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1

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

S. A. Eide; T. E. Wierman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such activities involve risk predictions including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Wierman, Thomas Edward

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Structure-Based Model of Energy Transfer Reveals the Principles of Light Harvesting in Photosystem II Supercomplexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to the antenna, or light harvesting, proteins of photosystem II (PSII). The resulting excitation energy

Fleming, Graham R.

4

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

Hua, Jing

5

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant Protease TPP II's Structure,

6

LMS-based method for damage detection applied to Phase II of Structural Health Monitoring benchmark problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in structural stiffness for the IASC-ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Task Group Benchmark problem for both Phase I and II. The research focuses primarily on Phase II of the benchmark problem. In Phase II, modeling error and noise is introduced to the problem...

Preston, Robin Huckaby

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the...

8

II. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Capacity 4. Solvent Properties 5. Dissociation: Acids & Bases / pH II. Organic Chemistry A transport in plants #12;Water has a high specific heat capacity specific heat capacity = amount of energyII. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure 2. Cohesion / Surface Tension 3. High

Frey, Terry

9

First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant Protease TPP II's

11

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant Protease TPP II'sGiant Protease

12

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant Protease TPP II'sGiant

13

Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

Red-Horse, J.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Phase-space structures II: Hierarchical Structure Finder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new multi-dimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in 6D phase-space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in 3D position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognise other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 % of the halo mass are found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 % of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Bound structures typically make only up to 6 orbits inside the main halo. Still, HSF can identify at the present time at least 80 % of the original content of structures with a redshift of infall as high as z space.

M. Maciejewski; S. Colombi; V. Springel; C. Alard; F. R. Bouchet

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An Enzyme Target forTopoisomerase II Structure

16

Band structures Optical absorption Summary Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Band structures Optical absorption Summary Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II) Kohn, Belfast Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II) Silvana Botti #12;Band structures Optical in Density Functional Theory (II) Silvana Botti #12;Band structures Optical absorption Summary Outline 1 From

Botti, Silvana

17

Structural model of uramarsite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) A, b = 7.167(5) A, c = 9.30(1) A, {alpha} = 90.13(7){sup o}, {beta} = 90.09(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 89.96(4){sup o}, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[AsO{sub 4}][PO{sub 4},AsO{sub 4}][NH{sub 4}][H{sub 3}O] . 6H{sub 2}O (Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH{sub 4}, H{sub 3}O, and H{sub 2}O groups.

Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Sidorenko, G. A. [All-Russia Research Institute of Mineral Resources (VIMS) (Russian Federation); Ivanova, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Chukanov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type II hyperprolinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH; also known as ALDH4A1), the aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate. Here, we report the first structure of human P5CDH (HsP5CDH) and investigate the impact of the hyperprolinemia-associated mutation of Ser352 to Leu on the structure and catalytic properties of the enzyme. The 2. 5-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of HsP5CDH was determined using experimental phasing. Structures of the mutant enzymes S352A (2.4 {angstrom}) and S352L (2.85 {angstrom}) were determined to elucidate the structural consequences of altering Ser352. Structures of the 93% identical mouse P5CDH complexed with sulfate ion (1.3 {angstrom} resolution), glutamate (1.5 {angstrom}), and NAD{sup +} (1.5 {angstrom}) were determined to obtain high-resolution views of the active site. Together, the structures show that Ser352 occupies a hydrophilic pocket and is connected via water-mediated hydrogen bonds to catalytic Cys348. Mutation of Ser352 to Leu is shown to abolish catalytic activity and eliminate NAD{sup +} binding. Analysis of the S352A mutant shows that these functional defects are caused by the introduction of the nonpolar Leu352 side chain rather than the removal of the Ser352 hydroxyl. The S352L structure shows that the mutation induces a dramatic 8-{angstrom} rearrangement of the catalytic loop. Because of this conformational change, Ser349 is not positioned to interact with the aldehyde substrate, conserved Glu447 is no longer poised to bind NAD{sup +}, and Cys348 faces the wrong direction for nucleophilic attack. These structural alterations render the enzyme inactive.

Srivastava, Dhiraj; Singh, Ranjan K.; Moxley, Michael A.; Henzl, Michael T.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J. (UNL); (UMC)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

SPAR Model Structural Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are supporting initiatives aimed at improving the quality of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Included in these initiatives are the resolution of key technical issues that are have been judged to have the most significant influence on the baseline core damage frequency of the NRC’s Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and licensee PRA models. Previous work addressed issues associated with support system initiating event analysis and loss of off-site power/station blackout analysis. The key technical issues were: • Development of a standard methodology and implementation of support system initiating events • Treatment of loss of offsite power • Development of standard approach for emergency core cooling following containment failure Some of the related issues were not fully resolved. This project continues the effort to resolve outstanding issues. The work scope was intended to include substantial collaboration with EPRI; however, EPRI has had other higher priority initiatives to support. Therefore this project has addressed SPAR modeling issues. The issues addressed are • SPAR model transparency • Common cause failure modeling deficiencies and approaches • Ac and dc modeling deficiencies and approaches • Instrumentation and control system modeling deficiencies and approaches

John Schroeder; Dan Henry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

Dalton, A.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for large mesh sizes (x 20 km) to vertically redistribute heat and moisture in a grid column when model in a numerical model Convective cloud systems are not resolved if the mesh size of the grid is larger than small to treat convection as sub-grid scale process but too large to treat it explicitly For example

Gohm, Alexander

22

Structural Analysis of Combustion Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using ReactionKinetics, a Mathematica based package a few dozen detailed models for combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methanol are investigated. Essential structural characteristics are pulled out, and similarities and differences of the mechanisms are highlighted. These investigations can be used before or parallel with usual numerical investigations, such as pathway analysis, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, or simulation.

Tóth, J; Zsély, I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solution NMR Structure of Photosystem II Reaction Center Protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is initiated by photosystem II (PSII) in the thylakoid membranes of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. PSII is a multi-subunit pigment-protein complex responsible for...

24

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

25

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures Christian Licht , Thibaut Weller mathematical models of smart materials and smart structures. Smart materials are materials which present perturbations methods, asymptotic analysis, plates and rods models. 1 Introduction Smart materials present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Modeling covariance structure in unbalanced longitudinal data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II A REVIEW OF MODELING COVARIANCE MATRICES WITH MODIFIED CHOLESKY DECOMPOSITION . . . . . . 5 2.1 Modified Cholesky Decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Fixed... Linear Mixed Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.6 Linear Mixed-Effects Models: Balanced Longitudinal Data 15 III FIXED-EFFECTS MODELS WITH UNBALANCED LON- GITUDINAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.1 Introduction...

Chen, Min

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Some Hamiltonian models of friction II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

T. Padmanabhan

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hybrid Model Structures Aaron David Ames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Model Structures by Aaron David Ames B.A. (University of St. Thomas) 2001 B.S. (University of California, Berkeley Fall 2006 #12;Hybrid Model Structures Copyright 2006 by Aaron David Ames #12;Abstract Hybrid Model Structures by Aaron David Ames Masters of Arts in Mathematics University of California

Ames, Aaron

30

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An Enzyme Target forTopoisomerase II

31

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site Selectivity and Magnetic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site, Florida 32306-4390, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Copper(II) acetate mediated coupling, was observed in the copper(II) complexes of L1 -L6 . The preference of copper(II) to two common bidentate 1

Weston, Ken

32

Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Sung [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Engineering Structurally Configurable Models with Model Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. #12;Engineering Structurally

34

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina ButlerToday inm"Topo II: An Enzyme Target

35

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina ButlerToday inm"Topo II: An Enzyme

36

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial andTopo

37

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial

38

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An Enzyme Target for

39

LHC Phenomenology of SO(10) Models with Yukawa Unification II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) non-universal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global chi^2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare these to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on M_gluino in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ~1.2 TEV at the 1 sigma level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the LSP, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

Archana Anandakrishnan; B. Charles Bryant; Stuart Raby

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 5 Influence of mixing on transient gas tracer ages · 2-comp. mixing Mook, 2001 Example: Mixing of fast and slow runoff components in a river Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universität HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 10 Mixed reactor model (exponential

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Models for solvated biomolecular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Point Charge / Extended (SPC/E) [15] [100] and Transferableexplicit water models). In both SPC/E and TIP3P, the siteearlier, models such as TIP3P and SPC/E describe water in a

Cerutti, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy EvolutionIa. Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —the ignition of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is critical to

Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale, Mike

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Structure of the ESCRT-II Endosomal Trafficking Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOurStructure ofRepresentingUCE Glycoprotein |

44

Structure of the ESCRT-II endosomal trafficking complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOurStructure ofRepresentingUCE Glycoprotein

45

GLYDE-II and Lignin: An XML markup language for representing lignin structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in secondary plant cell walls are of particular interest for alternative fuel. However, another complex Miller2, Krys Kochut2, Will York1,3 1. Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Athens, Georgia, 30605 2. University of Georgia. Athens, Georgia, 30601 Introduction GLYDE-II (GLYcan structural Data Exchange using

Miller, John A.

46

Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Structure of Tradeoffs in Model Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Structure of Tradeoffs in Model Building John Matthewson Australia National University Michael of model building depending on their theoretical goals (1966). His own discussion argued that a three three types of tradeoff relevant for model building. After giving definitions for these, we investigate

Weisberg, Michael

48

Giant radio galaxies - II. Tracers of large-scale structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out optical spectroscopy with the Anglo-Australian Telescope for 24,726 objects surrounding a sample of 19 Giant Radio Galaxies (GRGs) selected to have redshifts in the range 0.05 to 0.15 and projected linear sizes from 0.8 to 3.2 Mpc. Such radio galaxies are ideal candidates to study the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) because their radio lobes extend beyond the ISM and halos of their host galaxies, and into the tenuous IGM. We were able to measure redshifts for 9,076 galaxies. Radio imaging of each GRG, including high-sensitivity, wideband radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array for 12 GRGs and host optical spectra (presented in a previous paper, Malarecki et al. 2013), is used in conjunction with the surrounding galaxy redshifts to trace large-scale structure. We find that the mean galaxy number overdensity in volumes of ~700 Mpc$^3$ near the GRG host galaxies is ~70 indicating an overdense but non-virialized environment. A Fourier component analysis is used to qu...

Malarecki, J M; Saripalli, L; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the analysis of the significance and the utility of getting a specific analytic black hole solution, several (unsuccessful) analytic and numerical approaches to the problem developed over the years are presented with some discussion about their results. The chapter closes with the latest numerical results that actually consists a major advancement in the effort to address the challenge, the presentation of the most recent analytic work trying (and unfortunately failing) to build a solution assuming the existence of unconventional scalar fields and some ideas about the routes the forthcoming analytic approaches should explore.

Nikolaos D. Pappas

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

52

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

53

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

54

Wake II model for hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines for the wave plus current case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of the Wake II model for the determination of the hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines is extended to include the wave plus current case. There are two main differences between the Wake II and the traditional model that uses Morison...

Ramirez Sabag, Said

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Structured Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation Ying Zhang CMU-LTI-09-009 Language of Doctor of Philosophy In Language and Information Technologies © 2009, Ying Zhang #12;c Copyright Ying

Eskenazi, Maxine

56

Fractal Inspired Models of Quark and Gluon Distributions and Longitudinal Structure Function FL(x, Q2) at small x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, Fractal Inspired Models of quark and gluon densities at small x have been proposed. In this paper, we investigate longitudinal structure function F-L (x, Q2) within this approach. We make predictions using the QCD based approximate relation between the longitudinal structure function and the gluon density. As the Altarelli-Martinelli equation for the longitudinal structure function cannot be applied to Model I due to the presence of a singularity in the Bjorken x-space we consider Model II only. The qualitative feature of the prediction of Model II is found to be compatible with the QCD expectation.

Akbari Jahan; D. K. Choudhury

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling joint friction in structural dynamics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of mechanical joints--typified by the lap joint--in otherwise linear structures has been accommodated in structural dynamics via ad hoc methods for a century. The methods range from tuning linear models to approximate non-linear behavior in restricted load ranges to various methods which introduce joint dissipation in a post-processing stage. Other methods, employing constitutive models for the joints are being developed and their routine use is on the horizon.

Segalman, Daniel Joseph

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

Abdelwahed, Mohamed F. [Geological Hazards Research Unit, King Abdulaziz University (Saudi Arabia) and National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), Helwan (Egypt)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Comparison of ?Z-structure function models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The ?Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on ?Z-structure functions, F{sub 1,2,3}{sup ?Z}(x,Q{sup 2}). At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the ?Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

Rislow, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci c | II ENSO prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci#12;c | II ENSO prediction by Youmin Tang 1 , William W: ytang@cims.nyu.edu #12; Abstract Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), a dynamical ocean model coupled Introduction Models for ENSO prediction can be categorized into purely statistical models, hybrid coupled

Hsieh, William

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61

Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements Orlena C. Z. Gotel & Anthony C, and hence trace, those who have contributed in the production and refinement of the requirements illustrate the relationship between RT and software quality. In Section 3, we show the restricted impact

Gotel, Olly

64

Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume II. Integrative energy policy models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference, held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. For this volume, Vol. II, a separate abstract was prepared for each of 17 papers, 2 panel discussions, and three session-introduction commentaries for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 7 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Photometrical analysis of the Neck-Line structure of Comet Bennet 1970II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kimura and Liu (1977) analysis of the motion in space of cometary dust tail grains, which furnished information on the size-dependence of the dust ejection velocity from the inner coma and the size distribution on a millimetric scale, is presently applied to the Neck-Line Structure (NLS) displayed by Comet Bennett 1970II at the begining of May, 1970. Attention is given to two photographs of the comet which have been analyzed by digital image processing in order to extract reliable photometric data; the strong excess of millimetric grains noted is in agreement with the Fulle (1987) results for preperihelion times. 24 references.

Fulle, M.; Sedmak, G.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

Jin Tengteng [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu Wei [Institute of Science and Engineering of Materials, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Zhao Jingtai [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.hoffmann@cpfs.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what's elementary in the latter is considered 'advanced', if at all, in the former. It is little surprise then that published measurements typically contains neither error bars (for the random errors) nor estimates for the systematic in the former discipline. We have also showed how to estimate the state space by turn-by-turn data from two adjacent BPMs. And how to improve the resolution of the nonlinear resonance spectrum by Fourier analyzing the linear action variables instead of the betatron motion. In fact, the state estimator could be further improved by adding a Kalman filter. For transparency, we have also summarized on how these techniques provide a framework- and method for a TQM (Total Quality Management) approach for the main ring. Of course, to make the ($2.5M) turn-by-turn data acquisition system that is being implemented (for all the BPMs) useful, a means ({approx}10% contingency for the BPM system) to drive the beam is obviously required.

Bengtsson, J.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience Model: For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon in Clim. Dyn., is available at http and filesize.) The paper documents how well the model simulates past climate. Simulations with this model

Hansen, James E.

69

Make Model SPECS ACURA ILX (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 45  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II / Bin 5 42 BMW 328i (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk [P] Bin 5 / ULEV II 42 BMW 328i (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, manual [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 43 BMW 328i XDRIVE (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk Awd [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 41 BMW 335i (Model Year 2013) 3.0L 6, auto stk [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 41 BMW 528i (Model

70

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF A NICKEL(II)-TRIPEPTIDE MIMIC OF NICKEL SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, prior to this work, the structure and chemical reactivity of the nickel-peptide complex were undefined. The work presented herein involves structural and reactivity investigations of the MAP-tag bound with NiII in the dianionic complex [Ni-NCC]2...

Glass, Amanda M.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Unbonded Post Tensioned Concrete Slabs in Fire – Part IIModelling Tendon Response and the Consequences of Localized Heating   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is Part II of a two part paper dealing with the current state of knowledge of the fire-safe structural design and construction of unbonded post-tensioned (UPT) flat plate concrete structures. Part I provided ...

Gales, John; Bisby, Luke; Gillie, Martin

72

Phenomenology of heterotic and type II orientifold string models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a variety of orientifold backgrounds. In particular, we construct ?ipped SU(5), Pati-Salam, and MSSM-like models. The phenomenological properties of these models are studied. For one model in particular, we ?nd that we may explain the quark masses...

Mayes, Van Eric

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional Modeling: Part II--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

later) we have noticed that compositional modeling of a rich-retrograde gas condensate het- erogeneous of our study, stability analysis testing in the reduced space was formulated, and its robustness- sitional modeling, stability analysis testing in the reduction method was presented.1 In this paper, Part

Firoozabadi, Abbas

75

Low-energy fine-structure resonances in photoionization of O ii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant features in low-energy photoionization cross sections are reported in coupled-channel calculations for O ii including relativistic fine structure. The calculations reveal extensive near-threshold resonant structures in the small energy region between the fine structure levels of the ground state 2p{sup 2}({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) of the residual ion O iii. Although the resonances have not yet been observed, they are similar to other experimentally observed features. They are expected to significantly enhance the very-low-temperature dielectronic recombination rates, potentially leading to the resolution of an outstanding nebular abundances anomaly. Higher energy partial and total photoionization cross sections of the ground configuration levels 2p{sup 3}({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{sup o},{sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2}{sup o},{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup o}) are found to be in agreement with experimental measurements on synchrotron-based photon sources [1-3], thereby identifying the excited O iii levels present in the ion beams. These are also the first results from a recently developed version of Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) codes, with inclusion of two-body magnetic interaction terms. The improved relativistic treatment could be important for other astrophysical applications and for more precise benchmarking of experimental measurements.

Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Montenegro, Maximiliano [Facultad de Educaci, Pontificia Universidad Catholica de Chile, Avda Vicua Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Eissner, Werner [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Teilinstitut 1, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs II: evolutionary models and observable properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new model for protoplanetary disc evolution. This model combines viscous evolution with photoevaporation of the disc, in a manner similar to Clarke, Gendrin & Sotomayor (2001). However in a companion paper (Alexander, Clarke & Pringle 2006a) we have shown that at late times such models must consider the effect of stellar radiation directly incident on the inner disc edge, and here we model the observational implications of this process. We find that the entire disc is dispersed on a time-scale of order $10^5$yr after a disc lifetime of a few Myr, consistent with observations of T Tauri (TT) stars. We use a simple prescription to model the spectral energy distribution of the evolving disc, and demonstrate that the model is consistent with observational data across a wide range of wavelengths. We note also that the model predicts a short ``inner hole'' phase in the evolution of all TT discs, and make predictions for future observations at mid-infrared and millimetre wavelengths.

R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

Mackey, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

MODELING OF PERIODIC DIELECTRIC STRUCTURES (ELECTROMAGNETIC CRYSTALS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maxwell (1831­1879) #12;c John David Shumpert 2001 All Rights Reserved #12;Sola Deo Gloria ii #12 and Engineering (DDR&E) Multidisciplinary Univer- sity Research Initiative (MURI) on "Low Energy Electronics

Sarabandi, Kamal

80

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the modular structure of the genus-one Type II superstring low energy expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analytic contribution to the low energy expansion of Type II string amplitudes at genus-one is a power series in space-time derivatives with coefficients that are determined by integrals of modular functions over the complex structure modulus of the world-sheet torus. These modular functions are associated with world-sheet vacuum Feynman diagrams and given by multiple sums over the discrete momenta on the torus. In this paper we exhibit exact differential and algebraic relations for a certain infinite class of such modular functions by showing that they satisfy Laplace eigenvalue equations with inhomogeneous terms that are polynomial in non-holomorphic Eisenstein series. Furthermore, we argue that the set of modular functions that contribute to the coefficients of interactions up to order D**10 R*4 are linear sums of functions in this class and quadratic polynomials in Eisenstein series and odd Riemann zeta values. Integration over the complex structure results in coefficients of the low energy expansion that are rational numbers multiplying monomials in odd Riemann zeta values.

Eric D'Hoker; Michael B. Green; Pierre Vanhove

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

TR-IIS-06-003 A Scarce Resource Model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Shih, T.W. Kuo and J.W.S. Liu April 6, 2006 || Technical Report No. TR-IIS-06-003 http and J. W. S. Liu Abstract This report describes a resource model for medication scheduling. It is called with Department of Computer Science and Information Science, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. J. W. S. Liu

Chen, Sheng-Wei

83

F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND ITS ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ­ Hybrid power train, power-split eCVT, rule-based control strategy, Toyota Hybrid System, driver the challenge of minimizing the consumption of the road transport. Although hybrid power train technologies did

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Are collisions with neutral hydrogen important for modelling the Second Solar Spectrum of Ti I and Ca II ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical interpretation of scattering line polarization offers a novel diagnostic window for exploring the thermal and magnetic structure of the quiet regions of the solar atmosphere. Here we evaluate the impact of isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms on the scattering polarization signals of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I and on those of the K line and of the IR triplet of Ca II, with emphasis on the collisional transfer rates between nearby J-levels. To this end, we calculate the linear polarization produced by scattering processes considering realistic multilevel models and solving the statistical equilibrium equations for the multipolar components of the atomic density matrix. We confirm that the lower levels of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I are completely depolarized by elastic collisions. We find that upper-level collisional depolarization turns out to have an unnoticeable impact on the emergent linear polarization amplitudes, except for the ${\\lambda 4536$ line for which it is possible to notice a rather small depolarization caused by the collisional transfer rates. Concerning the Ca II lines, we show that the collisional rates play no role on the polarization of the upper level of the K line, while they have a rather small depolarizing effect on the atomic polarization of the metastable lower levels of the Ca II IR triplet.

M. Derouich; J. Trujillo Bueno; R. Manso Sainz

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Proposed database model and file structures for arthropod collection management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed database model and file structures for arthropod collection management Ronald A for taxonomic analysis or behavioral, physiological, and ecological information. The database model described how specific computerization projects can be related to each other. The proposed database model

Mathis, Wayne N.

87

Electromagnetic scattering from grassland Part II: Measurement and modeling results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-InvestigatoronmanyprojectssponsoredbyNASA,JPL,ARO,ONR,ARL, and GM all related in one way or the other to microwave and millimeter wave radar remote sensing. He has published many book chapters and more than 80 papers in refereed journals on electromagnetic scattering, random media modeling, microwave measurement...LecturerAwardfromtheGerman Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. FawwazT.Ulaby(M’68–SM’74–F’80)receivedthe B.S.degreeinphysicsfromtheAmericanUniversity of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1964, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D.degreesinelectricalengineeringfromtheUni- versity...

Stiles, James Marion; Ulaby, F. T.; Sarabandi, K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

Hill, Jeffrey E.

89

Photochemical oxidation of coals and some selected model compounds by using copper(II) chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The H-donor ability of different rank coals was examined by using a copper(II)chloride-acetonitrile system as the dehydrogenator. A bituminous coal and two lignites were irradiated in the UV in the presence of copper(II)chloride in acetonitrile. The coal was dehydrogenated while the Cu(II) was reduced to CU(I). Considerable amounts of aliphatic or alicyclic hydrogen were removed from the coals. In the process, while the oxygen contents of coals do not increase, more condensed aromatic products occur. It was concluded that lignites are better reducing agents than bituminous coals. A photooxidation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the model compound reaction. Photooxidation of alcohols (ethanol, 2-propanol, benzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, and diphenyl carbinol), a hydroaromatic compound (tetrahydronaphthalene), and an aromatic ether (dibenzyl ether) was performed under similar reaction conditions.

Yilmaz, M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordinastion polymers based on amino-tetrazole and phenylcarboxylate: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescent properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Zn(II) and Cd(II) compounds with the in-situ generated ligand of 5-amino-tetrazolate (atz{sup -}) were prepared from the hydrothermal reactions of the corresponding Cd or Zn(II) salts with phenylcarboxylate, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and TGA. The results of X-ray crystallographic analysis reveal that compound [Zn{sub 2}(BZA)(atz){sub 2}(OH)]{sub n} (1) (BZA=benzoic acid) presents a two-dimensional (2D) 'hcb' topological network constructed from the ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 2} tetrahedra. In compound [Cd{sub 6}(atz){sub 6}(PTA){sub 3}]{sub n} (2) (PTA=terephthalic acid), the identical [Cd{sub 3}(atz){sub 3})]{sup 3+}{sub n} clusters are connected by atz ligands to generate a 2D cationic layer, and the neighboring cationic layers are pillared by PTA giving birth to 3D network. After simplifying, the complicated 3D network of 2 can be presented as an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. The formations of the structures show a good example that using the combination of the in-situ generated ligand and other coligand synthetic strategy can construct interesting topological structures. The thermal stabilities and fluorescent properties of the complexes have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two d{sup 10} metal complexes have been synthesized by employing mixed-ligand synthetic approach. Complex 1 presents a 2D 'hcb' topological network. Complex 2 shows an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coligand synthetic strategy was applied to obtain new MOFs with useful properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes were constructed from the mixed-ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topologically, compound 2 presented an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two compounds may be excellent candidates for potential photoactive material.

Liu, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: liudongsheng@jgsu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China) [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Sui, Yan; Chen, Weng-Tong; Huang, Jian-Gen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Jian-Zhong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Huang, Chang-Cang, E-mail: cchuang@fzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals that have been produced in Jupiter's feeding zone without further vaporization, whereas, in the second scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals produced in the Jovian subnebula. In this latter case, we study the evolution of carbon and nitrogen gas-phase chemistries in the Jovian subnebula and we show that the conversions of N2 to NH3, of CO to CO2, and of CO to CH4 were all inhibited in the major part of the subdisk. Finally, we assess the mass abundances of the major volatile species with respect to H2O in the interiors of the Jovian regular icy satellites. Our results are then compatible with the detection of CO2 on the surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede and with the presence of NH3 envisaged in subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto.

Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Tree-Structured GARCH Models Francesco Audrino and Peter Buhlmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree-Structured GARCH Models Francesco Audrino and Peter Buhlmann #3; ETH Zurich, Switzerland Revised Version February 2001 Abstract We propose a new GARCH model with tree-structured multiple tree where every terminal node parameterizes a (local) GARCH model for a partition cell

Buehlmann, Peter

93

Modeling Structural Properties of Breast Cancer Cells at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological cells Modeling structural properties of cells Goals To advance in detection, characterization, analysis and predictions of biological cells and their inherent...

94

antibody structural model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for current cosmic acceleration. By deriving and solving the equations governing the evolution of the structure in the Universe, we show that this model predicts a pattern of...

95

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Abstract...

96

A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A...

97

A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for Mathematical and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 24, 2009 ... SET [15] offers facilities to declare the structure of a model as a postscript to the problem: an ... to have been abandoned. Overall, the main ...

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

A dynamic term structure model of Central Bank policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the implications of explicitly modeling the monetary policy of the Central Bank within a Dynamic Term Structure Model (DTSM). We follow Piazzesi (2005) and implement monetary policy by including ...

Staker, Shawn W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Phenomenological band structure model of magnetic coupling in semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological band structure model of magnetic coupling in semiconductors Gustavo M. Dalpian a,1­18]. Several models have been proposed to explain the phenomena, including the phenomenological Zener

Gong, Xingao

100

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Oprsal, Ivo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn4Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (Si-states, i =0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn4(III2,IV2) and Mn4(III,IV3) for S1 and S2 states, while it is still controversial for the S0 and S3 states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn4Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mncomplexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p3/2 RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S0 to S1, and S1 to S2 transitions is twice as large as that during the S2 to S3 transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mg II Selected Absorbers: Ionization structures and a Survey of Weak Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First results from a study of high ionization absorption properties in roughly 30 Mg II absorption selected galaxies are presented. We have tested for correlations of Mg II, C IV, Si IV, N V, and O VI equivalent widths with the galaxy properties and Mg II gas kinematics. The results are suggestive of multi-phase halos with little to no global ionization gradient with impact parameter. C IV may arise in both the Mg II - Lyman alpha clouds and a high ionization "halo" traced by O VI. We also report on an unbiased survey for weak Mg II systems using HIRES/Keck spectra. At = 0.9, we find dN/dz = 1.6 +/- 0.1 for 0.02 = -0.3 +/- 0.4 measured for the sample. We suggest that weak Mg II absorbers comprise a substantial yet-to-be explored population. If weak systems select the LSB and/or dwarf galaxy population, then the weakest Mg II absorbers may provide one of the most sensitive tracers of chemical enrichment and evolution of the UV background from z = 2 to z = 0.

Christopher W. Churchill

1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

1Kaiserslautern 9/05 Structural Break Detection in Time Series ModelsStructural Break Detection in Time Series Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regressive Modeling 4 pieces, 2.58 seconds. #12;4Kaiserslautern 9/05 Introduction Examples AR GARCH Stochastic for structural break estimation Simulation results Applications Simulation results for GARCH and SSM #12. Segmented GARCH model: where 0 = 1

106

Predictive modeling of pedestal structure in KSTAR using EPED model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A predictive calculation is given for the structure of edge pedestal in the H-mode plasma of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device using the EPED model. Particularly, the dependence of pedestal width and height on various plasma parameters is studied in detail. The two codes, ELITE and HELENA, are utilized for the stability analysis of the peeling-ballooning and kinetic ballooning modes, respectively. Summarizing the main results, the pedestal slope and height have a strong dependence on plasma current, rapidly increasing with it, while the pedestal width is almost independent of it. The plasma density or collisionality gives initially a mild stabilization, increasing the pedestal slope and height, but above some threshold value its effect turns to a destabilization, reducing the pedestal width and height. Among several plasma shape parameters, the triangularity gives the most dominant effect, rapidly increasing the pedestal width and height, while the effect of elongation and squareness appears to be relatively weak. Implication of these edge results, particularly in relation to the global plasma performance, is discussed.

Han, Hyunsun; Kim, J. Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ohjin [Department of Physics, Daegu University, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Daegu University, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Investigation of tornado models and structure by use of radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Theory . parent Call Structure Distributioa of snd Coaditioas in the Air Masses . Tornado Structure ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~, ~ ~ ~ * Dissussiea of Ccaditions and Models Revise of Various Models . Directioa of plou Directica of Rotstioa... Vortex 30 10. Ridge of Cold Air with Contour Lines ll. Norixontal Pro)ection of Tornado and Associated 33 Thunderstorn Call 37 12. Vertical Cross Section through the Eye of a Tornado Justification. Contributions to our knowledge of the structure...

Finley, William Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

A computer model to compare greenhouse structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Woven polypropylene ground cover 0. 00068 (4). Sand (5). Others Structure (1). Connected even span house. material wood alone wood /w iron iron alone steel & alum. alum. alone Price (sq. ft. ) (2). Barrel vault house. material wood alone... wood /w iron iron alone steel & alum. alum. alone 1. 16 (3). Saran covered structure house material 26 wood alone wood /w iron iron alone steel & alum. alum. alone (4). Lath house. material wood alone Covering system (1). Polyethylene...

Chiou, Jiun-Shian

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Internal Dynamics, Structure and Formation of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies: II. Rotating Versus Non-Rotating Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially-resolved internal kinematics and stellar chemical abundances for a sample of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster observed with Keck/ESI. We find that 4 out of 17 dEs have major axis rotation velocities consistent with rotational flattening, while the remaining dEs have no detectable major axis rotation. Despite this difference in internal kinematics, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their position in the Fundamental Plane, morphological structure, stellar populations, and local environment. We present evidence for faint underlying disks and/or weak substructure in a fraction of both rotating and non-rotating dEs, but a comparable number of counter-examples exist for both types which show no evidence of such structure. Absorption-line strengths were determined based on the Lick/IDS system (Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270, Fe5335) for the central region of each galaxy. We find no difference in the line-strength indices, and hence stellar populations, between rotating and non-rotating dE galaxies. The best-fitting mean age and metallicity for our 17 dE sample are 5 Gyr and Fe/H = -0.3 dex, respectively, with rms spreads of 3 Gyr and 0.1 dex. The majority of dEs are consistent with solar alpha/Fe abundance ratios. By contrast, the stellar populations of classical elliptical galaxies are, on average, older, more metal rich, and alpha-enhanced relative to our dE sample. The local environments of both dEs types appear to be diverse in terms of their proximity to larger galaxies in real or velocity space within the Virgo Cluster. Thus, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their structure, stellar content, and local environments, presenting a significant challenge to theoretical models of their formation. (abridged)

M. Geha; P. Guhathakurta; R. van der Marel

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning with a frequency glide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning and the level-dependent compressive nonlinearity into a phenomenological model for the AN was the primary focus nonlinear phenomenological model for the response patterns of AN fibers to different sound inputs

Carney, Laurel H.

113

Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and densitytool for iterative model- building, structure refinement andusing RESOLVE or TEXTAL model- building, RESOLVE statistical

Terwilliger, T. C.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Smart Structures: Model Development and Control Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advances in material science have produced a class of systems termed smart, intelligent or adaptive range. Actuators and sensors comprised of smart or active materials can meet these criteria. Like the definition for smart structures, the definitions of smart or active materials can vary somewhat between

115

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Learning Structural Changes of Gaussian Graphical Models in Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphical models are widely used in scienti fic and engineering research to represent conditional independence structures between random variables. In many controlled experiments, environmental changes or external stimuli can often alter the conditional dependence between the random variables, and potentially produce significant structural changes in the corresponding graphical models. Therefore, it is of great importance to be able to detect such structural changes from data, so as to gain novel insights into where and how the structural changes take place and help the system adapt to the new environment. Here we report an effective learning strategy to extract structural changes in Gaussian graphical model using l1-regularization based convex optimization. We discuss the properties of the problem formulation and introduce an efficient implementation by the block coordinate descent algorithm. We demonstrate the principle of the approach on a numerical simulation experiment, and we then apply the algorithm to...

Zhang, Bai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Template Synthesis, Properties, and Crystal Structure of a Trigonal Bipyramidal Cobalt(II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

template5,7,23-25 probably because cobalt(II) species are usually air-sensitive and cannot stay, purified according to literature methods,28 and deaerated immediately prior to use. Measurements. Infrared on a Shimadzu 260 UV/vis spectrophotometer. Conductance measure- ments were performed by using a SUNTEX SC-170

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

118

Reduced Order Structural Modeling of Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional three dimensional structural analysis methods prove to be expensive for the preliminary design of wind turbine blades. However, wind turbine blades are large slender members with complex cross sections. They can be accurately modeled...

Jonnalagadda, Yellavenkatasunil

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE RF. McKenna and S structlJre and unconsolidated ice ridges. The tests were conducted with a 0.32 m diameter structure in unconsolidated ridges are given in McKenna el al. (1995). The tests provide a means of correlating the forces

Bruneau, Steve

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121

Computational and physical models of RNA structure Ralf Bundschuh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partition function Definition The partition function of an RNA molecule with energy function E[S] is given;Molten RNA Energy model Energetics in molten phase Definition In the molten phase of RNA every base can;Boltzmann partition function Secondary structure Definition of RNA secondary structure Definition An RNA

Bundschuh, Ralf

122

Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Material-modeling and structural-mechanics aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material-modeling and structural-mechanics aspects of the traumatic brain injury problem M for causing traumatic brain injury. Design/methodology/approach ­ Two levels of blast peak overpressure were computational investigation of impact on a human skull/brain assembly. Keywords Brain, Injuries, Modeling

Grujicic, Mica

124

Graph/Network Visualization Data model: graph structures (relations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of physics #12;8 The Spring Model Using springs to represent node-node relations. Minimizing energy1 1 Graph/Network Visualization Data model: graph structures (relations, knowledge) and networks hierarchies #12;7 Sugiyama : Building Hierarchy Domain knowledge based. Designing heuristic, e.g. minimizing

Fang, Shiaofen

125

Scaled Experimental Modeling of Geologic Structures Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uncertainty associated with hydrocarbon exploration and production. Furthermore, experimental models allow us in the Department of Geological Sciences at Rutgers University. She has thirty years of experience in the oil & gas experimental models provide valuable information about structural processes, especially those not observed

126

Molecular, crystal, and electronic structure of the cobalt(II) complex with 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol (HL) with cobalt(II) acetate gives the coordination compound [CoL{sub 2}] {center_dot} CHCl{sub 3} (I). The molecular and crystal structure of I is determined by X-ray diffraction. The coordination polyhedron of the Co atom in complex I is an octahedron. The anion L acts as a tridentate chelating ligand and is coordinated to the Co atom through the phenanthrenequinone O1 atom and the benzothiazole N1 atom of the moieties L and the N3 atom of the azo group to form two five-membered metallocycles. The molecular and electronic structures of the compounds HL, L, and CoL{sub 2} are studied at the density functional theory level. The results of the quantum-chemical calculations are in good agreement with the values determined by X-ray diffraction.

Linko, R. V., E-mail: rlinko@mail.ru [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Sokol, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Polyanskaya, N. A.; Ryabov, M. A.; Strashnov, P. V.; Davydov, V. V. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Sergienko, V. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

128

A Ni(II) Bis(diphosphine)-Hydride Complex Containing Proton Relays - Structural Characterization and Electrocatalytic Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syntheses of the new 1,5-diphenyl-3,7-di(isopropyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligand, PiPr2NPh2, is reported. The two equivalents of the ligand react with [Ni(CH3CN)6](BF4)2 to form the bis-diphosphine Ni(II)-complex [Ni(PiPr2NPh2)2](BF4)2, which acts as a proton reduction electrocatalyst. In addition to [Ni(PiPr2NPh2)2]2+, we report the syntheses and structural characterization of the Ni(0)-complex Ni(PiPr2NPh2)2, and the Ni(II)-hydride complex [HNi(PiPr2NPh2)2]BF4. The [HNi(PiPr2NPh2)2]BF4 complex represents the first Ni(II)-hydride in the [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ family of compounds to be isolated and structurally characterized. In addition to the experimental data, the mechanism of electrocatalysis facilitated by [Ni(PiPr2NPh2)2]2+ is analyzed using linear free energy relationships recently established for the [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ family. We thank Dr. Aaron Appel, Dr. Simone Raugei and Dr. Eric Wiedner for helpful discussions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Mass spectrometry was provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Das, Partha Pratim; Stolley, Ryan M.; Van Der Eide, Edwin F.; Helm, Monte L.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Spin Topological Model for the g ) 4.1 S2 State Photosystem II Water Oxidase Manganese Aggregate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ReceiVed NoVember 30, 1998 The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes*, Departments of Chemistry Eugene F. Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 photosynthetic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Although the precise structure of the OEC is unknown

Hendrich, Mike

130

Effects of chronic receptor blockade on intracardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone content in an angiotensin II-infused model of hypertension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Ang II following acute infusion. However in rats, chronic10mg/kg/d for 21 d). Ang II-infusion increased intracardiacANIMALS .   A NG   II  INFUSION   (80  NG / MIN  X   4  

Conte, Debra Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

4.462 / 4.441 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic ...

Ochsendorf, John Allen

132

Mechanical modeling of the growth of salt structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2D numerical model for studying the morphology and history of salt structures by way of computer simulations is presented. The model is based on conservation laws for physical systems, a fluid marker equation to keep track of the salt/sediments interface, and two constitutive laws for rocksalt. When buoyancy alone is considered, the fluid-assisted diffusion model predicts evolution of salt structures 2.5 times faster than the power-law creep model. Both rheological laws predict strain rates of the order of 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}s{sup {minus}1} for similar structural maturity level of salt structures. Equivalent stresses and viscosities predicted by the fluid-assisted diffusion law are 10{sup 2} times smaller than those predicted by the power-law creep rheology. Use of East Texas Basin sedimentation rates and power-law creep rheology indicate that differential loading is an effective mechanism to induce perturbations that amplify and evolve to mature salt structures, similar to those observed under natural geological conditions.

Alfaro, R.A.M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: II. Structural changes and H desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural properties and H desorption from embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs) following irradiation with swift heavy ions were investigated as a function of energy and fluence. From x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis, Pt-H bonding was identified in NCs annealed in a forming gas (95% N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2}) ambient. The H content decreased upon irradiation and the desorption process was NC-size dependent such that larger NCs required a higher fluence to achieve a H-free state. Pt-H bonding and NC dissolution both perturbed the NC structural parameters (coordination number, bond-length and mean-square relative displacement) as determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Transport-theoretic model for the electron-proton-hydrogen atom auroa. II. Model results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a companion paper, a self-consistent transport-theoretic model for the combined electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora was described. In this paper, numberical results based on the model are presented. This is done for the pure electron aurora, the pure proton-hydrogen atom aurora, and finally for the combined aurora. Adopting commonly used types of energy distributions for the incident particle (electron and proton) fluxes, the authors give numerical solutions for the precipitating electron, proton, and hydrogen atom differential number fluxes. Results are also given for ionization yields and emission yields of the following features: N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative group (3914 {Angstrom}), N{sub 2} second positive group (3371 {Angstrom}), selected N{sub 2} Lyman-Birge-Hopfields bands (1325, 1354, 1383, 1493, and all bands between 1700 and 1800 {Angstrom}), O I (1356 {Angstrom}), L{sub {alpha}} (1216 {Angstrom}), H{sub {beta}} (4861 {Angstrom}), and H{sub {alpha}} (6563 {Angstrom}). The yield at 1493 {Angstrom} also contains a contribution from N I (1493 {Angstrom}), which in fact dominates LBH emission. A major new result of this study is that the secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of aurora interest) cross sections for secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of auroral interest) cross sections for secondary electron production by proton and hydrogen atom impact decrease exponentially with increasing secondary electron energy, whereas the cross sections for electron impact decrease as an inverse power law with increasing secondary energy.

Strickland, D.J. [Computational Physics, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Daniell, R.E. Jr. [Computational Physics, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Basu, B. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [and others

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

POSITION PAPER Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSITION PAPER Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements Orlena C. Z. Gotel, and hence trace, those who have contributed in the production and refinement of the requirements the restricted impact that conventional notions of RT can have on quality, and explain why extensions

Finkelstein, Anthony

138

Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealingModeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields S. Worman , A.B. Murray , R for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements

Claudin, Philippe

139

THE CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION OF STATISTICAL MODELS OF MELODIC STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION OF STATISTICAL MODELS OF MELODIC STRUCTURE IN MUSIC PERCEPTION and composition is to construct systems of symbolic rules and constraints on the basis of extensive music at the Royal College of Music who went out of their way to help me in recruiting judges for the experiments

Pearce, Marcus T.

140

Structured Deformations as Energy Minimizers in Models of Fracture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Deformations as Energy Minimizers in Models of Fracture and Hysteresis R. Choksi and for a bar experiencing both smooth exten- sion and macroscopic fractures then are determined, and applications to the shearing of single crystals and to the cohesive fracture of solids are discussed. Yield

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Knowledge Structures and Didactic Model Selection in Learning Object Navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge Structures and Didactic Model Selection in Learning Object Navigation Dietrich Albert' of the content of the learning objects, and (2) a `didactic preference level' of the specific preferences constraints and the didactic constraints are available. 1 Introduction According to the SCORM (Shareable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Modelling the coppice stand structure: an ecophysiological approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling the coppice stand structure: an ecophysiological approach G.E. Scarascia-Mugnozza, and A is managed as a coppice with standards, with 2400 sprouts on about 1200 stumps/ha and with 96 standards/ha. The latter are trees, managed on a longer rotation than the coppice, to produce seeds for the regeneration

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

143

A lattice model to simulate ice-structure interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lattice model to simulate ice-structure interaction O. Dorival, A. V. Metrikine, A. Simone of Technology P. O. Box 5048, 2600 GA Delft, Netherlands Abstract The interaction between ice sheets, due to the complexity of ice material the use of small-scale experiments is problematic if one aims

Boyer, Edmond

144

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

Xie, Si

145

Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an information bridge between super-resolution microscopy and structural biology by using generative models

Matsuda, Noboru

146

Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;FORWARD MODELING OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL EMISSIONS. II. IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL HEATING L. L

McTiernan, James M.

147

Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Internal Dynamics, Structure and Formation of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies: II. Rotating Versus Non-Rotating Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially-resolved internal kinematics and stellar chemical abundances for a sample of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster observed with Keck/ESI. We find that 4 out of 17 dEs have major axis rotation velocities consistent with rotational flattening, while the remaining dEs have no detectable major axis rotation. Despite this difference in internal kinematics, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their position in the Fundamental Plane, morphological structure, stellar populations, and local environment. We present evidence for faint underlying disks and/or weak substructure in a fraction of both rotating and non-rotating dEs, but a comparable number of counter-examples exist for both types which show no evidence of such structure. Absorption-line strengths were determined based on the Lick/IDS system (Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270, Fe5335) for the central region of each galaxy. We find no difference in the line-strength indices, and hence stellar populations, betwe...

Geha, M; Van der Marel, R P

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Discrete-Time Dataflow Models for Visual Simulation in Ptolemy II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Ptolemy II is a timed extension of the Synchronous Dataflow (SDF) domain. Although not completely backward compatible with SDF, DT keeps most of the desirable properties of SDF like static scheduling, regular in Ptolemy II 3.2 Synchronous Dataflow (SDF) Domain 3.3 Discrete Event (DE) Domain 3.4 Continuous Time (CT

150

Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of title complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties and electrochemical behaviors have been reported.

Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

The case against scaling defect models of cosmic structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate predictions from defect models of structure formation for both the matter and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over all observable scales. Our results point to a serious problem reconciling the observed large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization, a result which is robust for a wide range of defect parameters. We conclude that standard scaling defect models are in conflict with the data, and show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects would require radical departures from the standard scaling picture.

Andreas Albrecht; Richard A. Battye; James Robinson

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of chronic receptor blockade on intracardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone content in an angiotensin II-infused model of hypertension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During Ang II-Induced Hypertension: Role of AT1 Receptor.Hypertension 39: 116-121, 2002. Zou L, Hymel A, Imig J, andAngiotensin II-Infused Rats. Hypertension 27: 658-662, 1996.

Conte, Debra Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

Structure and Magnetic Ordering of a 2-D MnII(TCNE)I(OH2) (TCNE = tetracyanoethylene) Organic-based Magnet (Tc = 171 K)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mn{sup II}(TCNE)I(OH{sub 2}) was isolated from the reaction of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and MnI{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, and has a 2-D structure possessing an unusual, asymmetric bonded {mu}{sub 4}-[TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-}. Direct antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 5/2 Mn{sup II} and S = 1/2 [TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-} leads to magnetic ordering as a canted antiferromagnet at a T{sub c} of 171 K.

S Lapidus; A McConnell; P Stephens; J Miller

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecule’s structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecule’s structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of molecular species in the hot environments of combustion processes, there are several features that make the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy uniquely useful. First, the Rydberg electron’s orbit is quite large and covers the entire molecule for most molecular structures of combustion interest. Secondly, the ionization does not change vibrational quantum numbers, so that even complicated and large molecules can be observed with fairly well resolved spectra. In fact, the spectroscopy is blind to vibrational excitation of the molecule. This has the interesting consequence for the study of chemical dynamics, where the molecules are invariably very energetic, that the molecular structures are observed unobstructed by the vibrational congestion that dominates other spectroscopies. This implies also that, as a tool to probe the time-dependent structural dynamics of chemically interesting molecules, Rydberg spectroscopy may well be better suited than electron or x-ray diffraction. With recent progress in calculating Rydberg binding energy spectra, we are approaching the point where the method can be evolved into a structure determination method. To implement the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy we use a molecular beam based, time-resolved pump-probe multi-photon ionization/photoelectron scheme in which a first laser pulse excites the molecule to a Rydberg state, and a probe pulse ionizes the molecule. A time-of-flight detector measures the kinetic energy spectrum of the photoelectrons. The photoelectron spectrum directly provides the binding energy of the electron, and thereby reveals the molecule’s time-dependent structural fingerprint. Only the duration of the laser pulses limits the time resolution. With a new laser system, we have now reached time resolutions better than 100 fs, although very deep UV wavelengths (down to 190 nm) have slightly longer instrument functions. The structural dynamics of molecules in Rydberg-excited states is obtained by delaying the probe ionization photon from the pump photon; the structural dynamics of molecules in their ground state or e

Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota #12;PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

159

Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

Nathan Smith

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Impact of Not Fully Addressing Cross-Classified Multilevel Structure in Testing Measurement Invariance and Conducting Multilevel Mixture Modeling within Structural Equation Modeling Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data as hierarchical structure data in two different analytical settings under the structural equation modeling (SEM) framework. Study 1 evaluated the performance of conventional multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) which assumes hierarchical...

Im, Myung

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

A 'BOOSTED FIREBALL' MODEL FOR STRUCTURED RELATIVISTIC JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a model for relativistic jets which generates a particular angular distribution of Lorentz factor and energy per solid angle. We consider a fireball with specific internal energy E/M launched with bulk Lorentz factor ? {sub B}. In its center-of-momentum frame the fireball expands isotropically, converting its internal energy into radially expanding flow with asymptotic Lorentz factor ?{sub 0} ? E/M. In the lab frame the flow is beamed, expanding with Lorentz factor ? = 2?{sub 0}? {sub B} in the direction of its initial bulk motion and with characteristic opening angle ?{sub 0} ? 1/? {sub B}. The flow is jet-like with ??{sub 0} ? 2?{sub 0} such that jets with ? > 1/?{sub 0} are naturally produced. The choice ?{sub 0} ? ? {sub B} ? 10 yields a jet with ? ? 200 on-axis and angular structure characterized by opening angle ?{sub 0} ? 0.1 of relevance for cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while ? {sub B} ?> 1 may be relevant for low-luminosity GRBs. The model produces a family of outflows, of relevance for different relativistic phenomena with structures completely determined by ?{sub 0} and ? {sub B}. We calculate the energy per unit solid angle for the model and use it to compute light curves for comparison with the widely used top-hat model. The jet break in the boosted fireball light curve is greatly subdued when compared to the top-hat model because the edge of the jet is smoother than for a top-hat. This may explain missing jet breaks in afterglow light curves.

Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I., E-mail: pcd233@nyu.edu, E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1: The model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1 size-structured mathematical model of the energy flow through marine ecosystems, based on established-dependent. The physiological bases of the model are derived from the dynamic energy budget theory. The model outputs

Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

166

A detail study of defect models for cosmic structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate predictions from wide class of `active' models of cosmic structure formation which allows us to scan the space of possible defect models. We calculate the linear cold dark matter power spectrum and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies over all observable scales using a full linear Einstein-Boltzmann code. Our main result, which has already been reported, points to a serious problem reconciling the observed amplitude of the large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization. Here, we describe our methods and results in detail. The problem is present for a wide range of defect parameters, which can be used to represent potential differences among defect models, as well as possible systematic numerical errors. We explicitly examine the impact of varying the defect model parameters and we show how the results substantiate these conclusions. The standard scaling defect models are in serious conflict with the current data, and we show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects or modified stress-energy components would require radical departures from what has become the standard picture.

A. Albrecht; R. A. Battye; J. Robinson

1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Weak solutions for a fluid-elastic structure interaction model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on @(S(0),4) where nL denotes the outward normal to @ S(0), {,_i}i2INis an orthonormal basis of L2( S(0)) and {~i}i2INis a non negative non decreasing sequence of eigenvalues. The regularity

Esteban, Maria J.

168

Two-Factor Model of Soil Suction from Capillarity, Shrinkage, Adsorbed Film, and Intra-aggregate Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work is to derive the soil water retention from the soil structure without curve-fitting and only using the physical parameters found irrespective of an experimental retention curve. Two key points underlie the work: (i) the soil suction at drying coincides with that of the soil intra-aggregate matrix and contributive clay; and (ii) both the soil suction and volume shrinkage at drying depend on the same soil water content. In addition the two following results are used: (i) the available two-factor (capillarity and shrinkage) model of clay suction enables one to connect a clay suction and clay water content using the clay matrix structure; and (ii) the recent reference shrinkage curve model based on the concepts of intra-aggregate soil structure permits one to connect the soil water content at shrinkage with the water content of the contributive clay. With that the available two-factor model was essentially modified and, in particular, the effect of adsorbed water film was taken into account. The developed model includes the following input parameters: the solid density, relative volume of contributive-clay solids, relative volume of contributive clay in the oven-dried state, soil clay content, aggregate/intra-aggregate mass ratio, and specific volume of lacunar pores in the aggregates at maximum swelling. The validation of the model is based on available data of water retention and the above input parameters for six soils. A promising agreement between the predicted and observed water retention curves was found.

V. Y. Chertkov

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fluid--Structure Interaction : : Physiologic Simulation of Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Devices using Isogeometric Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for prebending of wind turbine blades. 89:323–336, 2012. [wind turbine rotors at full scale. Part II: Fluid– structure interaction modeling with composite blades.

Long, Christopher Curtis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Deformations of Geometric Structures in Topological Sigma Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields W{sub n} with it application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are described by a Hochschild cohomology of the DG-algebra A = (A,Q), Q = {partial_derivative}-bar+{partial_derivative}{sub deform,} which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1){sup n}Q+d{sub Hoch}. Here {partial_derivative}-bar is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while {partial_derivative}{sub deform} is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gl{sub n}.

Bytsenko, A. A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Caixa Postal 6001, Londrina-Parana (Brazil)

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES.............................................................................................................7 Composite Materials...................................................................................................7 Material Properties

173

PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vasyunin, A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States); Birnstiel, T., E-mail: akimkin@inasan.ru, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru, E-mail: pavyar@inasan.ru, E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de, E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electronic structure II: Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atomic levels N-degeneracy (atomic spacing)­1 energy bands E. Origin of the band gapE. Origin of the band 1ZB k ·· · 2. (1D) G k + G #12;4 2B. 2. Energy bands2B. 2. Energy bands #12;5 A. Introduction schemesB. Zone representation schemes #12;9 C. Energy bands in 3DC. Energy bands in 3D 3-dimensional solid

del Barco, Enrique

175

A Stochastic Age-Structured Population Model of Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Potomac River'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-structured population model of striped bass (Morone saatilis) in the Potomac River. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 40A Stochastic Age-Structured Population Model of Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Potomac. CHRISTENSEN.AND C. P. GOODYEAR.1983. A stochastic age-structured population model of striped bass (Morone sn

Cohen, Joel E.

176

Red variables in the OGLE-II data base -- III. Constraints on the three-dimensional structures of the LMC and SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the 3-D structure of the Magellanic Clouds, using period-luminosity (P-L) relations of pulsating red giants in the OGLE-II sample. By interpreting deviations from the mean P-L relations as distance modulus variations, we examine the three-dimensional distributions of the sample. The results for the Large Magellanic Cloud, based solely on stars below the tip of the Red Giant Branch, confirm previous results on the inclined and possibly warped bar of the LMC. The depth variation across the OGLE-II field is about 2.4 kpc, interpreted as the distance range of a thin but inclined structure. The inclination angle is about 29 deg. A comparison with OGLE-II red clump distances revealed intriguing differences that seem to be connected to the red clump reddening correction. A spatially variable red clump population in the LMC can explain the deviations, which may have a broader impact on our understanding of the LMC formation history. For the Small Magellanic Cloud, we find a complex structure showing patchy distribution scattered within 3.2 kpc of the mean. However, the larger range of the overall depth on every line-of-sight is likely to smooth out significantly the real variations.

P. Lah; L. L. Kiss; T. R. Bedding

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Can a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of sh populations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or applying an estimation method that is robust to the error structure assumption in modelling the dynamicsCan a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of ®sh populations? Y. Chena,* , J.E. Paloheimob a Fisheries Conservation Chair Program, Fisheries

Chen, Yong

178

Mnemonic Structure and Sociality: A Computational Agent-Based Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mnemonic Structure and Sociality: A Computational Agent-Based Simulation Model Claudio Cioffi-agent social simulation models are designed with agents lacking explicit internal information transformations affect human and social dynamics? Most computational multi-agent social simulation models

George Mason University

179

Topological Equivalence of a Structure-Preserving Power Network Model and a Non-Uniform Kuramoto Model of Coupled Oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model of Coupled Oscillators Florian D¨orfler and Francesco Bullo Abstract-- We study synchronization IIS-0904501 and CNS- 0834446. Florian D¨orfler and Francesco Bullo are with the Center for Control, {dorfler, bullo}@engineering.ucsb.edu on the reduced network can then be related to the original network

Bullo, Francesco

180

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir definition and development. Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith, Al Waibel, Maria C. Richards and Patrick Stepp Published GRC, 2009 DOI Not Provided...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Why Basin and Range Systems are Hard to Find II- Structural Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir definition and development. Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith, Al Waibel, Maria C. Richards and Patrick Stepp Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno,...

182

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: SaltTroyer & AssociatesWestILI Wind FarmNameIIProducing

183

Why Basin and Range Systems are Hard to Find II- Structural Model of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,GeothermalHawaii: Energy Resources

184

The Pierre Auger Observatory II: Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Hadronic Interaction models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers.

The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; U. Cotti; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. -H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodríguez-Frías; G. Ros; J. Rosado

2011-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas II. Spin states, screening and band structure effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1083 Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas II. Spin states, incorporant la condensation de Bose des paires électron-trou. Nous étudions en détail la limite diluée, et incorporates Bose condensation of bound electron-hole pairs. We discuss in detail the low density limit

Boyer, Edmond

186

Pictures: A simple structured graphics model Sigbjorn Finne and Simon Peyton Jones,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pictures: A simple structured graphics model Sigbjorn Finne and Simon Peyton Jones, Department­independent model for de­ scribing two­dimensional graphics using a functional language. Graphical scenes the geometric composition of arbitrary pictures. The structured graphics model presented has been implemented

Jones, Simon Peyton

187

A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse Grained Approach. A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse...

188

A spatially structured metapopulation model with patch dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 30, 2005 ... creation) and metapopulation dynamics (patch colonization and extinction). ... genetic structure (Gaines and Lyons, 1997), and commu-.

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Optics elements for modeling electrostatic lenses and accelerator components II. Acceleration columns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of optical models for a variety of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns has been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code including space charge that is often used to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators when the effects of beam current may be important. Several new matrix models have been developed that allow the code to be used for modeling beam lines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic deflectors (prisms), and (4) an electrostatic quadrupole. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The new models for (2) are described in this paper, selected comparisons with other calculations are presented, and a beamline application is summarized.

Gillespie, G.H., Brown, T.A.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mapping thin resistors and hydrocarbons with marine EM methods, Part II --Modeling and analysis in 3D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used in the ma- rine environment to map geological structure e.g., Hoversten et al., 2000; Key et al of the canonical disk model 100 m, 100 m thick, variable radius, 1 km deep in 1- m sediments showed that the inline

Constable, Steve

191

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Recombinatoric exploration of novel folded structures: heteropolymerbased model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction thus formally very similar Bryngelson and Wolynes' (11) seminal random energy model treatment # neutral # sequence space # thermodynamic stability # protein models I is widely recognized events

Chan, Hue Sun

193

Managerial Coaching Behavior and Employee Outcomes: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

‘s alpha estimates for reliability, correlation analysis, two-step modeling techniques for structural equation modeling, and Sobel tests were the analysis methods used in the study. The results of the analyses indicated that the hypothesized conceptual...

Kim, Sewon

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline Grain Structure of Steels at Mesoscopic Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline Grain Structure of Steels at Mesoscopic Level. The constitutive model of crystal grains utilizes anisotropic elasticity and crystal plasticity. Commercially be considered macroscopically homogeneous. Elastic and rate independent plastic deformation modes are considered

Cizelj, Leon

195

A comparison of structural and non-structural econometric models in the Toronto office market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to compare five systems of econometric equations to describe the Toronto office market. It compares four structural systems differing in their demand equations and a non-structural system that does not ...

Gole, Kimberly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

Thomas, Peter J.

197

Statistical system with fantom scalar interaction. II. Macroscopic Equations and Cosmological Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the proposed earlier by the Author approach to macroscopic description of scalar interaction, this paper develops the macroscopic model of relativistic plasma with a fantom scalar interaction of elementary particles. In the article the macroscopic equations for a statistical system with scalar interaction of particles are obtained and the complete set of macroscopic equations describing cosmological models is built.

Yu. G. Ignatyev; A. A. Agathonov; D. Yu. Ignatyev

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

Terzi, BalÂ?a

199

Detailed modeling of spectroscopic data: Modeling support for ORNL PMI WORK: TEXTORALT-II, TORE SUPRA, ATF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains vugraphs on particle source effects on confinement time scaling. Detailed modeling of H/sub ..cap alpha../ intensity spatial distribution is discussed. (LSP)

Hogan, J.; Klepper, C.; Hillis, D.; Uckan, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

Not Available

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION MAPPING OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS. II. THE STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE STARLESS CORES AND CLUMPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler and Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 {mu}m images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, {Sigma}, up to {approx_equal} 0.5 g cm{sup -2} with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring {Sigma}{sub cl}(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M{sub cl} = 60 M{sub Sun }. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R{sub cl} {approx_equal} 0.1 pc, mean {Sigma}{sub cl} = 0.3 g cm{sup -} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile {rho}{sub cl}{proportional_to}r{sup -k{sub {rho}}{sub ,}{sub c}{sub l}}, a mean value of k{sub {rho},cl} = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k{sub {rho},c} = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of M{sub c} {approx} 100 M{sub Sun} and {Sigma}-bar{sub c} {approx} 0.1 g cm{sup -2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed {Sigma} profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of {Sigma} and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper density profiles as star formation proceeds.

Butler, Michael J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 29562984 Numerical model simulations of continental shelf flows off  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure that appears just north of Bodega Bay and shows the offshore jet strengthening to the south. We with realistic topography and initial stratification in a limited-area domain with a high-resolution grid eddy-like recirculation feature offshore of Pt. Arena prior to the upwelling event causes large patches

Pierce, Stephen

203

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

Denver, University of

205

Dynamics of an age-structured metapopulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

address the temporal dynamics that characterize local popu- lations in ... this metapopulation framework, two structures have emerged as being critical in the ...

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ultrafast Structural Dynamics Inside Planar Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Cell Membranes Measured with 2D IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrafast Structural Dynamics Inside Planar Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Cell Membranes Measured diffusion caused by the structural dynamics of the membrane from 200 fs to 200 ps as a function structure and an abrupt change in dynamics at 35% cholesterol. The dynamics are independent of cholesterol

Fayer, Michael D.

207

MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN of the affected concrete that generally leads to cracking and decrease of its mechanical properties of the concrete works and structural integrity. To manage with considered suffering structures, it is necessary

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Methods Mol Biol . Author manuscript 3D structural models of transmembrane proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins is a major research area. Due to the lack of available 3D structures, automatic homology modelingMethods Mol Biol . Author manuscript Page /1 9 3D structural models of transmembrane proteins: Alexandre De Brevern Abstract Summary Transmembrane proteins

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Random Forest-Based Protein Model Quality Assessment (RFMQA) Using Structural Features and Potential Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Random Forest-Based Protein Model Quality Assessment (RFMQA) Using Structural Features and Potential Energy Terms Balachandran Manavalan, Juyong Lee, Jooyoung Lee* Center for In Silico Protein in protein structure prediction. In this study, we present the first application of random forest based model

Lee, Jooyoung

210

A structural risk-neutral model for pricing and hedging power derivatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nicolas Langrené§ October 12, 2010 Abstract We develop a structural risk-neutral model for energy market makes such a market incomplete. We follow a local risk minimization approach to price and hedge energyA structural risk-neutral model for pricing and hedging power derivatives René Aïd Luciano Campi

211

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic France (Dated: September 11, 2008) Fuzzy structure theory for sound-insulation layers 1 hal-00684495 is proposed in developing an elas- toacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for compu

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Modeling of the AISI Two-Zone Smelter, Part II: Physical Modeling and the AISI Pilot Plant Trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical modeling experiments were conducted for the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) two-zone smelter process. The effects of geometrical and operating parameters on backmixing flow rates were investigated. It was found that the driving force for a backmixing flow in the AISI smelter comes from gas stirring in a liquid bath. The backmixing flow rate in the AISI smelter is proportional to a bath depth and an opening area of a barrier. Based on the results of the physical modeling experiments, a dimensional analysis was performed to extrapolate the water modeling results to the operating conditions in the AISI pilot plant. Copper tracer trials were conducted at the AISI pilot plant to investigate the backmixing flow of the AISI two-zone smelter process. The results obtained from the pilot plant trials and the water modeling experiments were compared.

Keller, Joseph George; Zhang, X.; Fuehan, R. J.; Vassilicos, A.; Sarma, B.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used for Diesel sprays. However...

Prithiviraj, Manikandan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Optimization Online - A Non-Parametric Structural Hybrid Modeling ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 30, 2014 ... Keywords: Electricity market; Electricity price modeling; Energy trading; Supply stack. Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management ...

Somayeh Moazeni

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

MnII (TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2 - A 3-D Network-structured Organic-based Magnet and Comparison to a 2-D Analog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mn{sup II}(TCNE){sub 3/2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1/2} and Mn{sup II}(TCNE)[C{sub 4}(CN){sub 8}]{sub 1/2} [tetracyanoethylene (TCNE)] are organic-based magnets with 3D and 2D extended network structures with vastly different magnetic behavior. They have similar ferrimagnetic coupled layers of Mn{sup II}(TCNE){sup {lg_bullet}-} with different interlayer couplings, which lead, respectively, to net ferrimagnetic (T{sub c} = 171 K) and antiferromagnetic (T{sub c} = 68 K) order.

Stone, K.; Stephens, P; McConnell, A; Shurdha, E; Pokhodnya, K; Miller, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling H2 adsorption in carbon-based structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. One promising area of research is hydrogen physi-sorbed into carbonbased structures such as nanotubes and graphene. Two novel systems consisting of a phthalocyanine salt with a large cation were studied. Ab initio, density functional theory...

Lamonte, Kevin Anthony

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi (State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. II. HALO STRUCTURE AND SUBSTRUCTURE TRACED BY RR LYRAE STARS TO 30 kpc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a sample of {approx}5000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR data set and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over {approx}8000 deg{sup 2} of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We analyze in detail the light curve properties and Galactic distribution of the subset of {approx}4000 type ab RR Lyrae (RRab) stars, including a search for new halo substructures and the number density distribution as a function of Oosterhoff type. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4, but with a weaker separation than for globular cluster stars. The wide sky coverage and depth of this sample allow unique constraints for the number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance: it can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with an axis ratio q = 0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the Oosterhoff type II subsample has a steeper number density profile than the Oosterhoff type I subsample. Using the group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or globular clusters and seem to have a higher ratio of Oosterhoff type II to Oosterhoff type I RRab stars than what is found in the halo. The extended morphology and the position (outside the tidal radius) of some of the groups near globular clusters are suggestive of tidal streams possibly originating from globular clusters. Spectroscopic follow-up of detected halo groups is encouraged.

Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan M.; Becker, Andrew C. [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Sharma, Sanjib [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Palaversa, Lovro [Observatoire astronomique de l'Universite de Geneve, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Juric, Mario [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85121 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 30 Bikini Atoll Rd., Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Oluseyi, Hakeem [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

1 Intevep/2002/papers/FoamyOil-Pt2/nucleation_5-03.doc Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a depletion experiment in which oil is pulled out of a closed sand pack at a constant rate reservoirs of heavy foamy oil under solution gas drive. All of the background motivation, the arguments1 · Intevep/2002/papers/FoamyOil-Pt2/nucleation_5-03.doc Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media II

Joseph, Daniel D.

220

Proc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Seattle, WA, 98178 ABSTRACT Geospatial data analysis relies on Spatial Data Fusion and Mining (SDFMProc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining Boris Kovalerchuka* , Leonid Perlovskyb

Kovalerchuk, Boris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Simple Quantum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime II: Thermodynamics of Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this second part of our series of two papers, where spacetime is modelled by a graph, where Planck size quantum black holes lie on the vertices, we consider the thermodynamics of spacetime. We formulate an equation which tells in which way an accelerating, spacelike two-surface of spacetime interacts with the thermal radiation flowing through that surface. In the low temperature limit, where most quantum black holes constituting spacetime are assumed to lie in the ground state, our equation implies, among other things, the Hawking and the Unruh effects, as well as Einstein's field equation with a vanishing cosmological constant for general matter fields. We also consider the high temperature limit, where the microscopic black holes are assumed to lie in highly excited states. In this limit our model implies, among other things, that black hole entropy depends logarithmically on its area, instead of being proportional to the area.

J. Makela

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

Novel Geometrical Models of Relativistic Stars. II. Incompressible Stars and Heavy Black Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a series of articles we describe a novel class of geometrical models of relativistic stars. Our approach to the static spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein equations is based on a careful physical analysis of radial gauge conditions. It turns out that there exist heavy black dwarfs: relativistic stars with arbitrary large mass, which are to have arbitrary small radius and arbitrary small luminosity. In the present article we mathematically prove this new phenomena, using a detailed consideration of incompressible GR stars. We study the whole two parameter family of solutions of extended TOV equations for incompressible stars. This example is used to illustrate most of the basic features of the new geometrical models of relativistic stars. Comparison with newest observational data is discussed

P. P. Fiziev

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

ISO-SWS calibration and the accurate modelling of cool-star atmospheres - II. General results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fine calibration of the ISO-SWS detectors (Infrared Space Observatory - Short Wavelength Spectrometer) has proven to be a delicate problem. We therefore present a detailed spectroscopic study in the 2.38 -- 12 micron wavelength range of a sample of 16 A0 -- M2 stars used for the calibration of ISO-SWS. By investigating the discrepancies between the ISO-SWS data of these sources, the theoretical predictions of their spectra, the high-resolution FTS-KP (Kitt Peak) spectrum of Alpha Boo and the solar FTS-ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) spectrum, both calibration problems and problems in computing the theoretical models and the synthetic spectra are revealed. The underlying reasons for these problems are sought for and the impact on the further calibration of ISO-SWS and on the theoretical modelling is discussed extensively.

L. Decin; B. Vandenbussche; C. Waelkens; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; B. Plez; A. J. Sauval; K. Hinkle

2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Probing Quantum General Relativity Through Exactly Soluble Midi-Superspaces II: Polarized Gowdy Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canonical quantization of the polarized Gowdy midi-superspace with a 3-torus spatial topology is carried out. As in an earlier work on the Einstein-Rosen cylindrical waves, symmetry reduction is used to cast the original problem in 4-dimensional space-times to a 3-dimensional setting. To our knowledge, this is the first complete, systematic treatment of the Gowdy model in the geometrodynamical setting.

M. Pierri

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dicarboxylate assisted synthesis of the monoclinic heterometallic tetrathiocyanato bridged copper(II) and mercury(II) coordination polymer {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n}: Synthesis, structural, vibration, luminescence, EPR studies and DFT calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of the monoclinic polymorph of {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} is reported. The compound, as determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, consists of mercury and copper atoms linked by {mu}{sub 1,3}-SCN bridges. The crystal packing shows a highly porous infinite 3D structure. Diagnostic resonances for the SCN{sup -} ligand and metal-ligand bonds in the IR, far-IR and Raman spectra are assigned and discussed. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. The DFT calculations show that the observed luminescence of the compound arises mainly from an excited LLCT state with small MLCT contributions (from the copper to unoccupied {pi}{sup *} orbital of the thiocyanate groups). The X-band EPR spectrum of the powdered sample at room temperature reveals an axial signal with anisotropic g factors consistent with the unpaired electron of Cu(II) ion in the d{sub x}{sup 2}{sub -y}{sup 2} orbital. -- Graphical abstract: Synthesis and X-ray structure determination of the monoclinic {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} is reported. The IR, far-IR, Raman, photoluminescence as well as EPR spectra of the compound is discussed. Also, the emission and semiconducting behavior of the compound is illustrated through the density functional theory calculation of electronic band structure along with density of states. Display Omitted Research highlights: > The monoclinic {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} has been prepared. > The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. > The IR, far-IR, Raman, EPR and emission spectra of the compound is investigated. > As shown by DFT calculations, the emission bands of the compound are mainly LLCT. > Small MLCT from the copper to the thiocyanate groups contributes to these bands.

Khandar, Ali Akbar, E-mail: akhandar@yahoo.co [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Klein, Axel [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany); Bakhtiari, Akbar [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany); Mahjoub, Ali Reza [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14155-4838 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pohl, Roland W.H. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

PSMG–A Parallel Structured Model Generator for Mathematical ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity constraints (at lines 14 and 25) to model the edge capacity for routing ... The benchmark is typically the performance of a market index or a com-.

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Modeling and identification of parallel nonlinear systems: Structural classification and parameter estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural classification and parameter estimation (SCPE) methods are used for studying single-input single-output (SISO) parallel linear-nonlinear-linear (LNL), linear-nonlinear (LN), and nonlinear-linear (NL) system models from input-output (I-O) measurements. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of I-O mappings of different models tells them in what conditions different model structures can be differentiated from one another. Parameter uniqueness of the I-O mapping of a given structural model is also discussed, which tells the authors in what conditions a given model's parameters can be uniquely estimated from I-O measurements. These methods are then generalized so that they can be used to study single-input multi-output (SIMO), multi-input single-output (MISO), as well as multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear system models. Parameter estimation of the two-input single-output nonlinear system model (denoted as the 2f-structure in 2 cited references), which was left unsolved previously, can now be obtained using the newly derived algorithms. Applications of SCPE methods for modeling visual cortical neurons, system fault detection, modeling and identification of communication networks, biological systems, and natural and artificial neural networks are also discussed. The feasibility of these methods is demonstrated using simulated examples. SCPE methods presented in this paper can be further developed to study more complicated block-structures models, and will therefore have future potential for modeling and identifying highly complex multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems.

Chen, H.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group M715)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

Kervalishvili, N A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A finite element model for transient thermal/structural analysis of large composite space structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on approximate 6 analysis techniques based on finite elements has begun. Such techniques as reduced basis techniques and generalized transform methods offer hope of solving the finite element 8 equations more efficiently. An integrated thermal/structural... integrated analysis codes. However, Mahaney, Thornton, and Dechaumphai have identified require 5 ments for such thermal/structural programs. They concluded that such analysis methods should have the following five characteristics. First, a common finite...

Lutz, James Delmar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

A survey of air flow models for multizone structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Non-chiral fusion rules, structure constants of D_m minimal models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a technique to construct, for $D_{m}$ unitary minimal models, the non-chiral fusion rules which determines the operator content of the operator product algebra. Using these rules we solve the bootstrap equations and therefore determine the structure constants of these models. Through this approach we emphasize the role played by some discrete symmetries in the classification of minimal models.

A. Rida; T. Sami

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Key to images: [1] Model system: fission yeast [2] Cryo-EM structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key to images: [1] Model system: fission yeast [2] Cryo-EM structure of the MCM helicase [3 combing [8] Model system: Xenopus [9] Extreme environments [10] Model system: C.elegans. Background image of the evolution of the replication machinery highlighted. BSRC B306 Email: sam31@st-and.ac.uk 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Brierley, Andrew

234

Interactive physically-based structural modeling of hydrocarbon systems Mael Bosson a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using scripts and/or modeling tools. For many systems, however, these building methods may models of hydrocarbon systems. As the user edits the geometry of the system, atomic positions are alsoInteractive physically-based structural modeling of hydrocarbon systems Mael Bosson a, , Sergei

Redon, Stephane - NRIA Grenoble

235

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory -Experimental validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory - Experimental.fernandez@univ-paris-est.fr Abstract One proposes a novel approach to model sound-insulation layers based on the use of the fuzzy in computational models. The keypoint of the method is the construction of a mean elastoacoustic sound-insulation

Boyer, Edmond

236

Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

09NVC-0163 Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory Laurent [20,200] Hz, sound-insulation layer modeling remains a critical topic. Recent work allows- insulation layer. Nevertheless, such an approach requires a FE model of sound-insulation layer, which may

Boyer, Edmond

237

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M. Szortyka,1,a) Mauricio Girardi,2,b) Vera B-sphere gas in a solvent modeled as an associating lattice gas. The solution phase diagram for solute at 5

Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

238

Fixation at a locus with multiple alleles: Structure and solution of the Wright Fisher model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fixation at a locus with multiple alleles: Structure and solution of the Wright Fisher model D genetics a b s t r a c t We consider the Wright Fisher model for a finite population of diploid sexual mathematical representation of the Wright Fisher model that applies for arbitrary numbers of alleles. Within

Waxman, David

239

A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular architectures. {yields} The thermal and fluorescence properties of title complexes have also been reported.

Wang Xiuli, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.c [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electron spin and the origin of Bio-homochirality II. Prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of biomolecular homochirality is a critically important question about life phenomenon and the origins of life. In a previous paper (arXiv:1309.1229), I tentatively put forward a new hypothesis that the emergence of a single chiral form of biomolecules in living organisms is specifically determined by the electron spin state during their enzyme-catalyzed synthesis processes. However, how a homochirality world of biomolecules could have formed in the absence of enzymatic networks before the origins of life remains unanswered. Here I discussed the electron spin properties in Fe3S4, ZnS, and transition metal doped dilute magnetic ZnS, and their possible roles in the prebiotic synthesis of chiral molecules. Since the existence of these minerals in hydrothermal vent systems is matter of fact, the suggested prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model, if can be experimentally demonstrated, may help explain where and how life originated on early Earth.

Wang, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Renormalization of lattice-regularized quantum gravity models II. The case of causal dynamical triangulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causal dynamical triangulations approach aims to construct a quantum theory of gravity as the continuum limit of a lattice-regularized model of dynamical geometry. A renormalization group scheme--in concert with finite size scaling analysis--is essential to this aim. Formulating and implementing such a scheme in the present context raises novel and notable conceptual and technical problems. I explored these problems, and, building on standard techniques, suggested potential solutions in the first paper of this two-part series. As an application of these solutions, I now propose a renormalization group scheme for causal dynamical triangulations. This scheme differs significantly from that studied recently by Ambjorn, Gorlich, Jurkiewicz, Kreienbuehl, and Loll.

Joshua H. Cooperman

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

Binder, Meta; /Munich U.; ,

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The temporal cascade structure of reanalyses and Global Circulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stochastic forecasting. 1. Introduction "Weather prediction by Numerical Process" (Richardson, 1922 equations. While these equations are deterministic, numerical weather prediction has been increasingly of the deterministic models. Interestingly, Richardson is not only the father of numerical weather forecasting, he

Lovejoy, Shaun

244

Engineering change modelling using a function-behaviour-structure scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an FBS Linkage model is demonstrated. The method’s potential benefits are discussed. Finally, the application of the method to two industrial case studies involving a diesel engine and a scanning electron microscope is presented. The method evaluation...

Hamraz, Bahram

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Computational tools for modeling and measuring chromosome structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA conformation within cells has many important biological implications, but there are challenges both in modeling DNA due to the need for specialized techniques, and experimentally since tracing out in vivo conformations ...

Ross, Brian Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hubble expansion & Structure Formation in Time Varying Vacuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the properties of the FLRW flat cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density evolves with time, $\\Lambda(t)$. Using different versions of the $\\Lambda(t)$ model, namely quantum field vacuum, power series vacuum and power law vacuum, we find that the main cosmological functions such as the scale factor of the universe, the Hubble expansion rate $H$ and the energy densities are defined analytically. Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia data, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) shift parameter and the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, we put tight constraints on the main cosmological parameters of the $\\Lambda(t)$ scenarios. Furthermore, we study the linear matter fluctuation field and the growth rate of clustering of the above vacuum models. Finally, we derived the theoretically predicted dark-matter halo mass function and the corresponding distribution of cluster-size halos for all the models studied. Their expected redshift distribution indicates that it will be difficult to distinguish the closely resembling models (constant vacuum, quantum field and power-law vacuum), using realistic future X-ray surveys of cluster abundances. However, cluster surveys based on the Sunayev-Zeldovich detection method give some hope to distinguish the closely resembling models at high redshifts.

S. Basilakos; M. Plionis; J. Sola

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO, BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regionalof lakes in numerical weather prediction and climate models:

Subin, Z.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed Cluster/Continuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed and thermodynamic properties of Cu(II) species in aqueous solution. 1. Introduction Copper is a key component evidence that copper may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases

Goddard III, William A.

249

1Banff 6/06 Structural Break Detection in Time Series ModelsStructural Break Detection in Time Series Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breaks in this series? #12;5Banff 6/06 Introduction Examples AR GARCH Stochastic volatility State space Simulation results Applications Simulation results for GARCH and SV models #12;6Banff 6/06 Examples 1 ),,( 1 jjpj K #12;7Banff 6/06 Examples (cont) 2. Segmented GARCH model: where 0 = 1

250

1NCAR-IMAGe 2006 Structural Break Detection in Time Series ModelsStructural Break Detection in Time Series Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-202 Any breaks in this series? #12;5NCAR-IMAGe 2006 Introduction Examples AR GARCH Stochastic volatility break estimation Simulation results Applications Simulation results for GARCH and SV models #12;6NCAR-tjptjptjjt tYYY jj GARCH model

251

Numerical and physical modeling of hydraulic structures Hydraulic structures are used to control the flow of water in hydropower developments, urban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical and physical modeling of hydraulic structures Hydraulic structures are used to control, their solution is found either by physical hydraulic modeling or, more recently, by numerical modeling significantly reduce turbine efficiency and cause premature mechanical failure when they occur at hydropower

Barthelat, Francois

252

Structure of light meson multiplets and a semirelativistic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semirelativistic model of light quark-antiquark pairs, which is an extension of the phenomenological model of De Rujula, Georgi, and Glashow, is presented. Our model incorporates significant new relativistic kinetic energy effects as well as important relativistic corrections to the potential energy. For definiteness, the potential of Gupta, Radford, and Repko is used to help define the mass parameters. In order to obtain good agreement between theory and experiment, we include quark-antiquark annihilation effects for the 1S mesons and higher-order spin-spin effects for the 2S mesons. We are also successful at identifying numerous meson states between about 900 and 2300 MeV as members of the 1P, 1D, and 1F multiplets. Predictions are given for the locations of 19 missing meson states between 1300 and 2300 MeV.

Fulcher, L.P.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Seismic structural response from continuous and discrete models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Derivation . 2. Solving the Shear Beam Differential Equation 3. Adding Damping to the Shear Beam Model D. Comparisons of Results from the Models E. Simple Dynamic Tests of the Models 1. Acceleration Pulse 2. Velocity Pulse . 3. Instantaneous Pulse... + asst) + C(tt t tt 4 + a4vt + t23ttt) Solve Kttt+ttt = p, for Btt t3t / t+rtt ~ u0(ut+t3t ut) tt2vt tt3ttt Vt+at + Vt + ttsttt ? tt&ttt+ttt outPut ttt+ttt vt+ttt t3t+t3t t 4 ? t+Dt ut 4 ut+za vt 4 ? vt4-d, t ttt 4 ttt+za enddo...

Roberts, Matthew Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Structural Models and Endogeneity in Corporate Finance: The Link Between Managerial Ownership and Corporate Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a parsimonious, structural model that isolates primary economic determinants of the level and dispersion of managerial ownership, firm scale, and performance and the empirical associations among them. ...

Coles, Jeffrey L.; Lemmon, Michael L.; Meschke, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Green Water Flow Kinematics and Impact Pressure on a Three Dimensional Model Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow kinematics of green water due to plunging breaking waves interacting with a simplified, three-dimensional model structure was investigated in laboratory. Two breaking wave conditions were tested: one with waves impinging and breaking...

Ariyarathne, Hanchapola Appuhamilage Kusalika Suranjani

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reviewing progress in PJM's capacity market structure via the new reliability pricing model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reliability Pricing Model introduces significant changes to the capacity market structure of PJM. The main feature of the RPM design is a downward-sloping demand curve, which replaces the highly volatile vertical demand curve. The authors review the latest RPM structure, results of the auctions, and the future course of the implementation process. (author)

Sener, Adil Caner; Kimball, Stefan

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

258

Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transmembrane proteins is a major research area. Due to the lack of available 3D structures, automatic homology1 Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins. Alexandre G proteins are macromolecules implicated in major biological process and diseases. Due to their specific

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Ecological Modelling 147 (2002) 2339 Dispersal success on spatially structured landscapes: when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 147 (2002) 23­39 Dispersal success on spatially structured landscapes: when do a simulation study in which we explored (1) the conditions under which landscape structure affects dispersal success and (2) the dependency of dispersal success on the choice of dispersal algorithm. We simulated

With, Kimberly A.

260

Constitutive model for predicting dynamic interactions between soil ejecta and structural panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blast loading a b s t r a c t A constitutive model is developed for the high-rate deformation that the deflections and reaction forces induced by the blast are smaller and the incidence of tearing is diminished to the structure (relative to a thicker solid plate) through a fluid/structure interaction (FSI) effect (Deshpande

Wadley, Haydn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A SURVEY OF COMMODITY MARKETS AND STRUCTURAL MODELS FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SURVEY OF COMMODITY MARKETS AND STRUCTURAL MODELS FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES RENE CARMONA AND MICHAEL attention to the most idiosyncratic of all: electricity mar- kets. Following a discussion of traded. In doing so, we present a detailed analysis of the structural approach for electricity, arguing for its

Carmona, Rene

262

Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil parameters due to temperature changes from those caused by structural damage or other environmental e ects to environmental factors can be far larger than those caused by structural damage. During damp weather, for example

Stanford University

263

Synthesis and X-ray structure analysis of a new binuclear Schiff base Co(II) complex with the ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-butanediamine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title binuclear complex, tris[N,N-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane] dicobalt(II), C{sub 60}H{sub 70}Co{sub 2}N{sub 6}O{sub 15}, was prepared by the reaction of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane and Co(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} . 4H{sub 2}O in a ethanol solution and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This complex has a dinuclear structure where two Co(II) ions are bridged by one N{sup 0},N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane. The two Co(II) ions, have two distorted octahedral coordination involving two O and two N atoms.

Nasr-Esfahani, M., E-mail: m-nasresfahani@iaun.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Template-Based Modeling of Protein Structure David Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will obviously have an effect on the quality of the ultimate model that is predicted. In recent years, the line this method. Simple BLAST searches comparing sequences to sequences can be sufficient for very easy queries the query to templates using sequence profiles generated by PSI- BLAST or HMM can result

265

Modelling the Structure and Dynamics of Science Using Books  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific research is a major driving force in a knowledge based economy. Income, health and wellbeing depend on scientific progress. The better we understand the inner workings of the scientific enterprise, the better we can prompt, manage, steer, and utilize scientific progress. Diverse indicators and approaches exist to evaluate and monitor research activities, from calculating the reputation of a researcher, institution, or country to analyzing and visualizing global brain circulation. However, there are very few predictive models of science that are used by key decision makers in academia, industry, or government interested to improve the quality and impact of scholarly efforts. We present a novel 'bibliographic bibliometric' analysis which we apply to a large collection of books relevant for the modelling of science. We explain the data collection together with the results of the data analyses and visualizations. In the final section we discuss how the analysis of books that describe different modellin...

Ginda, Michael; Borner, Katy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of Structural MtrC Models Based on Homology with the Crystal Structure of MtrF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome MtrC is part of the transmembrane MtrCAB complex required for mineral respiration by Shewanella oneidensis. MtrC has significant sequence similarity to the paralogous decahaem cytochrome MtrF, which has been structurally solved through X-ray crystallography. This now allows for homology-based models of MtrC to be generated. The structure of these MtrC homology models contain ten bis-histidine-co-ordinated c-type haems arranged in a staggered cross through a four-domain structure. This model is consistent with current spectroscopic data and shows that the areas around haem 5 and haem 10, at the termini of an octahaem chain, are likely to have functions similar to those of the corresponding haems in MtrF. The electrostatic surfaces around haem 7, close to the ?-barrels, are different in MtrF and MtrC, indicating that these haems may have different potentials and interact with substrates differently.

Edwards, Marcus; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

array ii comparing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I I I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I II I I I II I I I II I I 292 STEAM RECEIVER MODELS FOR SOLAR DISH CONCENTRATORS: TWO MODELS COMPARED Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

268

Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear PhysicsDo you see what I see? Scientists model

269

Potts model based on a Markov process computation solves the community structure problem effectively  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potts model is a powerful tool to uncover community structure in complex networks. Here, we propose a new framework to reveal the optimal number of communities and stability of network structure by quantitatively analyzing the dynamics of Potts model. Specifically we model the community structure detection Potts procedure by a Markov process, which has a clear mathematical explanation. Then we show that the local uniform behavior of spin values across multiple timescales in the representation of the Markov variables could naturally reveal the network's hierarchical community structure. In addition, critical topological information regarding to multivariate spin configuration could also be inferred from the spectral signatures of the Markov process. Finally an algorithm is developed to determine fuzzy communities based on the optimal number of communities and the stability across multiple timescales. The effectiveness and efficiency of our algorithm are theoretically analyzed as well as experimentally validate...

Li, Hui-Jia; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sensitive Growth Grammars Specifying Models of Forest Structure, Competition and Plant-Herbivore Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and data interfaces to other software. 1 Introduction Simulation models which are able to reproduce. Comparison of the architecture of a classical simulation model (left), where each modification requires of irregular stand structures, (b) simulation of competitive effects on crown radius development and resulting

Kurth, Winfried

271

On a tensor-based finite element model for the analysis of shell structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present study, we propose a computational model for the linear and nonlinear analysis of shell structures. We consider a tensor-based finite element formulation which describes the mathematical shell model in a natural and simple way by using...

Arciniega Aleman, Roman Augusto

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity for identifying the factors contributing to market integration or to high transfer costs1 A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii June 2009 i Model of Markets in Madagascar Abstract Market efficiency and price transmission across space

Krivobokova, Tatyana

273

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media By Daniel E.A. van with the formulation and numerical solution of equations for modelling multicomponent, two-phase, thermal fluid flow typical flow behaviour that occurs during fluid injection into a reservoir. Keywords: porous media flow

274

3D-mesh models: view-based indexing and structural analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D-mesh models: view-based indexing and structural analysis Mohamed Daoudi, Tarik Filali Ansary.daoudi@lifl.fr, tarik.filali@lifl.fr, julien.tierny@lifl.fr, jean-philippe.vandeborre@lifl.fr Abstract. 3D-mesh models applications, medical or military simulations, video games and so on. Indexing and analyzing these 3D data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER the effect of insulation layers in complex dynamical systems for low- and medium-frequency ranges such as car booming noise analysis, one introduces a sim- plified stochastic model of insulation layers based

Boyer, Edmond

276

Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuum Damage Mechanics at the Representative Element Volume scale is a relevant tool to deal with largeAnisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures Ragueneau F with damage induced anisotropy modelling for concrete-like materials. A thermodynamics based constitutive

Boyer, Edmond

277

CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stretched-spiral vortex has been suc- cessfully applied to the calculation of the energy spectrum,6 and some for larger scales is perhaps questionable. Most quantitative vortex-based models have utilized tube and sheetCALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model

Barr, Al

278

Modeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Berkeley, California. Abstract. The recent solar minimum, marking the end of solar cycle 23, has beenModeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum: Model Mikic and Janet G. Luhmann Predictive Science, San Diego, California. Harvard-Smithsonian Center

California at Berkeley, University of

279

An Efficient Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Tertiary Structures in the 2D HP Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been widely genetic algo- rithm for the protein folding problem under the HP model in the two-dimensional square Genetic Algorithm, Protein Folding Problem, 2D HP Model 1. INTRODUCTION Amino acids are the building

Istrail, Sorin

280

Polarization from aligned atoms as a diagnostics of circumstellar, AGN and interstellar magnetic fields: II. Atoms with Hyperfine Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that atomic alignment presents a reliable way to study topology of astrophysical magnetic fields. The effect of atomic alignment arises from modulation of the relative population of the sublevels of atomic ground state pumped by anisotropic radiation flux. As such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects the properties of the polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by the atoms. As the result the polarizations of emission and absorption lines depend on the 3D geometry of the magnetic field as well as the direction and anisotropy of incident radiation. We consider a subset of astrophysically important atoms with hyperfine structure. For emission lines we obtain the dependencies of the direction of linear polarization on the directions of magnetic field and the incident pumping radiation. For absorption lines we establish when the polarization is perpendicular and parallel to magnetic field. For both emission and absorption lines we find the dependence on the degree of polarization on the 3D geometry of magnetic field. We claim that atomic alignment provides a unique tool to study magnetic fields in circumstellar regions, AGN, interplanetary and interstellar medium. This tool allows studying of 3D topology of magnetic fields and establish other important astrophysical parameters. We consider polarization arising from both atoms in the steady state and also as they undergo individual scattering of photons. We exemplify the utility of atomic alignment for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields by considering a case of Na alignment in a comet wake.

Huirong Yan; A. Lazarian

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(?-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Localized structures and front propagation in the Lengyel-Epstein model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pattern selection, localized structure formation, and front propagation are analyzed within the framework of a model for the chlorine dioxide--iodine--malonic acid reaction that represents a key to understanding recently obtained Turing structures. This model is distinguished from previously studied, simple reaction-diffusion models by producing a strongly subcritical transition to stripes. The wave number for the modes of maximum linear gain is calculated and compared with the dominant wave number for the finally selected, stationary structures grown from the homogeneous steady state or developed behind a traveling front. The speed of propagation for a front between the homogeneous steady state and a one-dimensional (1D) Turing structure is obtained. This velocity shows a characteristic change in behavior at the crossover between the subcritical and supercritical regimes for the Turing bifurcation. In the subcritical regime there is an interval where the front velocity vanishes as a result of a pinning of the front to the underlying structure. In 2D, two different nucleation mechanisms for hexagonal structures are illustrated on the Lengyel-Epstein and the Brusselator model. Finally, the observation of 1D and 2D spirals with Turing-induced cores is reported.

Jensen, O.; Pannbacker, V.O.; Mosekilde, E.; Dewel, G.; Borckmans, P. (Physics Department, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark) Service de Chimie-Physique, Code Postal 231 Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III(O2 CO)4 3- Based Molecule Based Magnets: Three-Dmensional Network Structure and Two Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Kennon, B.; Her, J; Stephens, P; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Speeding Up the Process of Modeling Temporary Structures in a Building Information Model Using Predefined Families  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been less than a decade that Building Information Modeling (BIM) has been used in construction industries. During this short period of time the application of this new modeling approach has increased significantly, but still the main users...

Sabahi, Parsa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling the Spread of Epidemic Cholera: an Age-Structured Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in crowded conditions and poor sanitation. A common type of model for the spread of an infectious disease

Gobbert, Matthias K.

286

Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: the Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of ten BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Using the blastwave model and some assumptions which include on-axis viewing and standard jet structure, constant blastwave energy and no evolution of the microphysical parameters, we find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.04 +0.02/-0.03. A statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3-sigma level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k=0 (homogeneous) and k=2 (wind-like). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly wind-like. The fifth source has a value of 0

R. L. C. Starling; A. J. van der Horst; E. Rol; R. A. M. J. Wijers; C. Kouveliotou; K. Wiersema; P. A. Curran; P. Weltevrede

2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electronic Structure of the Mn(4)Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem Ii Studied By Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i=0--4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states also showed characteristic features which were not clear from the K-edge spectroscopy.

Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl pendant arm: synthesis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl that were used for the preparation of the copper(II) complexes. The structures of three nickel(II) complexes and two copper(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography. Protonation of the pendant arm (p

Nazarenko, Alexander

289

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

291

The structure of the free energy surface of coarse-grained off-lattice protein models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed multicanonical simulations of hydrophobic-hydrophilic heteropolymers with a simple effective, coarse-grained off-lattice model to study the structure and the topology of the energy surface. The multicanonical method samples the whole rugged energy landscape, in particular the low-energy part, and enables one to better understand the critical behaviors and visualize the folding pathways of the considered protein model.

E. Akturk; H. Arkin Olgar; T. Celik

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Collinearity in Linear Structural Models of Market Power Jeffrey M. Perloff*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the marginal cost and demand equations are linear. Key Words: collinearity, estimation, market power. JEL that the marginal cost curve is cMC = + w+ r + Q + , (1) where w is the wage, r is the rental rate on capital, Q The well-known structural model used to estimate market power suffers from a severe collinearity problem

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

293

CHANGE OF STRUCTURE IN FINANCIAL TIME SERIES, LONG RANGE DEPENDENCE AND THE GARCH MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGE OF STRUCTURE IN FINANCIAL TIME SERIES, LONG RANGE DEPENDENCE AND THE GARCH MODEL THOMAS having as limit a Gaussian #12;eld. In the case of GARCH(p; q) processes a statistic closely related limit theorem for this statistic under the hypothesis of a GARCH(p; q) sequence with a #12;nite 4th

Mikosch, Thomas

294

Merchant Commodity Storage and Term Structure Model Error Nicola Secomandi,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; specifically, we consider natural gas storage lease contracts (Maragos 2002). Natural gas is an important flows of commodity and energy conversion assets as real options based on stochastic models the futures term structure affect the valuation and hedging of natural gas storage. We find that even small

Sadeh, Norman M.

295

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy University, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Free energy potentials, combining molecular mechanics of discrimination that in- clude the correlation coefficient between RMSD and free energy, and a new measure labeled

Vajda, Sandor

296

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model Mathias specific interaction phenomenon that may occur in turbo- machines due to radial rub between a bladed disk requirements leading to reduced clearance between blade-tips and casing together with the rotation of the blade

Boyer, Edmond

297

Spectral Analysis of Synchronization in a Lossless Structure-Preserving Power Network Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral Analysis of Synchronization in a Lossless Structure-Preserving Power Network Model Florian D¨orfler Center for Control, Dynamical Systems, and Computation University of California at Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Email: dorfler@engineering.ucsb.edu Francesco Bullo Center for Control

Bullo, Francesco

298

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers present a detailed numerical study of the electronic properties of single-layer graphene with resonant and transport properties of functionalized graphene in a broad range of concentration of impurities from

299

A Hamilton-Jacobi approach for a model of population structured by space and trait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hamilton-Jacobi approach for a model of population structured by space and trait Emeric Bouin WKB ansatz, we prove that the propagation of the population in space can be de- scribed by a Hamilton, Hamilton-Jacobi equation, Spectral problem, Front propagation AMS Class. No: 45K05, 35B25, 49L25, 92D15, 35

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

Structural parameters The analytical model proposed here can explain high fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural parameters · The analytical model proposed here can explain high fracture toughness, P.J., et al., Engineering Fracture Mechanics, 2007. 74: p. 19281941. 4. Ritchie, R.O., et al Tensile strength Fracture toughness Composite properties E max S )~( ~ aJ III. Fracture toughness

Barthelat, Francois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling of the interaction of an acoustic wave with immersed targets for telemetry of complex structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are being followed: the core monitoring where transducers are directly immersed in sodium near the reactor reactors, which consists in locating various reactor structures using an ultrasonic inspection performed and applicability domains. A theoretical comparison of these models is carried out to define the more adequate one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Modeling infant learning via symbolic structural alignment Sven E. Kuehne (skuehne@ils.nwu.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling infant learning via symbolic structural alignment Sven E. Kuehne (skuehne@ils.nwu.edu) Department of Computer Science, Northwestern University 1890 Maple Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201 USA Dedre, IL 60201 USA Kenneth D. Forbus (forbus@ils.nwu.edu) Department of Computer Science, Northwestern

Forbus, Kenneth D.

303

Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure). We have recently developed a QM/MM extension of a Car-Parrinello scheme [5]. These hybrid Car functional theory embedded in a classical force field description. The power of such a combined Car

Guidoni, Leonardo

304

A STRUCTURAL MODEL FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STRUCTURAL MODEL FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ Abstract pricing in electricity markets, thus extending the growing branch of liter- ature which describes power prices for electricity. We capture both the heavy-tailed nature of spot prices and the complex dependence

Carmona, Rene

305

Optimization of the structural Gabor functions in a homogeneous velocity model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of the structural Gabor functions in a homogeneous velocity model for a zero-o#11;set functions should be optimized, and the Gabor functions should form a frame. We present a simple attempt functions and the space{wavenumber lattice of their central points are optimized analytically

Cerveny, Vlastislav

306

Towards QoS Prediction Based on Composition Structure Analysis and Probabilistic Environment Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards QoS Prediction Based on Composition Structure Analysis and Probabilistic Environment Models Dragan Ivanovi´c Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid idragan@clip.dia.fi.upm.es Peerachai Kaowichakorn Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid p.kaowichakorn@gmail.com Manuel Carro Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid

Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

307

Predicting Protein Folds with Structural Repeats Using a Chain Graph Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Protein Folds with Structural Repeats Using a Chain Graph Model Yan Liu yanliu, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA Abstract Protein fold recognition is a key step to to accurately identify protein folds aris- ing from typical spatial arrangements of well-defined secondary

Xing, Eric P.

308

Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G. [CC Technologies Labs., Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: the Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Assuming the fireball model, we can find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.04 +0.02/-0.03. A statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3-sigma level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k=0 (homogeneous) and k=2 (wind-...

Starling, R L C; Rol, E; Wijers, R A M J; Kouveliotou, C; Wiersema, K; Curran, P A; Weltevrede, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

313

Testing the Effectiveness of Various Commonly Used Fit Indices for Detecting Misspecifications in Multilevel Structure Equation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two Monte Carlo studies were conducted to investigate the sensitivity of fit indices in detecting model misspecification in multilevel structural equation models (MSEM) with normally distributed or dichotomous outcome variables separately under...

Hsu, Hsien-Yuan

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Behavioral and Structural Responses to Chronic Cocaine Require a Feedforward Loop Involving ?FosB and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transcription factor ?FosB and the brain-enriched calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII?) are induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by chronic exposure to cocaine or other psychostimulant drugs of ...

Neve, Rachael L.

315

Crystal Structure of a Luteoviral RNA Pseudoknot and Model for a Minimal Ribosomal Frameshifting Motif  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand the role of structural elements of RNA pseudoknots in controlling the extent of -1-type ribosomal frameshifting, we determined the crystal structure of a high-efficiency frameshifting mutant of the pseudoknot from potato leaf roll virus (PLRV). Correlations of the structure with available in vitro frameshifting data for PLRV pseudoknot mutants implicate sequence and length of a stem-loop linker as modulators of frameshifting efficiency. Although the sequences and overall structures of the RNA pseudoknots from PLRV and beet western yellow virus (BWYV) are similar, nucleotide deletions in the linker and adjacent minor groove loop abolish frameshifting only with the latter. Conversely, mutant PLRV pseudoknots with up to four nucleotides deleted in this region exhibit nearly wild-type frameshifting efficiencies. The crystal structure helps rationalize the different tolerances for deletions in the PLRV and BWYV RNAs, and we have used it to build a three-dimensional model of the PRLV pseudoknot with a four-nucleotide deletion. The resulting structure defines a minimal RNA pseudoknot motif composed of 22 nucleotides capable of stimulating -1-type ribosomal frameshifts.

Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marshall, William S.; Harp, Joel; Jewett III, Frederic C.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Brown II, Bernard A.; Rich, Alexander; Egli, Martin (MIT); (Wake Forest); (Dharmacon); (Vanderbilt)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An overview of APECOSM, a spatialized mass balanced ``Apex Predators ECOSystem Model" to study physiologically structured tuna population dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physiologically structured tuna population dynamics in their ecosystem Olivier Maury * IRD (Institut de Recherche by the organisms are modelled according to the DEB (dynamic energy budget) theory (Kooijmann, 2000) and the size-structured- mental variability and fishing on the structure and dynamics of pe- lagic ecosystems. APECOSM uses a size

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

318

Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS AUDI TT ROADSTER QUATTRO 2.0L 4, auto Awd [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 22 31 42  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (CONVERTIBLE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (COUPE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES

Derisi, Joseph

319

Discrete Quantum Gravity: II. Simplicial complexes, irreps of SL(2,C), and a Lorentz invariant weight in a state sum model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In part I of [1] we have developed the tensor and spin representation of SO(4) in order to apply it to the simplicial decomposition of the Barrett-Crane model. We attach to each face of a triangle the spherical function constructed from the Dolginov-Biedenharn function. In part II we apply the same technique to the Lorentz invariant state sum model. We need three new ingredients: the classification of the edges and the corresponding subspaces that arises in the simplicial decomposition, the irreps of SL(2,C) and its isomorphism to the bivectors appearing in the 4-simplices, the need of a zonal spherical function from the intertwining condition of the tensor product for the simple representations attached to the faces of the simplicial decomposition.

P. Kramer; M. Lorente

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Structural model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals Yanfa Yan National Renewable Energy, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Received 15 February 2000 We propose a structure model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals based on its 2 -inflated Al13Co4 approximant phase: Applying a 105 screw operation

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

3D modelling of forest canopy structure for remote sensing simulations in the optical and microwave domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D modelling of forest canopy structure for remote sensing simulations in the optical and microwave July 2005; received in revised form 4 October 2005; accepted 8 October 2005 Abstract A detailed 3D using detailed 3D models of tree structure including the location and orientation of individual needles

Jones, Peter JS

322

Model structures, categorial quotients and representations of super commutative Hopf algebras II, The case Gl(m,n)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a tensor functor from the category of super representations of the superlinear group Gl(m,n) over a field of characteristic zero to the category of super representations of the linear group Gl(m-n) over some extension field (for m at least equal to n). We show that this functor maps irreducible representations to isotypic representations, and we compute the multiplicities.

Rainer Weissauer

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

A model for structural response to hydrogen combustion loads in severe accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of structures to different pressure histories from hydrogen combustion is analyzed using the model of a linear undamped oscillator. The effective static pressures from a slow deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and a stable detonation are calculated as functions of oscillator frequency. The response of components with a low natural frequency, such as the outermost shell in a large dry containment, is governed by the long-term pressure after combustion. Detonation peak pressure and impulse are not important. For structures with low frequencies, fast flames have a damage potential very similar to detonations. For the investigated pressure loads, the normally reflected detonation provides the bounding effective static pressure for oscillators up to 500 Hz. Fully confined DDT events can exceed the detonation load near the transition location for structural frequencies about {approximately}40 Hz.

Breitung, W.; Redlinger, R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Analytical modeling and structural response of a stretched-membrane reflective module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical and structural load deformation response behavior of a uniform pressure-loaded stretched-membrane reflective module subject to nonaxisymmetric support constraints is studied in this report. To aid in the understanding of this behavior, an idealized analytical model is developed and implemented and predictions are compared with predictions based on the detailed structural analysis code NASTRAN. Single structural membrane reflector modules are studied in this analysis. In particular, the interaction of the frame-membrane combination and variations in membrane pressure loading and tension are studied in detail. Variations in the resulting lateral shear load on the frame, frame lateral support, and frame twist as a function of distance between the supports are described as are the resulting optical effects. Results indicate the need to consider the coupled deformation problem as the lateral frame deformations are amplified by increasing the membrane tension. The importance of accurately considering the effects of different membrane attachment approaches is also demonstrated.

Murphy, L.M.; Sallis, D.V.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fractal large-scale structure from a stochastic scaling law model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A stochastic model relating the parameters of astrophysical structures to the parameters of their granular components is applied to the formation of hierarchical, large-scale structures from galaxies assumed as point-like objects. If the density profile of galaxies on a given scale is described by a power law then the stochastic model leads naturally to a mass function that is proportional to the square of the distance from an occupied point, which corresponds to a two-point correlation function that is inversely proportional to the distance. This result is consistent with observations indicating that galaxies are, on the largest scales, characterized by a fractal distribution with a dimension of order 2 and well-fit with transition to homogeneity at cosmological scales.

S. Capozziello; S. Funkhouser

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hamiltonian structure of reduced fluid models for plasmas obtained from a kinetic description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Hamiltonian structure of reduced fluid models obtained from a kinetic description of collisionless plasmas by Vlasov-Maxwell equations. We investigate the possibility of finding Poisson subalgebras associated with fluid models starting from the Vlasov-Maxwell Poisson algebra. In this way, we show that the only possible Poisson subalgebra involves the moments of zeroth and first order of the Vlasov distribution, meaning the fluid density and the fluid velocity. We find that the bracket derived in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 175002 (2004)] which involves moments of order 2 is not a Poisson bracket since it does not satisfy the Jacobi identity.

Loïc De Guillebon; Cristel Chandre

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rapid Loss Modeling of Death and Downtime Caused By Earthquake Induced Damage to Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses produced by large, damaging earthquakes. This was when California Office of Emergency Services started thinking of some rational basis for state rescue and recovery operations for future. Kennedy et al. (1980) studied probabilistic seismic... (1999) developed a relationship between seismic demands on structures in terms of ground motion parameters which is part of the second step of the performance based design model. They worked on probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear...

Ghorawat, Sandeep

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Anti-optimisation for modelling the vibration of locally nonlinear structures: An exploratory study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sound and Vibration 332 (2013) 7099–71227100in the automotive industry [6]; and any structure with a joint will introduce some degree of nonlinearity at the interface. Such systems present a modelling opportunity: efficient linear methods can still... is denoted M.the pla‘best’ or ‘correct’ for these applications: the intention is to demonstrate the broadness of the approach, and show that usible metrics and constraints can be envisaged for many kinds of locally nonlinear problem. What is important...

Butlin, T.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Forces due to waves in the presence of currents on a submerged model structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering FORCES DUE TO WAVES IN THE PRESENCE OF CURRENTS ON A SUBMERGED MODEL STRUCTURE A Thesis by DAVID RAY SHIELDS Approved as to style and content by: Jo n . Her &c (Chairman of Committee) K... Engineering Program of the Civil Engineering Department for the use of its wave tank and instrumentation to perform this research. A much needed 8-channel recorder was provided through the courtesy of the Mechanical Engineering Department. A Texas A...

Shields, David Ray

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Optimal Harvesting in an Age-Structured Predator-Prey Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate optimal harvesting control in a predator-prey model in which the prey population is represented by a first-order partial differential equation with age-structure and the predator population is represented by an ordinary differential equation in time. The controls are the proportions of the populations to be harvested, and the objective functional represents the profit from harvesting. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal control pair are established.

Fister, K. Renee [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Murray State University, Murray, KY 42071-3341 (United States)], E-mail: renee.fister@murraystate.edu; Lenhart, Suzanne [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1300 (United States) and Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6016 (United States)], E-mail: lenhart@math.utk.edu

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

333

Modeling of structure H hydrate equilibria for methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clathrate hydrates are inclusion compounds in which guest molecules are engaged by water molecules under favorable conditions of pressure and temperature. The well known structures 1 and 2 have been discovered since last century, while a new structure called H has been recently described in the literature. Since that time, structure H hydrate equilibrium data involving methane and different intermediate liquid hydrocarbon molecules have been published. The equilibrium calculations involving hydrates are based on the fact that the chemical potential of water in the aqueous liquid phase is equal to the one in the hydrate phase. The chemical potential of water in the liquid aqueous phase can be easily described by classical thermodynamic relations, while the chemical potential of water in the hydrates phase is described by the expressions proposed by Van der Walls and Platteeuw derived from an adsorption model based on statistical thermodynamics. The authors present in this paper a set of Kihara potential parameters which enable the calculation of Langmuir constants which characterize the adsorption of some naphthenic and iso-paraffinic intermediate hydrocarbons in the larger cage of structure H hydrates. This work thus allows the computation of structural H hydrate equilibrium conditions for systems made of methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water.

Thomas, M.; Behar, E. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

An examination of the construct validity of predictors of productive and counterproductive job performance using structural equation modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING by JULIE ANNE GOODWiN TICE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved to style and conte t by: Judith M. Col ' (Chair... Performance Using Structural Equation Modeling. (December 1996) Julie Anne Goodwm Tice, B. A. , Northwestern University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Judith M. Collins This research used structural equation modeling to test the construct validity...

Tice, Julie Anne Goodwin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs II. Halo Occupation Distribution Modeling of the Cross Correlation Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of AGNs in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS Broad-line AGNs with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a `typical' AGN host halo mass, M_h, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M_h more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper lim...

Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison L; Aceves, Hector

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Modeling of AAR affected structures using the GROW3D FEA program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to present a rational and practical methodology for finite element stress analysis of AAR affected structures. The methodology is presented using case history studies which illustrate the practical application of the GROW3D program. GROW3D uses an anisotropic expansion strain function and concrete properties which simulates the following key characteristics of AAR affected concrete (1) concrete growth expansion rates dependent on the stress vectors at each point; (2) concrete growth rate variation due to changes in moisture content and temperature; and (3) time-dependent, enhanced creep behavior. GROW3D has been applied to several hydropower structures and case histories from the Mactaquac Generating Station are presented herein. Mactaquac is selected because extensive instrumentation data before and after remedial measures have been used to calibrate and test the model. The results of analyses of three different structures are given, i.e., the intake, diversion sluiceway and powerhouse. The analysis results are used to identify potential structural problems and the need and timing of remedial measures. The output from GROW3D includes displacement rates, total displacements, global stresses and local factors of safety. The local factors of safety (or strength to stress ratios) are computed for several modes of failure including crushing, cracking, shear and sliding on horizontal construction joints. The analysis results are compared with field measurements which are taken before and after slot cutting. The effects of including the above-mentioned characteristics and other modeling assumptions on the computed results is discussed herein. Finally, a brief discussion on the recent enhancements to the model is given. These enhancements include the implementation of a more rigorous treatment of concrete creep effects.

Curtis, D.D. [Acres International Limited, Niagara Falls, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

A nonlocal model for fluid-structure interaction with applications in hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling important engineering problems related to flow-induced damage (in the context of hydraulic fracturing among others) depends critically on characterizing the interaction of porous media and interstitial fluid flow. This work presents a new formulation for incorporating the effects of pore pressure in a nonlocal representation of solid mechanics. The result is a framework for modeling fluid-structure interaction problems with the discontinuity capturing advantages of an integral based formulation. A number of numerical examples are used to show that the proposed formulation can be applied to measure the effect of leak-off during hydraulic fracturing as well as modeling consolidation of fluid saturated rock and surface subsidence caused by fluid extraction from a geologic reservoir. The formulation incorporates the effect of pore pressure in the constitutive description of the porous material in a way that is appropriate for nonlinear materials, easily implemented in existing codes, straightforward in i...

Turner, Daniel Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

A nonstoichiometric structural model to characterize changes in the nickel hydroxide electrode during cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental capacities and mass changes are recorded using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance during the first 9 charge and discharge cycles of nickel hydroxide thin films cycled in 3.0 weight percent (wt%) potassium hydroxide electrolyte. For the first time, the film capacities have been corrected for the oxygen evolution side reaction, and the data used as input into the point defect-containing structural model to track the changes that occur during short-term cycling. Variations in capacity and mass during formation and charge/discharge cycling are related to changes in the point defect parameters, thus providing a structural origin for the unique experimental variations observed here and often reported in the literature, but previously unexplained. Proton-, potassium-, and water-content vary in the active material during charge/discharge cycling. The observed capacity loss, or ''capacity fade'', is explained by incomplete incorporation of potassium ions in (or near) the nickel vacancy during charge, as additional protons are then allowed to occupy the vacant lattice site. The increase in water content during reduction parallels the expansion of the electrode that is well known during cycling. This result confirms the origin of the swelling phenomenon as being caused by water incorporation. The model and methodology developed in this paper can be used to correlate electrochemical signatures with material chemical structure.

Srinivasan, Venkat; Bahne, C. Cornilsen; Weidner, John W.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

The long-period Galactic Cepheid RS Puppis - II. 3D structure and mass of the nebula from VLT/FORS polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-period Cepheid RS Pup is surrounded by a large dusty nebula reflecting the light from the central star. Due to the changing luminosity of the central source, light echoes propagate into the nebula. This remarkable phenomenon was the subject of Paper I.The origin and physical properties of the nebula are however uncertain: it may have been created through mass loss from the star itself, or it could be the remnant of a pre-existing interstellar cloud. Our goal is to determine the 3D structure of the nebula, and estimate its mass. Knowing the geometrical shape of the nebula will also allow us to retrieve the distance of RS Pup in an unambiguous manner using a model of its light echoes (in a forthcoming work). The scattering angle of the Cepheid light in the circumstellar nebula can be recovered from its degree of linear polarization. We thus observed the nebula surrounding RS Pup using the polarimetric imaging mode of the VLT/FORS instrument, and obtained a map of the degree and position angle of linear...

Kervella, P; Szabados, L; Sparks, W B; Havlen, R J; Bond, H E; Pompei, E; Fouqué, P; Bersier, D; Cracraft, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Representation of the molecular structure of petroleum resid through characterization and Monte Carlo modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased refining of heavy petroleum feedstocks has led to greater interest in the chemical and physical properties of resid. Although resid has been implicated in many processing difficulties, very little detailed structural information is available in the literature. This is mainly due to the molecular complexity and high initial boiling point of the material, which makes traditional analytical methods difficult or impossible to use. To cope with these problems a stochastic molecular level construction model coupled to a global optimization program has been developed. Structural attributes were defined in terms of aromatic and naphthenic rings and alkyl sidechains. The attributes were quantified using probability density functions (pdfs). By stochastically sampling the attributes many times a large number of molecules representative of a resid were constructed. Using initial starting points estimated from the literature, optimal structural attributes were found in an iterative manner by comparing the predicted resid properties with actual experimental measurements. The program yields detailed structural information in the form of probability density functions for the initial resid.

Trauth, D.M.; Stark, S.M.; Petti, T.F.; Neurock, M.; Yasar, M.; Klein, M.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Type II Radio Burst without a Coronal Mass Ejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only with a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of $\\sim$ 600 km s$^{-1}$ during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is in particular explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure (DEM) method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The ...

Su, W; Ding, M D; Chen, P F; Sun, J Q

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Home Ignition Assessment Model Applied to Structures in the Wildland-Urban Interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of exterior fire threat to buildings, from either wildfires in the wildland-urban interface or neighboring structure fires, is critically important. To address this, theWildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program was initiated. The WIRHD program developed a tool, theWildFIREWizard, that will allow homeowners to estimate the external fire threat to their homes based on specific features and characteristics of the homes and yards. The software then makes recommendations to reduce the threat. The inputs include the structural and material features of the home and information about any ignition sources or flammable objects in its immediate vicinity, known as the home ignition zone. The tool comprises an ignition assessment model that performs explicit calculations of the radiant and convective heating of the building envelope from the potential ignition sources. This article describes a series of material ignition and flammability tests that were performed to calibrate and/or validate the ignition assessment model. The tests involved exposing test walls with different external siding types to radiant heating and/or direct flame contact.The responses of the test walls were used to determine the conditions leading to melting, ignition, or any other mode of failure of the walls. Temperature data were used to verify the model predictions of temperature rises and ignition times of the test walls.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Werth, David [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC; Gupta, Narendra [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Non-equilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin film active gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the presence of ATP, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modelling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organisation and dynamics on molecular and supra-molecular length scales. Here we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of non-equilibrium behaviour. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end-detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit super-diffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with non-unique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end-detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modelling in the field of active gels.

D. A. Head; W. J. Briels; G. Gompper

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

A. Dorodnitsyn; T. Kallman; D. Proga

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorp...

Dorodnitsyn, A; Proga, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the experiments where the decomposition gases were vented sufficiently. The CPUF model results were not as good for the partially confined radiant heat experiments where the vent area was regulated to maintain pressure. Liquefaction and flow effects, which are not considered in the CPUF model, become important when the decomposition gases are confined.

Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Durability-Based Design Guide for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 2. Background Data and Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This background report is a companion to the document entitled ''Durability-Based Design Criteria for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 1. Design Rules'' (ORNL-6930). The rules and the supporting material characterization and modeling efforts described here are the result of a U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Automotive Materials project entitled ''Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures.'' The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive structural composites. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC). The initial reference material addressed by the rules and this background report was chosen and supplied by ACC. The material is a structural reaction injection-molded isocyanurate (urethane), reinforced with continuous-strand, swirl-mat, E-glass fibers. This report consists of 16 position papers, each summarizing the observations and results of a key area of investigation carried out to provide the basis for the durability-based design guide. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluids, vibrations, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. The position papers cover these durability issues. Topics include (1) tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural properties; (2) creep and creep rupture; (3) cyclic fatigue; (4) the effects of temperature, environment, and prior loadings; (5) a multiaxial strength criterion; (6) impact damage and damage tolerance design; (7) stress concentrations; (8) a damage-based predictive model for time-dependent deformations; (9) confirmatory subscale component tests; and (10) damage development and growth observations.

Corum, J.M. [ORNL; Battiste, R.L. [ORNL; Brinkman, C.R. [ORNL; Ren, W. [ORNL; Ruggles, M.B. [ORNL; Weitsman, Y.J. [ORNL; Yahr, G.T. [ORNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The fixed structurally robust internal model principle for linear multivariable regulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)]~ = 0 where all the poles must be within C . The property described by (6) is defined as loop stability, Note that loop s . ability does not guarantee internal stability since un'table canoelle, t'ion may occur in the ce. . cede of T(s, 0, )F(s). W(s... for the degree of I'V. STER OF S"IENCE Vay 1980 Va jor Sub jec ~: Elec+r ical Engineering THE FIXED STRUCTURALLY ROBUST INTERNAL MODEL PRINCIPLE FOR LINEAR MULTIVARIABLE REGUIATORS A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS MCGRATH Aoproved as to style and content by...

McGrath, John Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Do homes that are more energy efficient consume less energy?: A structural equation model for England's residential sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy consumption from the residential sector is a complex sociotechnical problem that can be explained using a combination of physical, demographic and behavioural characteristics of a dwelling and its occupants. A structural equation model (SEM...

Kelly, Scott

356

Combined search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to b bbar using the D0 Run II data set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into b bbar using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in p pbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV Higgs boson.

D0 Collaboration

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

Lefor, Alsn T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Phase structure of an Abelian two-Higgs model and high temperature superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase structure of a three dimensional Abelian Higgs model with singly- and doubly-charged scalar fields coupled to a compact Abelian gauge field. The model is pretending to describe systems of strongly correlated electrons such as high-Tc superconductivity in overdoped regime and exotic phases supporting excitations with fractionalized quantum numbers. We identify the Fermi liquid, the spin gap, the superconductor and the strange metallic phases in which densities and properties of holon and spinon vortices and monopoles are explored. The phase diagram in the 3D coupling space is predicted. We show that at sufficiently strong gauge coupling the spinon-pair and holon condensation transitions merge together and become, unexpectedly, first order.

M. N. Chernodub; E. -M. Ilgenfritz; A. Schiller

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Forecasting the conditional volatility of oil spot and futures prices with structural breaks and long memory models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting the conditional volatility of oil spot and futures prices with structural breaks of oil spot and futures prices using three GARCH-type models, i.e., linear GARCH, GARCH with structural that oil price fluctuations influence economic activity and financial sector (e.g., Jones and Kaul, 1996

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

On the intersection of the shell, collective and cluster models of atomic nuclei II: Symmetry-breaking and large deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the role of the broken symmetries in the connection of the shell, collective and cluster models. The cluster-shell competition is described in terms of cold quantum phases. Stable quasi-dynamical U(3) symmetry is found for specific large deformations for a Nilsson-type Hamiltonian.

J. Cseh; J. Darai

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Dual-use tools and systematics-aware analysis workflows in the ATLAS Run-II analysis model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ATLAS analysis model has been overhauled for the upcoming run of data collection in 2015 at 13 TeV. One key component of this upgrade was the Event Data Model (EDM), which now allows for greater flexibility in the choice of analysis software framework and provides powerful new features that can be exploited by analysis software tools. A second key component of the upgrade is the introduction of a dual-use tool technology, which provides abstract interfaces for analysis software tools to run in either the Athena framework or a ROOT-based framework. The tool interfaces, including a new interface for handling systematic uncertainties, have been standardized for the development of improved analysis workflows and consolidation of high-level analysis tools. This presentation will cover the details of the dual-use tool functionality, the systematics interface, and how these features fit into a centrally supported analysis environment.

FARRELL, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Electronic Structure Description of the Cis-MoOS Unit in Models for Molybdenum Hydroxylases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molybdenum hydroxylases catalyze the oxidation of numerous aromatic heterocycles and simple organics and, unlike other hydroxylases, utilize water as the source of oxygen incorporated into the product. The electronic structures of the cis-MoOS units in CoCp{sub 2}[Tp{sup iPr}Mo{sup V}OS(OPh)] and Tp{sup iPr}Mo{sup VI}OS(OPh) (Tp{sup iPr} = hydrotris(3-isopropylpyrazol-1-yl)borate), new models for molybdenum hydroxylases, have been studied in detail using S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, and detailed bonding calculations. The results show a highly delocalized Mo {double_bond} S {pi}* LUMO redox orbital that is formally Mo(d{sub xy}) with {approx}35% sulfido ligand character. Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to quantitate Mo-S{sub sulfido} bond order changes in the cis-MoOS units as a function of redox state. Results support a redox active molecular orbital that has a profound influence on MoOS bonding through changes to the relative electro/nucleophilicity of the terminal sulfido ligand accompanying oxidation state changes. The bonding description for these model cis-MoOS systems supports enzyme mechanisms that are under orbital control and dominantly influenced by the unique electronic structure of the cis-MoOS site. The electronic structure of the oxidized enzyme site is postulated to play a role in polarizing a substrate carbon center for nucleophilic attack by metal activated water and acting as an electron sink in the two-electron oxidation of substrates.

Doonan, C.J.; Rubie, N.D.; Peariso, K.; Harris, H.H.; Knottenbelt, S.Z.; George, G.N.; Young, C.G.; Kirk, M.L.; /New Mexico U. /Melbourne U. /SLAC, SSRL

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

Shen, Bo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Magneto Hydro Dynamical Model of KHz Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low Mass X-ray Binaries (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model (Shi \\& Li 2009) is re-examined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636--53, 4U 1608--52, 4U 1915--15, 4U 1728--34, XTE 1807--294) with measured spins. In this model the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at high accretion rate due to the restriction of innermost stable circular orbit.

Shi, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiang-Dong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

HOT X-RAY CORONAE AROUND MASSIVE SPIRAL GALAXIES: A UNIQUE PROBE OF STRUCTURE FORMATION MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminous X-ray gas coronae in the dark matter halos of massive spiral galaxies are a fundamental prediction of structure formation models, yet only a few such coronae have been detected so far. In this paper, we study the hot X-ray coronae beyond the optical disks of two 'normal' massive spirals, NGC 1961 and NGC 6753. Based on XMM-Newton X-ray observations, hot gaseous emission is detected to {approx}60 kpc-well beyond their optical radii. The hot gas has a best-fit temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV and an abundance of {approx}0.1 Solar, and exhibits a fairly uniform distribution, suggesting that the quasi-static gas resides in hydrostatic equilibrium in the potential well of the galaxies. The bolometric luminosity of the gas in the (0.05-0.15)r{sub 200} region (r{sub 200} is the virial radius) is {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for both galaxies. The baryon mass fractions of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 are f{sub b,NGC1961} {approx} 0.11 and f{sub b,NGC6753} {approx} 0.09, which values fall short of the cosmic baryon fraction. The hot coronae around NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 offer an excellent basis to probe structure formation simulations. To this end, the observations are confronted with the moving mesh code AREPO and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET. Although neither model gives a perfect description, the observed luminosities, gas masses, and abundances favor the AREPO code. Moreover, the shape and the normalization of the observed density profiles are better reproduced by AREPO within {approx}0.5r{sub 200}. However, neither model incorporates efficient feedback from supermassive black holes or supernovae, which could alter the simulated properties of the X-ray coronae. With the further advance of numerical models, the present observations will be essential in constraining the feedback effects in structure formation simulations.

Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; David, Laurence P. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bourdin, Herve [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Gilfanov, Marat; Churazov, Eugene, E-mail: abogdan@cfa.harvard.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Frequency Ratio Method for the seismic modelling of gamma Doradus stars. II The role of rotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of rotation on the Frequency Ratio Method (Moya et al. 2005) is examined. Its applicability to observed frequencies of rotating gamma Doradus stars is discussed taking into account the following aspects: the use of a perturbative approach to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies; the effect of rotation on the observational Brunt-Vaisala integral determination and finally, the problem of disentangling multiplet-like structures from frequency patterns due to the period spacing expected for high-order gravity modes in asymptotic regime. This analysis reveals that the FRM produces reliable results for objects with rotational velocities up to 70 kms/s, for which the FRM intrinsic error increases one order of magnitude with respect to the typical FRM errors given in Moya et al. (2005). Our computations suggest that, given the spherical degree "l" identification, the FRM may be discriminating for m = 0 modes, in the sense that the method avoids any misinterpretation induced by the presence of rotation...

Suárez, J C; Martin-Ruiz, S; Amado, P J; Garrido, A G R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Structure of the particle-hole amplitudes in no-core shell model wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the structure of the no-core shell model wave functions for {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C by investigating the ground state and first excited state electron scattering charge form factors. In both nuclei, large particle-hole (ph) amplitudes in the wave functions appear with the opposite sign to that needed to reproduce the shape of the (e,e{sup '}) form factors, the charge radii, and the B(E2) values for the lowest two states. The difference in sign appears to arise mainly from the monopole DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=2 matrix elements of the kinetic and potential energy (T+V) that transform under the harmonic oscillator SU(3) symmetries as (lambda,mu)=(2,0). These are difficult to determine self-consistently, but they have a strong effect on the structure of the low-lying states and on the giant monopole and quadrupole resonances. The Lee-Suzuki transformation, used to account for the restricted nature of the space in terms of an effective interaction, introduces large higher-order DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=n,n>2, ph amplitudes in the wave functions. The latter ph excitations aggravate the disagreement between the experimental and predicted (e,e{sup '}) form factors with increasing model spaces, especially at high momentum transfers. For sufficiently large model spaces, the situation begins to resolve itself for {sup 6}Li, but the convergence is slow. A prescription to constrain the ph excitations would likely accelerate convergence of the calculations.

Hayes, A. C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kwiatkowski, A. A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Refined Cauchy/Littlewood identities and six-vertex model partition functions: II. Proofs and new conjectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove two identities of Hall-Littlewood polynomials, which appeared recently in a paper by two of the authors. We also conjecture, and in some cases prove, new identities which relate infinite sums of symmetric polynomials and partition functions associated with symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices. These identities generalize those already found in our earlier paper, via the introduction of additional parameters. The left hand side of each of our identities is a simple refinement of a relevant Cauchy or Littlewood identity. The right hand side of each identity is (one of the two factors present in) the partition function of the six-vertex model on a relevant domain.

D. Betea; M. Wheeler; P. Zinn-Justin

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

Benning, Liane G.

374

Optimization of the GB/SA Solvation Model for Predicting the Structure of Surface Loops in Proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of the GB/SA Solvation Model for Predicting the Structure of Surface Loops in ProteinsVed: October 10, 2005; In Final Form: December 1, 2005 Implicit solvation models are commonly optimized the force field is sometimes not considered. In previous studies, we have developed an optimization

Meirovitch, Hagai

375

Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

Margraf, J

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

Infrared behavior and fixed-point structure in the compactified Ginzburg--Landau model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Euclidean $N$-component Ginzburg--Landau model in $D$ dimensions, of which $d$ ($d\\leq D$) of them are compactified. As usual, temperature is introduced through the mass term in the Hamiltonian. This model can be interpreted as describing a system in a region of the $D$-dimensional space, limited by $d$ pairs of parallel planes, orthogonal to the coordinates axis $x_1,\\,x_2,\\,...,\\,x_d$. The planes in each pair are separated by distances $L_1,\\;L_2,\\; ...,\\,L_d$. For $D=3$, from a physical point of view, the system can be supposed to describe, in the cases of $d=1$, $d=2$, and $d=3$, respectively, a superconducting material in the form of a film, of an infinitely long wire having a retangular cross-section and of a brick-shaped grain. We investigate in the large-$N$ limit the fixed-point structure of the model, in the absence or presence of an external magnetic field. An infrared-stable fixed point is found, whether of not an external magnetic field is applied, but for different ranges of values of the space dimension $ D$.

C. A. Linhares; A. P. C. Malbouisson; M. L. Souza

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ab initio correlation effects on the electronic and transport properties of metal(II)-phthalocyanine based devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using first principles calculations in the framework of Density Functional Theory, we investigated the electronic and transport properties of metal(II)-phthalocyanine (M(II)Pc) systems, both in a single molecule configuration and in a model-device geometry. In particular, using the Copper(II)- and Manganese(II)-Pc as prototypical examples, we studied how electronic correlations on the central metal-ion influence the analysis of the electronic structure of the system and we demonstrated that the choice of the exchange-correlation functional, also beyond the standard local or gradient corrected level, is of crucial importance for a correct interpretation of the data. Finally, our electronic transport simulations have shown that M(II)Pc-based devices can act selectively as molecular conductors, as in the case of Copper, or as spin valves, as in the case of Manganese, demonstrating once more the great potential of these systems for molecular nanoelectronics applications.

Arrigo Calzolari; Andrea Ferretti; Marco Buongiorno Nardelli

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Singularity free analysis of a self-similar model of proton structure function at small \\textit{x}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we make re-analysis of a self-similarity based model of the proton structure function at small \\textit{x} pursued in recent years. The additional assumption is that it should be singularity free in the entire kinematic range $0<\\textit{x}<1$. Our analysis indicates that the model is valid in a more restrictive range of $Q^{2}$. We also discuss the possibility of incorporation of Froissart saturation condition in the model.

Baishali Saikia; D. K. Choudhury

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

[NeII] emission line profiles from photoevaporative disc winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I model profiles of the [NeII] forbidden emission line at 12.81um, emitted by photoevaporative winds from discs around young, solar-mass stars. The predicted line luminosities (~ 1E-6 Lsun) are consistent with recent data, and the line profiles vary significantly with disc inclination. Edge-on discs show broad (30-40km/s) double-peaked profiles, due to the rotation of the disc, while in face-on discs the structure of the wind results in a narrower line (~10km/s) and a significant blue-shift (5-10km/s). These results suggest that observations of [NeII] line profiles can provide a direct test of models of protoplanetary disc photoevaporation.

R. D. Alexander

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters Probed by Raman Spectroscopy, NMR and Structural Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water in different states, e.g., bulk water, water clusters, aqueous solutions of ions or organicThe Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters are used to elucidate the properties of water in Metavariscite, AlPO4-H3, AlPO4-8 and VPI-5. The framework

Goddard III, William A.

385

Structure of A=7 iso-triplet $?$ hypernuclei studied with he four-body model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of the T=1 iso-triplet hypernuclei, $^7_{\\Lambda}$He, $^7_{\\Lambda}$Li and $^7_{\\Lambda}$Be within the framework of an $\\alpha +\\Lambda +N+N$ four-body cluster model is studied. Interactions between the constituent subunits are determined so as to reproduce reasonably well the observed low-energy properties of the $\\alpha N$, $\\alpha \\Lambda$, $\\alpha NN$ and $\\alpha \\Lambda N$ subsystems. Furthermore, the two-body $\\Lambda N$ interaction is adjusted so as to reproduce the $0^+$-$1^+$ splitting of $^4_{\\Lambda}$H. Also a phenomenological $\\Lambda N$ charge symmetry breaking(CSB) interaction is introduced. The $\\Lambda$ binding energy of the ground state in $^7_{\\Lambda}$He is predicted to be 5.16(5.36) MeV with(without) the CSB interaction. The calculated energy splittings of the $3/2^+$-$5/2^+$ states in $^7_{\\Lambda}$He and $^7_{\\Lambda}$Li are around 0.1 MeV. We point out that there is a three-layer structure of the matter distribution, $\\alpha$ particle, $\\Lambda$ skin, proton or neutron halo, in the $^7_{\\Lambda}{\\rm He}(J=5/2^+)$, $^7_{\\Lambda}{\\rm Li}(J=5/2^+)$ and $^7_{\\Lambda}{\\rm Be}(J=1/2^+)$ states.

E. Hiyama; Y. Yamamoto; T. Motoba; M. Kamimura

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Algorithms and Discrete Mathematics Dept.

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurement and modeling of Ar/H2/CH4 arc jet discharge chemical vapor deposition reactors II: Modeling of the spatial dependence of expanded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and used to deposit thin films of polycrystalline diamond. This reactor has been the subject of many prior of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond and diamondlike carbon films. The model incorporates gas activation-containing radical species incident on the growing diamond surface C atoms and CH radicals within this reactor

Bristol, University of

388

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Shupe, Matthew

389

Effect of temperature on the optical and structural properties of hexadecylamine capped ZnS nanoparticles using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as single source precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? HDA-capped ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized via thermolysis of a single source precursor. ? Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate was used as the single source precursor. ? The growth temperature was varied to study the optical properties of the nanocrystals. ? Change in growth temperature affects the structural properties of the ZnS nanoparticles. ? Hexagonal wurtzite phase was obtained at lower temperatures while cubic sphalerite phase was obtained at higher growth temperatures. -- Abstract: Reported in this work is the synthesis of HDA (hexadecylamine)-capped ZnS nanoparticles by a single source route using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as a precursor. By varying the growth temperature, the temporal evolution of the optical properties and morphology of the nanocrystals were investigated. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All the particles exhibited quantum confinement in their optical properties with band edge emission at the early stage of the reaction. The XRD showed transition from hexagonal wurtzite phase to cubic sphalerite phase as the growth temperature increases. The TEM image showed that the particles are small and spherical in shape while the HRTEM image confirmed the crystalline nature of the material.

Onwudiwe, Damian C., E-mail: dconwudiwe@webmail.co.za [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Strydom, Christien [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)] [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S., E-mail: oluwafemi.oluwatobi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag X1, Mthatha (South Africa); Songca, Sandile P. [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Walter Sisulu University, P.O. Box 19712, Tecoma, East London (South Africa)] [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Walter Sisulu University, P.O. Box 19712, Tecoma, East London (South Africa)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

391

The metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement of aryl-cyclopropenes. II. Approaches towards a model system of dynemicin A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of 3-vinyl- or 3-phenylcyclopropenes to undergo metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement with CO insertion to yield phenol or naphthol derivatives led to investigations using 3-naphthylcyclopropenes with the goal of producing material containing an anthracene carbon framework. Rearrangement of 1-methyl-3-(1,4-dimethoxynaphth-2-yl)cyclopropene, however, only gave material containing the phenanthrene framework. It is the goal of Part I of this thesis to modify a naphthylcyclopropene so that the metal carbonyl induced rearrangement will yield material containing an anthracene framework. A working hypothesis was put forth that focused on the electronic stabilization of certain aromatic intermediates to explain phenanthrene vs. anthracene formation. Semi-empirical calculations performed on model systems to estimate thermodynamic properties supported the hypothesis. Two naphthoquinone derivatives were prepared based on the hypothesis. In the first case, the cyclopropene substituent is arranged in the 2-position of a naphthoquinone-1,4-bisketal; in the second case, the cyclpropene is at C-2 in a 1,4-naphthoquinone. In both cases, the alkene unit (C-2/C-4) is less aromatic' than an alkene unit in a naphthalene ring, and the expected rearrangement can give only the anthraquinone skeleton. Investigations with the bisketal were unsucessful; attempted rearrangement at low temperatures gave only recovered starting material and experiments at higher temperatures polymerized the sensitive cyclopropene. Investigations with the 1,4-naphthoquinone proved modestly successful. Metal carbonyl catalyzed rearrangement with CO insertion to yield anthraquinone was observed. Additionally, low temperature conditions were developed that may prove useful in future work.

Cohen, D.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. INTERMITTENCY AND THE DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION PROBABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of Type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. The bulk of turbulence in the ash regions appears to be less intermittent than predicted by the standard log-normal model and the She-Leveque model. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. The determination of the total number of regions at the flame surface, in which DDTs can be triggered, enables us to estimate the total number of events. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 s after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km s{sup -1}. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 s after ignition at a transition density close to 1 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}.

Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W., E-mail: schmidt@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Synergetic effects of II-VI sensitization upon TiO{sub 2} for photoelectrochemical water splitting; a tri-layered structured scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World's energy demands are growing on a higher scale increasing the need of more reliable and long term renewable energy resources. Efficient photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices based on novel nano-structured designs for solar-hydrogen generation need to be developed. This study provides an insight of the tri-layered-TiO2 based nanostructures. Observing the mechanism of hydrogen production, the comparison of the structural order during the synthesis is pronounced. The sequence in the tri-layered structure affects the photogenerated electron (e{sup ?}) and hole (h{sup +}) pair transfer and separation. It is also discussed that not only the semiconductors band gaps alignment is important with respect to the water redox potential but also the interfacial regions. Quasi-Fermi-level adjustment at the interfacial regions plays a key role in deciding the solar to hydrogen efficiency. More efficient multicomponent semiconductor nano-design (MCSN) could be developed with the approach given in this study.

Mumtaz, Asad, E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, University Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

John McCord

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses of a Deeply Embedded Model Reactor – SASSI Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the SASSI analyses of a deeply embedded reactor model performed by BNL and CJC and Associates, as part of the seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) simulation capability project for the NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) Program of the Department of Energy. The SASSI analyses included three cases: 0.2 g, 0.5 g, and 0.9g, all of which refer to nominal peak accelerations at the top of the bedrock. The analyses utilized the modified subtraction method (MSM) for performing the seismic SSI evaluations. Each case consisted of two analyses: input motion in one horizontal direction (X) and input motion in the vertical direction (Z), both of which utilized the same in-column input motion. Besides providing SASSI results for use in comparison with the time domain SSI results obtained using the DIABLO computer code, this study also leads to the recognition that the frequency-domain method should be modernized so that it can better serve its mission-critical role for analysis and design of nuclear power plants.

Nie J.; Braverman J.; Costantino, M.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Modeling precursor diffusion and reaction of atomic layer deposition in porous structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique for depositing thin films of materials with a precise thickness control and uniformity using the self-limitation of the underlying reactions. Usually, it is difficult to predict the result of the ALD process for given external parameters, e.g., the precursor exposure time or the size of the precursor molecules. Therefore, a deeper insight into ALD by modeling the process is needed to improve process control and to achieve more economical coatings. In this paper, a detailed, microscopic approach based on the model developed by Yanguas-Gil and Elam is presented and additionally compared with the experiment. Precursor diffusion and second-order reaction kinetics are combined to identify the influence of the porous substrate's microstructural parameters and the influence of precursor properties on the coating. The thickness of the deposited film is calculated for different depths inside the porous structure in relation to the precursor exposure time, the precursor vapor pressure, and other parameters. Good agreement with experimental results was obtained for ALD zirconiumdioxide (ZrO{sub 2}) films using the precursors tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)zirconium and O{sub 2}. The derivation can be adjusted to describe other features of ALD processes, e.g., precursor and reactive site losses, different growth modes, pore size reduction, and surface diffusion.

Keuter, Thomas, E-mail: t.keuter@fz-juelich.de; Menzler, Norbert Heribert; Mauer, Georg; Vondahlen, Frank; Vaßen, Robert; Buchkremer, Hans Peter [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-1), 52425 Jülich (Germany)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Exact Coherent Structures and Chaotic Dynamics in a Model of Cardiac Tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unstable nonchaotic solutions embedded in the chaotic attractor can provide significant new insight into chaotic dynamics of both low- and high-dimensional systems. In particular, in turbulent fluid flows, such unstable solutions are referred to as exact coherent structures (ECS) and play an important role in both initiating and sustaining turbulence. The nature of ECS and their role in organizing spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics, however, is reasonably well understood only for systems on relatively small spatial domains lacking continuous Euclidean symmetries. Construction of ECS on large domains and in the presence of continuous translational and/or rotational symmetries remains a challenge. This is especially true for models of excitable media which display spiral turbulence and for which the standard approach to computing ECS completely breaks down. This paper uses the Karma model of cardiac tissue to illustrate a potential approach that could allow computing a new class of ECS on large domains of arbitrary shape by decomposing them into a patchwork of solutions on smaller domains, or tiles, which retain Euclidean symmetries locally.

Greg Byrne; Christopher D. Marcotte; Roman O. Grigoriev

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Application and modeling of near-infrared frequency domain photon migration for monitoring pharmaceutical powder blending operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of blending. A simulation method was developed which consisted of (i) dynamic simulation for generating the powder structure; (ii) the completely-randommixture model for predicting the spatial distribution of API particles within the powder bed; and (iii...

Pan, Tianshu

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

The structure of the Sun and the planets of the solar system from the viewpoint of mechanics of the inertless mass II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The second part of the monograph contains the investigation of the structure of the Sun and planets of the solar system. This monograph is addressed to specialists in the field of theoretical and practical hydrodynamics and adjacent sciences. It will be useful for astronomers, meteorologists and geologists.

I. Z. Shkurchenko

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ground-and Excited-State Electronic Structures of the Solar Cell Sensitizer Bis(4,4-dicarboxylato-2,2-bipyridine)bis(isothiocyanato)ruthenium(II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground- and Excited-State Electronic Structures of the Solar Cell Sensitizer Bis(4,4-dicarboxylato-1460, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State UniVersity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1322, and Department implications of these results for the molecular engineering of solar cell sensitizers are discussed

McCusker, James K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a reinforced concrete slab bolted to a reaction structure. Both the slab thickness and soil media were varied in the test series. The wealth of data obtained from these tests along with the variations in experimental setups provide ample opportunity to assess the robustness of the Zapotec CEL methodology.

Bessette, Gregory Carl

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure Interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

405

Structural genomics of protein phosphatases Steven C. Almo Jeffrey B. Bonanno J. Michael Sauder Spencer Emtage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure modeling, a PSI materials repository for central- ized archiving and distribution of reagents Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA M. R. Chance Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA A. Sali structures. PSI-II employs a balanced target selection strategy that continues to emphasize the impor- tance

Sali, Andrej

406

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

407

Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Marutzky, Sam

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The structure of the HIV-1 Vpu ion channel: modelling and simulation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and (ii) W facing the lipids. Two equivalent bundles have been generated using a simulated annealing via in the life cycle of the virus: (i) it controls the release/secretion of virus particles from the cell surface,8]. The TM segment of Vpu is responsible for particle release/secretion [9] whereas the cytoplasmic site

Fischer, Wolfgang

410

Abstract -This paper presents a methodology and a tool for the coupled magnetic-structural with semi-analytical models. For this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract - This paper presents a methodology and a tool for the coupled magnetic-structural with semi-analytical models. For this coupling, the magnetic model is available; we developed the structural MODEL Magnetic fields radiated by permanent magnets and conductors are computed through Coulombian

Boyer, Edmond

411

Phase structure and Higgs boson mass in a Higgs-Yukawa model with a dimension-6 operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the impact of a $\\lambda_6 \\varphi^6$ term included in a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model. Such a term could emerge from BSM physics at some larger energy scale. We map out the phase structure of the Higgs-Yukawa model with positive $\\lambda_6$ and negative quartic self coupling of the scalar fields. To this end, we evaluate the constraint effective potential in lattice perturbation theory and also determine the magnetization of the model via numerical simulations which allow us to reach also non-perturbative values of the couplings. As a result, we find a complex phase structure with first and second order phase transitions identified through the magnetization. Further we analyze the effect of such a $\\varphi^6$ term on the lower Higgs boson mass bound to see, whether the standard model lower mass bound can be altered.

David Y. -J. Chu; Karl Jansen; Bastian Knippschild; C. -J. David Lin; Kei-Ichi Nagai; Attila Nagy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An equilibrium double-twist model for the radial structure of collagen fibrils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mammalian tissues contain networks and ordered arrays of collagen fibrils originating from the periodic self-assembly of helical 300 nm long tropocollagen complexes. The fibril radius is typically between 25 to 250 nm, and tropocollagen at the surface appears to exhibit a characteristic twist-angle with respect to the fibril axis. Similar fibril radii and twist-angles at the surface are observed in vitro, suggesting that these features are controlled by a similar self-assembly process. In this work, we propose a physical mechanism of equilibrium radius control for collagen fibrils based on a radially varying double-twist alignment of tropocollagen within a collagen fibril. The free-energy of alignment is similar to that of liquid crystalline blue phases, and we employ an analytic Euler-Lagrange and numerical free energy minimization to determine the twist-angle between the molecular axis and the fibril axis along the radial direction. Competition between the different elastic energy components, together with a surface energy, determines the equilibrium radius and twist-angle at the fibril surface. A simplified model with a twist-angle that is linear with radius is a reasonable approximation in some parameter regimes, and explains a power-law dependence of radius and twist-angle at the surface as parameters are varied. Fibril radius and twist-angle at the surface corresponding to an equilibrium free-energy minimum are consistent with existing experimental measurements of collagen fibrils. Remarkably, in the experimental regime, all of our model parameters are important for controlling equilibrium structural parameters of collagen fibrils.

Aidan I Brown; Laurent Kreplak; Andrew D Rutenberg

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, {mu}) and two neutrino final state in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb{sup -1}. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 {+-} 41 background events and 7.8 {+-} 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c{sup 2} at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3} with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c{sup 2} to 200GeV/c{sup 2} are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (E{sub T}) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ {yields} ll{nu}{nu} channel is 1.2{sigma}. It adds extra significance to the ZZ {yields} 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 {sigma} significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

Hsu, Shih-Chieh; /UC, San Diego

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Structural Patterns for the Transformation of Business Process Models This research has partly been funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Culture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Patterns for the Transformation of Business Process Models This research has partly@wit.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Due to company mergers and business to business interoperability, there is a need for model transformations in the area of business process modeling to facilitate scenarios like model integration and model

415

STRUCTURAL MODELING OF PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS USING MULTIPLE-CHAIN THREADING AND FRAGMENT ASSEMBLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since its birth, the study of protein structures has made progress with leaps and bounds. However, owing to the expenses and difficulties involved, the number of protein structures has not been able to catch up with the ...

Mukherjee, Srayanta

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Lead (II) selenite halides Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = Br, I): Synthesis and crystal structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two lead selenite halides, Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}Br{sub 2} and Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}I{sub 2}, have been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and structurally characterized. These compounds are isotypic and can be considered 3D with a microporous framework composed of lead polyhedra (distorted Archimedean antiprisms formed by oxygen and halogen atoms). The framework contains channels oriented in the [010] direction. These channels contain selenium atoms, which are bound with framework oxygen atoms belonging to different lead polyhedra.

Berdonosov, P. S., E-mail: berdonosov@inorg.chem.msu.ru; Olenev, A. V.; Dolgikh, V. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of the in-structure response spectra of the VVER-440 Model 230 Kozloduy Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kozloduy NPP is located in the North-West part of Bulgaria on the Danube river. The plant consists of four units of 440 MW and two units of 1,000 MW. In the last 15 years there have been three strong, intermediate depth earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone (1977, 1986, 1990) which have affected the NPP site. The Vrancea zone is located approximately 300 km northeast of the plant. It is known for the generation of strong, long-period seismic motions. In 1990 an intensive work program for qualification of the plant according to the international standards (IAEA 1991; IAEA 1992) was initiated. The work started by a project for site confirmation. As a result, new design seismic characteristics were obtained. A Review Level Earthquake is defined by a maximum acceleration of 0.2 g; a response spectrum is shown. The generation of the in-structure response spectra for units 1 and 2 VVER-440 Model 230 is presented in this paper. The coauthors belong to an IAEA Advisory Team assisting the seismic upgrading project of the Kozloduy plant.

Kostov, M.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (BG). Central Lab. for Seismic Mechanics and Earthquake Engineering; Ma, D.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Prato, C.A. [Univ. of Cordoba (AR); Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

419

LADTAP II: technical reference and user guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission computer program LADTAP II, which performs environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into surface waters. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program.

Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Whelan, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

GASPAR II: Technical reference and user guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program GASPAR II used by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into the atmosphere. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals and population groups from inhalation, ingestion (terrestrial foods), and external-exposure (ground and plume) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program. 20 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

Strenge, D.L.; Bander, T.J.; Soldat, J.K.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Paper No. 2004-mfb-03 Kelly Page: 1 of 4 Tensile Loading of Model Caisson Foundations for Structures on Sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper No. 2004-mfb-03 Kelly Page: 1 of 4 Tensile Loading of Model Caisson Foundations for Structures on Sand R.B. Kelly, B.W. Byrne, G.T. Houlsby and C.M. Martin Department of Engineering) (see Byrne et al, 2002; Byrne et al, 2003; Kelly et al, 2003). This paper concentrates on the tensile

Byrne, Byron

422

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures Emerald Article: A study of the blast-induced brain white-matter damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures Emerald Article: A study of the blast, (2012),"A study of the blast-induced brain white-matter damage and the associated diffuse axonal injury Abstract Purpose ­ Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a signature injury of the current military

Grujicic, Mica

423

A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar proton events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar is possible into regions that are at the moment effectively shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. A two (process, timescale, magnetostratigraphy); 1650 Global Change: Solar variability; 2716 Magnetospheric

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

424

Ethanol plant investment in Canada: A structural model1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Fujin Yi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ethanol plant investment in Canada: A structural model1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Fujin Yi Most of the fuel ethanol plants in Canada were built recently and either use corn or wheat as feedstock. It is important to determine what factors affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

425

Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

NONE

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Biofoam II  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties. 1 fig.

Morrison, R.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biofoam II  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties.

Morrison, Robert L. (Modesto, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A general purpose Fortran 90 electronic structure program for conjugated systems using Pariser-Parr-Pople model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pariser-Parr-Pople (P-P-P) model Hamiltonian has been used extensively over the years to perform calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of $\\pi$-conjugated systems successfully. In spite of tremendous successes of \\emph{ab initio} theory of electronic structure of large systems, the P-P-P model continues to be a popular one because of a recent resurgence in interest in the physics of $\\pi$-conjugated polymers, fullerenes and other carbon based materials. In this paper, we describe a Fortran 90 computer program developed by us, which uses P-P-P model Hamiltonian to not only solve Hartree-Fock (HF) equation for closed- and open-shell systems, but also for performing correlation calculations at the level of single configuration interactions (SCI) for molecular systems. Moreover, the code is capable of computing linear optical absorption spectrum at various levels, such as, tight binding (TB) Hueckel model, HF, SCI, and also of calculating the band structure using the Hueckel model. The code ...

Sony, Priya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously reported the synthesis and structural characterization of a model membrane protein comprised of an amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptide with a hydrophobic domain based on a synthetic ion channel and a hydrophilic domain with designed cavities for binding the general anesthetic halothane. In this work, we synthesized an improved version of this halothane-binding amphiphilic peptide with only a single cavity and an otherwise identical control peptide with no such cavity, and applied x-ray reflectivity to monolayers of these peptides to probe the distribution of halothane along the length of the core of the 4-helix bundle as a function of the concentration of halothane. At the moderate concentrations achieved in this study, approximately three molecules of halothane were found to be localized within a broad symmetric unimodal distribution centered about the designed cavity. At the lowest concentration achieved, of approximately one molecule per bundle, the halothane distribution became narrower and more peaked due to a component of {approx}19Angstroms width centered about the designed cavity. At higher concentrations, approximately six to seven molecules were found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the bundle, corresponding to approximately one molecule per heptad. Monolayers of the control peptide showed only the latter behavior, namely a uniform distribution along the length of the bundle irrespective of the halothane concentration over this range. The results provide insight into the nature of such weak binding when the dissociation constant is in the mM regime, relevant for clinical applications of anesthesia. They also demonstrate the suitability of both the model system and the experimental technique for additional work on the mechanism of general anesthesia, some of it presented in the companion parts II and III under this title.

Strzalka, J.; Liu, J; Tronin, A; Churbanova, I; Johansson, J; Blasie, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Synthesis, crystal structures, and luminescent properties of Cd(II) coordination polymers assembled from semi-rigid multi-dentate N-containing ligand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three new polymers, [Cd(L){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [Cd{sub 3}(L){sub 2}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}({mu}{sub 2}-Cl){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (2), {l_brace}[Cd{sub 2}(L){sub 2}(nic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (3) (HL=5-(4-((1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)methyl)phenyl)-1H-tetrazole, Hnic=nicotinic acid) have been prepared and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 display 2D monomolecular layers built by the inter-linking single helical chains and L{sup -} ligands connecting chain-like [Cd({mu}{sub 3}-OH)({mu}{sub 2}-Cl)]{sub n} secondary building units, respectively. Compound 3 is constructed from the mixed ligands and possesses a (3,4)-connected framework with (4{center_dot}8{sup 2})(4{center_dot}8{sup 2}{center_dot}10{sup 3}) topology. Moreover, the fluorescent properties of HL ligand and compounds 1-3 are also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination polymers based on the semi-rigid multidentate N-donor ligand have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit the 2D layers formed by inter-linking single helices and L{sup -} anions bridging 1D chain-like SBUs, respectively. Complex 3 is buit by L{sup -} and assistant nic{sup -} ligands connecting metal centers and possesses a (3,4)-connected framework with (4 Multiplication-Sign 8{sup 2})(4 Multiplication-Sign 8{sup 2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}) topology. Moreover, these complexes display fluorescent properties indicating that they may have potential applications as optical materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Cd-compounds were prepared from semi-rigid HL ligand with different N-containing groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They exhibit diverse structures from 2D monomolecular layer to 3D covalent framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HL ligands displayed various coordination modes under different reaction conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds exhibit good luminescent properties.

Yuan, Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xin-Xin [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China)] [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China); Su, Zhong-Min, E-mail: zmsu@nenu.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China)] [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China); Ma, Jian-Fang [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China)] [Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, Jilin (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Existence domains of arbitrary amplitude nonlinear structures in two-electron temperature space plasmas. II. High-frequency electron-acoustic solitons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-component plasma model composed of ions, cool electrons, and hot electrons is adopted to investigate the existence of large amplitude electron-acoustic solitons not only for the model for which inertia and pressure are retained for all plasma species which are assumed to be adiabatic but also neglecting inertial effects of the hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev potential formalism, the Mach number ranges supporting the existence of large amplitude electron-acoustic solitons are presented. The limitations on the attainable amplitudes of electron-acoustic solitons having negative potentials are attributed to a number of different physical reasons, such as the number density of either the cool electrons or hot electrons ceases to be real valued beyond the upper Mach number limit, or, alternatively, a negative potential double layer occurs. Electron-acoustic solitons having positive potentials are found to be supported only if inertial effects of the hot electrons are retained and these are found to be limited only by positive potential double layers.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, P.O. Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (West), Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (West), Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

Damiani, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Introducing Protein Folding Using Simple Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss recent theoretical developments in the study of simple lattice models of proteins. Such models are designed to understand general features of protein structures and mechanism of folding. Among the topics covered are (i) the use of lattice models to understand the selection of the limited set of viable protein folds; (ii) the relationship between structure and sequence spaces; (iii) the application of lattice models for studying folding mechanisms (topological frustration, kinetic partitioning mechanism). Classification of folding scenarios based on the intrinsic thermodynamic properties of a sequence (namely, the collapse and folding transition temperatures) is outlined. A brief discussion of random heteropolymer model is also presented.

D. Thirumalai; D. K. Klimov

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Causal Gene Network Inference from Genetical Genomics Experiments via Structural Equation Modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The goal of this research is to construct causal gene networks for genetical genomics experiments using expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) mapping and Structural Equation… (more)

Liu, Bing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Stochastic Dynamical Structure (SDS) of Nonequilibrium Processes in the Absence of Detailed Balance. II: construction of SDS with nonlinear force and multiplicative noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a whole range of emergent phenomena in non-equilibrium behaviors can be well described by a set of stochastic differential equations. Inspired by an insight gained during our study of robustness and stability in phage lambda genetic switch in modern biology, we found that there exists a classification of generic nonequilibrium processes: In the continuous description in terms of stochastic differential equations, there exists four dynamical elements: the potential function $\\phi$, the friction matrix $ S$, the anti-symmetric matrix $ T $, and the noise. The generic feature of absence of detailed balance is then precisely represented by $T$. For dynamical near a fixed point, whether or not it is stable or not, the stochastic dynamics is linear. A rather complete analysis has been carried out (Kwon, Ao, Thouless, cond-mat/0506280; PNAS, {\\bf 102} (2005) 13029), referred to as SDS I. One important and persistent question is the existence of a potential function with nonlinear force and with multiplicative noise, with both nice local dynamical and global steady state properties. Here we demonstrate that a dynamical structure built into stochastic differential equation allows us to construct such a global optimization potential function. First, we provide the construction. One of most important ingredient is the generalized Einstein relation. We then present an approximation scheme: The gradient expansion which turns every order into linear matrix equations. The consistent of such methodology with other known stochastic treatments will be discussed in next paper, SDS III; and the explicitly connection to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics will be discussed in a forthcoming paper, SDS IV.

P. Ao

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Modeling Actuation Forces and Strains in Nastic Structures Luke A. Matthews, Victor Giurgiutiu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted to re-create a membrane using phospholipids and transport proteins extracted from plants [10 a phospholipid bilayer with embedded active transport proteins, which move the water from the low pressure fluid structures; induced strain actuation; active materials; smart structures; biotransport; ion pumps; ATP, SUT-4

Giurgiutiu, Victor

438

Dynamics of structures coupled with elastic media -a review of numerical models and methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the structure's environment is restricted here to a large and possibly unbounded visco-elastic medium. Under in the field of structure-environment interaction problems, in which the environment is an elastic body and vibration emitted by transportation systems and wave diffraction by obstacles in an elastic medium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

COMMENTS ON STRUCTURAL CONDITION ANALYSIS BASED ON STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON TRIPOD MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tripod, strain, damage detection INTRODUCTION Future wind energy farms will be built in deeper locations relatively short history. There are different definitions of support structure for wind turbine strain can be valuable indicator of such changes. KEYWORDS : offshore support structure, wind turbine

Boyer, Edmond

440

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III2(O2CO)4]3?, Based Molecule-Based Magnets: Three-Dimensional Network Structure and Two-Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Novoa, J.; Stephens, P; Weerasekare, M; Shum, W; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Neutrinos in the holographic dark energy model: constraints from latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The model of holographic dark energy (HDE) with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation is investigated in detail. The background and perturbation evolutions in the HDE model are calculated. We employ the PPF approach to overcome the gravity instability difficulty (perturbation divergence of dark energy) led by the equation-of-state parameter $w$ evolving across the phantom divide $w=-1$ in the HDE model with $cradiation on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum and the matter power spectrum in the HDE scenario are discussed. Furthermore, we constrain the models of HDE with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation by using the latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure, including the Planck CMB temperature data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the JLA supernova data, the Hubble constant direct measurement, the cosmic shear data of weak lensing, the Planck CMB lensing data, and the redshift space distortions data. We find that $\\sum m_\

Jing-Fei Zhang; Ming-Ming Zhao; Yun-He Li; Xin Zhang

2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

Neutrinos in the holographic dark energy model: constraints from latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The model of holographic dark energy (HDE) with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation is investigated in detail. The background and perturbation evolutions in the HDE model are calculated. We employ the PPF approach to overcome the gravity instability difficulty (perturbation divergence of dark energy) led by the equation-of-state parameter $w$ evolving across the phantom divide $w=-1$ in the HDE model with $cdark radiation on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum and the matter power spectrum in the HDE scenario are discussed. Furthermore, we constrain the models of HDE with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation by using the latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure, including the Planck CMB temperature data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the JLA supernova data, the Hubble constant direct measurement, the cosmic shear...

Zhang, Jing-Fei; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An improved structural mechanics model for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to provide improved predictions of Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code, a new model, the FRAPCON Radial-Axial Soft Pellet (FRASP) model, was developed. This ...

Mieloszyk, Alexander James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

age-structured dynamical models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

does not migrate. Le, Thuc Manh; Van Minh, Nguyen 2010-01-01 36 Galactic Nonlinear Dynamic Model Mathematical Physics (arXiv) Summary: We develop a model for spiral galaxies...

445

Annealing contour Monte Carlo algorithm for structure optimization in an off-lattice protein model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, the HP model1 treats each amino acid as a point particle and restricts the model to fold of the energy landscape, so it is an excellent tool for Monte Carlo optimization. The ACMC algorithm is an accel

Liang, Faming

446

A Chiral Schwinger model, its Constraint Structure and Applications to its Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Jackiw-Rajaraman version of the chiral Schwinger model is studied as a function of the renormalization parameter. The constraints are obtained and they are used to carry out canonical quantization of the model by means of Dirac brackets. By introducing an additional scalar field, it is shown that the model can be made gauge invariant. The gauge invariant model is quantized by establishing a pair of gauge fixing constraints in order that the method of Dirac can be used.

Paul Bracken

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modeling multi-stream flow in collisionless matter: approximations for large-scale structure beyond shell-crossing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generally held view that a model of large-scale structure, formed by collisionless matter in the Universe, can be based on the matter model ``dust'' fails in the presence of multi-stream flow, i.e., velocity dispersion. We argue that models for large-scale structure should rather be constructed for a flow which describes the average motion of a multi-stream system. We present a clearcut reasoning how to approach the problem and derive an evolution equation for the mean peculiar-velocity relative to background solutions of Friedmann-Lema\\^\\i tre type. We consider restrictions of the nonlinear problem and show that the effect of velocity dispersion gives rise to an effective viscosity of non-dissipative gravitational origin. We discuss subcases which arise naturally from this approach: the ``sticky particle model'' and the ``adhesion approximation''. We also construct a novel approximation that features adhesive action in the multi-stream regime while conserving momentum, which was considered a drawback of the standard approximation based on Burger's equation. We finally argue that the assumptions made to obtain these models should be relaxed and we discuss how this can be achieved.

Thomas Buchert; Alvaro Dominguez

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOurStructureSurvivor Structure ofStructure

449

Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing July 30, 2014 Bryna Berendzen Technology Manager BETO Conversion...

450

Experimental investigation and constitutive modeling of metallic honeycombs in sandwich structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, honeycomb sandwich structures are designed in the elastic range, but recent studies on the crushing of sandwich profiles have shown their potential in crashworthiness applications. Thin sandwich sheets also ...

Mohr, Dirk, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

GWIDD: a comprehensive resource for genome-wide structural modeling of protein-protein interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein-protein interactions are a key component of life processes. The knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of these interactions is important for understanding protein function. Genome-Wide Docking Database ...

Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vakser, Ilya A.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Model-based design of an ultra high performance concrete support structure for a wind turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A support tower is the main structure which would support rotor, power transmission and control systems, and elevates the rotating blades above the earth boundary layer. A successful design should ensure safe, efficient ...

Wang, Zheng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary ...

Pan, Keyao

454

A model of the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir based on surface-to-borehole seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

455

Direct comparison of Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic and Model Prediction Variable Structure vortex flow controllers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Variable Structure and Fuzzy Logic based controllers for the same benchmark problem. Evaluation criteria consist of closed-loop system performance, activity level of the VFC nozzles, ease of controller synthesis, time required to synthesize...

Joshi, Praveen Sudhakar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy pathways and structures of oceanic eddies from the ECCO2 State Estimate and Simplified Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying oceanic eddies is important for understanding and predicting ocean circulation and climate variability. The central focus of this dissertation is the energy exchange between eddies and mean ow and banded structures ...

Chen, Ru, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kamenetzky, J., E-mail: oberstte@westminster.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

459

Bootes II ReBooted: An MMT/MegaCam Study of An Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[abridged] We present MMT/Megacam imaging in Sloan $g$ and $r$ of the extremely low luminosity Bo\\"otes II Milky Way companion. We use a bootstrap approach to perform robust measurements of, and uncertainties on, Bo\\"otes II's distance, luminosity, size, and morphology. We show that Bo\\"otes II's stellar population is old and metal-poor ([Fe/H] $\\lta$ -2). Assuming a stellar population like that of M92, Bo\\"otes II is at a distance of 42 $\\pm$ 2 kpc, closer than the initial published estimate of 60 $\\pm$ 10 kpc. This distance revision, combined with a more robust measurement of Bo\\"otes II's structure with a Plummer model (exponential model) results in a more compact half-light size of $r_h\\simeq 36 (33) \\pm 9 (10)$ pc and lower luminosity of $M_V\\simeq-2.4 (-2.2) \\pm 0.7 (0.7)$ mag. This revised size and luminosity move Bo\\"otes II into a region of size-luminosity space not previously known to be occupied by old stellar populations, but also occupied by the recently discovered Milky Way satellites Willman 1 and SEGUE 1. We show that the apparently distorted morphology of Bo\\"otes II is not statistically significant given the present data. We use a tidal argument to support a scenario where Bo\\"otes II is a dwarf galaxy (dark matter dominated) rather than a globular cluster (not dark matter dominated). However, we can not rule out that Bo\\"otes II is a star cluster on the verge of disruption, such as Palomar 5.

S. M. Walsh; B. Willman; D. Sand; J. Harris; A. Seth; D. Zaritsky; H. Jerjen

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

A model study of the forces due to oscillatory waves on submerged structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfies the necessary boundary conditions is sought. Once it 1s found, the dynam1c pressure distribution is determined from the linearized Bernouili equation. The forces are obtained by 1ntegrating the pressure d1stribut1on over the surface... significant linear dimension equal to the height of the model squared divided by the length of the model in the direction of wave propagation for all models except the flat plate height of model for flat plate water depth 10 H = wave height v...

Versowsky, Paul Edward

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Structural-chemical modeling of transition of coals to the plastic state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural-chemical simulation of the formation of plastic state during the thermal treatment (pyrolysis, coking) of coals is based on allowance for intermolecular interactions in the organic matter. The feasibility of transition of coals to the plastic state is determined by the ratio between the onset plastic state (softening) and runaway degradation temperatures, values that depend on the petrographic composition and the degree of metamorphism of coals and the distribution of structural and chemical characteristics of organic matter. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

A.M. Gyul'maliev; S.G. Gagarin [FGUP Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOurStructureSurvivor Structure

463

Senescence and antibiotic resistance in an age-structured population model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been modeled. One strain, community acquired CA-MRSA was assumed to have higher growth rate than the hospital acquired strain HA-MRSA. In agreement with the principle of competitive exclusion [15, 37] the model [11] predicts that CA-MRSA will eventually dominate and outcompete HA-MRSA

Gedeon, Tomas

464

Research Article A Network Modeling Approach for the Spatial Distribution and Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and diseased bone of 20­30 to 70­80 year-olds demonstrated the method's effectiveness for modeling osteoporosis data in clinical trials. KEY WORDS: bone; imaging; modeling; osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis is estimated to affect 200 million women and cause

Zhang, Aidong

465

LIKELIHOOD RATIO TESTS FOR THE STRUCTURAL CHANGE OF AN AR(P) MODEL TO A THRESHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or econo- metric model is stable to some possible events, such as the great depres- sion/expansion, oil price shocks and abrupt policy intervention. Due to the well need for model stability, a lot) and Quandt (1960). For the history and more early results, we refer to Horv´ath (1993, 1995) and Cs

Ling, Shiqing

466

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal HeatStarted GettingStarted

467

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal HeatStarted GettingStartedGiant

468

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance Get

469

Modelling of Structures in Fire: An Example of the Boundary Condition   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The collapse of the World Trade Center Towers 1, 2 and 7 on September 11th 2001 has highlighted the need for proper understanding of the behaviour of structures in the event of a fire. A detailed analysis of the fires and the behaviour...

Jowsey, Allan; Torero, Jose L; Usmani, Asif

470

Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a low-res- olution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Ã? 2013 Elsevier Inc, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA c Markey Center for Structural Biology, College

Kihara, Daisuke

471

Wavelet-based cascade model for intermittent structure in terrestrial environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wavelet-like model for distributions of objects in natural and man-made terrestrial environments is developed. The model is constructed in a self-similar fashion, with the sizes, amplitudes, and numbers of objects occurring at a constant ratios between parent and offspring objects. The objects are randomly distributed in space according to a Poisson process. Fractal supports and a cascade model are used to organize objects intermittently in space. In its basic form, the model is for continuously varying random fields, although a level-cut is introduced to model two-phase random media. The report begins with a description of relevant concepts from fractal theory, and then progresses through static (time-invariant), steady-state, and non-steady models. The results can be applied to such diverse phenomena as turbulence, geologic distributions, urban buildings, vegetation, and arctic ice floes. The model can be used as a basis for synthesizing realistic terrestrial scenes, and for predicting the performance of ...

Wilson, D Keith; Vecherin, Sergey N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: Code structure, system models, and solution methods. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling, approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I provides modeling theory and associated numerical schemes.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

475

Towards a Formal Semantics for a Structurally Dynamic Noncausal Modelling Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling approach, promoting the reuse of components. Modelica is a prime example of this class of lan, many of these languages are referred to as object-oriented mod- elling languages. Modelica [23] is one

Nilsson, Henrik

476

Preliminary Functional-Structural Modeling on Poplar (Salicaceae) Dongxiang Liu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is cultivated in plantations not only for paper, wood products and energy, but also for soil erosion control [1 of poplar at growing season [6]. These models are helpful to understand crop production and management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

477

Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

Reyes, Jennifer McGee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

478

Modeling and Algorithmic Approaches to Constitutively-Complex, Micro-structured Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team for this Project made significant progress on modeling and algorithmic approaches to hydrodynamics of fluids with complex microstructure. Our advances are broken down into modeling and algorithmic approaches. In experiments a driven magnetic bead in a complex fluid accelerates out of the Stokes regime and settles into another apparent linear response regime. The modeling explains the take-off as a deformation of entanglements, and the longtime behavior is a nonlinear, far-from-equilibrium property. Furthermore, the model has predictive value, as we can tune microstructural properties relative to the magnetic force applied to the bead to exhibit all possible behaviors. Wave-theoretic probes of complex fluids have been extended in two significant directions, to small volumes and the nonlinear regime. Heterogeneous stress and strain features that lie beyond experimental capability were studied. It was shown that nonlinear penetration of boundary stress in confined viscoelastic fluids is not monotone, indicating the possibility of interlacing layers of linear and nonlinear behavior, and thus layers of variable viscosity. Models, algorithms, and codes were developed and simulations performed leading to phase diagrams of nanorod dispersion hydrodynamics in parallel shear cells and confined cavities repr