mo- mentum fraction of parton (?=energy transfer in the lab frame), and the fi(x,Q2... distribution comes from inclusive jet measure- ments by D0 and CDF at Tevatron. They mea- 0 50 100 -1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Dc 2 k Valence quarks Figure 6. ??2 against the isospin violating parameter ?. sure d?/dET d? for central rapidity CDF...

Thorne, Robert S

255

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

256

THE THERMAL SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH TOMOGRAPHY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect directly measures the thermal pressure of free electrons integrated along the line of sight and thus contains valuable information on the thermal history of the universe. However, the redshift information is entangled in the projection along the line of sight. This projection effect severely degrades the power of the tSZ effect to reconstruct the thermal history. We investigate the tSZ tomography technique to recover this otherwise lost redshift information by cross-correlating the tSZ effect with galaxies of known redshifts, or alternatively with matter distribution reconstructed from weak-lensing tomography. We investigate in detail the three-dimensional distribution of the gas thermal pressure and its relation with the matter distribution, through our adiabatic hydrodynamic simulation and the one with additional gastrophysics including radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. (1) We find a strong correlation between the gas pressure and matter distribution, with a typical cross-correlation coefficient r {approx}> 0.7 at k {approx}tight correlation will enable robust cross-correlation measurement between SZ surveys such as Planck, ACT, and SPT and lensing surveys such as DES and LSST, at {approx}>20{sigma}-100{sigma} level. (2) We propose a tomography technique to convert the measured cross-correlation into the contribution from gas in each redshift bin to the tSZ power spectrum. Uncertainties in gastrophysics may affect the reconstruction at {approx}2% level, due to the {approx}1% impact of gastrophysics on r found in our simulations. However, we find that the same gastrophysics affects the tSZ power spectrum at {approx}40% level, so it is robust to infer the gastrophysics from the reconstructed redshift-resolved contribution.

Shao Jiawei; Zhang Pengjie; Lin Weipeng; Jing Yipeng, E-mail: jwshao@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

258

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

259

Proceedings of the solar thermal technology conference  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Thermal Technology Conference was held on August 26-28, 1987, at the Marriott Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories. Topics covered during the conference included a status summary of the Sandia Solar Thermal Development Project, perspectives on central and distributed receiver technology including energy collection and conversion technologies, systems analyses and applications experiments. The proceedings contain summaries (abstracts and principal visual aids) of the presentations made at the conference.

Tyner, C.E. (ed.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

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261

NSLS-II Project Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Pages Project Management Team Project Schedule Integrated Project Team (IPT) Monthly Status Meetings Advisory Committees Project Reviews Documents NSLS-II...

262

Thermal imaging experiments on ANACONDA ion beam generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal imaging technique was used in two experimental measurements. First, the ion intensity distribution on the anode surface was observed from different angles by using a multi-pinhole camera. Second, the plume from a target intercepting the beam was visualized by observing the distribution of temperature increase on a thin plate hit by the plume.

Jiang, W.; Yatsui, K. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology (Japan). Lab. of Beam Technology; Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

Jamil A. Khan

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams  

SciTech Connect

The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

PEP-II injection timing and controls  

SciTech Connect

Hardware has been built and software written and incorporated in the existing SLC accelerator control system to control injection of beam pulses from the accelerator into the PEP-II storage rings currently under construction. Hardware includes a CAMAC module to delay the machine timing fiducial in order that a beam pulse extracted from a damping ring will be injected into a selected group of four 476 MHz buckets in a PEP-II ring. Further timing control is accomplished by shifting the phase of the bunches stored in the damping rings before extraction while leaving the phase of the PEP-II stored beam unchanged. The software which drives timing devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis relies on a dedicated communication link on which one scheduling microprocessor broadcasts a 128-bit message to all distributed control microprocessors at 360 Hz. PEP-II injection will be driven by the scheduling microprocessor according to lists specifying bucket numbers in arbitrary order, and according to scheduling constraints maximizing the useful beam delivered to the SLC collider currently in operation. These lists will be generated by a microprocessor monitoring the current stored per bucket in each of the PEP-II rings.

Bharadwaj, V.; Browne, M.; Crane, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Ross, M.; Stanek, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ronan, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Distribution in Szekeres Type I and II Space Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper has excessive overlap with the following papers also written by the authors or their collaborators: gr-qc/0607103, gr-qc/0607119, gr-qc/0607115, gr-qc/0607102, gr-qc/0602012, gr-qc/0702047, gr-qc/0607089, gr-qc/0510123, and others.

Sezgin Aygun; Melis Aygun; Ismail Tarhan

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Certification of SRM 114q: Part II (Particle size distribution)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LA: Ronald J. Rajki California Portland Cement ... Mitsubishi Cement Corp., Lucerne Valley, CA: Tom ... of diffracted light around the central beam can ...

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

Certification of SRM 114q: Part II (Particle size distribution)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physical and Chemical Properties2 • Analytical Chemistry ... and Conformance Testing • Statistical Engineering ... and the requirements for sample ...

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

271

Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 1, final report. Conceptual design, demand and fuel projections and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I Report, Grid ICES, presented the broad alternatives and implications for development of an energy system satisfying thermal demand with the co-generation of electric power, all predicated on the use of solid fuels. Participants of the system are the University of Minnesota, operator and primary thermal user, and Northern States Power Company, primary electrical user; with St. Mary's Hospital, Fairview Hospital, and Augsburg College as Add-on Customers for the thermal service (Option I). Included for consideration are the Options of (II) solid waste disposal by the Pyrolysis Method, with heat recovery, and (III) conversion of a portion of the thermal system from steam to hot water distribution to increase co-generation capability and as a demonstration system for future expansion. This report presents the conceptual design of the energy system and each Option, with the economic implications identified so that selection of the final system can be made. Draft outline of the Environmental Assessment for the project is submitted as a separate report.

Not Available

1978-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

PARS II User Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document serves as a reference manual to assist DOE end-users in performing their respective functions within the PARS II web application. The document provides a description and “How To” for...

275

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

276

Integrated Thermal Analysis of the FRIB Cryomodule Design  

SciTech Connect

Thermal analysis of the FRIB cryomodule design is performed to determine the heat load to the cryogenic plant, to minimize the cryogenic plant load, to simulate thermal shield cool down as well as to determine the pressure relief sizes for failure conditions. Static and dynamic heat loads of the cryomodules are calculated and the optimal shield temperature is determined to minimize the cryogenic plant load. Integrated structural and thermal simulations of the 1100-O aluminium thermal shield are performed to determine the desired cool down rate to control the temperature profile on the thermal shield and to minimize thermal expansion displacements during the cool down. Pressure relief sizing calculations for the SRF helium containers, solenoids, helium distribution piping, and vacuum vessels are also described.

Y. Xu, M. Barrios, F. Casagrande, M.J. Johnson, M. Leitner, D. Arenius, V. Ganni, W.J. Schneider, M. Wiseman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with sealing duct air leakage in commercialassociated with sealing duct air leakage in the commercialby the air punctures the glue bridge sealing the leak. The

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications Specify actual fan design kW/CFM if desired. Ifconstant flow rate fan design power part-load-ratiorelevant than the original fan design data. Similarly, if

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sizing and design, e.g. , excessive fan-power requirement,fan-power and energy savings could be realized by better design

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997).1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, American Society1997a.1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, Chapter 3, "Heat1997b. 1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, Chapter 32, ''

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 1999 AC Adjustable-Speed Drive Population Horsepower Range 1 - 5 70% 5.1 - 20 23% 21 - 50 4% 51 - 100 1% 101 - 200 1% 200 + 1% Total 100% Source(s): Electrical Apparatus Service...

284

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 1999 Energy Efficient Motors, Replacements and Sales, by Horsepower Class | Units in Use Horsepower | Energy Efficient Horsepower Range (106) | % Retired 1 - 5 | 17% 5.1 - 20 |...

285

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infiltration rates, space conditioning energy use, and peakgas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughlymajority of this space conditioning energy passes through

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Research, Berkeley, CEDR-02-98. California EnergyDesign Research (CEDR), University of California; Berkeley.Design Research (CEDR), University of California, Berkeley.

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Localized Thermal Distribution for Office Buildings; Final Report - Phase III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E.A. , F.S. Bauman, L.P. Johnston and FL Zhang CEDR-R06-91and E . A . Arens Bauman, F. CEDR-R01-91 Bauman, F. and M .C.C. Benton 2:35 P M 1/6/98 CEDR-R07-94 CEDR-R01-94 CEDR-

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design." Atlanta, American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, andRefrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers Brake horsepower Building Management System Constant air volume Center for Environmental Design

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

CAV Packaged CAV Condenser Fan 0.3 0.2 Cooling Tower Fan 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.0 Condenser Water Pump 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.0 Chilled Water Pump 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.0 Supply & Return Fans 0.7 0.5...

290

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air leakage, and heat conduction gains," Lawrence Berkeleyheat conduction losses due to both heat conduction through duct walls and

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains." Final Report ofof air leakage and heat conduction may lead to inappropriatethermal losses due to heat conduction through duct walls

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Efficient Thermal Energy Distribution in Commercial Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cconolllic studics havc shown, dccp rcductions in CO2 cmissions can nc achicvcd with cxisting tcchnologics cconomy or today's c.lrs thaI havc thc salnc pcrrormanl:C. nut lhcy would c(}sl 11()morc to own control for fucl-hound nitrogen would hc Icss costly for hiomass than for coal. Typical co.lls havc

293

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symmetry Ulrich Kr¨ahmer University of Glasgow RI Masterclass Stirling 2013 Ulrich Kr¨ahmer (University of Glasgow) Symmetry RI Masterclass Stirling 2013 1 / 23 #12;Problem 1: geometry Given two points Kr¨ahmer (University of Glasgow) Symmetry RI Masterclass Stirling 2013 2 / 23 #12;Problem 2: algebra

Sanders, Seth

294

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the top story of a building, insulation located at theplenum. The building had R-11 insulation located above thebuildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation.

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Appendix II. In-Situ Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California LBNL Report Number 51860 May 2003 Legal Notice This report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission, Energy Commission). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, or the State of California. The Commission, the State of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warranty, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved

296

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two-models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thermal and non-thermal emission in the Cygnus X region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio continuum observations detect non-thermal synchrotron and thermal bremsstrahlung radiation. Separation of the two different emission components is crucial to study the properties of diffuse interstellar medium. The Cygnus X region is one of the most complex areas in the radio sky which contains a number of massive stars and HII regions on the diffuse thermal and non-thermal background. More supernova remnants are expected to be discovered. We aim to develop a method which can properly separate the non-thermal and thermal radio continuum emission and apply it to the Cygnus X region. The result can be used to study the properties of different emission components and search for new supernova remnants in the complex. Multi-frequency radio continuum data from large-scale surveys are used to develop a new component separation method. Spectral analysis is done pixel by pixel for the non-thermal synchrotron emission with a realistic spectral index distribution and a fixed spectral index of beta = -2.1 for the t...

Xu, W F; Han, J L; Liu, F S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

EIA - Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal...

299

In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin II (Ang II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus  

SciTech Connect

Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 ..mu..m coronal sections with 0.4 nM /sup 125/I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 ..mu..M unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system.

Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE Temperature Response 4-7 4.6 Thermal Storage Requirements 4-16 4.6.1 Pressurized Water/Steam System 4-19 4

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Light beam dynamics in materials with radially-inhomogeneous thermal conductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of bright and vortex solitons in thermal media with nonuniform thermal conductivity and homogeneous refractive index, whereby the local modulation of the thermal conductivity strongly affects the entire refractive index distribution. While regions where the thermal conductivity is increased effectively expel light, self-trapping may occur in the regions with reduced thermal conductivity, even if such regions are located close to the material boundary. As a result, strongly asymmetric self-trapped beams may form inside a ring with reduced thermal conductivity and perform persistent rotary motion. Also, such rings are shown to support stable vortex solitons, which may feature strongly non-canonical shapes.

Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

304

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Theory for the Retrievals of Virtual Temperature from Remote Measurements of Horizontal Winds and Thermal Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory for the estimation of virtual temperature from remote measurements of (i) emitted thermal radiation by microwave and infrared radiometers and (ii) horizontal winds by Doppler radars (or lidars). The problem of ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS  

SciTech Connect

This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

Yiming Sun

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

314

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials… (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

324

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

325

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes Speaker(s): Pierre S. Farrugia Date: November 18, 2010 - 12:05pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Lorenzetti Thermal plumes have been widely investigated in a variety of scenarios, including natural convection and stratified environments. The resulting theory may be used to predict ventilation flow rates in, for example, natural and displacement ventilation, and under-floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. However, there has been little effort in investigating how uniform upward flows affect the plume velocity, rate of growth, and thermal profile. Such situations can arise if, for example, the diffusers of a UFAD system are evenly distributed. In order to study such situations, analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature profiles of a plume

326

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter against Random Matrix Theory, Quantum Chaos and Direct Interaction: Warming up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of a thermalized non-equilibrated state of matter offers a conceptually new understanding of the strong angular asymmetry. In this compact review we present some clarifications, corrections and further developments of the approach, and provide a brief account of results previously discussed but not reported in the literature. The cross symmetry compound nucleus $S$-matrix correlations are obtained (i) starting from the unitary $S$-matrix representation, (ii) by explicitly taking into account a process of energy equilibration, and (iii) without taking the thermodynamic limit of an infinite number of particles in the thermalized system. It is conjectured that the long phase memory is due to the exponentially small total spin off-diagonal resonance intensity correlations. This manifestly implies that the strong angular asymmetry intimately relates to extremely small deviations of the eigenfunction distribution from Gaussian law. The spin diagonal resonance intensity correlations determine a new time/energy scale for a validity of random matrix theory. Its definition does not involve overlaps of the many-body interacting configurations with shell model non-interacting states and thus is conceptually different from the physical meaning (inverse energy relaxation time) of the spreading widths introduced by Wigner. Exact Gaussian distribution of the resonance wave functions corresponds to the instantaneous phase relaxation. We invite the nuclear reaction community for the competition to describe, as the first challenge, the strong forward peaking in the typically evaporation part of the proton spectra. This is necessary to initiate revealing long-term misconduct in the heavily cross-disciplinary field, also important for nuclear industry applications.

S. Kun; Y. Li; M. H. Zhao; M. R. Huang

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ant Colony Optimisation solution to distribution transformer planning problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a stochastic optimisation method, based on Ant Colony Optimisation (ACO), for the optimal choice of transformer sizes to be installed in a distribution network. This method is properly introduced to the solution of the Optimal ... Keywords: ACO, OTS, ant colony optimisation, distribution network planning, energy loss cost, optimal transformer sizing, thermal loading, transformers

Eleftherios I. Amoiralis; Pavlos S. Georgilakis; Marina A. Tsili; Antonios G. Kladas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

334

PARS II Training Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 4 5 6 7 8 WEEK 3 11 12 13 14 15 WEEK 4 18 19 20 21 22 WEEK 5 25 26 27 28 PARS II Training Schedule FEBRUARY 2013 Webinar PARS 102: Session A) 10:00 - 12:00 1 Hour Break...

335

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

336

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

339

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP...

340

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Infrared [Fe II] and Dust Emissions from Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supernova remnants (SNRs) are strong thermal emitters of infrared radiation. The most prominent lines in the near-infrared spectra of SNRs are [Fe II] lines. The [Fe II] lines are from shocked dense atomic gases, so they trace SNRs in dense environments. After briefly reviewing the physics of the [Fe II] emission in SNR shocks, I describe the observational results which show that there are two groups of SNRs bright in [Fe II] emission: middle-aged SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and young core-collapse SNRs in dense circumstellar medium. The SNRs belonging to the former group are also bright in near-infrared H$_2$ emission, indicating that both atomic and molecular shocks are pervasive in these SNRs. The SNRs belonging to the latter group have relatively small radii in general, implying that most of them are likely the remnants of SN IIL/b or SN IIn that had strong mass loss before the explosion. I also comment on the "[Fe II]-H$_2$ reversal" in SNRs and on using the [Fe II]-line luminosity as an indic...

Koo, Bon-Chul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

PARS II Software Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These...

343

Center-to-Limb Variation of Radio Emissions from Thermal-Rich and Thermal-Poor Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of radio flare events was performed by using the event list of Nobeyama Radioheliograph in 1996-2009. We examined center-to-limb variations of 17GHz and 34GHz flux by dividing the flare events into different groups with respect to the 'thermal plasma richness' (ratio of the peak flux of soft X-ray to non-thermal radio emissions) and the duration of radio bursts. It is found that peak flux of 17 and 34GHz tend to be higher toward the limb for thermal-rich flares with short durations. We propose that the thermal-rich flares, which are supposed to be associated with an efficient precipitation of high energy particles into the chromosphere, have a pitch angle distribution of non-thermal electrons with a higher population along the flare loop.

Kawate, Tomoko; Kiyoshi, Ichimoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II. Purpose: On May 20, 2010, NIST hosted the first Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

350

Integrated system for control and monitoring in real time of efficient electrical and thermal energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated monitoring and driving system is made of main distributed components: - first level:_one or two computers placed in the control room which monitors the thermal and electrical processes based on the datas provided by the second level via ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, distribution management system, electric power systems, optimization, process control, real time systems, simulation

Ion Miciu; Florin Hartescu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul, E-mail: antognini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: bird@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: martini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was installed to supply cooling for the test cell, which was built to validate the heat balance and radiant time series cooling load calculation procedures. However, some instrumentation has been added which provides and a Brief Description of Experimental Apparatus The experimental apparatus is in a test cell building

357

Distribution effectiveness and impacts on equipment sizing for residential thermal distribution systems  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission), through a contract with the Regents of the University of California, California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, the State of California, The Regents, or CIEE. The Commission, the Regents, the State of California, CIEE, their employees, contractors, and subcontractors, make no warranty, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the Commission or CIEE, nor has the Commission or CIEE passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information in this report.

Walker, Iain; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pretzelosity distribution function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 'pretzelosity' distribution is discussed. Theoretical properties, model results, and perspectives to access experimental information on this leading twist, transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function are reviewed. Its relation to helicity and transversity distributions is highlighted.

H. Avakian; A. V. Efremov; P. Schweitzer; F. Yuan

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

360

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

362

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Particulate Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling the distribution and contiguity of the different phases can lead to ... matrix, spectral peaks reveal load transfer behavior under varying volume fractions of ... results in dense anodes and has a direct impact on the electrical resistivity.

367

Smart Distribution Applications for Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P180.014 Smart Distribution Applications for Distributed Energy Resources (070625)The factors listed below all support the proliferation of Distributed Generating (DG) units in electric utility systems. The growing rate of DG deployment suggests that alternative energy-based solutions play an increasingly important role in the smart grid and modern utility.Deregulation of the electric utility industry in some countriesEnvironmental ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Survey of solar thermal test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

Masterson, K.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gold charge state distributions in highly ionized, low-density beam plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of Au charge state distributions (CSDs) from low density, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and EBIT-II). X-ray emission from Ni-like to Kr-like Au ions has been recorded from monoenergetic electron beam plasmas having E{sub beam}=2.66, 2.92, 3.53, and 4.54 keV, and the CSDs of the beam plasmas have been inferred by fitting the collisionally excited line transitions and radiative recombination emission features with synthetic spectra. We have modeled the beam plasmas using a collisional-radiative code with various treatments of the atomic structure for the complex M- and N-shell ions and find that only models with extensive doubly excited states can properly account for the dielectronic recombination (DR) channels that control the CSDs. This finding would be unremarkable for plasmas with thermal electron distributions, where many such states are sampled, and the importance of DR is well established. But in an EBIT source, the beam is resonant with only a subset of such states having spectator electrons in orbitals with high principal quantum number n (8{<=}n{<=}20). The inclusion of such states in the model was also necessary to obtain agreement with observed stabilizing transitions in the x-ray spectra.

May, M. J.; Scofield, J.; Schneider, M.; Wong, K.; Beiersdorfer, P. [PO Box 808 L260, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94551 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, ICF Target Design, Albuquerque New Mexico, 87185-1186 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues  

SciTech Connect

In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Integrated thermal treatment systems study. Internal review panel report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) commissioned two studies to evaluate nineteen thermal treatment technologies for treatment of DOE mixed low-level waste. These studies were called the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) Phase I and Phase II. With the help of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Mixed Waste Focus Group, OTD formed an ITTS Internal Review Panel to review and comment on the ITTS studies. This Panel was composed of scientists and engineers from throughout the DOE complex, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the California EPA, and private experts. The Panel met from November 15-18, 1994 to review the ITTS studies and to make recommendations on the most promising thermal treatment systems for DOE mixed low-level wastes and on research and development necessary to prove the performance of the technologies. This report describes the findings and presents the recommendations of the Panel.

Cudahy, J.; Escarda, T.; Gimpel, R. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

THERMAL INSULATION MATERIALS TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 01/W01 CAN/CGSB-51.2-M88 Thermal Insulation, Calcium Silicate, for Piping, Machinery and Boilers _____ ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NVLAP Thermal Insulation Materials LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for thermal insulation materials. The final report for Round 31 was released in February 2010. Proficiency testing is on hold ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II  

SciTech Connect

In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I. [Central Design Bureau of Machine Building, Krasnogvardeyskaya Square 3, St. Petersburg, (Russia) 195272

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphene’s thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

Ghosh, Suchismita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Holographic Thermal Helicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal helicity, defined in arXiv:1211.3850, of a conformal field theory with anomalies in the context of AdS$_{2n+1}$/CFT$_{2n}$. To do so, we consider large charged rotating AdS black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant using fluid/gravity expansion. We compute the anomaly-induced current and stress tensor of the dual CFT in leading order of the fluid/gravity derivative expansion and show their agreement with the field theoretical replacement rule for the thermal helicity. Such replacement rule is reflected in the bulk by new replacement rules obeyed by the Hall currents around the black hole.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; R. Loganayagam; Gim Seng Ng; Maria J. Rodriguez

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

387

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Satellite Estimation of the Surface Energy Balance, Moisture Availability and Thermal Inertia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for inferring the distribution of surface heat and evaporative fluxes and the ground moisture availability and thermal inertia (ground conductive capacity) is used to analyze two urbanized areas, Los Angeles and St. Louis. The technique ...

Toby N. Carlson; Joseph K. Dodd; Stanley G. Benjamin; James N. Cooper

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A novel thermal optimization flow using incremental floorplanning for 3D ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal issue is a critical challenge in 3D IC design. To eliminate hotspots, physical layouts are always adjusted by shifting or duplicating hot blocks. However, these modifications may degrade the packing area as well as interconnect distribution greatly. ...

Xin Li; Yuchun Ma; Xianlong Hong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Response of a Zonally Symmetric Atmosphere to Subtropical Thermal Forcing: Threshold Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the response of a zonally symmetric atmosphere to a thermal forcing that is localized in the subtropics. Specifically, the equilibrium temperature distribution has a local subtropical peak and is flat elsewhere, including at the ...

R. Alan Plumb; Arthur Y. Hou

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optimal detection of losses by thermal probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the discrimination of lossy bosonic channels and focus to the case when one of the values for the loss parameter is zero, i.e., we address the detection of a possible loss against the alternative hypothesis of an ideal lossless channel. This discrimination is performed by inputting one-mode or two-mode squeezed thermal states with fixed total energy. By optimizing over this class of states, we find that the optimal inputs are pure, thus corresponding to single- and two-mode squeezed vacuum states. In particular, we show that for any value of the damping rate smaller than a critical value there is a threshold on the energy that makes the two-mode squeezed vacuum state more convenient than the corresponding single-mode state, whereas for damping larger than this critical value two-mode squeezed vacua are always better. We then consider the discrimination in realistic conditions, where it is unlikely to have pure squeezing. Thus by fixing both input energy and squeezing, we show that two-mode squeezed thermal states are always better than their single- mode counterpart when all the thermal photons are directed into the dissipative channel. Besides, this result also holds approximately for unbalanced distribution of the thermal photons. Finally, we also investigate the role of correlations in the improvement of detection. For fixed input squeezing (single-mode or two-mode), we find that the reduction of the quantum Chernoff bound is a monotone function of the two-mode entanglement as well as the quantum mutual information and the quantum discord. We thus verify that employing squeezing in the form of correlations (quantum or classical) is always a resource for loss detection whenever squeezed thermal states are taken as input.

Carmen Invernizzi; Matteo G. A. Paris; Stefano Pirandola

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

STATISTICAL ANALYSES ON THERMAL ASPECTS OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The frequency distribution of flare energies provides a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in flares and to estimate the role of flares in coronal heating. It often takes a power law as its functional form. We have analyzed various variables, including the thermal energies E{sub th} of 1843 flares at their peak time. They were recorded by both Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the time period from 2002 to 2009 and are classified as flares greater than C 1.0. The relationship between different flare parameters is investigated. It is found that fitting the frequency distribution of E{sub th} to a power law results in an index of -2.38. We also investigate the corrected thermal energy E{sub cth}, which represents the flare total thermal energy including the energy loss in the rising phase. Its corresponding power-law slope is -2.35. Compilation of the frequency distributions of the thermal energies from nanoflares, microflares, and flares in the present work and from other authors shows that power-law indices below -2.0 have covered the range from 10{sup 24} to 10{sup 32} erg. Whether this frequency distribution can provide sufficient energy to coronal heatings in active regions and the quiet Sun is discussed.

Li, Y. P.; Gan, W. Q.; Feng, L., E-mail: wqgan@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 210008 Nanjing (China)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Secondary concentrators for parabolic dish solar thermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

One approach to production of electricity or high-temperature process heat from solar energy is to use point-focusing, two-axis pointing concentrators in a distributed-receiver solar thermal system. This paper discusses some of the possibilities and problems in using compound concentrators in parabolic dish systems. 18 refs.

Jaffe, L.D.; Poon, P.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

THE THREE DIMENSIONAL THERMAL HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.  

SciTech Connect

BAGIRA - a thermal-hydraulic program complex was primarily developed for using it in nuclear power plant simulator models, but is also used as a best-estimate analytical tool for modeling two-phase mixture flows. The code models allow consideration of phase transients and the treatment of the hydrodynamic behavior of boiling and pressurized water reactor circuits. It provides the capability to explicitly model three-dimensional flow regimes in various regions of the primary and secondary circuits such as, the mixing regions, circular downcomer, pressurizer, reactor core, main primary loops, the steam generators, the separator-reheaters. In addition, it is coupled to a severe-accident module allowing the analysis of core degradation and fuel damage behavior. Section II will present the theoretical basis for development and selected results are presented in Section III. The primary use for the code complex is to realistically model reactor core behavior in power plant simulators providing enhanced training tools for plant operators.

KALINICHENKO,S.D.; KOHUT,P.; KROSHILIN,A.E.; KROSHILIN,V.E.; SMIRNOV,A.V.

2003-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

403

Thermal fluctuations of granular gas under HCS using two-point kinetic theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fluctuations of the granular gas under the homogeneous cooling state (HCS) are estimated using two-point kinetic theory by Tsuge-Sagara. Thermal fluctuations of the elastic gas are modified for the granular gas by nonequilibrium moments, which defines the distribution function under the HCS. The deviations of thermal fluctuations for the granular gas from those for the elastic gas obtained by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem are calculated as a function of the restitution coefficient.

Yano, Ryosuke

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

PADD IV PADD II lakes PADD V - PADD II - inland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Source Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V -

405

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

406

HYFIRE II: a fusion/synfuel producer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HYFIRE II is a point design study of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor coupled to a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) system for the production of hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the application of fusion energy for the production of these basic fuels. The HYFIRE II fusion reactor design is based on the STARFIRE commercial power reactor, the primary differences are in the type of blankets between the two reactors, the power cycle design and in the increased thermal power rating (to 6000 MW(th)). Otherwise, the major features of STARFIRE which are maintained include: steady-state operation; rf drive; mechanical limiters; number of TF coils; etc. Based on HYFIRE conceptual design studies to date, the following observations are made: a) blanket designs have been identified to simultaneously meet global tritium breeding requirements and required energy splits between process steam and helium; b) attractive tritium breeders such as LiAlO/sub 2/ and liquid lead with dissolved lithium have been identified; c) gross power cycle efficiencies in the 40 to 45% range appear achievable; and d) high H/sub 2/ production efficiencies in the 50 to 55% range appear achievable.

Fillo, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume II.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II - Responses to Comments II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS af acre-feet afy acre-feet per year APP Avian Protection Plan BA Biological Assessment Barr Barr Engineering Company BMPs Best Management Practices Btu British thermal unit CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule

408

Thermal stress analysis of eccentric tube receiver using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

In the parabolic trough concentrator with tube receiver system, the heat transfer fluid flowing through the tube receiver can induce high thermal stress and deflection. In this study, the eccentric tube receiver is introduced with the aim to reduce the thermal stresses of tube receiver. The ray-thermal-structural sequential coupled numerical analyses are adopted to obtain the concentrated heat flux distributions, temperature distributions and thermal stress fields of both the eccentric and concentric tube receivers. During the sequential coupled numerical analyses, the concentrated heat flux distribution on the bottom half periphery of tube receiver is obtained by Monte-Carlo ray tracing method, and the fitting function method is introduced for the calculated heat flux distribution transformation from the Monte-Carlo ray tracing model to the CFD analysis model. The temperature distributions and thermal stress fields are obtained by the CFD and FEA analyses, respectively. The effects of eccentricity and oriented angle variation on the thermal stresses of eccentric tube receiver are also investigated. It is recommended to adopt the eccentric tube receiver with optimum eccentricity and 90 oriented angle as tube receiver for the parabolic trough concentrator system to reduce the thermal stresses. (author)

Wang, Fuqiang; Shuai, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guo; Tan, Heping [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

410

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

411

The Globular Cluster NGC 5286. II. Variable Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 5286, which has recently been suggested to be associated with the Canis Major dwarf spheroidal galaxy. 57 variable stars were detected, only 19 of which had previously been known. Among our detections one finds 52 RR Lyrae (22 RRc and 30 RRab), 4 LPV's, and 1 type II Cepheid of the BL Herculis type. Periods are derived for all of the RR Lyrae as well as the Cepheid, and BV light curves are provided for all the variables. The mean period of the RRab variables is = 0.656 days, and the number fraction of RRc stars is N(c)/N(RR) = 0.42, both consistent with an Oosterhoff II (OoII) type -- thus making NGC 5286 one of the most metal-rich ([Fe/H] = -1.67; Harris 1996) OoII globulars known to date. The minimum period of the \\RRab's, namely Pab,min = 0.513 d, while still consistent with an OoII classification, falls towards the short end of the observed Pab,min distribution for OoII globular clusters. As was recently found in the case o...

Zorotovic, M; Smith, H A; Pritzl, B J; Aguirre, P; Angulo, R E; Aravena, M; Assef, R J; Contreras, C; Cortes, C; De Martini, G; Escobar, M E; González, D; Jofre, P; Lacerna, I; Navarro, C; Palma, O; Prieto, G E; Recabarren, E; Trivino, J; Vidal, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

413

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

414

Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.  

SciTech Connect

Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

Mirrokni, Vahab (Google Research, New York, NY); Andersen, Reid (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA); Gleich, David F.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A bimetal and electret-based converter for thermal energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new device able to turn thermal gradients into electricity by using a bimetal-based heat engine coupled to an electrostatic converter. A two-steps conversion is performed: (i) a curved bimetallic strip turns the thermal gradient into a mechanical movement (thermal-to-mechanical conversion) that is (ii) then converted into electricity thanks to an electret-based electrostatic converter (mechanical-to-electrical conversion). An output power up to 5.5uW on a hot source at 50{\\deg}C has already been reached, validating this new concept.

Boisseau, S; Monfray, S; Puscasu, O; Skotnicki, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX 78212 (United States); Uomoto, Alan [Carnegie Institution for Science, The Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

418

Raindrop Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews some of the published results relating to raindrop-size distributions and couples this with some of the authors' results in order to show that the mathematical description of the distribution can be divided into three ...

M. C. Hodson

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Transversity Parton Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transversity distribution is one of the three fundamental parton distributions that completely describe polarized spin 1/2 nucleon. Its chiral odd nature prevented for many years its experimental exploration, however presently we have obtained great deal of information about this distribution. This includes experimental data from Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering, knowledge of scale dependence and phenomenological extractions. I will discuss main features of this distribution and indicate the future improvements of our knowledge.

Alexei Prokudin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermal transient anemometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multispectral thermal imaging  

SciTech Connect

Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Corp., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Kay, R.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Monitoring Systems and Technology Center

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing materials that can conduct electricity easily, but block the motion of phonons is necessary in the applications of thermoelectric devices, which can generate electricity from temperature differences. In converse, a key requirement as chips get faster is to obtain better ways to dissipate heat. Controlling heat transfer in these crystalline materials devices — such as silicon — is important. The heat is actually the motion or vibration of atoms known as phonons. Finding ways to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials — phononic crystals — might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many fields of physical sciences and engineering, acoustic wave propagation in solids attracts many researchers. Wave propagation phenomena can be analyzed by mathematically solving the acoustic wave equation. However, wave propagation in inhomogeneous media with various geometric structures is too complex to find an exact solution. Hence, the Finite Difference Time Domain method is developed to investigate these complicated problems. In this work, the Finite-Difference Time-Domain formula is derived from acoustic wave equations based on the Taylor’s expansion. The numerical dispersion and stability problems are analyzed. In addition, the convergence conditions of numerical acoustic wave are stated. Based on the periodicity of phononic crystal, the Bloch’s theorem is applied to fulfill the periodic boundary condition of the FDTD method. Then a wide-band input signal is used to excite various acoustic waves with different frequencies. In the beginning of the calculation process, the wave vector is chosen and fixed. By means of recording the displacement field and taking the Fourier transformation, we can obtain the eigenmodes from the resonance peaks of the spectrum and draw the dispersion relation curve of acoustic waves. With the large investment in silicon nanofabrication techniques, this makes tungsten/silicon phononic crystal a particularly attractive platform for manipulating thermal phonons. Phononic crystal makes use of the fundamental properties of waves to create band gap over which there can be no propagation of acoustic waves in the crystal. This crystal can be applied to deterministically manipulate the phonon dispersion curve affected by different crystal structures and to modify the phonon thermal conductivity accordingly. We can expect this unique metamaterial is a promising route to creating unprecedented thermal properties for highly-efficient energy harvesting and thermoelectric cooling.

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix A. A table is included in Appendix A which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. This Revision of the Blend Plan adds items of lesser dose rate to lower the exposure of the workers until additional shielding can be added to the gloveboxes.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Advanced solar thermal technology  

SciTech Connect

The application of dish solar collectors to industrial process heat (IPH) has been reviewed. IPH represents a market for displacement of fossil fuels (10 quads/y). A 10% market penetration would indicate a substantial market for solar thermal systems. Apparently, parabolic dish systems can produce IPH at a lower cost than that of troughs or compound parabolic concentrators, even though dish fabrication costs per unit area are more expensive. Successful tests of point-focusing collectors indicate that these systems can meet the energy requirements for process heat applications. Continued efforts in concentrator and transport technology development are needed. 7 figures.

Leibowitz, L.P.; Hanseth, E.; Liu, T.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The energy distribution of beta CrB for the specific stellar abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison of the observed and computed energy distributions of beta CrB has shown that a model with the specific chemical composition of the star can account for the visual enery distribution, while it is still unable to reproduce ultraviolet observations shortward of 1700 A. Furthermore, the predicted absorption of strong Fe II and Mg II UV lines is much larger than the observed one.

F. Castelli

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Facility location: distributed approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we initiate the study of the approximability of the facility location problem in a distributed setting. In particular, we explore a trade-off between the amount of communication and the resulting approximation ratio. We give a distributed ... Keywords: distributed approximation, facility location, linear programming, primal-dual algorithms

Thomas Moscibroda; Rogert Wattenhofer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

430

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

431

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

432

Thermal batteries: A technology review and future directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermally activated (``thermal``) batteries have been used for ordnance applications (e.g., proximity fuzes) since World War II and, subsequent to that, in nuclear weapons. This technology was developed by the Germans as a power source for their V2 rockets. It was obtained by the Allies by interrogation of captured German scientists after the war. The technology developed rapidly from the initial primitive systems used by the Germans to one based on Ca/CaCrO{sub 4}. This system was used very successfully into the late 1970s, when it was replaced by the Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} electrochemical system. This paper describes the predominant electrochemical couples that have been used in thermal batteries over the years. Major emphasis is placed on the chemistry and electrochemistry of the Ca/CaCrO{sub 4} and Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} systems. The reason for this is to give the reader a better appreciation for the advances in thermal-battery technology for which these two systems are directly responsible. Improvements to date in the current Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} and related systems are discussed and areas for possible future research and development involving anodes, cathodes, electrolytes, and insulations are outlined. New areas where thermal-battery technology has potential applications are also examined.

Guidotti, R.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hard thermal effective action in QCD through the thermal operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the application of the thermal operator to the zero temperature retarded Green's functions, we derive in a simple way the well known hard thermal effective action in QCD. By relating these functions to forward scattering amplitudes for on-shell particles, this derivation also clarifies the origin of important properties of the hard thermal effective action, such as the manifest Lorentz and gauge invariance of its integrand.

Ashok Das; J. Frenkel

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

2 Technology Description: Solar Thermal Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

– Parabolic troughs track sun, concentrate incident light onto a centralized, tubular receiver that runs length of each trough – Thermal fluid circulates through all receivers in solar field – Thermal fluid brought to one or more centralized power production facilities – Heat transferred to a steam cycle, drives a steam turbine to generate power – Cooled thermal fluid is then recirculated th through h solar fi field ld – Wet cooling is common, dry cooling possible

Timothy J. Skone; Risks Of Implementation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Investigation on thermal performance calculation of two type solar air collectors using artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, two types of solar air collectors are constructed and examined experimentally. The types are called as zigzagged absorber surface type and flat absorber surface type called Model I and Model II respectively. Experiments are carried out ... Keywords: ANN, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, Solar air collector, Thermal performance

Murat Caner; Engin Gedik; Ali Keçeba?

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. April 2012 Exercises I of II ­ Numerical fluid dynamics 1. A tornado can be modelled as a steady, incompressible flow : rCv rCv v r x / / 2 1 0 where C1 and C2 are constants. a. Show that this model satisfies

Zevenhoven, Ron

437

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. April 2013 Exercises I of II ­ Numerical fluid dynamics 1. A tornado can be modelled as a steady, incompressible flow : rCv rCv v r x / / 2 1 0 where C1 and C2 are constants. a. Show that this model satisfies

Zevenhoven, Ron

438

Materials Processing Fundamentals Symposium II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ilmenite concentrate and methane were fed into a non-transferred thermal plasma reactor to produce ultrafine powders of TiC and Fe. Free energy minimization ...

439

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal and Structural Equilibrium Studies of Organic Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These organic materials undergo a solid-solid state phase transition before melting which will store large amounts of thermal energy. The binary system of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

He II Heat Exchanger Test Unit for the LHC Inner Triplet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inner Triplet Heat Exchanger Test Unit (IT-HXTU) is a 30-m long thermal model designed at Fermilab, built in US industry, fully automated and tested at CERN as part of the US LHC program to develop the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole system. The cooling scheme of the IT-HXTU is based on heat exchange between stagnant pressurized He II in the magnet cold mass and saturated He II (two-phase) flowing in a heat exchanger located outside of and parallel to the cold mass. The purposes of this test are, among others, to validate the proposed cooling scheme and to define an optimal control strategy to be implemented in the future LHC accelerator. This paper discusses the results for the heat exchanger test runs and emphasizes the thermal and hydraulic behavior of He II for the inner triplet cooling scheme.

Blanco-Viñuela, E; Huang, Y; Nicol, T H; Peterson, T; Van Weelderen, R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Integration of Distributed Energy The CERTS MicroGrid Concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of Distributed Energy Resources The CERTS MicroGrid Concept CALIFORNIA ENERGY Resources The CERTS MicroGrid Concept Prepared for Transmission Reliability Program Office of Power ­ The CERTS MicroGrid Concept ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction...................................................................................................

444

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

445

PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation (Course 103) PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) PARS103Presentation.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II PARS II...

446

Thermal Flipping of Interstellar Grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interstellar dust grains, internal processes dissipate rotational kinetic energy. The dissipation is accompanied by thermal fluctuations, which transfer energy from the vibrational modes to rotation. Together, these processes are known as internal relaxation. For the past several years, internal relaxation has been thought to give rise to thermal flipping, with profound consequences for grain alignment theory. I show that thermal flipping is not possible in the limit that the inertia tensor does not vary with time.

Joseph C. Weingartner

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

PARS II Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II Training PARS II Training PARS II training is delivered as traditional, instructor-led, hands-on classroom training, and also, as instructor-led Webinars with limited...

448

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on thermally stable jet fuel from coal liquids and petroleum distillates. The oxidative and thermal stabilities of ten fuels have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in microautoclave reactors. The compositions of the stressed fuels (as well as the unreacted fuels) were characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, simulated distillation curves were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The product distributions and reaction mechanisms for the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes in near-critical and supercritical regions were studied. The emphasis of the work in this reporting period has been placed on reaction mechanisms and product distributions. Work is continuing on obtaining additional {sup 13}C-labeled jet fuel components for future thermal stressing studies. Compounds of current interest include 6-{sup 13}C-dodecane and 1-cyclohexyl-1-{sup 13}C-hexane. Further analysis of the formation of solids from the thermal stressing of decane and decalin has been performed.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Boehman, A.; Song, C. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Shock waves in thermal lensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review experimental investigation on spatial shock waves formed by the self-defocusing action of a laser beam propagation in a disordered thermal nonlinear media.

Gentilini, S; DeRe, E; Conti, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Thermal Oxidation of Titanium Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and Thermal Study of Al2O3 Produced by Oxidation of Al-Powders Mixed with Corn Starch · Study of Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Composite ...

452

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test… (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

455

X_II_DesignPhase_Topical_Report_Dec05.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topical Report Topical Report submitted to The Department of Energy (DoE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Contract # DE-FC26-04NT42264 for PHASE I TOPICAL REPORT Reporting Period: 10-01-2004 to 12-31-2005 compiled as part of the project titled Explorer-II: Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains Document Number: REP-GOV-DOE-051231 Date of Submission: January 31 st , 2006 submitted by Carnegie Mellon University The Robotics Institute - REC #10 on 40th Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 (412) 268-2000 Administrative Contact: Susan Burkett Technical Contact: Hagen Schempf, Ph.D. Explorer-II:Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains Topical Report - Design Phase i DISCLAIMER

456

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; INFRARED SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Watson, K. Published: Geophysics, 4/1/1976

457

Liquid metal thermal-electric converter electrode development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done in support of distributed receiver technology development. Dish-electric systems are being pursued in an effort to circumvent the need for energy transport by providing for heat-to-electricity energy conversion by individual heat engines at the focal point of parabolic dish concentrators. The Liquid Metal Thermal-Electric Converter is an engine that can convert thermal energy to electricity without the need for moving parts. The report documents the results of contracted work in the development of a long-lifetime, high-performance electrode for LMTEC, including the materials prepared for it. 17 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Martinez, J.I. (ed.)

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thermal bremsstrahlung probing the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of the analysis of the hard photon production in the $^{129}${Xe}+$^{\\rm nat}${Sn} at 50{\\it A} MeV system studied in the GANIL E300 experiment. The energy and angular hard photon distributions confirm the existence of a thermal component which follows the recently measured thermal bremsstrahlung systematics. Exploiting the performances of our complete detection system, consisting of TAPS and 3 charged particle multidetectors, we have also measured the hard photon multiplicity as a function of the charged particle multiplicity.

R. Ortega; D. d'Enterria; F. Fernandez; G. Martinez

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Inhomogeneous holographic thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sudden injection of energy in a strongly coupled conformal field theory and its subsequent thermalization can be holographically modeled by a shell falling into anti-de Sitter space and forming a black brane. For a homogeneous shell, Bhattacharyya and Minwalla were able to study this process analytically using a weak field approximation. Motivated by event-by-event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions, we include inhomogeneities in this model, obtaining analytic results in a long wavelength expansion. In the early-time window in which our approximations can be trusted, the resulting evolution matches well with that of a simple free streaming model. Near the end of this time window, we find that the stress tensor approaches that of second-order viscous hydrodynamics. We comment on possible lessons for heavy ion phenomenology.

V. Balasubramanian; A. Bernamonti; J. de Boer; B. Craps; L. Franti; F. Galli; E. Keski-Vakkuri; B. Müller; A. Schäfer

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii thermal distribution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. A plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

Bennett, G.A.; Moore, T.K.

1986-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

Chang, C.C.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

463

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix B. A table is included in Appendix B which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. There is no chance of exceeding the 15 watt limit with items starting with the designations ''LAO'' or ''PBO.'' All items starting with the designations ''BO,'' ''BLO,'' and ''DZ0'' are at risk of exceeding the 15 watt specification if the can were to be filled.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermally stabilized heliostat  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement being characterized by an internal support structure within each mirror module and front and back sheets attached to the internal support structure, the front and back sheets having the same coefficient of thermal expansion such that no curvature is induced by temperature change, and a layer of adhesive adhering the mirror to the front sheet. The adhesive is water repellent and has adequate set strength to support the mirror but has sufficient shear tolerance to permit the differential expansion of the mirror and the front sheet without inducing stresses or currature effect. The adhesive also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and to protect the mirror backside against the adverse effects of weather. Also disclosed are specific details of the preferred embodiment.

Anderson, Alfred J. (Littleton, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant’s thermal dissatisfaction below a given threshold. The DECS energy usage was calculated using the simplified thermal model. OSFA control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected HIYW control with a thermostat at each workstation were implemented for 3 cities representing 3 different climatic regions and control scenarios. It is shown that optimization allows DECS to deliver a higher level of individual and population thermal comfort while achieving annual energy savings between 14 and 26% compared to OSFA. The optimization model also allowed us to study the influence of the partitions’ thermal resistance and the variability of internal loads at each office. These influences didn’t make significant changes in the optimized energy consumption relative to OSFA. The results show that it is possible to provide thermal comfort for each occupant while saving energy compared to OSFA Furthermore, to simplify the implementation of this approach, a fuzzy logic system has been developed to generalize the overall optimization strategy. Its performance was almost as good as the gradient system. The fuzzy system provided thermal comfort to each occupant and saved energy compared to OSFA. The energy savings of the fuzzy system were not as high as for the gradient-optimized system, but the fuzzy system avoided complete connectivity, and the optimization did not have to be repeated for each population. 3. We employed a detailed CFD model of adjacent occupied cubicles to extend the thermal-circuit model in three significant ways: (a) relax the “office wall” requirement by allowing energy to flow between zones via advection as well as conduction, (b) improve the comfort model to account both for radiation as well as convection heat transfer, and (c) support ventilation systems in which the temperature is stratified, such as in underfloor air distribution systems. Initially, three-dimensional CFD simulations of several cubicle configurations, with an adjoining corridor, were performed both to understand the advection between cubicles and the

Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling conductance · Pump probe apparatus · Transient absorption ­ Carbon nanotubes and thermal transport at hard optical absorption of nanoparticles and nanotubes in liquid suspensions. ­ Measure the thermal relaxation

Braun, Paul

468

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

NSLS-II Design and Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Design & Performance NSLS-II CD-0 Proposal Preliminary Design Report (PDR) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) Source Properties (.pdf) Cell section Last Modified: April 2,...

470

PARS II FAQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PARS 3.0 Data Model Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

471

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

472

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

473

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

474

Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Thermal sensation and comfort in transient non-uniform thermal environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling applied cooling removed Thermal Sensation Skincooling = 14°C cooling removed Thermal Sensation We measureda hand cooling test Models to predict thermal sensation and

Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward; Wang, Danni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z