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1

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

S. A. Eide; T. E. Wierman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such activities involve risk predictions including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Wierman, Thomas Edward

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Dixie Valley is the hottest (> 285°C at 3 km) and one of the largest geothermal systems (63 MW power plant operated for over 20 years) in the Basin and Range province. The heat source is deep circulation in a high heat flow, highly fractured upper crust without a significant magmatic thermal input. Many hot springs in the Basin and Range Province share the characteristics of the Dixie Valley system. Major geothermal resource

4

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

5

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

6

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

7

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

8

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety

9

Offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines, dynamics modelling state of the art. Part II: Mooring line and structural dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need to exploit enhanced wind resources far offshore as well as in deep waters requires the use of floating support structures to become economically viable. The conventional three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine may not continue to be the optimal design for floating applications. Therefore it is important to assess alternative concepts in this context that may be more suitable. Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are a promising concept, and it is important to first understand the coupled and relatively complex dynamics of floating \\{VAWTs\\} to assess their technical feasibility. As part of this task, a series of articles have been developed to present a comprehensive literature review covering the various areas of engineering expertise required to understand the coupled dynamics involved in floating VAWTs. This second article focuses on the modelling of mooring systems and structural behaviour of floating VAWTs, discussing various mathematical models and their suitability within the context of developing a model of coupled dynamics. Emphasis is placed on computational aspects of model selection and development as computational efficiency is an important aspect during preliminary design stages. This paper has been written both for researchers new to this research area, outlining underlying theory whilst providing a comprehensive review of the latest work, and for experts in this area, providing a comprehensive list of the relevant references where the details of modelling approaches may be found.

Michael Borg; Maurizio Collu; Athanasios Kolios

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

11

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

12

Sorption Speciation of Nickel(II) onto Ca-Montmorillonite: Batch, EXAFS Techniques and Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sorption Speciation of Nickel(II) onto Ca-Montmorillonite: Batch, EXAFS Techniques and Modeling, 44307 Nantes cedex 03, France The sorption speciation of Ni(II) on Ca-montmorillonite was evaluated(II) sorption as well as the local atomic structure of the adsorbed Ni(II) ions. At 0.001 mol/L Ca(NO3)2 and low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Performance of Parallel Eigensolvers on Electronic Structure Calculations II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Parallel Eigensolvers on Electronic Structure Calculations II Robert C. Ward1 employed to solve problems in quantum mechanics, such as electronic structure calculations, result in both symmetric linear eigensolvers applied to such eigenproblems in electronic structure calculations on the IBM

Ward, Robert C.

14

First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

16

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

17

A revised structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II from a neutron fiber diffraction analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal and molecular structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II have been revised using new neutron diffraction data extending to 1.2 {angstrom} resolution collected from two highly crystalline fiber samples of mercerized flax. Mercerization was achieved in NaOH/H{sub 2}O for one sample and in NaOD/D{sub 2}O for the other, corresponding to the labile hydroxymethyl moieties being hydrogenated and deuterated, respectively. Fourier difference maps were calculated in which neutron difference amplitudes were combined with phases calculated from two revised X-ray models of cellulose II. The revised phasing models were determined by refinement against the X-ray data set of Kolpak and Blackwell, using the LALS methodology. Both models have two antiparallel chains organized in a P2{sub 1} space group and unit cell parameters: a = 8.01 {angstrom}, b = 9.04 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, and {gamma} = 117.1{degree}. One has equivalent backbone conformations for both chains but different conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties: gt for the origin chain and tg for the center chain. The second model based on the recent crystal structures of cellotetraose, has different conformations for the two chains but nearly equivalent conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties. On the basis of the X-ray data alone, the models could not be differentiated. From the neutron Fourier difference maps, possible labile hydrogen atom positions were identified for each model and refined using LALS. The second model is significantly different from previous proposals based on the crystal structures of cellotetraose, MD simulations of cellulose II, and any potential hydrogen-bonding network in the structure of cellulose II determined in earlier X-ray fiber diffraction studies. The exact localization of the labile hydrogen atoms involved in this bonding, together with their donor and acceptor characteristics, is presented and discussed. This study provides, for the first time, the coordinates of all of the atoms in cellulose II.

Langan, P.; Nishiyama, Y.; Chanzy, H.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

19

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Spatial and Temporal Structure of Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75 lat 3.75 long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases ...

J. M. Murphy; J. F. B. Mitchell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeling Topaz-II system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Band structures Optical absorption Summary Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Band structures Optical absorption Summary Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II) Kohn, Belfast Key concepts in Density Functional Theory (II) Silvana Botti #12;Band structures Optical in Density Functional Theory (II) Silvana Botti #12;Band structures Optical absorption Summary Outline 1 From

Botti, Silvana

22

Modelling oil price volatility with structural breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we provide two main innovations: (i) we analyze oil prices of two prominent markets namely West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent using the two recently developed tests by Narayan and Popp (2010) and Liu and Narayan, 2010 both of which allow for two structural breaks in the data series; and (ii) the latter method is modified to include both symmetric and asymmetric volatility models. We identify two structural breaks that occur in 1990 and 2008 which coincidentally correspond to the Iraqi/Kuwait conflict and the global financial crisis, respectively. We find evidence of persistence and leverage effects in the oil price volatility. While further extensions can be pursued, the consideration of asymmetric effects as well as structural breaks should not be jettisoned when modelling oil price volatility.

Afees A. Salisu; Ismail O. Fasanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part II: Spatial and temporal structure of response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75{degrees} lat x 3.75{degrees} long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases linearly, there is a delay of about 30 yr before the ocean warms appreciably. This {open_quotes}cold start{close_quotes} is, at least partly, an artifact of the experimental design. At the time of doubling (after 70 yr), the patterns of change are similar to those found in comparable studies of the equilibrium response, except in the high latitudes of the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic, where the warming is considerably reduced. The mechanisms leading to this reduction are discussed. After two to three decades, the pattern of warming is well established. The warming over land is substantially larger than that over the sea, with a consequent lowering of surface pressure over the northern continents in summer. The patterns of changes in precipitation and soil moisture take longer to establish themselves, although locally there are consistent changes after the third decade. 55 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Murphy, J.M.; Mitchell, J.F.B. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

Dalton, A.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Test cell modeling and optimization for FPD-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Power Demonstration, Configuration II (FPD-II), will ba a DT burning tandem mirror facility with thermal barriers, designed as the next step engineering test reactor (ETR) to follow the tandem mirror ignition test machines. Current plans call for FPD-II to be a multi-purpose device. For approximately the first half of its lifetime, it will operate as a high-Q ignition machine designed to reach or exceed engineering break-even and to demonstrate the technological feasibility of tandem mirror fusion. The second half of its operation will focus on the evaluation of candidate reactor blanket designs using a neutral beam driven test cell inserted at the midplane of the 90 m long cell. This machine called FPD-II+T, uses an insert configuration similar to that used in the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T study. The modeling and optimization of FPD-II+T are the topic of the present paper.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

Structure beyond the Standard Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...see Ross (1997) for a review and further references...superpartners of the Standard Model states. These...factorizable metric M2 Plan ck;4 = M2+ Plan ck;4+ nR and, provided...Structure beyond the Standard Model 415 10 100 10003...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Eight-band kp modeling of InAs/InGaAsSb type-II W-design quantum well structures for interband cascade lasers emitting in a broad range of mid infrared  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Band structure properties of the type-II W-design AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells have been investigated theoretically in a systematic manner and with respect to their use in the active region of interband cascade laser for a broad range of emission in mid infrared between below 3 to beyond 10??m. Eight-band kp approach has been utilized to calculate the electronic subbands. The fundamental optical transition energy and the corresponding oscillator strength have been determined in function of the thickness of InAs and GaIn(As)Sb layers and the composition of the latter. There have been considered active structures on two types of relevant substrates, GaSb and InAs, introducing slightly modified strain conditions. Additionally, the effect of external electric field has been taken into account to simulate the conditions occurring in the operational devices. The results show that introducing arsenic as fourth element into the valence band well of the type-II W-design system, and then altering its composition, can efficiently enhance the transition oscillator strength and allow additionally increasing the emission wavelength, which makes this solution prospective for improved performance and long wavelength interband cascade lasers.

Ryczko, K.; S?k, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting. Part II: Stochastic Optimization Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting. Part II: Stochastic Optimization Modeling C for the Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting problem, so that the expected profit of the advertising of standard opti- mization software. The model has been tested for planning a realistic advertising campaign

Beltran-Royo, Cesar

29

Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for large mesh sizes (x 20 km) to vertically redistribute heat and moisture in a grid column when model in a numerical model Convective cloud systems are not resolved if the mesh size of the grid is larger than small to treat convection as sub-grid scale process but too large to treat it explicitly For example

Gohm, Alexander

30

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

31

RISK SENSITIVE CONTROL AND AN OPTIMAL INVESTMENT MODEL (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISK SENSITIVE CONTROL AND AN OPTIMAL INVESTMENT MODEL (II) W. H. Fleming1 and S. J. Sheu2 Brown University and Academia Sinica Abstract. We consider an optimal investment problem proposed by Bielecki and Pliska. The goal of the investment problem is to optimize the long term growth of expected utility

Sheu, Shuenn-Jyi

32

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures Christian Licht , Thibaut Weller mathematical models of smart materials and smart structures. Smart materials are materials which present perturbations methods, asymptotic analysis, plates and rods models. 1 Introduction Smart materials present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

Some Hamiltonian models of friction II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

T. Padmanabhan

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hybrid Model Structures Aaron David Ames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Model Structures by Aaron David Ames B.A. (University of St. Thomas) 2001 B.S. (University of California, Berkeley Fall 2006 #12;Hybrid Model Structures Copyright 2006 by Aaron David Ames #12;Abstract Hybrid Model Structures by Aaron David Ames Masters of Arts in Mathematics University of California

Ames, Aaron

37

Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Sung [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thesis IDSC-LG-FZ-05 Gas Diesel Engine Modeling and Control The gas diesel engine is a natural gas enginePrerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems, IC Engines, ...), Optimization Course, Matlab

Lygeros, John

39

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site Selectivity and Magnetic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site, Florida 32306-4390, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Copper(II) acetate mediated coupling, was observed in the copper(II) complexes of L1 -L6 . The preference of copper(II) to two common bidentate 1

Weston, Ken

40

Engineering Structurally Configurable Models with Model Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. #12;Engineering Structurally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PHASE I AND II PARKING STRUCTURE CONDITION SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 7.0 FIRE PROTECTION, structural, mechanical, fire protection, electrical and a specialty elevator consultant. Estimated of Hawaii at Manoa. The survey included a visual inspection of architectural, structural, mechanical, fire

42

Fragment of the chemical structure of type II and II-S kerogen in the Upper Jurassic and Upper Devonian formations of the East European Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is proposed for a fragment of the chemical structures of the geopolymers based on elemental ... Jurassic and Devonian formations in the East European Platform. The Sorg/C ratio in kerogen from oil shales ...

N. S. Burdelnaya; D. A. Bushev

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Pie Model of Capital Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model of the debt-equity ratio of the firms, graphically depicted in slices of a pie that represents the value of the firm...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

GLYDE-II and Lignin: An XML markup language for representing lignin structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in secondary plant cell walls are of particular interest for alternative fuel. However, another complex Miller2, Krys Kochut2, Will York1,3 1. Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Athens, Georgia, 30605 2. University of Georgia. Athens, Georgia, 30601 Introduction GLYDE-II (GLYcan structural Data Exchange using

Miller, John A.

45

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

46

Quantifying parsimony in structural equation modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fitting propensity (FP) is defined as a model's average ability to fit diverse data patterns, all else being equal. The relevance of FP to model selection is examined in the context of structural equation modeling (SEM). In SEM it is well known...

Preacher, K. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F. [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the analysis of the significance and the utility of getting a specific analytic black hole solution, several (unsuccessful) analytic and numerical approaches to the problem developed over the years are presented with some discussion about their results. The chapter closes with the latest numerical results that actually consists a major advancement in the effort to address the challenge, the presentation of the most recent analytic work trying (and unfortunately failing) to build a solution assuming the existence of unconventional scalar fields and some ideas about the routes the forthcoming analytic approaches should explore.

Nikolaos D. Pappas

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

51

Modeling joint friction in structural dynamics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of mechanical joints--typified by the lap joint--in otherwise linear structures has been accommodated in structural dynamics via ad hoc methods for a century. The methods range from tuning linear models to approximate non-linear behavior in restricted load ranges to various methods which introduce joint dissipation in a post-processing stage. Other methods, employing constitutive models for the joints are being developed and their routine use is on the horizon.

Segalman, Daniel Joseph

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci c | II ENSO prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci#12;c | II ENSO prediction by Youmin Tang 1 , William W: ytang@cims.nyu.edu #12; Abstract Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), a dynamical ocean model coupled Introduction Models for ENSO prediction can be categorized into purely statistical models, hybrid coupled

Hsieh, William

53

Comparison of ?Z-structure function models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The ?Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on ?Z-structure functions, F{sub 1,2,3}{sup ?Z}(x,Q{sup 2}). At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the ?Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

Rislow, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Modeling Heterogeneity in Indirect Effects: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heterogeneity implicit in much of social science research can be accommodated by using complex modeling procedures such as SEM or MLM. Ignoring heterogeneity, particularly with regard to nested data structures, can have serious consequences...

Fall, Emily C.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human carbonic anhydrases are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3-, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of a variant of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole) have been determined in order to identify the binding sites for such compounds, and a mechanism to explain the effects on catalytic activity is proposed.

Aggarwal, M.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coastal Structures Modeling Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structures Modeling Complex Structures Modeling Complex Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Structures Modeling Complex Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 54.9 Beam(m) 35.4 Depth(m) 1.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

58

Wake II model for hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines for the wave plus current case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kostas Lambrakos, for their time and advice relating the Wake II model, necessary for the success in completing this research. I am grateful to the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Institute of Petroleum) for its support during all my graduate...

Ramirez Sabag, Said

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EIS Studies of Porous Oxygen Electrodes with Discrete II. Transmission Line Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EIS Studies of Porous Oxygen Electrodes with Discrete Particles II. Transmission Line Modeling Chad conclusions. We describe a new model based on an array of parallel, nonuniform transmission lines to be the first porous electrode transmission line model that incorporates such physically realistic features

60

Structure of the minor pseudopilin XcpW from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type II secretion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes the type II secretion machinery to transport virulence factors through the outer membrane into the extracellular space. Five proteins in the type II secretion system share sequence homology with pilin subunits of type IV pili and are called the pseudopilins. The major pseudopilin X{sub cp}T{sub G} assembles into an intraperiplasmic pilus and is thought to act in a piston-like manner to push substrates through an outer membrane secretin. The other four minor pseudopilins, X{sub cp}U{sub H}, X{sub cp}V{sub I}, X{sub cp}W{sub J} and X{sub cp}X{sub K}, play less well defined roles in pseudopilus formation. It was recently discovered that these four minor pseudopilins form a quaternary complex that is presumed to initiate the formation of the pseudopilus and to localize to its tip. Here, the structure of X{sub cp}W{sub J} was refined to 1.85 {angstrom} resolution. The structure revealed the type IVa pilin fold with an embellished variable antiparallel {beta}-sheet as also found in the X{sub cp}W{sub J} homologue enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli G{sub sp}J{sub W} and the X{sub cp}U{sub H} homologue Vibrio cholerae E{sub ps}U{sub H}. It is proposed that the exposed surface of this sheet may cradle the long N-terminal 1 helix of another pseudopilin. The final 31 amino acids of the X{sub cp}W{sub J} structure are instrinsically disordered. Deletion of this unstructured region of X{sub cp}W{sub J} did not prevent type II secretion in vivo.

Franz, Laura P.; Douzi, Badreddine; Durand, Eric; Dyer, David H.; Voulhouxd, Rom; Forest, Katrina T. (CNRS-UMR); (CNRS-CRMD); (UW)

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what's elementary in the latter is considered 'advanced', if at all, in the former. It is little surprise then that published measurements typically contains neither error bars (for the random errors) nor estimates for the systematic in the former discipline. We have also showed how to estimate the state space by turn-by-turn data from two adjacent BPMs. And how to improve the resolution of the nonlinear resonance spectrum by Fourier analyzing the linear action variables instead of the betatron motion. In fact, the state estimator could be further improved by adding a Kalman filter. For transparency, we have also summarized on how these techniques provide a framework- and method for a TQM (Total Quality Management) approach for the main ring. Of course, to make the ($2.5M) turn-by-turn data acquisition system that is being implemented (for all the BPMs) useful, a means ({approx}10% contingency for the BPM system) to drive the beam is obviously required.

Bengtsson, J.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

1951-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

63

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF A NICKEL(II)-TRIPEPTIDE MIMIC OF NICKEL SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, prior to this work, the structure and chemical reactivity of the nickel-peptide complex were undefined. The work presented herein involves structural and reactivity investigations of the MAP-tag bound with NiII in the dianionic complex [Ni-NCC]2...

Glass, Amanda M.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Phenomenology of heterotic and type II orientifold string models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a variety of orientifold backgrounds. In particular, we construct ?ipped SU(5), Pati-Salam, and MSSM-like models. The phenomenological properties of these models are studied. For one model in particular, we ?nd that we may explain the quark masses...

Mayes, Van Eric

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Do you see what I see? Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects The team tried developing a computer model based on human neural structure and function,...

66

Modeling of magnetostrictive materials and structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constitutive model for a magnetostrictive material and its effect on the structural response is presented in this article. The example of magnetostrictive material considered is the TERFENOL-D. As like the piezoelectric material, this material has two constitutive laws, one of which is the sensing law and the other is the actuation law, both of which are highly coupled and non-linear. For the purpose of analysis, the constitutive laws can be characterized as coupled or uncoupled and linear or non linear. Coupled model is studied without assuming any explicit direct relationship with magnetic field. In the linear coupled model, which is assumed to preserve the magnetic flux line continuity, the elastic modulus, the permeability and magnetoelastic constant are assumed as constant. In the nonlinear-coupled model, the nonlinearity is decoupled and solved separately for the magnetic domain and the mechanical domain using two nonlinear curves, namely the stress vs. strain curve and the magnetic flux density vs. magnetic field curve. This is performed by two different methods. In the first, the magnetic flux density is computed iteratively, while in the second, the artificial neural network is used, where in the trained network will give the necessary strain and magnetic flux density for a given magnetic field and stress level. The effect of nonlinearity is demonstrated on a simple magnetostrictive rod.

Gopalakrishnan, S. [Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electronic structure of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductor cleavage surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of cleavage surfaces of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductors. CdSe(1120), CdSe(1010), and CdS(1010) were investigated. The STM images confirm a 11 reconstruction for all surfaces. At negative and positive sample voltages the occupied and empty dangling-bond states above anions and cations, respectively, dominate the contrast of the STM images. No states in the band gap were found. The electronic structure of the surface permits the observation of dopant atoms in subsurface layers and thus also cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy studies of point defects and heterostructures.

B. Siemens, C. Domke, Ph. Ebert, and K. Urban

1997-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

Mackey, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MODELING OF PERIODIC DIELECTRIC STRUCTURES (ELECTROMAGNETIC CRYSTALS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maxwell (1831­1879) #12;c John David Shumpert 2001 All Rights Reserved #12;Sola Deo Gloria ii #12 and Engineering (DDR&E) Multidisciplinary Univer- sity Research Initiative (MURI) on "Low Energy Electronics

Sarabandi, Kamal

70

Anomalous Stoichiometry Layered Structure and Magnetic Ordering of the Prussian Blue Analog [NEt4]2MnII3(CN)8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atypical of Prussian blue structured materials, Mn{sup II} and [NEt{sub 4}]CN react to form [NEt{sub 4}]{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}(CN){sub 8} possessing layers of octahedral [Mn{sup II}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-} bonded to two high-spin tetrahedral Mn{sup II} sites.

J Her; P Stephens; C Kareis; J Moore; J Miller

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Magnetic Bianchi type II string cosmological model in loop quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The loop quantum cosmology of the Bianchi type II string cosmological model in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field is studied. We present the effective equations which provide modifications to the classical equations of motion due to quantum effects. The numerical simulations confirm that the big bang singularity is resolved by quantum gravity effects.

Victor Rikhvitsky; Bijan Saha; Mihai Visinescu

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND ITS ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ­ Hybrid power train, power-split eCVT, rule-based control strategy, Toyota Hybrid System, driver the challenge of minimizing the consumption of the road transport. Although hybrid power train technologies did

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

TR-IIS-06-003 A Scarce Resource Model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Shih, T.W. Kuo and J.W.S. Liu April 6, 2006 || Technical Report No. TR-IIS-06-003 http and J. W. S. Liu Abstract This report describes a resource model for medication scheduling. It is called with Department of Computer Science and Information Science, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. J. W. S. Liu

Chen, Sheng-Wei

74

22Mathematical Model of Magnetic Field Lines -II Magnets have a north and a south  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22Mathematical Model of Magnetic Field Lines - II Magnets have a north and a south pole. If you and 4 to complete the magnetic field line drawing! Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12 diagram in the First Quadrant into quadrants 2, 3 and 4 to complete the magnetic field line drawing

75

Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 C and 1,500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pas. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Are collisions with neutral hydrogen important for modelling the Second Solar Spectrum of Ti I and Ca II ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical interpretation of scattering line polarization offers a novel diagnostic window for exploring the thermal and magnetic structure of the quiet regions of the solar atmosphere. Here we evaluate the impact of isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms on the scattering polarization signals of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I and on those of the K line and of the IR triplet of Ca II, with emphasis on the collisional transfer rates between nearby J-levels. To this end, we calculate the linear polarization produced by scattering processes considering realistic multilevel models and solving the statistical equilibrium equations for the multipolar components of the atomic density matrix. We confirm that the lower levels of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I are completely depolarized by elastic collisions. We find that upper-level collisional depolarization turns out to have an unnoticeable impact on the emergent linear polarization amplitudes, except for the ${\\lambda 4536$ line for which it is possible to notice a rather small depolarization caused by the collisional transfer rates. Concerning the Ca II lines, we show that the collisional rates play no role on the polarization of the upper level of the K line, while they have a rather small depolarizing effect on the atomic polarization of the metastable lower levels of the Ca II IR triplet.

M. Derouich; J. Trujillo Bueno; R. Manso Sainz

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Numerical models of black body dominated GRBs: II. Emission properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend an existing theoretical model to explain the class of Black-Body Dominated (BBD) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), long lasting events characterized by the presence of a significant thermal component trailing the GRB prompt emission, and also by an absence of a traditional afterglow. GRB 101225A, the Christmas Burst, is a prototype of such class. It has been suggested that BBD-GRBs could be observed after a merger in a binary system consisting of a neutron star and a Helium core of a main sequence star. Using detailed relativistic hydrodynamic numerical simulations we model the propagation of ultrarelativistic jets through the environments created by such mergers. In this paper we focus on explaining the emission properties of the jet evolution computing the whole radiative signature (both thermal and non-thermal) of the jet dynamical evolution. A comprehensive parameter study of the jet/environment interaction has been performed and synthetic spectra and light curves are compared with the observational data...

Cuesta-Martnez, Carlos F; Mimica, Petar; Thne, Christina C; de Ugarte-Postigo, Antonio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Shell model level structure of 216Fr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sources of 220Ac in secular equilibrium with 221Pa were produced using the reaction 209Bi(18O,3n)224Pa. The alpha decay of 220Ac and coincident gamma and electron spectra were used to study the level structure of 216Fr. The levels in 216Fr can be interpreted in terms of the ?(h9/2)9/25?(g9/2)9/23, ?(h9/2)04(f7/2)7/2?(g9/2)9/23, and ?(h9/2)9/25?(g9/2)02(i11/2)11/2 shell model configurations. The alpha decay hindrance factors of the ground state to ground state transitions in the sequence 224Pa?220Ac?216Fr?212At suggest the collapse of quadrupole-octupole Nilsson orbitals into the more degenerate shell model orbitals. The sequence of hindrance factors in this odd chain are mirrored in the corresponding odd proton and odd neutron sequences beginning with 223Pa and 223Th, respectively.

R. K. Sheline; C. F. Liang; P. Paris; A. Gizon

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordinastion polymers based on amino-tetrazole and phenylcarboxylate: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescent properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Zn(II) and Cd(II) compounds with the in-situ generated ligand of 5-amino-tetrazolate (atz{sup -}) were prepared from the hydrothermal reactions of the corresponding Cd or Zn(II) salts with phenylcarboxylate, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and TGA. The results of X-ray crystallographic analysis reveal that compound [Zn{sub 2}(BZA)(atz){sub 2}(OH)]{sub n} (1) (BZA=benzoic acid) presents a two-dimensional (2D) 'hcb' topological network constructed from the ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 2} tetrahedra. In compound [Cd{sub 6}(atz){sub 6}(PTA){sub 3}]{sub n} (2) (PTA=terephthalic acid), the identical [Cd{sub 3}(atz){sub 3})]{sup 3+}{sub n} clusters are connected by atz ligands to generate a 2D cationic layer, and the neighboring cationic layers are pillared by PTA giving birth to 3D network. After simplifying, the complicated 3D network of 2 can be presented as an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. The formations of the structures show a good example that using the combination of the in-situ generated ligand and other coligand synthetic strategy can construct interesting topological structures. The thermal stabilities and fluorescent properties of the complexes have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two d{sup 10} metal complexes have been synthesized by employing mixed-ligand synthetic approach. Complex 1 presents a 2D 'hcb' topological network. Complex 2 shows an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coligand synthetic strategy was applied to obtain new MOFs with useful properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes were constructed from the mixed-ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topologically, compound 2 presented an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two compounds may be excellent candidates for potential photoactive material.

Liu, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: liudongsheng@jgsu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China) [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Sui, Yan; Chen, Weng-Tong; Huang, Jian-Gen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Jian-Zhong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Huang, Chang-Cang, E-mail: cchuang@fzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

MODELING THE NEAR-UV BAND OF GK STARS. II. NON-LTE MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a grid of atmospheric models and synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for late-type dwarfs and giants of solar and 1/3 solar metallicity with many opacity sources computed in self-consistent non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE), and compare them to the LTE grid of Short and Hauschildt (Paper I). We describe, for the first time, how the NLTE treatment affects the thermal equilibrium of the atmospheric structure (T({tau}) relation) and the SED as a finely sampled function of T{sub eff}, log g, and [A/H] among solar metallicity and mildly metal-poor red giants. We compare the computed SEDs to the library of observed spectrophotometry described in Paper I across the entire visible band, and in the blue and red regions of the spectrum separately. We find that for the giants of both metallicities, the NLTE models yield best-fit T{sub eff} values that are 30-90 K lower than those provided by LTE models, while providing greater consistency between log g values, and, for Arcturus, T{sub eff} values, fitted separately to the blue and red spectral regions. There is marginal evidence that NLTE models give more consistent best-fit T{sub eff} values between the red and blue bands for earlier spectral classes among the solar metallicity GK giants than they do for the later classes, but no model fits the blue-band spectrum well for any class. For the two dwarf spectral classes that we are able to study, the effect of NLTE on derived parameters is less significant. We compare our derived T{sub eff} values to several other spectroscopic and photometric T{sub eff} calibrations for red giants, including one that is less model dependent based on the infrared flux method (IRFM). We find that the NLTE models provide slightly better agreement to the IRFM calibration among the warmer stars in our sample, while giving approximately the same level of agreement for the cooler stars.

Ian Short, C.; Campbell, Eamonn A. [Department of Astronomy and Physics and Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada); Pickup, Heather [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Hauschildt, Peter H., E-mail: ishort@ap.smu.ca, E-mail: yeti@hs.uni-hamburg.de [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, 21029 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for Mathematical and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 24, 2009 ... proach does not scramble the block structure of the problem, and thus it ...... J. Gondzio, Optimization modeling languages, in Handbook of Ap-.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to light Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion in type-II two-Higgs-doublet model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the precision predictions on the pair production of light, $CP$-even Higgs in weak vector boson fusion (VBF) up to the QCD next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) at hadron colliders within the $CP$-conserving type-II two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM(II)) by adopting the structure function approach. We investigate the model parameter dependence, residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, PDFs and $\\alpha_s$ on the integrated cross section at the QCD NNLO, and find that the NNLO QCD corrections can reduce the scale uncertainty significantly. By analyzing the kinematic distributions of final Higgs bosons, we can extract the $CP$-even Higgs resonance via $H^0 \\to h^0 h^0$ channel as a means of probing the extension of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs sector.

Li Wei-Hua; Zhang Ren-You; Ma Wen-Gan; Guo Lei; Ling Liu-Sheng; Li Xiao-Zhou

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to light Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion in type-II two-Higgs-doublet model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the precision predictions on the pair production of light, $CP$-even Higgs in weak vector boson fusion (VBF) up to the QCD next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) at hadron colliders within the $CP$-conserving type-II two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM(II)) by adopting the structure function approach. We investigate the model parameter dependence, residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, PDFs and $\\alpha_s$ on the integrated cross section at the QCD NNLO, and find that the NNLO QCD corrections can reduce the scale uncertainty significantly. By analyzing the kinematic distributions of final Higgs bosons, we can extract the $CP$-even Higgs resonance via $H^0 \\to h^0 h^0$ channel as a means of probing the extension of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs sector.

Wei-Hua, Li; Wen-Gan, Ma; Lei, Guo; Liu-Sheng, Ling; Xiao-Zhou, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to light Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the precision predictions on the pair production of light, CP-even Higgs boson in weak vector boson fusion (VBF) up to the QCD next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) at hadron colliders within the CP-conserving type II two-Higgs-doublet model [2HDM(II)] by adopting the structure function approach. We investigate the model parameter dependence, residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, PDFs, and ?s on the integrated cross section at the QCD NNLO and find that the NNLO QCD corrections can reduce the scale uncertainty significantly. By analyzing the kinematic distributions of final Higgs bosons, we can extract the CP-even Higgs resonance via the H0?h0h0 channel as a means of probing the extension of the standard model (SM) Higgs sector.

Wei-Hua Li; Ren-You Zhang; Wen-Gan Ma; Lei Guo; Liu-Sheng Ling; Xiao-Zhou Li

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Generating Counterexamples for Structural Inductions by Exploiting Nonstandard Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Counterexamples for Structural Inductions by Exploiting Nonstandard Models Jasmin 2 Dept. of CSE, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract. Induction proofs the theorem or prove auxiliary properties before performing the induction step. (Counter)model finders

Cengarle, María Victoria

86

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Oprsal, Ivo

87

A dynamic term structure model of Central Bank policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the implications of explicitly modeling the monetary policy of the Central Bank within a Dynamic Term Structure Model (DTSM). We follow Piazzesi (2005) and implement monetary policy by including ...

Staker, Shawn W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Phenomenological band structure model of magnetic coupling in semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological band structure model of magnetic coupling in semiconductors Gustavo M. Dalpian a,1­18]. Several models have been proposed to explain the phenomena, including the phenomenological Zener

Gong, Xingao

89

Modeling covariance structure in unbalanced longitudinal data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and BIC for several models for Kenward?s cattle data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2 Simulation results for fixed-effects models: average maximum like- lihood estimators and Monte Carlo standard deviations from the true model and five... scenarios considered in the simulation study. . . . 34 3 Simulation results for mixed-effects models: average maximum likelihood estimators and Monte Carlo standard deviations from the true model and five scenarios considered in the simulation study. . 55 ix...

Chen, Min

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

XMM observation of M~87 II. Abundance structure of the interstellar and intergalactic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on a detailed study of the temperature structure of the intracluster medium in the halo of M~87, abundance profiles of 7 elements, O, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe are derived. In addition, abundance ratios are derived from the ratios of line strengths, whose temperature dependences are small within the temperature range of the ICM of M~87. The abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe show strong decreasing gradients outside 2$'$ and become nearly constant within the radius at $\\sim1.5$ solar. The Fe/Si ratio is determined to be 0.9 solar with no radial gradient. In contrast, the O abundance is less than a half of the Si abundance at the center and has a flatter gradient. The Mg abundance is $\\sim$1 solar within 2$'$, which is close to stellar abundance within the same radius. The O/Si/Fe pattern of M~87 is located at the simple extension of that of Galactic stars. The observed Mg/O ratio is about 1.25 solar, which is also the same ratio as for Galactic stars. The O/Si/Fe ratio indicates that the SN Ia contribution to Si and Fe becomes important towards the center and SN Ia products have similar abundances of Si and Fe at least around M~87, which may reflect dimmer SN Ia observed in old stellar systems. The S abundance is similar to the Si abundance at the center, but has a steeper gradient. This result suggests that the S/Si ratio of SN II products is much smaller than the solar ratio.

Kyoko Matsushita; Alexis Finoguenov; Hans Bhringer

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lower bounds on sample size in structural equation modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computationally intensive structural equation modeling (SEM) approaches have been in development over much of the 20th century, initiated by the seminal work of Sewall Wright. To this day, sample size requirements remain a vexing question in SEM based ... Keywords: AMOS, Common factor bias, Gini correlation, LISREL, PLS, Partial least squares, Rule of 10, SEM, Sample size, Structural equation modeling

J. Christopher Westland

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Investigation of tornado models and structure by use of radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortex Theory . parent Call Structure Distributioa of snd Coaditioas in the Air Masses . Tornado Structure ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~, ~ ~ ~ * Dissussiea of Ccaditions and Models Revise of Various Models . Directioa of plou Directica of Rotstioa... Vortex 30 10. Ridge of Cold Air with Contour Lines ll. Norixontal Pro)ection of Tornado and Associated 33 Thunderstorn Call 37 12. Vertical Cross Section through the Eye of a Tornado Justification. Contributions to our knowledge of the structure...

Finley, William Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and sensible heat fluxes appear to occupy intermediate positions between these extremes, but the existing large observational uncertainties in these processes make this a provisional assessment. In all selected processes as well, the error statistics are found to be sensitive to season and latitude sector, confirming the need for finer-scale analyses which also are in progress.

Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Internal Dynamics, Structure and Formation of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies: II. Rotating Versus Non-Rotating Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially-resolved internal kinematics and stellar chemical abundances for a sample of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster observed with Keck/ESI. We find that 4 out of 17 dEs have major axis rotation velocities consistent with rotational flattening, while the remaining dEs have no detectable major axis rotation. Despite this difference in internal kinematics, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their position in the Fundamental Plane, morphological structure, stellar populations, and local environment. We present evidence for faint underlying disks and/or weak substructure in a fraction of both rotating and non-rotating dEs, but a comparable number of counter-examples exist for both types which show no evidence of such structure. Absorption-line strengths were determined based on the Lick/IDS system (Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270, Fe5335) for the central region of each galaxy. We find no difference in the line-strength indices, and hence stellar populations, between rotating and non-rotating dE galaxies. The best-fitting mean age and metallicity for our 17 dE sample are 5 Gyr and Fe/H = -0.3 dex, respectively, with rms spreads of 3 Gyr and 0.1 dex. The majority of dEs are consistent with solar alpha/Fe abundance ratios. By contrast, the stellar populations of classical elliptical galaxies are, on average, older, more metal rich, and alpha-enhanced relative to our dE sample. The local environments of both dEs types appear to be diverse in terms of their proximity to larger galaxies in real or velocity space within the Virgo Cluster. Thus, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their structure, stellar content, and local environments, presenting a significant challenge to theoretical models of their formation. (abridged)

M. Geha; P. Guhathakurta; R. van der Marel

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Tetragonal structure model for boehmite-derived ?-alumina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-alumina (?-Al2O3) derived from boehmite has historically been described as having a cubic spinel structure with Fd3m symmetry, despite reports of tetragonal distortion in the structure. Based on neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR data, we propose a tetragonal model for the structure of boehmite-derived ?-Al2O3 with I41/amd space group symmetry, a maximal subgroup of Fd3m. It is also demonstrated that an accurate average structural model cannot be achieved if the cations are restricted to spinel positions.

G. Paglia; C. E. Buckley; A. L. Rohl; B. A. Hunter; R. D. Hart; J. V. Hanna; L. T. Byrne

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model Evaluation (RP-1097)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE 1 ABSTRACT: Sorption data obtained by using small environmental chambers under to evaluate the linear Langmuir model and the diffusion model for VOC sorption by different building materials

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

99

A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning with a frequency glide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning and the level-dependent compressive nonlinearity into a phenomenological model for the AN was the primary focus nonlinear phenomenological model for the response patterns of AN fibers to different sound inputs

Carney, Laurel H.

100

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the Corrective Action Strategy in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Artificial Neural Networks and Hidden Markov Models for Predicting the Protein Structures: The Secondary Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Artificial Neural Networks and Hidden Markov Models for Predicting the Protein Structures advice on the development of this project #12;2 Artificial Neural Networks and Hidden Markov Models learning methods: artificial neural networks (ANN) and hidden Markov models (HMM) (Rost 2002; Karplus et al

102

The IMPACTT model: Structure and technical description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies model, or IMPACTT, is a spreadsheet model that calculates the effect of advanced-technology vehicles and market penetration on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs include estimates of the quantity and value of oil displaced and emissions reduced by advanced-technology vehicles, the quantity of alternative fuels they consume, and the total incremental costs bome by purchasers of advanced-technology vehicles. In the current version of IMPACTT, up to eight fuel or engine technologies applicable to light-duty vehicles can be modeled by using a three-phase approach. First, the vehicle stock and miles traveled by the advanced-technology vehicle are determined. Second, assumptions about efficiency and fuel shares are used to estimate substitution-fuel use and oil displacement. Third, changes in emissions of carbon monoxide, non-methane hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide are computed.

Mintz, M.M.; Tompkins, M.M.; Camp, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Linking Models and Data on Vegetation Structure Submitted to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linking Models and Data on Vegetation Structure Submitted to: Journal of Geophysical Research the original development of "Nachhaltigkeit" or in English "sustainability" with the Germans in the mid-18th

Moorcroft, Paul R.

104

Purchasing Power Parity: Error Correction Models and Structural Breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines purchasing power parity (PPP) behavior using error correction models (ECM) and allowing for structural breaks. We distinguish four different objectives: first, this paper examines which var...

Amalia Morales Zumaquero; Rodrigo Peruga Urrea

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE RF. McKenna and S structlJre and unconsolidated ice ridges. The tests were conducted with a 0.32 m diameter structure in unconsolidated ridges are given in McKenna el al. (1995). The tests provide a means of correlating the forces

Bruneau, Steve

106

Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (345)(3{sup 2}456{sup 2}7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 13. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 13 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Synthesis, structural characterization and ferrimagnetic property of MnPS{sub 3} intercalated with nickel(II) cyclopolyamine complex cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new intercalation compounds were prepared by the reactions of Ni(II) cyclopolyamine complex cations with a preintercalate Mn{sub 1-x}PS{sub 3}K{sub 2x}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}, respectively, through 'ion exchange' process. Their structures were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The lattice spacing increased 0.567 and 1.093nm with respect to the pristine MnPS{sub 3}. Ferrimagnetism of the intercalates was confirmed by SQUID experiment with T{sub c} at 40 and 33K, respectively.

Yang Kai [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China); Su Xu [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China); Zhang Xuan [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China); Chen Xingguo [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China); Fu Enqin [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China)]. E-mail: fueq@chem.whu.edu.cn; Qin Jingui [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuhan City, Hubei Province 430072 (China); Inokuchi, Makoto [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Environmental Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi 1-1-1 Daigaku-dori, Onoda, Yamaguchi 756-0884 (Japan)]. E-mail: inokuchi@ed.yama.tus.ac.jp; Kinoshita, Minoru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Environmental Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi 1-1-1 Daigaku-dori, Onoda, Yamaguchi 756-0884 (Japan)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Creative industries urban model: structure and functioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initiate office refurbishment/construction projects and real estate refurbishment/development projects accordingly. In addition, by studying the evolution of land-use transformation displayed by the model, areas not productive to invest are easily... ). Later, their contribution to support urban creativity (Stam and Jeroen et al, 2008; Scott, 2006), facilitate urban regeneration (Pratt, 2009; Evans, 2005), and promote sustainable urban development (Kakiuchi, 2012; Forum for the Future, 2010) is also...

Liu, Helen; Silva, Elisabete A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modelling Zn (II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model Tertre E.1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling Zn (II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model Tertre E.1.tertre@univ-poitiers.fr Keywords: ion exchange theory, zinc, clayey sediments, geochemical modelling, sorption and desorption the behaviour of these contaminants and, in particular, the sorption reactions on mineral surfaces. In this way

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Bs?l+l- in a type-II two-Higgs-doublet model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the process Bs?l+l- in a type-II two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) and the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). All the leading terms of Wilson coefficients relevant to the process are given in the large tan ? limit. It is shown that the decay width for Bs?l+l- depends on all parameters except mA0 in the 2HDM. The branching ratio of Bs??+?- can reach its experimental bound in some large tan ? regions of the parameter space in the MSSM because the amplitude increases as tan3? in the regions. For l=?, the branching ratio can even reach 10-4 in the regions. Therefore, the experimental measurements of leptonic decays of Bs could put a constraint on the contributions of neutral Higgs bosons and consequently the parameter space in the MSSM.

Chao-Shang Huang, Liao Wei, Qi-Shu Yan, and Shou-Hua Zhu

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Scaled Experimental Modeling of Geologic Structures Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uncertainty associated with hydrocarbon exploration and production. Furthermore, experimental models allow us in the Department of Geological Sciences at Rutgers University. She has thirty years of experience in the oil & gas experimental models provide valuable information about structural processes, especially those not observed

112

Material-modeling and structural-mechanics aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material-modeling and structural-mechanics aspects of the traumatic brain injury problem M for causing traumatic brain injury. Design/methodology/approach ­ Two levels of blast peak overpressure were computational investigation of impact on a human skull/brain assembly. Keywords Brain, Injuries, Modeling

Grujicic, Mica

113

Modeling Structural Heterogeneity in Proteins From X-Ray Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Structural Heterogeneity in Proteins From X-Ray Data Ankur Dhanik1 , Henry van den Bedem2: In a crystallographic experiment, a protein is precipitated to obtain a crystalline sample (crystal) containing many determination and density calculation. The protein conformation is modeled by placing the atoms in 3-D space

Pratt, Vaughan

114

Renaissance of paper models and folded plate structures in glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of glass folded plate structures. Glass will not only be used as a transparent covering but as a load-bearing element for the whole structure. A complete outline ranging from the architectural approach including simple paper models to structural analysis will be presented. The structural concept and its functional characteristics will be confirmed by finite element analysis. Moreover, this paper will also put into focus the geometrical diversity and individuality and will present mathematical algorithms as definitions of the geometrical freeform.

Stefan Trometer; Mathias Krupna

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

116

Modeling and Feed?Forward Control of Structural Elastic Robots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper an approach for modeling and control of robots with elasticities in power trains and in structural parts is presented and experimentally verified. For this purpose object?oriented nonlinear models are developed in the modeling language Modelica. A system theoretical study of the generated models shows that a direct inversion of the models due to the unstable zero dynamics is not possible. Therefore an algorithm for the approximate inversion is developed. With this inversion method an approximate inverse model considering structural elasticity for a 6?axis robot is created and verified for the control of the robot. The new control leads to a considerable improvement of the driving characteristics of the robot in the experiment.

M. Reiner; M. Otter; H. Ulbrich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Molecular, crystal, and electronic structure of the cobalt(II) complex with 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol (HL) with cobalt(II) acetate gives the coordination compound [CoL{sub 2}] {center_dot} CHCl{sub 3} (I). The molecular and crystal structure of I is determined by X-ray diffraction. The coordination polyhedron of the Co atom in complex I is an octahedron. The anion L acts as a tridentate chelating ligand and is coordinated to the Co atom through the phenanthrenequinone O1 atom and the benzothiazole N1 atom of the moieties L and the N3 atom of the azo group to form two five-membered metallocycles. The molecular and electronic structures of the compounds HL, L, and CoL{sub 2} are studied at the density functional theory level. The results of the quantum-chemical calculations are in good agreement with the values determined by X-ray diffraction.

Linko, R. V., E-mail: rlinko@mail.ru [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Sokol, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Polyanskaya, N. A.; Ryabov, M. A.; Strashnov, P. V.; Davydov, V. V. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Sergienko, V. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup: IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMEX-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency sponsored a Coordinated Research Project on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup (FUMEX-II). Eighteen fuel modelling groups participated with the intention of improving their capabilities to understand and predict the behaviour of water reactor fuel at high burnups. The exercise was carried out in coordination with the OECD/NEA. The participants used a mixture of data derived from actual irradiation histories of high burnup experimental fuel and commercial irradiations where post-irradiation examination measurements are available, combined with idealised power histories intended to represent possible future extended dwell commercial irradiations and test code capabilities at high burnup. All participants have been asked to model nine priority cases out of some 27 cases made available to them for the exercise from the IAEA/OECD International Fuel Performance Experimental Database. Calculations carried out by the participants, particularly for the idealised cases, have shown how varying modelling assumptions affect the high burnup predictions, and have led to an understanding of the requirements of future high burnup experimental data to help discriminate between modelling assumptions. This understanding is important in trying to model transient and fault behaviour at high burnup. It is important to recognise that the code predictions presented here should not be taken to indicate that some codes do not perform well. The codes have been designed for different applications and have differing assumptions and validation ranges; for example codes intended to predict Candu fuel operation with thin wall collapsible cladding do not need the clad creep and gap conductivity modelling found in PWR codes. Therefore, when a case is based on Candu technology or PWR technology, it is to be expected that the codes may not agree. However, it is the very differences in such behaviour that is useful in helping to understand the effects of such internal modelling. (authors)

Killeen, J.C. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Turnbull, J.A. [Cherry-Lyn, Tockington, South Glos (United Kingdom); Sartori, E. [OECD/NEA, 12 Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Spin Topological Model for the g ) 4.1 S2 State Photosystem II Water Oxidase Manganese Aggregate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ReceiVed NoVember 30, 1998 The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes*, Departments of Chemistry Eugene F. Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 photosynthetic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Although the precise structure of the OEC is unknown

Hendrich, Mike

120

Structure-Based Identification of Energy Sinks in Plant Light-Harvesting Complex II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, the latter causes the excited states of the PPC to be delocalized over several pigments and the corresponding energy levels to be shifted with respect to the site energies. ... A survey is given in Figure 9. ... (ii) Assuming a high site energy for Chla 604 in accordance with Novoderezhkin et al.(53) (i.e., E4 > E10), Chla 604 could still transfer excitation energy to other Chla even from a weakly dipole-allowed low-lying state (in the same way as a dark carotenoid state could do), so that it is a bottleneck rather than an exciton trap. ...

Frank Mu?h; Mohamed El-Amine Madjet; Thomas Renger

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field is a blind geothermalprospect (i.e., no surface hot springs) along the west flank of BlueMountain in southern Humboldt County, Nevada. Developmentwells in the system have high flow rates and temperatures above190°C at depths of ~600 to 1,070 m. Blue Mountain is a small~8-km-long east-tilted fault block situated between the EugeneMountains and Slumbering Hills. The geothermal field occupiesthe intersection between a regional NNE- to ENE-striking,west-dipping

122

Advances on statistical/thermodynamical models for unpolarized structure functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the eights and nineties many statistical/thermodynamical models were proposed to describe the nucleons' structure functions and distribution of the quarks in the hadrons. Most of these models describe the compound quarks and gluons inside the nucleon as a Fermi / Bose gas respectively, confined in a MIT bag with continuous energy levels. Another models considers discrete spectrum. Some interesting features of the nucleons are obtained by these models, like the sea asymmetries {sup -}d/{sup -}u and {sup -}d-{sup -}u.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Campus do Mucuri, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl II Barra Funda, 01140070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modelling and analysis of a novel wind turbine structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study introduces a novel wind turbine structure for an urban environment. A computational modelling has been conducted to investigate the effect of the new structure on the flow behaviour of entrance wind through the structure and the feasibility of the new wind turbine working at different wind speeds in an urban area. The wind flow behaviour through a chamber of the wind turbine structure has resulted in an increase of 1.3 times of the wind velocity at the outlet of the wind turbine. This is equivalent to 2.5 times increase of wind energy. The wind tunnel tests were carried out to validate the simulation results. There is a good correlation between the experimental and computational results. It is evident that the presented computational method can predict and evaluate the performance of this new type of shroud structure in an urban environment.

Xu Zhang; Yong K. Chen; Rajnish K. Calay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Transport Processes in the Tropical Warm Pool Boundary Layer. Part II: Vertical Structure and Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the intertropical convergence zone ITCZ cloud-topped marine atmospheric boundary layer away from the most intense mesoscale convective systems during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response ...

A. G. Williams; J. M. Hacker; H. Kraus

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Statistical quark models for the nucleon structure functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider some existing relativistic models for the nucleon structure functions, relying on statistical approaches instead of perturbative ones. These models are based on the Fermi-Dirac distribution for the confined quarks, where a density of energy levels is obtained from an effective confining potential. In this context, it is presented some results obtained with a recent statistical quark model for the sea-quark asymmetry in the nucleon. It is shown, within this model, that experimental available observables, such as the ratio and difference between proton and neutron structure functions, are quite well reproduced with just three parameters: two chemical potentials used to reproduce the valence up and down quark numbers in the nucleon, and a temperature that is being used to reproduce the Gottfried sum rule violation.

Mirez, Carlos [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271, Barra-Funda, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271, Barra-Funda, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia, Engenharia e Tecnologia - ICET, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri - UFVJM, Campus do Mucuri, Rua do Cruzeiro 01, Jardim Sao Paulo, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Structural properties and spatial ordering in multilayered ZnMgTe/ZnSe type-II quantum dot structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the structural properties and spatial ordering of multilayer ZnMgTe quantum dots (QDs) embedded in ZnSe, where sub-monolayer quantities of Mg were introduced periodically during growth in order to reduce the valence band offset of ZnTe QDs. The periodicity, period dispersion, individual layer thickness, and the composition of the multilayer structures were determined by comparing the experimental high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) spectra to simulated ones for the allowed (004) and quasi-forbidden (002) reflections in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles confirmed the incorporation of Mg inside the QD layers, and the HRXRD analysis revealed that there is approximately 32% Mg in the ZnMgTe QDs. The presence of Mg contributes to higher scattering intensity of the HRXRD, leading to the observation of higher order superlattice peaks in both the (004) and (002) reflections. The distribution of scattered intensity in the reciprocal space map (RSM) shows that the diffuse scattered intensity is elongated along the q{sub x} axis, indicating a vertical correlation of the dots, which is found to be less defined for the sample with larger periodicity. The diffuse scattered intensity is also found to be weakly correlated along the q{sub z} direction indicating a weak lateral correlation of the dots.

Manna, U.; Noyan, I. C.; Neumark, G. F. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zhang, Q.; Moug, R. [Department of Chemistry, City College of CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Salakhutdinov, I. F. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Flushing, New York 11367 (United States); Dunn, K. A.; Novak, S. W. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Tamargo, M. C. [Department of Chemistry, City College of CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Kuskovsky, I. L. [Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Flushing, New York 11367 (United States); Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: II. Structural changes and H desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural properties and H desorption from embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs) following irradiation with swift heavy ions were investigated as a function of energy and fluence. From x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis, Pt-H bonding was identified in NCs annealed in a forming gas (95% N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2}) ambient. The H content decreased upon irradiation and the desorption process was NC-size dependent such that larger NCs required a higher fluence to achieve a H-free state. Pt-H bonding and NC dissolution both perturbed the NC structural parameters (coordination number, bond-length and mean-square relative displacement) as determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Superoxide dismutase activity and novel reactions with hydrogen peroxide of histidine-containing nickel(II)-oligopeptide complexes and nickel(II)-induced structural changes in synthetic DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At physiologic pH values, histidine-containing nickel(II) oligopeptides reduced the flux of superoxide anion (O2) generated in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system. The postulated involvement of the Ni(III)/N...

E. Nieboer; R. T. Tom; F. E. Rossetto

131

Structural Dimensions, Fabrication, Materials, and Operational History for Types I and II Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste is confined in 48 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste will eventually be processed and transferred to other site facilities for stabilization. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks, including those with flaws and/or defects, will be required to be in service for another 15 to 20 years. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a leak-tight barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis event which include loading from both normal service and abnormal conditions.

Wiersma, B.J.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Damped Lyman alpha systems and galaxy formation models - II. High ions and Lyman limit systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a model for the high-ionization state gas associated with observed damped Lyman-alpha systems, based on a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation set within the paradigm of hierarchical structure formation. In our model, the hot gas in halos and sub-halos gives rise to CIV absorption, while the low-ionization state gas is associated with the cold gas in galaxies. The model matches the distribution of CIV column densities and leads naturally to kinematic properties that are in good agreement with the data. We examine the contribution of both hot and cold gas to sub-damped systems and suggest that the properties of these systems can be used as an important test of the model. We expect that sub-DLA systems will generally be composed of a single gas disk and thus predict that they should have markedly different kinematics than the damped systems. Finally, we find that hot halo gas produces less than one third of Lyman limit systems at redshift three. We model the contribution of mini-halos (halos with virial velocities < 35 km/s) to Lyman limit systems and find that they may contain as much gas as is observed in these systems. However, if we adopt realistic models of the gas density distribution we find that these systems are not a significant source of Lyman limit absorption. Instead we suggest that uncollapsed gas outside of virialized halos is responsible for most of the Lyman limit systems at high redshift.

Ariyeh H. Maller; Jason X. Prochaska; Rachel S. Somerville; Joel R. Primack

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The structural model is based on the role of subsurface igneous dikes providing a buttressing effect in a regional strain field such that permeability is greatly enhanced. The basic thermal anomaly at McCoy was defined by substantial U.S. Department of Energy-funded temperature gradient drilling and geophysical studies conducted during the period 1978 to 1982. This database will be augmented with modern magnetotelluric, controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric, and 2D/3D reflection seismic surveys to define likely fluid up-flow plumes that will be drilled with slant-hole technology. Two sites for production-capable wells will be drilled in geothermally prospective areas identified in this manner. The uniqueness of this proposal lies in the use of a full suite of modern geophysical tools, use of slant-hole drilling, and the extensive technical database from previous DOE funding.

134

The PDB_REDO server for macromolecular structure model optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The PDB_REDO pipeline aims to improve macromolecular structures by optimizing the crystallographic refinement parameters and performing partial model building. Here, algorithms are presented that allowed a web-server implementation of PDB_REDO, and the first user results are discussed.

Joosten, R.P.

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Structural Modelling of Financial Constraints on Investment: Where Do We  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Modelling of Financial Constraints on Investment: Where Do We Stand? Jean tests of investment facing financial constraints, to their link with firms data and asset prices the interpretation of the sensitivity of investment to liquidity variables such as cash flow as a measure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Structured Deformations as Energy Minimizers in Models of Fracture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Deformations as Energy Minimizers in Models of Fracture and Hysteresis R. Choksi and for a bar experiencing both smooth exten- sion and macroscopic fractures then are determined, and applications to the shearing of single crystals and to the cohesive fracture of solids are discussed. Yield

137

Bayesian Estimation and Testing of Structural Equation Models Richard Scheines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carnegie Mellon University, USA Herbert Hoijtink Dept. of Methodology and Statistics University of Utrecht applying the Gibbs sampler to structural equation models to the first author at a 1994 workshop be applied to obtain a sample from the posterior distribution over the parameters of a SEM. We present

Spirtes, Peter

138

Coupling structural and functional models for interaction design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......map. Structural models, such as the subway map in this example, describe the internal...instance, returning to the example of the subway passenger given above, the passenger's...word processor, a cellular phone, a car audio system, and an ultrasonic device. The......

Dong-Seok Lee; Wan Chul Yoon

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A meta-modeling simulation of structure abandonment timing decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An offshore oil and gas structure will be decommissioned and removed from service at the end of its productive life, depending upon operator preferences, legislative requirements, and strategic opportunities. The basic aim of decommissioning is to render all wells permanently safe and remove most, if not all, surface/seabed signs of production activity. The purpose of this paper is to characterize the timing decisions associated with abandoning offshore oil and gas structures. Three models are developed, ranging from a production-based forecast to a risked, net present value approach. Functions that describe how the age of the structure upon abandonment is related to system parameters is constructed using a meta-modeling simulation and illustrated on a generic field development scenario.

Mark J. Kaiser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Multiobjective Tuning of Grid-Enabled Earth System Models Using a Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tuning of parameters in climate models is essential to provide reliable long-term forecasts of Earth system behaviour. In this paper we present the first application of the multiobjective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) to the GENIE-1 ...

A. R. Price; I. I. Voutchkov; G. E. Pound; N. R. Edwards; T. M. Lenton; S. J. Cox

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

X-ray Structure of Mercerized Cellulose II at 1 Resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A revised crystal structure for mercerized cellulose based on high-resolution synchrotron X-ray data collected from ramie fibers is reported (space group P21, a = 8.10(3) , b = 9.03(3) , c = 10.31(5) , ? = 117.10(5); 751 reflections in 304 composite ...

Paul Langan; Yoshiharu Nishiyama; Henri Chanzy

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an information bridge between super-resolution microscopy and structural biology by using generative models

Matsuda, Noboru

143

Japan Sea Thermohaline Structure and Circulation. Part II: A Variational P-Vector Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The second part of this work investigates the seasonal variabilities of the Japan/East Sea (JES) circulation using the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatological temperature and salinity dataset (public domain) on a ...

Peter C. Chu; Jian Lan; Chenwu Fan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Structures of FeII spin-crossover complexes from synchrotron powder-diffraction data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using synchrotron powder-diffraction data and direct-space search techniques, crystal structures have been obtained at room temperature and 90 K for the compounds [Fe(teeX)6](BF4)2 (teeX is haloethyltetrazole, and X = I and Br), which both show a gradual, complete high-spin-to-low-spin transition according to molar magnetic susceptibility and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy.

Dova, E.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Aerodynamic performance and characteristic of vortex structures for Darrieus wind turbine. II. The relationship between vortex structure and aerodynamic performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a straight-bladed Darrieus type vertical axis wind turbine were performed by means of an in-house CFD code. The Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model was implemented in the numerical code for the turbulence. Particular emphasis was placed on effect of interaction between vortices and blades on the aerodynamic performance of the simulated turbine at different tip speed and solidity ratios. The obtained results suggested that vortices were shed from previous blade passages and the close encounter of a rotor blade with these vortices can have a considerable impact on power coefficient of the simulated turbine during operation at different tip speed ratios. As a result possible reasons for the changes in the behavior of this type of turbine due to the variation of tip speed ratio and solidity were proposed.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport Models for Use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five atmospheric transport models were evaluated for use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant. Models included a simple straight-line ... hexafluoride tracer measurement...

Arthur S. Rood; George G. Killough; John E. Till

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Two-Factor Model of Soil Suction from Capillarity, Shrinkage, Adsorbed Film, and Intra-aggregate Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work is to derive the soil water retention from the soil structure without curve-fitting and only using the physical parameters found irrespective of an experimental retention curve. Two key points underlie the work: (i) the soil suction at drying coincides with that of the soil intra-aggregate matrix and contributive clay; and (ii) both the soil suction and volume shrinkage at drying depend on the same soil water content. In addition the two following results are used: (i) the available two-factor (capillarity and shrinkage) model of clay suction enables one to connect a clay suction and clay water content using the clay matrix structure; and (ii) the recent reference shrinkage curve model based on the concepts of intra-aggregate soil structure permits one to connect the soil water content at shrinkage with the water content of the contributive clay. With that the available two-factor model was essentially modified and, in particular, the effect of adsorbed water film was taken into acc...

Chertkov, V Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Internal Dynamics, Structure and Formation of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies: II. Rotating Versus Non-Rotating Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially-resolved internal kinematics and stellar chemical abundances for a sample of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster observed with Keck/ESI. We find that 4 out of 17 dEs have major axis rotation velocities consistent with rotational flattening, while the remaining dEs have no detectable major axis rotation. Despite this difference in internal kinematics, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their position in the Fundamental Plane, morphological structure, stellar populations, and local environment. We present evidence for faint underlying disks and/or weak substructure in a fraction of both rotating and non-rotating dEs, but a comparable number of counter-examples exist for both types which show no evidence of such structure. Absorption-line strengths were determined based on the Lick/IDS system (Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270, Fe5335) for the central region of each galaxy. We find no difference in the line-strength indices, and hence stellar populations, betwe...

Geha, M; Van der Marel, R P

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Heat conduction: a telegraph-type model with self-similar behavior of solutions II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our former study (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43, (2010) 325210 or arXiv:1002.0999v1 [math-ph]) we introduced a modified Fourier-Cattaneo law and derived a non-autonomous telegraph-type heat conduction equation which has desirable self-similar solution. Now we present a detailed in-depth analysis of this model and discuss additional analytic solutions for different parameters. The solutions have a very rich and interesting mathematical structure due to various special functions.

I. F. Barna; R. Kersner

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Do you see what I see? Do you see what I see? Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects The team tried developing a computer model based on human neural structure and function, to do what we do, and possibly do it better. December 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

151

Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Model electrode structures for studies of electrocatalyst degradation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are being extensively studied as power sources because of their technological advantages such as high energy efficiency and environmental friendliness. The most effective catalyst in these systems consists of nanoparticles of Pt or Pt-based alloys on carbon supports. Understanding the role of the nanoparticle size and structure on the catalytic activity and degradation is needed to optimize the fuel cell performance and reduce the noble metal loading. One of the more significant causes of fuel cell performance degradation is the cathode catalyst deactivation. There are four mechanisms considered relevant to the loss of electrochemically active surface area of Pt in the fuel cell electrodes that contribute to cathode catalyst degradation including: catalyst particle sintering such as Ostwald ripening, migration and coalescence, carbon corrosion and catalyst dissolution. Most approaches to study this catalyst degradation utilize membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), which results in a complex system where it is difficult to deconvolute the effects of the metal nanoparticles. Our research addresses catalyst degradation by taking a fundamental approach to study electrocatalyst using model supports. Nanostructured particle arrays are engineered directly onto planar glassy carbon electrodes. These model electrocatalyst structures are applied to electrochemical activity measurements using a rotating disk electrode and surface characterization by scanning electron microscopy. Sample transfer between these measurement techniques enables examination of the same catalyst area before and after electrochemical cycling. This is useful to probe relationships between electrochemical activity and catalyst structure such as particle size and spacing. These model systems are applied to accelerated aging studies of activity degradation. We will present our work demonstrating the mechanistic aspects of catalyst degradation using this simplified geometric system. The active surface area loss observed in repeated cyclic voltammetry is explained through characterization and imaging of the same RDE electrode structures throughout the aging process.

St. Pierre, Jean (University of South Carolina); Atanassov, Plamen Borissov (University of New Mexico); Datye, Abhaya K. (University of New Mexico); Goeke, Ronald S. (University of New Mexico)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecules structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecules structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of molecular species in the hot environments of combustion processes, there are several features that make the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy uniquely useful. First, the Rydberg electrons orbit is quite large and covers the entire molecule for most molecular structures of combustion interest. Secondly, the ionization does not change vibrational quantum numbers, so that even complicated and large molecules can be observed with fairly well resolved spectra. In fact, the spectroscopy is blind to vibrational excitation of the molecule. This has the interesting consequence for the study of chemical dynamics, where the molecules are invariably very energetic, that the molecular structures are observed unobstructed by the vibrational congestion that dominates other spectroscopies. This implies also that, as a tool to probe the time-dependent structural dynamics of chemically interesting molecules, Rydberg spectroscopy may well be better suited than electron or x-ray diffraction. With recent progress in calculating Rydberg binding energy spectra, we are approaching the point where the method can be evolved into a structure determination method. To implement the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy we use a molecular beam based, time-resolved pump-probe multi-photon ionization/photoelectron scheme in which a first laser pulse excites the molecule to a Rydberg state, and a probe pulse ionizes the molecule. A time-of-flight detector measures the kinetic energy spectrum of the photoelectrons. The photoelectron spectrum directly provides the binding energy of the electron, and thereby reveals the molecules time-dependent structural fingerprint. Only the duration of the laser pulses limits the time resolution. With a new laser system, we have now reached time resolutions better than 100 fs, although very deep UV wavelengths (down to 190 nm) have slightly longer instrument functions. The structural dynamics of molecules in Rydberg-excited states is obtained by delaying the probe ionization photon from the pump photon; the structural dynamics of molecules in their ground state or e

Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Structure and Magnetic Ordering of a 2-D MnII(TCNE)I(OH2) (TCNE = tetracyanoethylene) Organic-based Magnet (Tc = 171 K)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mn{sup II}(TCNE)I(OH{sub 2}) was isolated from the reaction of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and MnI{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, and has a 2-D structure possessing an unusual, asymmetric bonded {mu}{sub 4}-[TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-}. Direct antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 5/2 Mn{sup II} and S = 1/2 [TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-} leads to magnetic ordering as a canted antiferromagnet at a T{sub c} of 171 K.

S Lapidus; A McConnell; P Stephens; J Miller

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota #12;PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

157

Charge Requirements of Lipid II Flippase Activity in Escherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport. INTRODUCTION...first 12 transmembrane domains of YtgP (green) and MurJ (gray) structure models showing...including R312, are present within allowed energy fields in the structural model (see Fig...

Emily K. Butler; Wee Boon Tan; Hildy Joseph; Natividad Ruiz

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Model of an Electrical Discharge in the Flance Contacts With Omega Seals at High Currents in PEP-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During PEP-II operation with high currents in the High Energy Ring (HER), elevated temperatures were found at many locations in the vacuum chamber where they have an RF seal for the flex flange. Most of these omega RF seals were badly damaged and had evidence of metal vaporization from sparks and electrical discharge. They suggest a physical model, which may explain this effect.

Novokhatski, A; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A 'BOOSTED FIREBALL' MODEL FOR STRUCTURED RELATIVISTIC JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a model for relativistic jets which generates a particular angular distribution of Lorentz factor and energy per solid angle. We consider a fireball with specific internal energy E/M launched with bulk Lorentz factor ? {sub B}. In its center-of-momentum frame the fireball expands isotropically, converting its internal energy into radially expanding flow with asymptotic Lorentz factor ?{sub 0} ? E/M. In the lab frame the flow is beamed, expanding with Lorentz factor ? = 2?{sub 0}? {sub B} in the direction of its initial bulk motion and with characteristic opening angle ?{sub 0} ? 1/? {sub B}. The flow is jet-like with ??{sub 0} ? 2?{sub 0} such that jets with ? > 1/?{sub 0} are naturally produced. The choice ?{sub 0} ? ? {sub B} ? 10 yields a jet with ? ? 200 on-axis and angular structure characterized by opening angle ?{sub 0} ? 0.1 of relevance for cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while ? {sub B} ?> 1 may be relevant for low-luminosity GRBs. The model produces a family of outflows, of relevance for different relativistic phenomena with structures completely determined by ?{sub 0} and ? {sub B}. We calculate the energy per unit solid angle for the model and use it to compute light curves for comparison with the widely used top-hat model. The jet break in the boosted fireball light curve is greatly subdued when compared to the top-hat model because the edge of the jet is smoother than for a top-hat. This may explain missing jet breaks in afterglow light curves.

Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I., E-mail: pcd233@nyu.edu, E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Growing network model for community with group structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a growing network model for a community with a group structure. The community consists of individual members and groups, gatherings of members. The community grows as a new member is introduced by an existing member at each time step. The new member then creates a new group or joins one of the groups of the introducer. We investigate the emerging community structure analytically and numerically. The group size distribution shows a power-law distribution for a variety of growth rules, while the activity distribution follows an exponential or a power law depending on the details of the growth rule. We also present an analysis of empirical data from online communities the Groups in http://www.yahoo.com and the Cafe in http://www.daum.net, which show a power-law distribution for a wide range of group sizes.

Jae Dong Noh; Hyeong-Chai Jeong; Yong-Yeol Ahn; Hawoong Jeong

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arabinoxylan Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses Ameya R. Kulkarni, 1 Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Michael G. Hahn, 1,2 William S. York, 1,3 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 1 1 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and US Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, 2 Department of Plant Biology, and 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Abstract Heteroxylans were solubilized from the alcohol-insoluble residue of switchgrass, rice, Brachypodium, Miscanthus, foxtail millet, and poplar with 1 M KOH. A combination of enzymatic, chemical, nu- clear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopic, and immu- nological techniques indicated that grass arabinoxylans have comparable structures and contain no discernible amount of the reducing end sequence present in dicot glucuronoxylan. Our data suggest that rice, Brachypodium, and foxtail

165

Weak solutions for a fluid-elastic structure interaction model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on @(S(0),4) where nL denotes the outward normal to @ S(0), {,_i}i2INis an orthonormal basis of L2( S(0)) and {~i}i2INis a non negative non decreasing sequence of eigenvalues. The regularity

Esteban, Maria J.

166

New model updating method for damped structural systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the following two problems are considered: Problem I Given a full column rank matrix X@?R^n^x^k, a diagonal matrix @L@?R^k^x^k(k@?n) and matrices M"a@?R^n^x^n,C"0,K"0@?R^r^x^r, find nxn matrices C,K such that M"aX@L^2+CX@L+KX=0, s. t.C([1,r])=C"0,K([1,r])=K"0, ... Keywords: Best approximation, Damped structural systems, Inverse problem, Model updating, Quadratic eigenvalue problem

Hao Liu; Yongxin Yuan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Atomic and Electronic Structure of the FeO (111)/MgO(111) Model...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure of the FeO (111)MgO(111) Model Polar Oxide Interface. Atomic and Electronic Structure of the FeO (111)MgO(111) Model Polar Oxide Interface. Abstract: High...

168

Two-Factor Model of Soil Suction from Capillarity, Shrinkage, Adsorbed Film, and Intra-aggregate Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work is to derive the soil water retention from the soil structure without curve-fitting and only using the physical parameters found irrespective of an experimental retention curve. Two key points underlie the work: (i) the soil suction at drying coincides with that of the soil intra-aggregate matrix and contributive clay; and (ii) both the soil suction and volume shrinkage at drying depend on the same soil water content. In addition the two following results are used: (i) the available two-factor (capillarity and shrinkage) model of clay suction enables one to connect a clay suction and clay water content using the clay matrix structure; and (ii) the recent reference shrinkage curve model based on the concepts of intra-aggregate soil structure permits one to connect the soil water content at shrinkage with the water content of the contributive clay. With that the available two-factor model was essentially modified and, in particular, the effect of adsorbed water film was taken into account. The developed model includes the following input parameters: the solid density, relative volume of contributive-clay solids, relative volume of contributive clay in the oven-dried state, soil clay content, aggregate/intra-aggregate mass ratio, and specific volume of lacunar pores in the aggregates at maximum swelling. The validation of the model is based on available data of water retention and the above input parameters for six soils. A promising agreement between the predicted and observed water retention curves was found.

V. Y. Chertkov

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

169

?-Extended and Six-Coordinate Iron(II) Complexes: Structures, Magnetic Properties, and the Electrochemical Synthesis of a Conducting Iron(II) Metallopolymer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) coated borosilicate glass cuvette slides (515 ohms) were purchased from Delta Technologies, Ltd. 1H/13C NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker Advance 300 MHz spectrometer with a 7.05 T Ultrashield magnet using deuterated solvents. ... Epsilon electrochemical workstation. ... Iron(II) complexes with neutral and oxidized tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) moieties, 2,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-4-(2-(tetrathiafulvaleneyl)ethenyl)pyridine (L), [FeL2](BPh4)2MeNO20.5Et2O ...

Brandon Djukic; Takele Seda; Serge I. Gorelsky; Alan J. Lough; Martin T. Lemaire

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

A component-based debugging approach for detecting structural inconsistencies in declarative equation based models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Object-oriented modeling with declarative equation based languages often unconsciously leads to structural inconsistencies. Component-based debugging is a new structural analysis approach that addresses this problem by analyzing the structure of each ... Keywords: component-based debugging, declarative model, modelica, simulation, structural inconsistency

Jian-Wan Ding; Li-Ping Chen; Fan-Li Zhou

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vasyunin, A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States); Birnstiel, T., E-mail: akimkin@inasan.ru, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru, E-mail: pavyar@inasan.ru, E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de, E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Speeding Up the Process of Modeling Temporary Structures in a Building Information Model Using Predefined Families  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems and formworks, are good examples. Although these structures play a significant role in the logistics of the jobsite, there are neither a special tools nor predefined objects in BIM applications to help model these elements. In this case study a...

Sabahi, Parsa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electronic structure II: Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atomic levels N-degeneracy (atomic spacing)­1 energy bands E. Origin of the band gapE. Origin of the band 1ZB k ·· · 2. (1D) G k + G #12;4 2B. 2. Energy bands2B. 2. Energy bands #12;5 A. Introduction schemesB. Zone representation schemes #12;9 C. Energy bands in 3DC. Energy bands in 3D 3-dimensional solid

del Barco, Enrique

174

Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II: A hydrogen bonded water network switch is observed between pH 7.8 and 10.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron structure of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II at pH 7.8 has been determined to 2.0 resolution. Detailed analysis and comparison to the previous determined structure at pH 10.0 shows important differences in protonation of key catalytic residues in the active site as well as a rearrangement of the hydrogen bonded water network. For the first time, a completed hydrogen bonded network stretching from the Zn-bound solvent to the proton shuttling residue His64 has been directed observed.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Langan, Paul [ORNL; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geometric model of the structure of the neutron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper examines the geometrical properties of a six-dimensional Kaluza-Klein type model. They may have an impact on the model of the structure of a neutron and its excited states in the realm of one particle physics. The statistical reason for the six-dimensionality and the stability of the solution is given. The derivation of the weak limit approximation of the general wave mechanical (quantum mechanical) approach, defined in the context of losing its self-consistency (here gravitational), is presented. The non self-consistent case for the Klein-Gordon equation is defined. The derivation of the energy of states and the analysis of the spin origin of the analyzed fields configuration is presented as the manifestation of both the geometry of the internal two-dimensional space and kinematics of fields inside it. The problem of the departure from the (gravitational) self-consistent calculations of the metric tensor and of other fields of the configuration is discussed. The implementation of the model for the description of a neutron and its excited states, including their spins and energies, is given. The informational reason for the existence of the internal extra space dimensions is proposed.

Jacek Syska

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mnemonic Structure and Sociality: A Computational Agent-Based Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mnemonic Structure and Sociality: A Computational Agent-Based Simulation Model Claudio Cioffi-agent social simulation models are designed with agents lacking explicit internal information transformations affect human and social dynamics? Most computational multi-agent social simulation models

George Mason University

178

Modeling Lost-Particle Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

Fieguth, T.; /SLAC; Barlow, R.; /Manchester U.; Kozanecki, W.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. (JPL, Pasadena, CA (USA) Queen Mary College, London (England))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Growth of sheets in 3D confinements - a model for the C-S-H meso 2 structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.20 2.0 0 02 5 6 8 P0 rog resVaVNeoml i eet al. di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eRWwWDml di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eWi RWwWDml rhVaal TWi f ehI TRl en h p022ei ewt Al Tl Figure 6: Example scattering curves obtained for structure (h) in Figure 3 together with small... ] H. M. Jennings, Refinements to colloid model of C-S-H in cement: CM-II, Cem. Conc. Res 38 (3) (2008) 275289.293 [7] R. F. Feldman, P. J. Sereda, New model for hydrated portland cement and its practical implications, Eng.J.-Canada294 53 (8/9) (1970...

Etzold, Merlin A.; McDonald, Peter J.; Routh, Alexander F.

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

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181

The Pierre Auger Observatory II: Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Hadronic Interaction models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers.

The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Buml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Belltoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blmer; M. Boh?ov; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceio; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; U. Cotti; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Daz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Frhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. Garca; D. Garca Gmez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gmez Berisso; P. Gonalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Gra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hrandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovsk; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. -H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kgl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krmer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leo; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. Lpez; A. Lopez Agera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martnez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostaf; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Mller; M. Mnchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Noka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschlger; A. Olinto; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodrguez-Fras; G. Ros; J. Rosado

2011-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir definition and development. Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith, Al Waibel, Maria C. Richards and Patrick Stepp Published GRC, 2009 DOI Not Provided...

183

Why Basin and Range Systems are Hard to Find II- Structural Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir definition and development. Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith, Al Waibel, Maria C. Richards and Patrick Stepp Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno,...

184

CONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING OF A SOLID-OXIDE FUEL CELL STACK USING AN LPV MODEL STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING OF A SOLID-OXIDE FUEL CELL STACK USING AN LPV MODEL STRUCTURE Borhan M dynamic model of a solid oxide fuel cell stack. Using a detailed physical model as a starting point, we (usually air) on the cathode side. Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) utilize a ceramic oxygen-ion conducting

Sanandaji, Borhan M.

185

Recovery of 3D Solar Magnetic Field Model Parameter Using Image Structure Matching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to recover a 3D solar magnetic field model parameter using intensity images of the Sun's corona is introduced. The approach is a quantitative approach in which the 3D model parameter is determined via an image structure matching scheme. The ... Keywords: 3D Parameter Recovery, Image-based Modeling, Structure Matching

Jong Kwan Lee; G. Allen Gary

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A new framework for the simulation of equation-based models with variable structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many modern models contain changes that affect the structure of their underlying equation system, e.g. the breaking of mechanical devices or the switching of ideal diodes. The modeling and simulation of such systems in current equation-based languages ... Keywords: differential-algebraic equations, equation-based modeling, index reduction, variable-structure systems

Dirk Zimmer

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part II: African Easterly Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between African easterly waves and convection is examined in two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the superparameterized CCSM (SP-CCSM). In the CCSM, the easterly waves are much ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dynamic modeling and optimal control of DFIG wind energy systems using DFT and NSGA-II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Once a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is subjected to a disturbance by a change in the wind speed, the stator flux cannot change instantly. Under this condition, rotor back-EMF voltages reflect the effects of stator dynamics on rotor current dynamics, and have an important role on the oscillations of the rotor current. These oscillations decrease the DFIG system reliability and gear lifetime. Moreover, by focusing only on small signal analysis, the dynamic damping performance immediately following such disturbances is often degraded. Additional improvement in performance will be achieved if discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is used to quantify damping characteristic of the rotor current during changes of the operating points. This paper introduces an optimization technique based on non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II) incorporating DFT analysis to achieve better control performance for DFIG system stability. Considering small signal stability, the main purpose of the control system in the present paper is to increase the system damping ratio as well as to guarantee enough stability margin. Eigenvalue analysis and time-domain simulations have been presented to demonstrate that the proposed optimizing method yields better control performance in comparison with one designed using mere eigenvalue relocation.

M. Zamanifar; B. Fani; M.E.H. Golshan; H.R. Karshenas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse Grained Approach. A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse...

190

Stereochemistry and structural phase transition of Cu(II) complexes containing orthophosphate ions and pyridine/picoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Copper complexes of the type Cu(L)4(H2PO4)2 designated as complex (I), and Cu(L)4 HPO4 designated as complex (II), (whereL = pyridine (py) or ?-picoline (pic)) have been synthesised, characterised by chemical ana...

M. S. Sastry; M. D. Sastry

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Primitive Equation Model. Part II: Nonaxisymmetric Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of baroclinic eddies on the structure of the Hadley cell. Self-consistent calculations of both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric circulations allow an unambiguous estimate of baroclinic eddy effects on the ...

Hyun-kyung Kim; Sukyoung Lee

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A schistosomiasis model with mating structure and time delay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 22, 2007 ... the parasite's mating structure, multiple resistant schistosome strains, and biological complexity associated with the parasite's life cycle.

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

A lattice model to simulate ice-structure interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the forces exerted by ice sheets on oil rigs is of great interest for designers of offshore structures. Over and offshore structures is of key im- portance in the design of offshore platforms in the Arctic. Unfortunately at drawing some conclusions about the forces exerted on large-scale structures such as oil rigs

Boyer, Edmond

194

Simulation of systems with dynamically varying model structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid systems are dynamical systems composed of components with discrete and continuous behavior. Some systems change their structure during simulation, or their components behavior is essentially changing. This ''structural dynamics'' can be described ... Keywords: Discrete-continuous simulation, Hybrid systems, Modelica, Structural dynamics, VHDL-AMS

Peter Schwarz

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mapping thin resistors and hydrocarbons with marine EM methods, Part II --Modeling and analysis in 3D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used in the ma- rine environment to map geological structure e.g., Hoversten et al., 2000; Key et al of the canonical disk model 100 m, 100 m thick, variable radius, 1 km deep in 1- m sediments showed that the inline

Constable, Steve

196

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II) ... In the fast heating method, initial decomposition components, glucose (0.365%) and 5-HMF (0.003%), were found in the sucrose sample coincident with the onset temperature of the first endothermic peak. ... Three sample pans of sucrose were loaded in the DSC cell; one pan was placed on the sample platform, and the others were placed on the bottom of the DSC cell. ...

Joo Won Lee; Leonard C. Thomas; John Jerrell; Hao Feng; Keith R. Cadwallader; Shelly J. Schmidt

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume 1. Model evolution and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has been engaged in the development of a comprehensive mechanistic model of Fluidized Bed Combustors (FBC). The primary aims of this modeling effort are the generation and to the extent possible, validation of an analytical framework for the design and scale-up of fluidized bed combustors. In parallel with this modeling effort, M.I.T. also embarked upon the development of an FBC-Data Base Management System (FBC-DBMS) aimed at facilitating the coordination, interpretation and utilization of the experimental data that are or will become available from diverse sources, as well as in the identification of areas of large uncertainty or having a paucity of experimental results. The synergistic operation of the FBC-Model and FBC-Data Base promises to offer a powerful tool for the design and optimization of FBC's and represents the ultimate goal of the M.I.T. effort. The modeling effort was initially focused upon evaluation and application of state-of-the-art models. The initial system model was divided into five basic components: fluid dynamics, combustion, sulfur capture, heat transfer and emissions. Due to the technical complexity of modeling FBC operation and the initial primitive nature of models for these components, it was deemed necessary to be able to incorporate evolutionary improvements in understanding and correlating FBC phenomena: the M.I.T. system model is, therefore, modular in nature, i.e., each sub-model can be replaced by an updated or equivalent sub-model without necessitating reprogramming of the entire system model.

Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}5.5H{sub 2}O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (4) and [Cd{sub 2}(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2 Prime -bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1 Prime -yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2 Prime -bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {l_brace}Cd{sub 2}Na{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {l_brace}Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Five new d{sup 10} metal(II) coordination polymers based on H{sub 3}BOABA ligand were obtained and characterized. They display different topological structures and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five d{sup 10} metal(II) polymers based on 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymers were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymers 1-5 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They show strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state.

Jiang Xianrong; Yuan Hongyan [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Recombinatoric exploration of novel folded structures: heteropolymerbased model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction thus formally very similar Bryngelson and Wolynes' (11) seminal random energy model treatment # neutral # sequence space # thermodynamic stability # protein models I is widely recognized events

Chan, Hue Sun

200

Managerial Coaching Behavior and Employee Outcomes: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s alpha estimates for reliability, correlation analysis, two-step modeling techniques for structural equation modeling, and Sobel tests were the analysis methods used in the study. The results of the analyses indicated that the hypothesized conceptual...

Kim, Sewon

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modeling Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline Grain Structure of Steels at Mesoscopic Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline Grain Structure of Steels at Mesoscopic Level. The constitutive model of crystal grains utilizes anisotropic elasticity and crystal plasticity. Commercially be considered macroscopically homogeneous. Elastic and rate independent plastic deformation modes are considered

Cizelj, Leon

202

Electricity price modeling and asset valuation: a multi-fuel structural approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a new and highly tractable structural model for spot and derivative prices in electricity markets. Using a stochastic model ... we translate the demand for power and the prices of generating fuels in...

Ren Carmona; Michael Coulon; Daniel Schwarz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Trees and beyond : exploiting and improving tree-structured graphical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic models commonly assume that variables are independent of each other conditioned on a subset of other variables. Graphical models provide a powerful framework for encoding such conditional independence structure ...

Choi, Myung Jin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Testing turbulent convection theory in solar models II. Solar p-mode oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Reynolds number in the solar convection zone makes the turbulent energy spectrum greatly...and concluded that solar models considering...turbulent kinetic energy could result in better...turbulence in our solar models in the present...of China through project number 10303007......

J. Y. Yang; Y. Li

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

Thomas, Peter J.

206

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

Terzi, Bal?a

207

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 29562984 Numerical model simulations of continental shelf flows off  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure that appears just north of Bodega Bay and shows the offshore jet strengthening to the south. We with realistic topography and initial stratification in a limited-area domain with a high-resolution grid eddy-like recirculation feature offshore of Pt. Arena prior to the upwelling event causes large patches

Pierce, Stephen

208

Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model part II: Kinetics and clinical implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinematic multi-segment foot models have seen increased use in clinical and research settings, but the addition of kinetics has been limited and hampered by measurement limitations and modeling assumptions. In this second of two companion papers, we complete the presentation and analysis of a three segment kinetic foot model by incorporating kinetic parameters and calculating joint moments and powers. The model was tested on 17 pediatric subjects (ages 718years) during normal gait. Ground reaction forces were measured using two adjacent force platforms, requiring targeted walking and the creation of two sub-models to analyze ankle, midtarsal, and 1st metatarsophalangeal joints. Targeted walking resulted in only minimal kinematic and kinetic differences compared with walking at self selected speeds. Joint moments and powers were calculated and ensemble averages are presented as a normative database for comparison purposes. Ankle joint powers are shown to be overestimated when using a traditional single-segment foot model, as substantial angular velocities are attributed to the mid-tarsal joint. Power transfer is apparent between the 1st metatarsophalangeal and mid-tarsal joints in terminal stance/pre-swing. While the measurement approach presented here is limited to clinical populations with only minimal impairments, some elements of the model can also be incorporated into routine clinical gait analysis.

Dustin A. Bruening; Kevin M. Cooney; Frank L. Buczek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

On the use of fuzzy inference techniques in assessment models: part II: industrial applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the applicability of the monotone output property and the output resolution property in fuzzy assessment models to two industrial Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) problems. First, t...

Kai Meng Tay; Chee Peng Lim

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development of a general model of aggregate rebound for dry-mix shotcrete(Part II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanical model previously developed is briefly described and linked to particle velocity versus size relationships experimentally obtained, allowing prediction of the energy of rebound of an aggregate particl...

Hugo S. Armelin Ph.D. Candidate; Professor Nemkumar Banthia

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Dynamic modeling of steam power cycles: Part II Simulation of a small simple Rankine cycle system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the second part of the work concerning the dynamic simulation of small steam cycle plants for power generation. The work is part of the preliminary study for a 600kWe biomass fired steam power plant for which the complete open-loop, lumped parameter dynamic model of the steam cycle has been developed using the SimECS software described in Part I of this work. For these low-power plants, a dynamic simulation tool is especially useful because these systems must be designed to operate in transient mode for most of the time. The plant model presented here consists of the following components: feedwater pump, economizer, evaporator, superheater, impulse turbine, electrical generator and condenser. The primary heat source is modeled as a flue gas flow and no combustion models are incorporated yet to model the furnace. A description of the various components forming the complete steam cycle is given to illustrate the capabilities and modularity of the developed modeling technique. The model is first validated quantitatively against steady-state values obtained using a well known, reliable steady-state process modeling software. Subsequently, the dynamic validation is presented. Results can only be discussed based on the qualitative assessment of the observed trends because measurements are not available, being the plant in the preliminary design phase. The qualitative validation is based on four dynamic simulations involving three small step disturbances of different magnitude imposed on the pump rotational speed and on the flue gas mass flow and a single large ramp disturbance on the flue gas mass flow.

H. van Putten; P. Colonna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Structural model of F1ATPase and the implications for rotary catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and R. M. Simmons Structural model of F1-ATPase and the implications for rotary...crystal structure of bovine mitochondrial F1-ATPase is described. Several features...approximately spherical alpha3beta3 sub-assembly. F1-ATPase|crystal structure|rotary catalysis...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enhanced adsorption of Pb(II) by Al(OH)3/(PAA-CO-PAM) sub-microspheres with three-dimensional interpenetrating network structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Al(OH)3/(PAA-CO-PAM) sub-microspheres have been synthesized via inverse emulsion polymerization method using 0.0132g (NH4)2S2O8 as initiator, 2.2g each of acrylamide aluminum acrylate as monomers, 1.5g Span-80 and 0.5g polyoxyethylene octylphenol ether (OP-10) as emulsifiers at 66C for 10h. The composition and morphology of the obtained Al(OH)3/(PAA-CO-PAM) sub-microspheres were investigated by infrared spectrum, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. The obtained Al(OH)3/(PAA-CO-PAM) sub-microspheres were used to investigate adsorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions. The research results display that composite material has high adsorption capacity for Pb(II) at an optimum pH 5. The maximum adsorption capacity was 106.2mg/g within 240min at 24C. Various thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (?G), enthalpy (?H) and entropy (?S) showed that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and feasible. Adsorption behavior for Pb(II) onto sub-microspheres belongs to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption process is a chemical process.

Qingchun Zhao; Lin Ren; Haiou Zhou; Tian Cao; Peng Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Finite element modeling of nonlinear vibration behavior of piezo-integrated structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims at finite element modeling of nonlinear vibration behavior of piezo-integrated structures subjected to weak electric field. This nonlinear vibration behavior was observed in the form of dependence of resonance frequency on the vibration ... Keywords: Finite element modeling, Modal reduction, Newmark method, Nonlinear vibration, Piezo-integrated structures

Sandeep Kumar Parashar; Utz Von Wagner; Peter Hagedorn

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Design of fast output sampling feedback control for smart structure model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the problem of modelling and output feedback control design for a smart structural system using piezoelectric material as a sensor/actuator is addressed. The model for a smart cantilever beam is developed by the finite element method. ... Keywords: output feedback, smart structure, vibration control

M. Umapathy; B. Bandyopadhyay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic France (Dated: September 11, 2008) Fuzzy structure theory for sound-insulation layers 1 hal-00684495 is proposed in developing an elas- toacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for compu

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

INTERNATIONAL DEPENDENCY AND STRUCTURE MODELLING CONFERENCE, DSM'10 22 23 JULY 2010, CAMBRIDGE, UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DSM'10 1 12 TH INTERNATIONAL DEPENDENCY AND STRUCTURE MODELLING CONFERENCE, DSM'10 22 ­ 23 JULY the feasibility and benefit of applying the Dependency Structure Matrix (DSM) as the modelling platform of the scores of all the value flows along that path. This is because under the #12;DSM'10 2 multipl

de Weck, Olivier L.

219

Cd-based II-VI semiconductor nanostructures produced by buffer-layer-assisted growth: Structural evolution and photoluminescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we discuss the assembly of nanostructures of CdS, CdSe, and CdTe using buffer- layer-assisted growth energies for diffusion for CdS, CdSe, and CdTe can be attributed to differences in London dispersion and branched7 core-shell structures. Improvements in the functionality of these structures have included doping

Weaver, John H.

220

Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used for Diesel sprays. However...

Prithiviraj, Manikandan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume II. SPAHR introductory guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of responses, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projects are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the user of the SPAHR program the information required to operate the program when it is up and running on the computer. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment. It contains a brief description of all commands and options available in SPAHR, as well as a user-oriented description of the structure and operation of the control system and language processor.

Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Optimization Online - A Non-Parametric Structural Hybrid Modeling ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 30, 2014 ... Keywords: Electricity market; Electricity price modeling; Energy trading; Supply stack. Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management...

Somayeh Moazeni

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assumes that mechanical energy can be stored and released...French University in Egypt for his guiding views...and ZJ Wang. 2007 Energy-minimizing kinematics...McArthur. 2010 Span efficiencies of wings at low Reynolds...disk model and span efficiency of flapping flight in...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...performance of aquatic rowing and flying. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B...inspired by insect flight. In Flying insects and robots (eds D Floreano...Smoke visualization of free-flying bumblebees indicates independent...A Hedenstrom. 2011 Actuator disk model and span efficiency of...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The anatomy of electroweak symmetry breaking Tome II: The Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The second part of this review is devoted to the Higgs sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. The properties of the neutral and charged Higgs bosons of the extended Higgs sector are summarized and their decay modes and production mechanisms at hadron colliders and at future lepton colliders are discussed.

Abdelhak Djouadi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modeling H2 adsorption in carbon-based structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. One promising area of research is hydrogen physi-sorbed into carbonbased structures such as nanotubes and graphene. Two novel systems consisting of a phthalocyanine salt with a large cation were studied. Ab initio, density functional theory...

Lamonte, Kevin Anthony

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modeling of Catalyst Structure Degradation in PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, the requirements of a high-performance catalyst layer are examined in order to understand the ways in which the structure might degrade with operation. The formation of oxide species on the su...

Jeremy P. Meyers

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

MnII (TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2 - A 3-D Network-structured Organic-based Magnet and Comparison to a 2-D Analog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mn{sup II}(TCNE){sub 3/2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1/2} and Mn{sup II}(TCNE)[C{sub 4}(CN){sub 8}]{sub 1/2} [tetracyanoethylene (TCNE)] are organic-based magnets with 3D and 2D extended network structures with vastly different magnetic behavior. They have similar ferrimagnetic coupled layers of Mn{sup II}(TCNE){sup {lg_bullet}-} with different interlayer couplings, which lead, respectively, to net ferrimagnetic (T{sub c} = 171 K) and antiferromagnetic (T{sub c} = 68 K) order.

Stone, K.; Stephens, P; McConnell, A; Shurdha, E; Pokhodnya, K; Miller, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 4 (ERSST.v4): Part II. Parametric and Structural Uncertainty Estimations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Described herein is the parametric and structural uncertainty quantification for monthly Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) version 4 (v4). A Monte Carlo ensemble approach was adopted to characterize parametric uncertainty ...

Wei Liu; Boyin Huang; Peter W. Thorne; Viva F. Banzon; Huai-Min Zhang; Eric Freeman; Jay Lawrimore; Thomas C. Peterson; Thomas M. Smith; Scott D. Woodruff

230

Low frequency vibrations in disc brakes at high car speed. Part II: mathematical model and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, a mathematical model is constructed for judder in disc brakes at high speed. Vehicle suspension is modelled by means of finite elements. Vibration modes and frequencies are derived that can be used in the classification of modes in main and secondary based in the relative disc-calliper displacement; the finite element model is also used as well as in forced-response analysis. Brake pads are defined through the friction coefficient as a function of speed, pressure, and temperature, in light of which one may consider the various braking conditions and types of pad. Since the line of reasoning introduces equivalent-damping terms into the equations of dynamics, these equations cannot be uncoupled by means of modal transformation. Two techniques are proposed for the solution of the problem. One of these consists in an examination of the 'main-modes', while the other is based on direct integration of the quasi-uncoupled equations. A computer program has been implemented which allows the simulation of this kind of judder with different pads, brake systems and braking conditions.

R. Aviles; G. Hennequet; E. Amezua; J. Vallejo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Non-Parametric Structural Hybrid Modeling Approach for ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 5, 2014 ... Keywords: Electricity market; Electricity price modeling; Energy trading; Supply ..... unit is measured by its ability to convert fuel energy content,.

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Dicarboxylate assisted synthesis of the monoclinic heterometallic tetrathiocyanato bridged copper(II) and mercury(II) coordination polymer {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n}: Synthesis, structural, vibration, luminescence, EPR studies and DFT calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of the monoclinic polymorph of {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} is reported. The compound, as determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, consists of mercury and copper atoms linked by {mu}{sub 1,3}-SCN bridges. The crystal packing shows a highly porous infinite 3D structure. Diagnostic resonances for the SCN{sup -} ligand and metal-ligand bonds in the IR, far-IR and Raman spectra are assigned and discussed. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. The DFT calculations show that the observed luminescence of the compound arises mainly from an excited LLCT state with small MLCT contributions (from the copper to unoccupied {pi}{sup *} orbital of the thiocyanate groups). The X-band EPR spectrum of the powdered sample at room temperature reveals an axial signal with anisotropic g factors consistent with the unpaired electron of Cu(II) ion in the d{sub x}{sup 2}{sub -y}{sup 2} orbital. -- Graphical abstract: Synthesis and X-ray structure determination of the monoclinic {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} is reported. The IR, far-IR, Raman, photoluminescence as well as EPR spectra of the compound is discussed. Also, the emission and semiconducting behavior of the compound is illustrated through the density functional theory calculation of electronic band structure along with density of states. Display Omitted Research highlights: > The monoclinic {l_brace}Cu[Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} has been prepared. > The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. > The IR, far-IR, Raman, EPR and emission spectra of the compound is investigated. > As shown by DFT calculations, the emission bands of the compound are mainly LLCT. > Small MLCT from the copper to the thiocyanate groups contributes to these bands.

Khandar, Ali Akbar, E-mail: akhandar@yahoo.co [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Klein, Axel [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany); Bakhtiari, Akbar [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany); Mahjoub, Ali Reza [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14155-4838 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pohl, Roland W.H. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Greinstrasse 6, 50939 Koeln (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Task II: ECRH and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics. Annual progress report on fusion plasma theory, January 1, 1983-December 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research performed under Task II of this contract has focused on (1) the coupling of an ECRH ray tracing and absorption code to a tandem mirror transport code in order to self-consistently model the temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma, and (2) the further development of a semi-analytical kinetic model for plasma flow in divertors and pumped limiters. Work on these topics is briefly summarized in this progress report.

Emmert, G.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ising models for neural activity inferred via Selective Cluster Expansion: structural and coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ising models for neural activity inferred via Selective Cluster Expansion: structural and coding) of the entropy, a method for inferring an Ising model which describes the correlated activity of populations: statistical inference, neuronal networks #12;Ising models for neural activity inferred via Selective Cluster

Cocco, Simona

235

MOCHA: A Model Checking Tool that Exploits Design Structure L. de Alfaro R. Grosu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Model checking is emerging as a practical tool for automated debugging of embedded software (seeMOCHA: A Model Checking Tool that Exploits Design Structure R. Alur L. de Alfaro¡ R. Grosu ¢ T [7] for a survey, and [12, 11] for sample model checkers, and [8] for applications to software

de Alfaro, Luca

236

MOCHA: A Model Checking Tool that Exploits Design Structure L. de Alfaro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Model checking is emerging as a practical tool for automated debugging of embedded software (seeMOCHA: A Model Checking Tool that Exploits Design Structure R. Alur L. de Alfaro R. Grosu T [7] for a survey, and [12, 11] for sample model checkers, and [8] for applications to software

Grosu, Radu

237

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory -Experimental validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory - Experimental.fernandez@univ-paris-est.fr Abstract One proposes a novel approach to model sound-insulation layers based on the use of the fuzzy in computational models. The keypoint of the method is the construction of a mean elastoacoustic sound-insulation

Boyer, Edmond

238

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M. Szortyka,1,a) Mauricio Girardi,2,b) Vera B-sphere gas in a solvent modeled as an associating lattice gas. The solution phase diagram for solute at 5

Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

239

Fixation at a locus with multiple alleles: Structure and solution of the Wright Fisher model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fixation at a locus with multiple alleles: Structure and solution of the Wright Fisher model D genetics a b s t r a c t We consider the Wright Fisher model for a finite population of diploid sexual mathematical representation of the Wright Fisher model that applies for arbitrary numbers of alleles. Within

Waxman, David

240

A finite element model for transient thermal/structural analysis of large composite space structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on approximate 6 analysis techniques based on finite elements has begun. Such techniques as reduced basis techniques and generalized transform methods offer hope of solving the finite element 8 equations more efficiently. An integrated thermal/structural... integrated analysis codes. However, Mahaney, Thornton, and Dechaumphai have identified require 5 ments for such thermal/structural programs. They concluded that such analysis methods should have the following five characteristics. First, a common finite...

Lutz, James Delmar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Renormalization of lattice-regularized quantum gravity models II. The case of causal dynamical triangulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causal dynamical triangulations approach aims to construct a quantum theory of gravity as the continuum limit of a lattice-regularized model of dynamical geometry. A renormalization group scheme--in concert with finite size scaling analysis--is essential to this aim. Formulating and implementing such a scheme in the present context raises novel and notable conceptual and technical problems. I explored these problems, and, building on standard techniques, suggested potential solutions in the first paper of this two-part series. As an application of these solutions, I now propose a renormalization group scheme for causal dynamical triangulations. This scheme differs significantly from that studied recently by Ambjorn, Gorlich, Jurkiewicz, Kreienbuehl, and Loll.

Joshua H. Cooperman

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

Binder, Meta; /Munich U.; ,

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mathematical modeling of irreversible dynamic deformation, micro- and macrofracture of materials and structures  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7: Material Phase Transition, Modeling, and Others 7: Material Phase Transition, Modeling, and Others Mathematical Modeling of Irreversible Dynamic Deformation, Micro- and Macrofracture of Materials and Structures P. P. Zakharov and A. B. Kiselev All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow 125412, Russia Thermomechanical processes, which proceed in deformable solids under intensive dynamic loading, consist of mechanical, thermal and structural ones, which correlate themselves. The structural processes involve the formation, motion and interaction of defects in metallic crystals, phase transitions, the breaking of bonds between molecules in polymers, the accumulation of microstructural damages (pores, cracks), etc. Irreversible deformations, zones of adiabatic shear and microfractures are caused by these

244

An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO, BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regionalof lakes in numerical weather prediction and climate models:

Subin, Z.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets. Keywords Protein binding surface Á Comparative model Á Signatures of binding pockets Á Amylase Abbreviation

Dai, Yang

246

The temporal cascade structure of reanalyses and Global Circulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stochastic forecasting. 1. Introduction "Weather prediction by Numerical Process" (Richardson, 1922 equations. While these equations are deterministic, numerical weather prediction has been increasingly of the deterministic models. Interestingly, Richardson is not only the father of numerical weather forecasting, he

Lovejoy, Shaun

247

Computational tools for modeling and measuring chromosome structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA conformation within cells has many important biological implications, but there are challenges both in modeling DNA due to the need for specialized techniques, and experimentally since tracing out in vivo conformations ...

Ross, Brian Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fit Index Sensitivity in Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1998). Multilevel modeling (MLM) is an extension of multiple regression analysis that provides a framework for such questions to be addressed (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002; Snijders & Bosker, 10 1999). MLM, also known as hierarchical linear modeling... these parameters to vary across groups addresses several of the aforementioned problems while providing new analytic insights. For example, MLM permits investigators to analyze cross-level interactions in order to determine whether within-group effects...

Boulton, Aaron Jacob

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Imprints of dark energy on cosmic structure formation II. Non-universality of the halo mass function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......g. the properties of dark energy) and redshift would be absent...especially in the context of dark energy cosmologies. Is the halo mass...conclusions in Section 7. 2 DARK ENERGY AND STRUCTURE FORMATION 2...for the ellipsoidal collapse (Audit, Teyssier Alimi 1997; Sheth......

J. Courtin; Y. Rasera; J.-M. Alimi; P.-S. Corasaniti; V. Boucher; A. Fzfa

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hubble expansion & Structure Formation in Time Varying Vacuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the properties of the FLRW flat cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density evolves with time, $\\Lambda(t)$. Using different versions of the $\\Lambda(t)$ model, namely quantum field vacuum, power series vacuum and power law vacuum, we find that the main cosmological functions such as the scale factor of the universe, the Hubble expansion rate $H$ and the energy densities are defined analytically. Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia data, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) shift parameter and the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, we put tight constraints on the main cosmological parameters of the $\\Lambda(t)$ scenarios. Furthermore, we study the linear matter fluctuation field and the growth rate of clustering of the above vacuum models. Finally, we derived the theoretically predicted dark-matter halo mass function and the corresponding distribution of cluster-size halos for all the models studied. Their expected redshift distribution indicates that it will be difficult to distinguish the closely resembling models (constant vacuum, quantum field and power-law vacuum), using realistic future X-ray surveys of cluster abundances. However, cluster surveys based on the Sunayev-Zeldovich detection method give some hope to distinguish the closely resembling models at high redshifts.

S. Basilakos; M. Plionis; J. Sola

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Stellar loci II. a model-free estimate of the binary fraction for field FGK stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a Stellar Locus OuTlier (SLOT) method to determine the binary fraction of main-sequence stars statistically. The method is sensitive to neither the period nor mass-ratio distributions of binaries, and able to provide model-free estimates of binary fraction for large numbers of stars of different populations in large survey volumes. We have applied the SLOT method to two samples of stars from the SDSS Stripe 82, constructed by combining the re-calibrated SDSS photometric data with respectively the spectroscopic information from the SDSS and LAMOST surveys. For the SDSS spectroscopic sample, we find an average binary fraction for field FGK stars of $41%\\pm2%$. The fractions decrease toward late spectral types, and are respectively $44%\\pm5%$, $43%\\pm3%$, $35%\\pm5%$, and $28%\\pm6%$ for stars of $g-i$ colors between 0.3 -- 0.6, 0.6 -- 0.9, 0.9 -- 1.2, and 1.2 - 1.6\\,mag. A modest metallicity dependence is also found. The fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. For stars of [Fe/H] between $-0.5$...

Yuan, Haibo; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed Cluster/Continuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed and thermodynamic properties of Cu(II) species in aqueous solution. 1. Introduction Copper is a key component evidence that copper may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases

Goddard III, William A.

254

Transmission Line Structure Spotting and Optimization within a Defined Transmission Line Routing Centerline Using Non-Linear Programming Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and optimize structure heights for overhead transmission lines. The modeling tool will address common problems in determining overhead transmission line structure heights and locations. Some of the common problems consist of structure locations often having...

Cockrum, Joshua W.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

EFFECT OF THE MODEL CORRELATING STRUCTURAL DAMAGE TO REPAIRING COST ON LIFE CYCLE ECONOMIC LOSS ESTIMATION OF BUILDING STRUCTURES IN HIGH SEISMIC ZONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlating the damage to repairing cost on the life cycle loss using a simple model. Buildings are modeledEFFECT OF THE MODEL CORRELATING STRUCTURAL DAMAGE TO REPAIRING COST ON LIFE CYCLE ECONOMIC LOSS ESTIMATION OF BUILDING STRUCTURES IN HIGH SEISMIC ZONE Noriyuki TAKAHASHI, Hitoshi SHIOHARA, and Shunsuke

Shiohara, Hitoshi

256

Seismic structural response from continuous and discrete models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Derivation . 2. Solving the Shear Beam Differential Equation 3. Adding Damping to the Shear Beam Model D. Comparisons of Results from the Models E. Simple Dynamic Tests of the Models 1. Acceleration Pulse 2. Velocity Pulse . 3. Instantaneous Pulse... + asst) + C(tt t tt 4 + a4vt + t23ttt) Solve Kttt+ttt = p, for Btt t3t / t+rtt ~ u0(ut+t3t ut) tt2vt tt3ttt Vt+at + Vt + ttsttt ? tt&ttt+ttt outPut ttt+ttt vt+ttt t3t+t3t t 4 ? t+Dt ut 4 ut+za vt 4 ? vt4-d, t ttt 4 ttt+za enddo...

Roberts, Matthew Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hubble expansion & Structure Formation in Time Varying Vacuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the properties of the FLRW flat cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density evolves with time, $\\Lambda(t)$. Using different versions of the $\\Lambda(t)$ model, namely quantum field vacuum, power series vacuum and power law vacuum, we find that the main cosmological functions such as the scale factor of the universe, the Hubble expansion rate $H$ and the energy densities are defined analytically. Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia data, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) shift parameter and the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, we put tight constraints on the main cosmological parameters of the $\\Lambda(t)$ scenarios. Furthermore, we study the linear matter fluctuation field and the growth rate of clustering of the above vacuum models. Finally, we derived the theoretically predicted dark-matter halo mass function and the corresponding distribution of cluster-size halos for all the mode...

Basilakos, S; Sol, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Structural Models and Endogeneity in Corporate Finance: The Link Between Managerial Ownership and Corporate Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a parsimonious, structural model that isolates primary economic determinants of the level and dispersion of managerial ownership, firm scale, and performance and the empirical associations among them. ...

Coles, Jeffrey L.; Lemmon, Michael L.; Meschke, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the ...

Cucinotta Francis A.; Wilson John W.; Shavers Mark R.; Katz Robert

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Quality assessment of protein model-structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

similar to proteins functionally similar to the prediction target. Whereas DALI is used to measure structure similarity, protein functional similarity is quantified using standardized and hierarchical model quality assessment method, the other is its modification, which provides a relative measure

Nebel, Jean-Christophe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Green Water Flow Kinematics and Impact Pressure on a Three Dimensional Model Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow kinematics of green water due to plunging breaking waves interacting with a simplified, three-dimensional model structure was investigated in laboratory. Two breaking wave conditions were tested: one with waves impinging and breaking...

Ariyarathne, Hanchapola Appuhamilage Kusalika Suranjani

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES the guidance and direction provided by my advisors: Dr. Mandell, Dr. Cairns and Dr. Larsen. I would also like

263

Predictive Models of Biohydrogen and Biomethane Production Based on the Compositional and Structural Features of Lignocellulosic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictive Models of Biohydrogen and Biomethane Production Based on the Compositional and Structural Features of Lignocellulosic Materials ...

Florian Monlau; Cecilia Sambusiti; Abdellatif Barakat; Xin Mei Guo; Eric Latrille; Eric Trably; Jean-Philippe Steyer; Hlne Carrere

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

A constraint propagation approach to structural model based image segmentation and recognition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interpretation of complex scenes in images requires knowledge regarding the objects in the scene and their spatial arrangement. We propose a method for simultaneously segmenting and recognizing objects in images, that is based on a structural representation ... Keywords: Constraint satisfaction, Fuzzy set, Image interpretation, Structural model

Olivier Nempont; Jamal Atif; Isabelle Bloch

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ecological Modelling 147 (2002) 2339 Dispersal success on spatially structured landscapes: when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 147 (2002) 23­39 Dispersal success on spatially structured landscapes: when do a simulation study in which we explored (1) the conditions under which landscape structure affects dispersal success and (2) the dependency of dispersal success on the choice of dispersal algorithm. We simulated

With, Kimberly A.

267

Local identification of scalar hybrid models with tree structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......using an SHM for the reactor. LOCAL IDENTIFICATION...established with the necessary reliability. Therefore, a black-box...complexity of the SHM for the reactor subprocesses as depicted...the SHM allows the analysis of the impact of monomer...extrapolability for practical reactor modelling. Indeed and......

Bernold Fiedler; Andreas Schuppert

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Free Energy Functionals for Efficient Phase Field Crystal Modeling of Structural Phase Transformations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase field crystal (PFC) method is a promising technique for modeling materials with atomic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. While numerically more efficient than classical density functional theory (CDFT), its single mode free energy limits the complexity of structural transformations that can be simulated. We introduce a new PFC model inspired by CDFT, which uses a systematic construction of two-particle correlation functions that allows for a broad class of structural transformations. Our approach considers planar spacings, lattice symmetries, planar atomic densities, and atomic vibrational amplitudes in the unit cell, and parameterizes temperature and anisotropic surface energies. The power of our approach is demonstrated by two examples of structural phase transformations.

Michael Greenwood; Nikolas Provatas; Jrg Rottler

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations with Spectral Neutrino Transport II. Models for Different Progenitor Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1D and 2D supernova simulations for stars between 11 and 25 solar masses are presented, making use of the Prometheus/Vertex neutrino-hydrodynamics code, which employs a full spectral treatment of the neutrino transport. Multi-dimensional transport aspects are treated by the ``ray-by-ray plus'' approximation described in Paper I. Our set of models includes a 2D calculation for a 15 solar mass star whose iron core is assumed to rotate rigidly with an angular frequency of 0.5 rad/s before collapse. No important differences were found depending on whether random seed perturbations for triggering convection are included already during core collapse, or whether they are imposed on a 1D collapse model shortly after bounce. Convection below the neutrinosphere sets in about 40 ms p.b. at a density above 10**12 g/cm^3 in all 2D models, and encompasses a layer of growing mass as time goes on. It leads to a more extended proto-neutron star structure with accelerated lepton number and energy loss and significantly higher muon and tau neutrino luminosities, but reduced mean energies of the radiated neutrinos, at times later than ~100 ms p.b. In case of an 11.2 solar mass star we find that low (l = 1,2) convective modes cause a probably rather weak explosion by the convectively supported neutrino-heating mechanism after ~150 ms p.b. when the 2D simulation is performed with a full 180 degree grid, whereas the same simulation with 90 degree wedge fails to explode like all other models. This sensitivity demonstrates the proximity of our 2D models to the borderline between success and failure, and stresses the need of simulations in 3D, ultimately without the axis singularity of a polar grid. (abridged)

R. Buras; H. -Th. Janka; M. Rampp; K. Kifonidis

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Ising model in a transverse field on comb-like ramified linear structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ising model in a transverse field on comb-like ramified linear structures R. Jullien, K. A une méthode de renormalisation et des résultats exacts, le modèle d'Ising dans un champ transverse Combining a real space renormalization group method and exact results, the Ising model with a transverse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Supplementary Material to "High-Dimensional Structure Learning of Ising Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Supplementary Material to "High-Dimensional Structure Learning of Ising) (P, Q) := 1 2 P - Q 1 = 1 2 xX |P(x) - Q(x)|. 1.1. Analysis of Ising Models on Trees. We first derive simple expressions for Ising models Markov on trees. This will be later used upon reduction of general

Anandkumar, Animashree

272

Modeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Berkeley, California. Abstract. The recent solar minimum, marking the end of solar cycle 23, has beenModeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum: Model Mikic and Janet G. Luhmann Predictive Science, San Diego, California. Harvard-Smithsonian Center

California at Berkeley, University of

273

Modeling and H? robust control of a smart structure with rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of smart structures in trajectory tracking under sub-micron level is hindered by the rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity. In this paper, a Hammerstein-like model based on the support vector machines (SVM) is proposed to capture the ... Keywords: H? robust control, Hammerstein-like model, Rate-dependent hysteresis, piezoelectric actuator, support vector machines (SVM)

Ping Liu; Zhen-Yan Wang; Zhen Zhang; Jian-Qin Mao; Ke-Min Zhou

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media By Daniel E.A. van with the formulation and numerical solution of equations for modelling multicomponent, two-phase, thermal fluid flow typical flow behaviour that occurs during fluid injection into a reservoir. Keywords: porous media flow

275

STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER the effect of insulation layers in complex dynamical systems for low- and medium-frequency ranges such as car booming noise analysis, one introduces a sim- plified stochastic model of insulation layers based

Boyer, Edmond

276

CAE (computer aided engineering) driven durability model verification for the automotive structure development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test/analysis correlation, in the refinement of finite element models to accord with test results of the modeled structure is an emerging field in the today's automotive industries. The accuracy of finite element analysis predictions in the linear and ... Keywords: CAE (computer aided engineering), Durability, EMBS (elastic multi body simulation), VPG (virtual proving ground), Vehicle body design

Dong-Chan Lee; Chang-Soo Han

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Remote robotic underwater grinding system and modeling for rectification of hydroelectric structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A submersible grinding robot has been designed to automate the dam gate metallic structure repair process. In order to measure and control the amount of material removed during the process, an empirical approach for modeling the material removal rate ... Keywords: Air injector, Grinding modeling, Material removal rate (MRR), Robotic grinding, Underwater grinding process, Water drag effect

Dominique Thuot; Zhaoheng Liu; Henri Champliaud; Julien Beaudry; Pierre-Luc Richard; Michel Blain

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sensitive Growth Grammars Specifying Models of Forest Structure, Competition and Plant-Herbivore Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and data interfaces to other software. 1 Introduction Simulation models which are able to reproduce. Comparison of the architecture of a classical simulation model (left), where each modification requires of irregular stand structures, (b) simulation of competitive effects on crown radius development and resulting

Kurth, Winfried

279

Longitudinal Data Analysis Using Multilevel Linear Modeling (MLM): Fitting an Optimal Variance-Covariance Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONGITUDINAL DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTILEVEL LINEAR MODELING (MLM): FITTING AN OPTIMAL VARIANCE-COVARIANCE STRUCTURE A Dissertation by YUAN-HSUAN LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Educational Psychology Longitudinal Data Analysis Using Multilevel Linear Modeling (MLM...

Lee, Yuan-Hsuan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

On a tensor-based finite element model for the analysis of shell structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present study, we propose a computational model for the linear and nonlinear analysis of shell structures. We consider a tensor-based finite element formulation which describes the mathematical shell model in a natural and simple way by using...

Arciniega Aleman, Roman Augusto

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity for identifying the factors contributing to market integration or to high transfer costs1 A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii June 2009 i Model of Markets in Madagascar Abstract Market efficiency and price transmission across space

Krivobokova, Tatyana

282

3D-mesh models: view-based indexing and structural analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D-mesh models: view-based indexing and structural analysis Mohamed Daoudi, Tarik Filali Ansary.daoudi@lifl.fr, tarik.filali@lifl.fr, julien.tierny@lifl.fr, jean-philippe.vandeborre@lifl.fr Abstract. 3D-mesh models applications, medical or military simulations, video games and so on. Indexing and analyzing these 3D data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

Towards a Formal Semantics for a Structurally Dynamic Noncausal Modelling Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, many of these languages are referred to as object-oriented mod- elling languages. Modelica [23] is oneTowards a Formal Semantics for a Structurally Dynamic Noncausal Modelling Language John Capper, UK nhn@cs.nott.ac.uk Abstract Modelling and simulation languages are evolving rapidly to sup- port

Nilsson, Henrik

284

Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuum Damage Mechanics at the Representative Element Volume scale is a relevant tool to deal with largeAnisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures Ragueneau F with damage induced anisotropy modelling for concrete-like materials. A thermodynamics based constitutive

Boyer, Edmond

285

CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stretched-spiral vortex has been suc- cessfully applied to the calculation of the energy spectrum,6 and some for larger scales is perhaps questionable. Most quantitative vortex-based models have utilized tube and sheetCALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 129 On Velocity Structure Functions and the Spherical Vortex Model

Barr, Al

286

An Efficient Genetic Algorithm for Predicting Protein Tertiary Structures in the 2D HP Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, predicting its tertiary structure is known as the protein folding problem. This problem has been widely genetic algo- rithm for the protein folding problem under the HP model in the two-dimensional square Genetic Algorithm, Protein Folding Problem, 2D HP Model 1. INTRODUCTION Amino acids are the building

Istrail, Sorin

287

A Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Sensing Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Hot Spring Law of Taiwan was passed in legislative assembly on 3 June 2003. Hot springs would become one of the most important natural resources for recreation purposes. Both public and private sectors will invest large amount of capital in this area in the near future. The value of remote sensing technology is to give a critical tool for observing the landscape to find out mega-scaled geological structures, which may not be able to be found by conventional approaches. The occurrences of the hot

288

Structure of high pressure Ca(OD){sub 2} II from powder neutron diffraction: Relationship to the ZrO{sub 2} and EuI{sub 2} structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {open_quotes}unquenchable{close_quotes} high pressure form of Ca(OD){sub 2} [Ca(OH){sub 2}II] has been synthesized at 9 GPa and 400{degrees}C and recovered to ambient pressure at cryogenic temperatures. The structure was determined from powder neutron diffraction data using the Rietveld technique. The symmetry is monoclinic P2{sub 1}/c with a = 5.3979(4) {angstrom}, b = 6.0931(4) {angstrom}, c = 5.9852(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 103.581(6), Z = 4 at 1 atm and 11 K. R{sub wp} = 2.8%, R{sub p} = 1.9%, reduced {chi}{sup 2} = 6.6. for 117 variables. The calcium and oxygen substructure is intermediate between that in {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} and that in fluorite; it was previously described as isostructural with baddeleyite (ZrO{sub 2}), but it is more accurately described as isostructural with EuI{sub 2}. This structure is distinguished by the presence of a 3{sup 6} anion met parallel to (100). Only one of the two kinds of D atoms in the structure shows appreciable hydrogen bonding to O, with a second neighbor D...O distance of 1.91 {angstrom}, and an O-D...O angle of 153.2{degrees}; the other D atom has 3 second-neighbor oxygens near 2.6 {angstrom} away.

Leinenweber, K.; Partin, D.E.; Schuelke, U. [Arziona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)] [and others] [Arziona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Edible oil structures at low and intermediate concentrations. II. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering of in situ tristearin solids in triolein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering has been used for the first time to elucidate, in situ, the aggregation structure of a model edible oil system. The three-dimensional nano- to micro-structure of tristearin solid particles in triolein solvent was investigated using 5, 10, 15, and 20% solids. Three different sample preparation procedures were investigated: two slow cooling rates of 0.5/min, case 1 (22 days of storage at room temperature) and case 2 (no storage), and one fast cooling of 30/min, case 3 (no storage). The length scale investigated, by using the Bonse-Hart camera at beamline ID-15D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, covered the range from 300? to 10??m. The unified fit and the Guinier-Porod models in the Irena software were used to fit the data. The former was used to fit 3 structural levels. Level 1 structures showed that the primary scatterers were essentially 2-dimensional objects for the three cases. The scatterers possessed lateral dimensions between 1000 and 4300?. This is consistent with the sizes of crystalline nanoplatelets present which were observed using cryo-TEM. Level 2 structures were aggregates possessing radii of gyration, R{sub g2} between 1800? and 12000? and fractal dimensions of either D{sub 2}=1 for case 3 or 1.8?D{sub 2}?2.1 for case 1 and case 2. D{sub 2}?=?1 is consistent with unaggregated 1-dimensional objects. 1.8???D{sub 2}???2.1 is consistent with these 1-dimensional objects (below) forming structures characteristic of diffusion or reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation. Level 3 structures showed that the spatial distribution of the level 2 structures was uniform, on the average, for case 1, with fractal dimension D{sub 3}?3 while for case 2 and case 3 the fractal dimension was D{sub 3}?2.2, which suggested that the large-scale distribution had not come to equilibrium. The Guinier-Porod model showed that the structures giving rise to the aggregates with a fractal dimension given by D{sub 2} in the unified fit level 2 model were cylinders described by the parameter s?1 in the Guinier-Porod model. The size of the base of these cylinders was in agreement with the cryo-TEM observations as well as with the results of the level 1 unified fit model. By estimating the size of the nanoplatelets and understanding the structures formed via their aggregation, it will be possible to engineer novel lipids systems that embody desired functional characteristics.

Peyronel, Fernanda; Marangoni, Alejandro G. [Food Science Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Ilavsky, Jan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Ave., Bldg. 434D, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Mazzanti, Gianfranco [Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Pink, David A. [Food Science Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Physics Department, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(?-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Polarization from aligned atoms as a diagnostics of circumstellar, AGN and interstellar magnetic fields: II. Atoms with Hyperfine Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that atomic alignment presents a reliable way to study topology of astrophysical magnetic fields. The effect of atomic alignment arises from modulation of the relative population of the sublevels of atomic ground state pumped by anisotropic radiation flux. As such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects the properties of the polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by the atoms. As the result the polarizations of emission and absorption lines depend on the 3D geometry of the magnetic field as well as the direction and anisotropy of incident radiation. We consider a subset of astrophysically important atoms with hyperfine structure. For emission lines we obtain the dependencies of the direction of linear polarization on the directions of magnetic field and the incident pumping radiation. For absorption lines we establish when the polarization is perpendicular and parallel to magnetic field. For both emission and absorption lines we find the dependence on the degree of polarization on the 3D geometry of magnetic field. We claim that atomic alignment provides a unique tool to study magnetic fields in circumstellar regions, AGN, interplanetary and interstellar medium. This tool allows studying of 3D topology of magnetic fields and establish other important astrophysical parameters. We consider polarization arising from both atoms in the steady state and also as they undergo individual scattering of photons. We exemplify the utility of atomic alignment for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields by considering a case of Na alignment in a comet wake.

Huirong Yan; A. Lazarian

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of atmospheric transport models for use in Phase II of the historical public exposures studies at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five atmospheric transport models were evaluated for use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant. Models included a simple straight-line Gaussian plume model (ISCST2), several integrated puff models (RATCHET, TRIAD, and INPUFF2), and a complex terrain model (TRAC). Evaluations were based on how well model predictions compared with sulfur hexafluoride tracer measurements taken in the vicinity of Rocky Flats in February 1991. Twelve separate tracer experiments were conducted, each lasting 9 hr and measured at 140 samplers in arcs 8 and 16 km from the release point at Rocky Flats. Four modeling objectives were defined based on the endpoints of the overall study: (1) the unpaired maximum hourly average concentration, (2) paired time-averaged concentration, (3) unpaired time-averaged concentration, and (4) arc-integrated concentration. Performance measures were used to evaluate models and focused on the geometric mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-observed ratio and the correlation coefficient between predicted and observed concentrations. No one model consistently outperformed the others in all modeling objectives and performance measures. The overall performance of the RATCHET model was somewhat better than the other models.

Rood, A.S.; Killough, G.G.; Till, J.E.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Folding Proteins with Both Alpha and Beta Structures in a Reduced Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A reduced model, which can fold both helix and sheet structures, is proposed to study the problem of protein folding. The goal of this model is to find an unbiased effective potential that has included the effects of water and at the same time can predict the three dimensional structure of a protein with a given sequence in reasonable time. For this purpose, rather than focusing on the real folding dynamics or full structural details at the atomic scale, we adopt the Monte Carlo method and the coarse-grained representation of the protein in which both side-chains and the backbones are replaced by suitable geometrical objects in consistent with the known structure. On top of the coarse-grained representation, our effective potential can be developed. Two new interactions, the dipole-dipole interactions and the local hydrophobic interactions, are introduced and are shown to be as crucial as the hydrogen bonds for forming the secondary structures. In particular, for the first time, we demonstrate that the resulting reduced model can successfully fold proteins with both helix and sheet structures without using any biased potential. Further analyses show that this model can also fold other proteins in reasonable accuracy and thus provides a promising starting point for the problem of protein folding.

Nan-yow Chen

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

A reduced-coordinate approach to modeling RNA 3-D structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the realization of RNA molecules capable of performing very specific functions (e.g., catalytic RNAs and RNAs that bind ligand with affinity and specificity of an anti-body) and contrary to the traditional view that structure of RNA molecules being functionally passive, it has become clear that studying the 3-dimensional (3-D) folding of RNA molecules is a very important task. In the absence of sufficient number of experimentally determined RNA structures available up-to-date, folding of RNA structures computationally provides an alternative approach in studying the 3-D structure of RNA molecules. We have developed a computational approach for folding RNA 3-D structures. The method is conceptually simple and general. It consists of two major components. The first being the arrangement of all helices in space. Once the helices are positioned and oriented in space, structures of the connecting loops are modeled and inserted between the helices. Any number of structural constraints derived either experimentally or theoretically can be used to guide the folding processes. A conformational sampling approach is developed with structural equilibration using the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation. The lengths of various loop sizes (ranging from 1 base to 7 bases) are calculated based on a set of RNA structures deposited in PDB as well as a set of loop structures constructed using our method. The validity of using the averaged loop lengths of the connecting loops as distance constraints for arranging the helices in space is studied.

Tung, Chang-Shung

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling the Spread of Epidemic Cholera: an Age-Structured Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in crowded conditions and poor sanitation. A common type of model for the spread of an infectious disease

Gobbert, Matthias K.

296

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Tongonan Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal power from the northern flank of the eroded Ancestral Mount Bao (AMB) volcano in Leyte Island, Philippines. A structural model guide is presented to delineate exploration targets in other flanks of the 1200 km2 area of the AMB volcano. If applied, the model constrains the coverage of geothermal exploration to

297

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III(O2 CO)4 3- Based Molecule Based Magnets: Three-Dmensional Network Structure and Two Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Kennon, B.; Her, J; Stephens, P; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

3D MHD Modeling of the Gaseous Structure of the Galaxy: Synthetic Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generated synthetic observations from the four-arm model presented in Gomez & Cox (2004) for the Galactic ISM in the presence of a spiral gravitational perturbation. We found that velocity crowding and diffusion have a strong effect in the l-v diagram. The v-b diagram presents structures at the expected spiral arm velocities, that can be explained by the off-the-plane structure of the arms presented in previous papers of this series. Such structures are observed in the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI survey. The rotation curve, as measured from the inside of the modeled galaxy, shows similarities with the observed one for the Milky Way Galaxy, although it has large deviations from the smooth circular rotation corresponding to the background potential. The magnetic field inferred from a synthetic synchrotron map shows a largely circular structure, but with interesting deviations in the midplane due to distortion of the field from circularity in the interarm regions.

Gmez, G C; Gomez, Gilberto C.; Cox, Donald P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

3D MHD Modeling of the Gaseous Structure of the Galaxy: Synthetic Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generated synthetic observations from the four-arm model presented in Gomez & Cox (2004) for the Galactic ISM in the presence of a spiral gravitational perturbation. We found that velocity crowding and diffusion have a strong effect in the l-v diagram. The v-b diagram presents structures at the expected spiral arm velocities, that can be explained by the off-the-plane structure of the arms presented in previous papers of this series. Such structures are observed in the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI survey. The rotation curve, as measured from the inside of the modeled galaxy, shows similarities with the observed one for the Milky Way Galaxy, although it has large deviations from the smooth circular rotation corresponding to the background potential. The magnetic field inferred from a synthetic synchrotron map shows a largely circular structure, but with interesting deviations in the midplane due to distortion of the field from circularity in the interarm regions.

Gilberto C. Gomez; Donald P. Cox

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Abstract In the western Great Basin, the Walker Lane is a system of right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodating ~15-25% of relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Relatively high rates of recent (<10 Ma) west-northwest extension absorb northwestward declining dextral motion in the Walker Lane, diffusing that motion into the Basin-Range. Abundant geothermal fields cluster in several northeasttrending belts in the

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301

Dynamics of the Structural Glass Transition and the p-SpinInteraction Spin-Glass Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mathematical structure of the dynamical theory for the soft-spin version of the p-spin-interaction (p>2) spin-glass model is related to that for the dynamical theories of the structural glass transition. The phase transitions predicted by both theories are discussed. The spin-glass transition predicted by the dynamical theory is related to a broken-replica-symmetry equilibrium calculation.

T. R. Kirkpatrick and D. Thirumalai

1987-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: the Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of ten BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Using the blastwave model and some assumptions which include on-axis viewing and standard jet structure, constant blastwave energy and no evolution of the microphysical parameters, we find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.04 +0.02/-0.03. A statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3-sigma level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k=0 (homogeneous) and k=2 (wind-like). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly wind-like. The fifth source has a value of 0

R. L. C. Starling; A. J. van der Horst; E. Rol; R. A. M. J. Wijers; C. Kouveliotou; K. Wiersema; P. A. Curran; P. Weltevrede

2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETECTION AND MODELLING DF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND WATER DISCHARGES A Thesis by DOUGLAS YINCENT ROBERTS Subm1tted to the Graduate Col leqe of Texas A&M University in part1al fulf1llment of the requirements or the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August IgSS Major Subject: Geophys1cs THE DETECTION AND MODELLING OF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND HATER DISCHARGES A Thesis DOUGLAS VINCENT ROBERTS Approved as to style and content by: Earl . oskins (Chair of Committee...

Roberts, Douglas Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Computational and experimental investigation of scour past laboratory models of stream restoration rock structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Local scour of the streambed around three models of stream restoration rock structures, including a rock vane, a cross vane, and a J-hook vane, is investigated via laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In the experimental study, a physical model of each rock structure is constructed via an assembly of rocks and installed in a straight mobile sand bed flume. Continuous bed topography measurements provide insight into the time evolution of the scour patterns downstream of the structures and yield comprehensive data sets for validating the numerical simulations in terms of scour patterns, maximum scour depths, and bar migration dynamics. The numerical simulations are carried out using the coupled, hydro-morphodynamic Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method of Khosronejad et al. (2011) [17]. The mobile channel bed and the individual rocks comprising a stream restoration structure are discretized with an unstructured triangular mesh and treated as sharp-interface immersed boundaries embedded in the background curvilinear mesh used to discretize the flow domain. For each case, simulations are carried out solving both the unsteady Reynolds-averaged NavierStokes (URANS) equations closed with the k? model and filtered Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) equations closed with the dynamic Smagorinski subgrid scale model. Both the URANS and LES models yield flow and scour patterns in reasonable agreement with the measurements with the LES results being consistently in better overall agreement with the measurements. To our knowledge, the present study is the first attempt to simulate local scour patterns around realistic model of stream restoration rock structures by taking into account and directly modeling their arbitrarily complex geometrical features.

Ali Khosronejad; Craig Hill; Seokkoo Kang; Fotis Sotiropoulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electronic Structure of the Mn(4)Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem Ii Studied By Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i=0--4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states also showed characteristic features which were not clear from the K-edge spectroscopy.

Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl pendant arm: synthesis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl that were used for the preparation of the copper(II) complexes. The structures of three nickel(II) complexes and two copper(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography. Protonation of the pendant arm (p

Nazarenko, Alexander

307

A molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal: Moving toward capturing the continuum structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large-scale molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal is generated based on an automated construction approach in an effort to move toward capturing the continuum structure. The model contains 50,789atoms within 728 molecules and is the largest, most complex coal representation constructed to-date. The aromatic ring size distribution was based on multiple high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) lattice fringe micrographs and was duplicated with automated construction protocols (Fringe3D) in molecular modeling space. Additional structural data was obtained from the abundant literature assessing this Argonne Premium coal. Organic oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functionalities were incorporated primarily into the polyaromatic structures according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy data. Aliphatic carbons were in the form of cross-links (bridges and loops) and pendant alkyl groups based on the combination of laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDIMS), ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation, elemental analysis, and NMR data in good agreement with the literature. Bound and bulk water was also included. Construction of the coal molecules was performed by use of Perl scripts developed in Materials Studio to eliminate personal bias and improve the accuracy and the scale of the structure generated. The large-scale model captured a broad and continuous molecular weight distribution in accordance with LDIMS data here ranging from 100 to 2850Da, enabling inclusion of structural diversity to capture a portion of the continuum structure. A theoretical pyridine extraction yield, determined by a group contribution approach, was in agreement with the experimental value. The extract and residue representations were generated from the large-scale Illinois coal model and showed consistency with NMR, elemental analysis and LDIMS trends. The distribution of heteroatomic classes and double bond equivalents was also well-defined experimentally based on electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These data further constrain the molecular weight of extractable material and was consistent with limited pyridine extractability and model heteroatom classes. Future work will be well served by staying within the limits established by the approach and increasing the structural diversity (sampling frequency through increased scale) to better capture the complex nature of coal structural diversity, i.e., the continuum.

Fidel Castro-Marcano; Vladislav V. Lobodin; Ryan P. Rodgers; Amy M. McKenna; Alan G. Marshall; Jonathan P. Mathews

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Extreme wind climate modeling of some locations in India for the specification of the design wind speed of structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind load on a structure is proportional to the square of the wind speed. Extreme wind climate modeling should be required for specifying the design wind speed of structures. Extreme wind speeds for a storm t...

Arnab Sarkar; Navneet Kumar; Debojyoti Mitra

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Model of Varying Fine Structure Constant and Varying Speed of Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent evidence for a cosmological evolution of the fine structure constant \\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c found from an analysis of absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, is modelled by a cosmological scenario in which it is assumed that only the speed of light varies. The model fits the spectral line data and can also lead to a solution of the initial value problems in cosmology.

J. W. Moffat

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

311

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

312

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

313

Towards QoS Prediction Based on Composition Structure Analysis and Probabilistic Environment Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards QoS Prediction Based on Composition Structure Analysis and Probabilistic Environment Models Dragan Ivanovi´c Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid idragan@clip.dia.fi.upm.es Peerachai Kaowichakorn Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid p.kaowichakorn@gmail.com Manuel Carro Universidad Polit´ecnica de Madrid

Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

314

Hierarchical Modelling of Automotive Sensor Front-Ends For Structural Diagnosis of Aging Faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shown [2] that 41% of failures in automotive electronics could not be identified by functional diagnosisHierarchical Modelling of Automotive Sensor Front-Ends For Structural Diagnosis of Aging Faults h.g.kerkhoff@utwente.nl Abstract: The semiconductor industry for automotive applications is growing

Wieringa, Roel

315

Sub-AQUA: real-value quality assessment of protein structure models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sub-AQUA: real-value quality assessment of protein structure models Yifeng David Yang1, Preston of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea, 3 Department of Computer Science, College of Science developed quality assessment methods, which predict real value of the global and local quality of protein

Kihara, Daisuke

316

Modeling water column structure and suspended particulate matter on the Middle Atlantic continental shelf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that contributed to the evolution of observed thermal structure and resuspension of particulate matter during resuspension processes. It is concluded that wave-current bottom shear stress was clearly the most important process for sediment resuspension during and following both hurricanes. Discrepancies between modeled

Chang, Grace C.

317

Merchant Commodity Storage and Term Structure Model Error Nicola Secomandi,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; specifically, we consider natural gas storage lease contracts (Maragos 2002). Natural gas is an important flows of commodity and energy conversion assets as real options based on stochastic models the futures term structure affect the valuation and hedging of natural gas storage. We find that even small

Sadeh, Norman M.

318

A spatial statistics approach to characterizing and modeling the structure of cognitive wireless networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of cognitive wireless networks (CWNs) depends heavily on their spatial structure. However, highly simplified models are still routinely used for performance evaluation of CWNs and other wireless networks, with node locations often being ... Keywords: Cognitive wireless networks, Point processes, Spatial statistics, Stochastic geometry

Janne Riihijrvi; Petri Mhnen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model Mathias specific interaction phenomenon that may occur in turbo- machines due to radial rub between a bladed disk requirements leading to reduced clearance between blade-tips and casing together with the rotation of the blade

Boyer, Edmond

320

A Hamilton-Jacobi approach for a model of population structured by space and trait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hamilton-Jacobi approach for a model of population structured by space and trait Emeric Bouin WKB ansatz, we prove that the propagation of the population in space can be de- scribed by a Hamilton, Hamilton-Jacobi equation, Spectral problem, Front propagation AMS Class. No: 45K05, 35B25, 49L25, 92D15, 35

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Structural parameters The analytical model proposed here can explain high fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural parameters · The analytical model proposed here can explain high fracture toughness, P.J., et al., Engineering Fracture Mechanics, 2007. 74: p. 19281941. 4. Ritchie, R.O., et al Tensile strength Fracture toughness Composite properties E max S )~( ~ aJ III. Fracture toughness

Barthelat, Francois

322

Modeling of the interaction of an acoustic wave with immersed targets for telemetry of complex structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are being followed: the core monitoring where transducers are directly immersed in sodium near the reactor reactors, which consists in locating various reactor structures using an ultrasonic inspection performed and applicability domains. A theoretical comparison of these models is carried out to define the more adequate one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

Optimization of the structural Gabor functions in a homogeneous velocity model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of the structural Gabor functions in a homogeneous velocity model for a zero-o#11;set functions should be optimized, and the Gabor functions should form a frame. We present a simple attempt functions and the space{wavenumber lattice of their central points are optimized analytically

Cerveny, Vlastislav

324

A STRUCTURAL MODEL FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STRUCTURAL MODEL FOR ELECTRICITY PRICES RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ Abstract pricing in electricity markets, thus extending the growing branch of liter- ature which describes power prices for electricity. We capture both the heavy-tailed nature of spot prices and the complex dependence

Carmona, Rene

325

Predicting Protein Folds with Structural Repeats Using a Chain Graph Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Protein Folds with Structural Repeats Using a Chain Graph Model Yan Liu yanliu, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA Abstract Protein fold recognition is a key step to to accurately identify protein folds aris- ing from typical spatial arrangements of well-defined secondary

Xing, Eric P.

326

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme Print Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme Print The rate and intensity of calcium (Ca2+) currents that oscillate through the plasma membrane around a cell affect such diverse phenomena as fertilization, the cardiac rhythm, and even the formation of memories. How does the cell sense these digital oscillations and transduce them into a cellular signal, such as changes in phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group to a protein) or gene transcription? A group from the University of California, Berkeley, the Yale University School of Medicine, and Berkeley Lab has combined protein crystallography and small-angle x-ray scattering to give a first glimpse into what this conversion may look like as well as the structural consequences of the conversion.

327

Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G. [CC Technologies Labs., Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by {Delta}u and {Delta}d of the polarized functions.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia, Engenharia e Tecnologia - ICET, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri - UFVJM, Campus do Mucuri, Rua do Cruzeiro 01, Jardim Sao Paulo, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: the Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Assuming the fireball model, we can find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.04 +0.02/-0.03. A statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3-sigma level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k=0 (homogeneous) and k=2 (wind-...

Starling, R L C; Rol, E; Wijers, R A M J; Kouveliotou, C; Wiersema, K; Curran, P A; Weltevrede, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

333

X-ray Crystallographic, Scanning Microprobe X-ray Diffraction, and Cross-Polarized/Magic Angle Spinning [superscript 13]C NMR Studies of the Structure of Cellulose III[subscript II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X-ray crystallographic structure of cellulose III{sub II} is characterized by disorder; the unit cell (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 7.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 106.96{sup o}) is occupied by one chain that is the average of statistically disordered antiparallel chains. {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR studies reveal the presence of three distinct molecular conformations that can be interpreted as a mixture of two different crystal forms, one equivalent to cellulose III{sub I}, and another with two independent glucosyl conformations in the asymmetric unit. Both X-ray crystallographic and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic results are consistent with an aggregated microdomain structure for cellulose III{sub II}. This structure can be generated from a new crystal form (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 14.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 90.05{sup o}; two crystallographically independent and antiparallel chains; gt hydroxymethyl groups) by multiple dislocation defects. These defects produce microdomains of the new crystal form and cellulose III{sub I} that scanning microprobe diffraction studies show are distributed consistently through the cellulose III{sub II} fiber.

Wada, Masahisa; Heux, Laurent; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Langan, Paul; (U of Tokyo); (CNRS-CRMD); (LANL)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Driving kinetically constrained models into non-equilibrium steady states: structural and slow transport properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex fluids in shear flow and biased dynamics in crowded environments exhibit counterintuitive features which are difficult to address both at theoretical level and by molecular dynamic simulations. To understand some of these features we study a schematic model of highly viscous liquid, the 2D Kob-Andersen kinetically constrained model, driven into non-equilibrium steady states by a uniform non-Hamiltonian force. We present a detailed numerical analysis of the microscopic behavior of the model, including transversal and longitudinal spatial correlations and dynamic heterogeneities. In particular, we show that at high particle density the transition from positive to negative resistance regimes in the current vs field relation can be explained via the emergence of nontrivial structures that intermittently trap the particles and slow down the dynamics. We relate such spatial structures to the current vs field relation in the different transport regimes.

Francesco Turci; Estelle Pitard; Mauro Sellitto

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Behavioral and Structural Responses to Chronic Cocaine Require a Feedforward Loop Involving ?FosB and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transcription factor ?FosB and the brain-enriched calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII?) are induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by chronic exposure to cocaine or other psychostimulant drugs of ...

Neve, Rachael L.

337

Forces due to waves in the presence of currents on a submerged model structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering FORCES DUE TO WAVES IN THE PRESENCE OF CURRENTS ON A SUBMERGED MODEL STRUCTURE A Thesis by DAVID RAY SHIELDS Approved as to style and content by: Jo n . Her &c (Chairman of Committee) K...-induced and nonwave-induced (ZO). Nonwave-induced loads are the result of nonwave-induced currents and fluid-entrained spray acting upon the structure which may extend above the water's free surface. The wave-induced hydrodynamic loads are the result of ocean...

Shields, David Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Electronic structure, stacking energy, partial charge, and hydrogen bonding in four periodic B-DNA models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of four periodic B-DNA models labeled (AT)10, (GC)10, (AT)5(GC)5, and (AT?GC)5 where A denotes adenine, T denotes thymine, G denotes guanine, and C denotes cytosine. Each model has ten base pairs with Na counterions to neutralize the negative phosphate group in the backbone. The (AT)5(GC)5 and (AT?GC)5 models contain two and five AT-GC bilayers, respectively. When compared against the average of the two pure models, we estimate the AT-GC bilayer interaction energy to be 19.015 Kcal/mol, which is comparable to the hydrogen bonding energy between base pairs obtained from the literature. Our investigation shows that the stacking of base pairs plays a vital role in the electronic structure, relative stability, bonding, and distribution of partial charges in the DNA models. All four models show a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap ranging from 2.14 to 3.12 eV with HOMO states residing on the PO4+Na functional group and LUMO states originating from the bases. Our calculation implies that the electrical conductance of a DNA molecule should increase with increased base-pair mixing. Interatomic bonding effects in these models are investigated in detail by analyzing the distributions of the calculated bond order values for every pair of atoms in the four models including hydrogen bonding. The counterions significantly affect the gap width, the conductivity, and the distribution of partial charge on the DNA backbone. We also evaluate quantitatively the surface partial charge density on each functional group of the DNA models.

Lokendra Poudel; Paul Rulis; Lei Liang; W. Y. Ching

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Structural model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals Yanfa Yan National Renewable Energy, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Received 15 February 2000 We propose a structure model for the Al72Ni20Co8 decagonal quasicrystals based on its 2 -inflated Al13Co4 approximant phase: Applying a 105 screw operation

Pennycook, Steve

340

3D modelling of forest canopy structure for remote sensing simulations in the optical and microwave domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D modelling of forest canopy structure for remote sensing simulations in the optical and microwave July 2005; received in revised form 4 October 2005; accepted 8 October 2005 Abstract A detailed 3D using detailed 3D models of tree structure including the location and orientation of individual needles

Jones, Peter JS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Phase diagram and structural properties of a simple model for one-patch Achille Giacometti,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase diagram and structural properties of a simple model for one-patch particles Achille and structural properties of a simple, one-patch fluid model using the reference hypernetted-chain RHNC integral, each of which carries a single identical, arbitrarily oriented and attractive circular patch on its

Beichner, Robert J.

342

Interpretation and mathematical modeling of temporal changes of temperature observed in borehole Yaxcopoil-1 within the Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Geothermal research of the Chicxulub impact structure on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, included repeated temperature logs following 0.30.8, 15, 24, 34 and 50 months after shut-in of drilling operations at the 1.5km deep Yaxcopoil-1 borehole. A gradual distortion of the linear temperature profile by a cold wave propagating downward from 145m to 317m was detected within the observational period of 49 months (March 2002April 2006). The amplitude of the cold wave was increasing with depth and time in the range of 0.81.6C. As an explanation of this unusual phenomenon, the hypothesis of downward migration of a large volume of drilling mud, reported lost during drilling within the overlying and cooler highly porous and permeable karstic rocks, has been proposed. The thermal effects of the migrating fluid have been evaluated by solving numerically the heat conductionconvection equation in appropriate geothermal models. The best coincidence between the observed data and the simulations was yielded by the model of the drilling mud migrating as a large body. Parameters of this model are constrained by the measured temperature logs relatively tightly: (i) the vertical extent of the downward migrating fluid body is about 510m, possibly increasing within the observational period of 49 months by a factor of 2; (ii) the horizontal extent of the body must be at least 1520m, i.e. by order(s) of magnitude larger than the diameter of the borehole; (iii) the average speed of the migration is about 5metres per month and (iv) the fluid must migrate through a highly porous rock (80% porosity or more). This high porosity, which is necessary for the model to fit the observed data, and the observed relatively stable velocity of the migration indicate the existence of a well-developed system of interconnected cavities down to more than 300m about 150m more than the deepest cave system known in Yucatan yet.

Jan afanda; Helmut Wilhelm; Philipp Heidinger; Vladimr ?ermk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Phase diagram and structural properties of a simple model for one-patch particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the thermodynamic and structural properties of a simple, one-patch fluid model using the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) integral equation and specialized Monte Carlo simulations. In this model, the interacting particles are hard spheres, each of which carries a single identical, arbitrarily-oriented, attractive circular patch on its surface; two spheres attract via a simple square-well potential only if the two patches on the spheres face each other within a specific angular range dictated by the size of the patch. For a ratio of attractive to repulsive surface of 0.8, we construct the RHNC fluid-fluid separation curve and compare with that obtained by Gibbs ensemble and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. We find that RHNC provides a quick and highly reliable estimate for the position of the fluid-fluid critical line. In addition, it gives a detailed (though approximate) description of all structural properties and their dependence on patch size.

Achille Giacometti; Fred Lado; Julio Largo; Giorgio Pastore; Francesco Sciortino

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hamiltonian structure of reduced fluid models for plasmas obtained from a kinetic description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Hamiltonian structure of reduced fluid models obtained from a kinetic description of collisionless plasmas by Vlasov-Maxwell equations. We investigate the possibility of finding Poisson subalgebras associated with fluid models starting from the Vlasov-Maxwell Poisson algebra. In this way, we show that the only possible Poisson subalgebra involves the moments of zeroth and first order of the Vlasov distribution, meaning the fluid density and the fluid velocity. We find that the bracket derived in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 175002 (2004)] which involves moments of order 2 is not a Poisson bracket since it does not satisfy the Jacobi identity.

Loc De Guillebon; Cristel Chandre

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Anti-optimisation for modelling the vibration of locally nonlinear structures: An exploratory study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sound and Vibration 332 (2013) 709971227100in the automotive industry [6]; and any structure with a joint will introduce some degree of nonlinearity at the interface. Such systems present a modelling opportunity: efficient linear methods can still... is denoted M.the plabest or correct for these applications: the intention is to demonstrate the broadness of the approach, and show that usible metrics and constraints can be envisaged for many kinds of locally nonlinear problem. What is important...

Butlin, T.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Models for Achromatic Light-Curve Breaks in GRB Afterglows: Jets, Structured Outflows, and Energy Injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The steepening (break) of the power-law fall-off observed in the optical emission of some GRB afterglows at epoch ~1 day is often attributed to a collimated outflow (jet), undergoing lateral spreading. Wider opening GRB ejecta with a non-uniform energy angular distribution (structured outflows) or the cessation of energy injection in the afterglow can also yield light-curve breaks. We determine the optical and X-ray light-curve decay indices and spectral energy distribution slopes for 10 GRB afterglows with optical light-curve breaks (980519, 990123, 990510, 991216, 000301, 000926, 010222, 011211, 020813, 030226), and use these properties to test the above models for light-curve steepening. It is found that the optical breaks of six of these afterglows can be accommodated by either energy injection or by structured outflows. In the refreshed shock model, a wind-like stratification of the circumburst medium (as expected for massive stars as GRB progenitors) is slightly favoured. A spreading jet interacting with a homogeneous circumburst medium is required by the afterglows 990510, 000301, 011211, and 030226. The optical pre- and post-break decays of these four afterglows are incompatible with a wind-like medium. The current sample of 10 afterglows with breaks suggests that the distribution of the break magnitude (defined as the increase of the afterglow decay exponent) is bimodal, with a gap at 1. If true, this bimodality favours the structured outflow model, while the gap location indicates a homogeneous circumburst environment.

A. Panaitescu

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

350

Modeling of structure H hydrate equilibria for methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clathrate hydrates are inclusion compounds in which guest molecules are engaged by water molecules under favorable conditions of pressure and temperature. The well known structures 1 and 2 have been discovered since last century, while a new structure called H has been recently described in the literature. Since that time, structure H hydrate equilibrium data involving methane and different intermediate liquid hydrocarbon molecules have been published. The equilibrium calculations involving hydrates are based on the fact that the chemical potential of water in the aqueous liquid phase is equal to the one in the hydrate phase. The chemical potential of water in the liquid aqueous phase can be easily described by classical thermodynamic relations, while the chemical potential of water in the hydrates phase is described by the expressions proposed by Van der Walls and Platteeuw derived from an adsorption model based on statistical thermodynamics. The authors present in this paper a set of Kihara potential parameters which enable the calculation of Langmuir constants which characterize the adsorption of some naphthenic and iso-paraffinic intermediate hydrocarbons in the larger cage of structure H hydrates. This work thus allows the computation of structural H hydrate equilibrium conditions for systems made of methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water.

Thomas, M.; Behar, E. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Validating the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology in Kuwaiti ministries: a structural equation modelling approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to describe a test of the validity of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model by applying it to Kuwaiti ministries. Structural equation modelling methods were used to test the relationships ... Keywords: ISU acceptance, Kuwait, UTAUT, developing countries, information systems usage, structural equation modelling, technology acceptance, technology use, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

Helaiel Almutairi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A nonlocal model for fluid-structure interaction with applications in hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling important engineering problems related to flow-induced damage (in the context of hydraulic fracturing among others) depends critically on characterizing the interaction of porous media and interstitial fluid flow. This work presents a new formulation for incorporating the effects of pore pressure in a nonlocal representation of solid mechanics. The result is a framework for modeling fluid-structure interaction problems with the discontinuity capturing advantages of an integral based formulation. A number of numerical examples are used to show that the proposed formulation can be applied to measure the effect of leak-off during hydraulic fracturing as well as modeling consolidation of fluid saturated rock and surface subsidence caused by fluid extraction from a geologic reservoir. The formulation incorporates the effect of pore pressure in the constitutive description of the porous material in a way that is appropriate for nonlinear materials, easily implemented in existing codes, straightforward in i...

Turner, Daniel Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure Structure functions 1 NOTE: THE FIGURES IN THIS SECTION ARE INTENDED TO SHOW THE REPRESENTATIVE DATA. THEY ARE NOT MEANT TO BE COMPLETE COMPILATIONS OF ALL THE WORLD'S RELIABLE DATA. Q 2 (GeV 2 ) F 2 (x,Q 2 ) * 2 i x H1 ZEUS BCDMS E665 NMC SLAC 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 Figure 16.6: The proton structure function F p 2 measured in electromagnetic scattering of positrons on protons (collider experiments ZEUS and H1), in the kinematic domain of the HERA data, for x > 0.00006 (cf. Fig. 16.9 for data at smaller x and Q 2 ), and for electrons (SLAC) and muons (BCDMS, E665, NMC) on a fixed target. Statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature are shown. The data are plotted as a function of Q 2 in bins of fixed x. Some points have been slightly offset in Q 2 for clarity. The ZEUS binning in x is used in this plot; all other data are rebinned to the x values of

354

Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

The cluster-core model for halo-structure of light nuclei at the drip lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclei at both the neutron- and proton-drip lines are studied. In the cluster-core model, the halo-structure of all the observed and proposed cases of neutron- or proton-halos is investigated in terms of simple potential energy surfaces calculated as the sum of binding energies, Coulomb repulsion, nuclear proximity attraction and the centrifugal potential for all the possible cluster+core configurations of a nucleus. The clusters of neutrons and protons are taken to be unbound, with additional Coulomb energy added for proton-clusters. The model predictions agree with the available experimental studies but show some differences with the nucleon separation energy hypothesis, particularly for proton-halo nuclei. Of particular interest are the halo-structures of $^{11}N$ and $^{20}Mg$. The calculated potential energy surfaces are also useful to identify the new magic numbers and molecular structures in exotic nuclei. In particular, N=6 is a possible new magic number for very neutron-deficient nuclei, but Z=N=2 and Z=8 seem to remain magic even for such nuclei, near the drip line.

Raj K. Gupta; Sushil Kumar; M. Balasubramaniam; G. Munzenberg; Werner Scheid

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Representation of the molecular structure of petroleum resid through characterization and Monte Carlo modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased refining of heavy petroleum feedstocks has led to greater interest in the chemical and physical properties of resid. Although resid has been implicated in many processing difficulties, very little detailed structural information is available in the literature. This is mainly due to the molecular complexity and high initial boiling point of the material, which makes traditional analytical methods difficult or impossible to use. To cope with these problems a stochastic molecular level construction model coupled to a global optimization program has been developed. Structural attributes were defined in terms of aromatic and naphthenic rings and alkyl sidechains. The attributes were quantified using probability density functions (pdfs). By stochastically sampling the attributes many times a large number of molecules representative of a resid were constructed. Using initial starting points estimated from the literature, optimal structural attributes were found in an iterative manner by comparing the predicted resid properties with actual experimental measurements. The program yields detailed structural information in the form of probability density functions for the initial resid.

Trauth, D.M.; Stark, S.M.; Petti, T.F.; Neurock, M.; Yasar, M.; Klein, M.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

An asymptotic homogenization model for smart 3D grid-reinforced composite structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive micromechanical model for smart 3D composite structures reinforced with a periodic grid of generally orthotropic cylindrical reinforcements that also exhibit piezoelectric behavior is developed. The original boundary value problem characterizing the piezothermoelastic behavior of these structures is decoupled into a set of three simpler unit cell problems dealing, separately, with the elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion characteristics of the smart composite. The technique used is that of asymptotic homogenization and the solution of the unit cell problems permits determination of the effective elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion coefficients. The general orthotropy of the constituent materials is very important from the practical viewpoint and makes the analysis much more complicated. Several examples of practical interest are used to illustrate the work including smart 3D composites with cubic and conical embedded grids as well as diagonally reinforced smart structures. It is also shown in this work that in the limiting particular case of 2D grid-reinforced structures with isotropic reinforcements our results converge to earlier published results.

E M Hassan; A L Kalamkarov; A V Georgiades; K S Challagulla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

RESRAD-BUILD: A model to estimate dose from contaminated structures. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RESRAD-BUILD model is an exposure pathway and analysis code used to determine whether radiologically contaminated buildings and structures can be free released for a specific land use (e.g., residential or industrial). The model provides estimates of dose to a hypothetical receptor from the structure. The RESRAD-BUILD technology can calculate dose from variety of site-specific hypothetical scenarios, decay-time intervals, and radionuclides. When using the RESRAD-BUILD code, specific project assumptions must be developed with the appropriate regulatory agencies, especially the cleanup criteria and the exposure scenario to be used. The C Reactor demonstration of RESRAD-BUILD modeled hypothetical future use of below grade portions of the reactor building complex. A residential exposure scenario with a cleanup criteria of 15 mrem/yr above background (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] draft guidance) was used to coordinate decommissioning with adjacent ongoing remedial actions conducted in accordance with an existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Home Ignition Assessment Model Applied to Structures in the Wildland-Urban Interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of exterior fire threat to buildings, from either wildfires in the wildland-urban interface or neighboring structure fires, is critically important. To address this, theWildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program was initiated. The WIRHD program developed a tool, theWildFIREWizard, that will allow homeowners to estimate the external fire threat to their homes based on specific features and characteristics of the homes and yards. The software then makes recommendations to reduce the threat. The inputs include the structural and material features of the home and information about any ignition sources or flammable objects in its immediate vicinity, known as the home ignition zone. The tool comprises an ignition assessment model that performs explicit calculations of the radiant and convective heating of the building envelope from the potential ignition sources. This article describes a series of material ignition and flammability tests that were performed to calibrate and/or validate the ignition assessment model. The tests involved exposing test walls with different external siding types to radiant heating and/or direct flame contact.The responses of the test walls were used to determine the conditions leading to melting, ignition, or any other mode of failure of the walls. Temperature data were used to verify the model predictions of temperature rises and ignition times of the test walls.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Werth, David [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC; Gupta, Narendra [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

A. Dorodnitsyn; T. Kallman; D. Proga

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorp...

Dorodnitsyn, A; Proga, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The long-period Galactic Cepheid RS Puppis - II. 3D structure and mass of the nebula from VLT/FORS polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-period Cepheid RS Pup is surrounded by a large dusty nebula reflecting the light from the central star. Due to the changing luminosity of the central source, light echoes propagate into the nebula. This remarkable phenomenon was the subject of Paper I.The origin and physical properties of the nebula are however uncertain: it may have been created through mass loss from the star itself, or it could be the remnant of a pre-existing interstellar cloud. Our goal is to determine the 3D structure of the nebula, and estimate its mass. Knowing the geometrical shape of the nebula will also allow us to retrieve the distance of RS Pup in an unambiguous manner using a model of its light echoes (in a forthcoming work). The scattering angle of the Cepheid light in the circumstellar nebula can be recovered from its degree of linear polarization. We thus observed the nebula surrounding RS Pup using the polarimetric imaging mode of the VLT/FORS instrument, and obtained a map of the degree and position angle of linear...

Kervella, P; Szabados, L; Sparks, W B; Havlen, R J; Bond, H E; Pompei, E; Fouqu, P; Bersier, D; Cracraft, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

An evaluation of WIPP structural modeling capabilities based on comparisons with South Drift data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The creep response of rock salt around a long uniform excavation of rectangular cross-section has been computed with the structural finite element code SANCHO, and the results are compared with field data. The excavation, known as the South Drift, is part of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. The geomechanical model used in the calculations is quite complex and includes constitutive models based on standard laboratory creep tests. Because closure and closure rate measurements are at least three times larger than computed values, a thorough investigation of the many parameters in the geomechanical model is presented. This investigation indicates that variations to parameters not related to the constitutive model for halite cannot produce the type of changes in the closure histories needed to produce good agreement with data. Thus, the reason for the discrepancy is attributed to the parameters in the constitutive model for halite. However, none of the halite parameters investigated could produce the measured behavior. Several areas for future study have been identified.

Morgan, H.S.; Stone, C.M.; Krieg, R.D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Where plants make oxygen: a structural model for the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving manganese cluster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MANGANESE O2-EVOLVING COMPLEX AND THE IRON QUINONE ACCEPTOR COMPLEX IN PHOTOSYSTEM-II...MANGANESE(III) - ANALOGS OF THE DI-IRON(III) CENTER IN HEMERYTHRIN, JOURNAL...Mn(IV)(sal)2(bipy) (acac, acetylacetonate; bipy, R:Mn(II) bipyridine; and...

VK Yachandra; VJ DeRose; MJ Latimer; I Mukerji; K Sauer; MP Klein

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Protein secondary structure prediction by combining hidden Markov models and sliding window scores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Instead of conformation states of single residues, refined conformation states of quintuplets are proposed to reflect conformation correlation. Simple hidden Markov models combined with sliding window scores are used to predict the secondary structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence. Since the length of protein conformation segments varies within a narrow range, we can ignore the duration effect of the length distribution. The window scores for residues are a window version of the Chou-Fasman propensities estimated under an approximation of conditional independency. Different window widths are examined, and the optimal width is found to be 17. A high accuracy of about 70% is achieved.

Wei-Mou Zheng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Numerical Simulation of the Meso-? Scale Structure and Evolution of the 1977 Johnstown Flood. Part I: Model Description and Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model, originally developed by Anthes and Warner, is modified to simulate the meso-? scale structure and evolution of convectively driven weather systems. The modifications include: (i) two-way ...

Da-Lin Zhang; J. Michael Fritsch

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mean Structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast Atlantic boundary layer clouds: Insights from satellite observations and multiscale modeling framework simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast (SE) Atlantic boundary layer clouds are described with satellite observations and multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) simulations during austral spring (September-November). Hourly resolution ...

David Painemal; Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng; Patrick Minnis; Rabindra Palikonda

369

Possible role of coronal streamer as magnetically-closed structure in shock-induced energetic electrons and metric type II radio bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two solar type II radio bursts, separated by ~24 hours in time, are examined together. Both events are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupting from the same active region (NOAA 11176) beneath a well-observed helmet streamer. We find that the type II emissions in both events ended once the CME/shock fronts passed the white-light streamer tip, which is presumably the magnetic cusp of the streamer. This leads us to conjecture that the closed magnetic arcades of the streamer may play a role in electron acceleration and type II excitation at coronal shocks. To examine such a conjecture, we conduct a test-particle simulation for electron dynamics within a large-scale partially-closed streamer magnetic configuration swept by a coronal shock. We find that the closed field lines play the role of an electron trap, via which the electrons are sent back to the shock front for multiple times, and therefore accelerated to high energies by the shock. Electrons with an initial energy of 300eV can be accelerate...

Kong, Xiangliang; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Phase structure of an Abelian two-Higgs model and high temperature superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase structure of a three dimensional Abelian Higgs model with singly- and doubly-charged scalar fields coupled to a compact Abelian gauge field. The model is pretending to describe systems of strongly correlated electrons such as high-Tc superconductivity in overdoped regime and exotic phases supporting excitations with fractionalized quantum numbers. We identify the Fermi liquid, the spin gap, the superconductor and the strange metallic phases in which densities and properties of holon and spinon vortices and monopoles are explored. The phase diagram in the 3D coupling space is predicted. We show that at sufficiently strong gauge coupling the spinon-pair and holon condensation transitions merge together and become, unexpectedly, first order.

M. N. Chernodub; E. -M. Ilgenfritz; A. Schiller

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

372

Resolving the massanisotropy degeneracy of the spherically symmetric Jeans equation II. Optimum smoothing and model validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......equally well the observables (Merritt 1987). Binney Mamon (1982...King mass model with Osipkov-Merritt beta anisotropy profile (top-left...authors would like to thank Nick Bate as well as the anonymous...R. AJ (1966) 71:64. Merritt D. ApJ (1987) 313:121......

Foivos I. Diakogiannis; Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

A long hard look at MCG6-30-15 with XMMNewton II. Detailed EPIC analysis and modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......due to Ca residuals on the mirror surfaces; F. Haberl, private...ISCO) for a non-rotating (Schwarzschild) black hole. In order to...best-fitting value for the Schwarzschild model was only R= 0.77...caused by Ca deposits on the mirror surfaces, but is only present......

S. Vaughan; A. C. Fabian

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

376

Electronic Structure Description of the Cis-MoOS Unit in Models for Molybdenum Hydroxylases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molybdenum hydroxylases catalyze the oxidation of numerous aromatic heterocycles and simple organics and, unlike other hydroxylases, utilize water as the source of oxygen incorporated into the product. The electronic structures of the cis-MoOS units in CoCp{sub 2}[Tp{sup iPr}Mo{sup V}OS(OPh)] and Tp{sup iPr}Mo{sup VI}OS(OPh) (Tp{sup iPr} = hydrotris(3-isopropylpyrazol-1-yl)borate), new models for molybdenum hydroxylases, have been studied in detail using S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, and detailed bonding calculations. The results show a highly delocalized Mo {double_bond} S {pi}* LUMO redox orbital that is formally Mo(d{sub xy}) with {approx}35% sulfido ligand character. Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to quantitate Mo-S{sub sulfido} bond order changes in the cis-MoOS units as a function of redox state. Results support a redox active molecular orbital that has a profound influence on MoOS bonding through changes to the relative electro/nucleophilicity of the terminal sulfido ligand accompanying oxidation state changes. The bonding description for these model cis-MoOS systems supports enzyme mechanisms that are under orbital control and dominantly influenced by the unique electronic structure of the cis-MoOS site. The electronic structure of the oxidized enzyme site is postulated to play a role in polarizing a substrate carbon center for nucleophilic attack by metal activated water and acting as an electron sink in the two-electron oxidation of substrates.

Doonan, C.J.; Rubie, N.D.; Peariso, K.; Harris, H.H.; Knottenbelt, S.Z.; George, G.N.; Young, C.G.; Kirk, M.L.; /New Mexico U. /Melbourne U. /SLAC, SSRL

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integrated LCALEED sustainability assessment model for structure and envelope systems of school buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In Canada and USA, nearly 80 million students and teachers spend at least eight hours daily in schools that could be unhealthy and restrict their ability to learn. Despite this fact there is lack of adopting sustainability principles in school buildings. Even though life cycle assessment (LCA) and LEED could serve as sustainability measurement tools, studies show that the integration of sustainability principles to LCA has not become standard practice yet. This paper presents an integrated LCALEED model that incorporates LCA into LEED and assigns corresponding LEED scores to achieve a high level of sustainability assessment, for the structure and envelope systems of Canadian school buildings. In this model, the selection of the most sustainable structure and envelope type for school buildings is done through the evaluation of three categories of the LEED rating system: energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and LCA (incorporated under the innovation and design process category of LEED). Various options are tested by considering structures such as concrete, steel, masonry and wood, and envelope types such as precast panels, steel stud, wood stud and cavity wall. Energy simulation is performed by eQUEST (version 3.64) program and LCA is performed by ATHENA impact estimator. The results show that concrete and masonry buildings have high energy consumption and global warming potential during certain life cycle stages such as manufacturing, construction and demolition. However they have lower annual energy consumption and environmental impact during the operating stage, as well as for the overall life span. Concrete building with minimum insulation has obtained the highest total LEED score (19) followed by masonry (17), while steel and steel-masonry buildings have the least score (14).

Othman Subhi Alshamrani; Khaled Galal; Sabah Alkass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Magneto Hydro Dynamical Model of KHz Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low Mass X-ray Binaries (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model (Shi \\& Li 2009) is re-examined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636--53, 4U 1608--52, 4U 1915--15, 4U 1728--34, XTE 1807--294) with measured spins. In this model the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at high accretion rate due to the restriction of innermost stable circular orbit.

Shi, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiang-Dong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHzQPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of thekHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U0614+09, 4U1636-53, 4U1608-52, 4U1915-15, 4U1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, thekHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The singlekHz QPOs and twinkHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twinkHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

Chang-Sheng Shi; Shuang-Nan Zhang; Xiang-Dong Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

Shen, Bo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An assessment of the pulsar outer gap model. II: Implications for the predicted $\\gamma$-ray spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important predictions of any gap model for pulsar magnetospheres is the predicted $\\gamma$-ray spectra. In the outer gap model, the properties of the synchro-curvature radiation are sensitive to many parameters, whose realistic ranges have been studied in detail in an accompanying paper. There we demonstrated that the uncertainty in the radius of curvature, the magnetic field geometry, and the X-ray surface flux may affect by orders of magnitude the predicted flux and spectral peak in the $\\gamma$-ray regime. Here, we present a systematic, numerical study of the impact of the different parameters on the particle dynamics along the gap and calculate the emitted synchro-curvature radiation along the trajectory. By integrating the emitted radiation along the gap and convolving it with a parametrized particle distribution, we discuss how the comparison with the wealth of {\\em Fermi}-LAT data can be used to constrain the applicability of the model. The resulting spectra show very different energy p...

Vigan, Daniele; Hirotani, Kouichi; Pessah, Martn E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Multi-wavelength Emission from the Fermi Bubble II. Secondary Electrons and the Hadronic Model of the Bubble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by $pp$ collisions. However, if these electrons loose their energy by the synchrotron and inverse-Compton, the spectrum of secondary electrons is too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of primary electrons is necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is $\\propto E_e^{-2}$, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within 2 - 7 $\\mu$G region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by $pp$ collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If magn...

Cheng, K -S; Dogiel, V A; Ko, C -M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. II. RECONNECTION-TRIGGERED DOWNFLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed high-resolution observations of supersonic bright downflows in quiescent prominences, known as prominence knots. We present observations in the Ca II H spectral line using the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite of a descending plasma knot of size {approx}900 km. The knot initially undergoes ballistic motion before undergoing impulsive accelerations at the same time as experiencing increases in intensity. We also present a subset of our three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, performed to investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Shlueter prominence model to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which interchange reconnection occurs. The interchange reconnection in the model breaks the force balance along the field lines which initiates the downflows. The downflows propagate with a downward fluid velocity of {approx}15 km s{sup -1} and a characteristic size of {approx}700 km. We conclude that the observed plasma blob and the simulated downflow are driven by the breaking of the force balance along the magnetic field as a result of a change in magnetic topology caused by reconnection of the magnetic field.

Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Berger, Thomas [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Frequency Ratio Method for the seismic modelling of gamma Doradus stars. II The role of rotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of rotation on the Frequency Ratio Method (Moya et al. 2005) is examined. Its applicability to observed frequencies of rotating gamma Doradus stars is discussed taking into account the following aspects: the use of a perturbative approach to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies; the effect of rotation on the observational Brunt-Vaisala integral determination and finally, the problem of disentangling multiplet-like structures from frequency patterns due to the period spacing expected for high-order gravity modes in asymptotic regime. This analysis reveals that the FRM produces reliable results for objects with rotational velocities up to 70 kms/s, for which the FRM intrinsic error increases one order of magnitude with respect to the typical FRM errors given in Moya et al. (2005). Our computations suggest that, given the spherical degree "l" identification, the FRM may be discriminating for m = 0 modes, in the sense that the method avoids any misinterpretation induced by the presence of rotation...

Surez, J C; Martin-Ruiz, S; Amado, P J; Garrido, A G R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Structure of the particle-hole amplitudes in no-core shell model wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the structure of the no-core shell model wave functions for {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C by investigating the ground state and first excited state electron scattering charge form factors. In both nuclei, large particle-hole (ph) amplitudes in the wave functions appear with the opposite sign to that needed to reproduce the shape of the (e,e{sup '}) form factors, the charge radii, and the B(E2) values for the lowest two states. The difference in sign appears to arise mainly from the monopole DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=2 matrix elements of the kinetic and potential energy (T+V) that transform under the harmonic oscillator SU(3) symmetries as (lambda,mu)=(2,0). These are difficult to determine self-consistently, but they have a strong effect on the structure of the low-lying states and on the giant monopole and quadrupole resonances. The Lee-Suzuki transformation, used to account for the restricted nature of the space in terms of an effective interaction, introduces large higher-order DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=n,n>2, ph amplitudes in the wave functions. The latter ph excitations aggravate the disagreement between the experimental and predicted (e,e{sup '}) form factors with increasing model spaces, especially at high momentum transfers. For sufficiently large model spaces, the situation begins to resolve itself for {sup 6}Li, but the convergence is slow. A prescription to constrain the ph excitations would likely accelerate convergence of the calculations.

Hayes, A. C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kwiatkowski, A. A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Optimization of the GB/SA Solvation Model for Predicting the Structure of Surface Loops in Proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of the GB/SA Solvation Model for Predicting the Structure of Surface Loops in ProteinsVed: October 10, 2005; In Final Form: December 1, 2005 Implicit solvation models are commonly optimized the force field is sometimes not considered. In previous studies, we have developed an optimization

Meirovitch, Hagai

387

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

Benning, Liane G.

388

Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Remote robotic underwater grinding system and modeling for rectification of hydroelectric structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A submersible grinding robot has been designed to automate the dam gate metallic structure repair process. In order to measure and control the amount of material removed during the process, an empirical approach for modeling the material removal rate (MRR) of the underwater grinding application is proposed and presented in this paper. The objective is to determine the MRR in terms of the process parameters such as cutting speed and grinding power over a range of variable wheel diameters. Experiments show that water causes drag and a significant loss of power occurs during grinding. An air injector encasing the grinding wheel has been prototyped, and it is shown that power loss can be reduced by up to 80%. A model, based on motor characterization and empirical relations among system and process parameters, is developed for predicting MRR which will be used for the robotic grinding control system. A validation is carried out through experiments, and confirms the good accuracy of the model for predicting the depth of cut for underwater grinding. A comparative study for dry and underwater grinding is also conducted through experiments and shows that the MRR is higher for underwater grinding than in dry conditions at low cutting speeds.

Dominique Thuot; Zhaoheng Liu; Henri Champliaud; Julien Beaudry; Pierre-Luc Richard; Michel Blain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Verification of a VOF-based two-phase flow model for wave breaking and wavestructure interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the present study is to develop a volume of fluid (VOF)-based two-phase flow model and to discuss the applicability of the model to the simulation of wavestructure interactions. First, an overview of the development of VOF-type models for applications in the field of coastal engineering is presented. The numerical VOF-based two-phase flow model has been developed and applied to the simulations of wave interactions with a submerged breakwater as well as of wave breaking on a slope. Numerical results are then compared with laboratory experimental data in order to verify the applicability of the numerical model to the simulations of complex interactions of waves and permeable coastal structures, including the effects of wave breaking. It is concluded that the two-phase flow model with the aid of the advanced VOF technique can provide with acceptably accurate numerical results on the route to practical purposes.

Phung Dang Hieu; Katsutoshi Tanimoto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solving the 3d Ising Model with the Conformal Bootstrap II. c-Minimization and Precise Critical Exponents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the conformal bootstrap to perform a precision study of the operator spectrum of the critical 3d Ising model. We conjecture that the 3d Ising spectrum minimizes the central charge c in the space of unitary solutions to crossing symmetry. Because extremal solutions to crossing symmetry are uniquely determined, we are able to precisely reconstruct the first several Z2-even operator dimensions and their OPE coefficients. We observe that a sharp transition in the operator spectrum occurs at the 3d Ising dimension Delta_sigma=0.518154(15), and find strong numerical evidence that operators decouple from the spectrum as one approaches the 3d Ising point. We compare this behavior to the analogous situation in 2d, where the disappearance of operators can be understood in terms of degenerate Virasoro representations.

El-Showk, Sheer; Poland, David; Rychkov, Slava; Simmons-Duffin, David; Vichi, Alessandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling the determinants of Medicaid home care payments for children with special health care needs: A structural equation model approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground The management of children with special needs can be very challenging and expensive. Objective To examine direct and indirect cost drivers of home care expenditures for this vulnerable and expensive population. Methods We retrospectively assessed secondary data on children, ages 420, receiving Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) (n=2760). A structural equation model assessed direct and indirect effects of several child characteristics, clinical conditions and functional measures on Medicaid home care payments. Results The mean age of children was 12.1 years and approximately 60% were female. Almost half of all subjects reported mild, moderate or severe ID diagnosis. The mean ADL score was 5.27 and about 60% of subjects received some type of rehabilitation services. Caseworkers authorized an average of 25.5h of PCS support per week. The SEM revealed three groups of costs drivers: indirect, direct and direct+indirect. Cognitive problems, health impairments, and age affect expenditures, but they operate completely through other variables. Other elements accumulate effects (externalizing behaviors, PCS hours, and rehabilitation) and send them on a single path to the dependent variable. A few elements exhibit a relatively complex position in the model by having both significant direct and indirect effects on home care expenditures medical conditions, intellectual disability, region, and ADL function. Conclusions The most important drivers of home care expenditures are variables that have both meaningful direct and indirect effects. The only one of these factors that may be within the sphere of policy change is the difference among costs in different regions.

Omolola E. Adepoju; Yichen Zhang; Charles D. Phillips

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Singularity free analysis of a self-similar model of proton structure function at small \\textit{x}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we make re-analysis of a self-similarity based model of the proton structure function at small \\textit{x} pursued in recent years. The additional assumption is that it should be singularity free in the entire kinematic range $0<\\textit{x}<1$. Our analysis indicates that the model is valid in a more restrictive range of $Q^{2}$. We also discuss the possibility of incorporation of Froissart saturation condition in the model.

Baishali Saikia; D. K. Choudhury

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

[NeII] emission line profiles from photoevaporative disc winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I model profiles of the [NeII] forbidden emission line at 12.81um, emitted by photoevaporative winds from discs around young, solar-mass stars. The predicted line luminosities (~ 1E-6 Lsun) are consistent with recent data, and the line profiles vary significantly with disc inclination. Edge-on discs show broad (30-40km/s) double-peaked profiles, due to the rotation of the disc, while in face-on discs the structure of the wind results in a narrower line (~10km/s) and a significant blue-shift (5-10km/s). These results suggest that observations of [NeII] line profiles can provide a direct test of models of protoplanetary disc photoevaporation.

R. D. Alexander

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique Garca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Algorithms and Discrete Mathematics Dept.

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters Probed by Raman Spectroscopy, NMR and Structural Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water in different states, e.g., bulk water, water clusters, aqueous solutions of ions or organicThe Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters are used to elucidate the properties of water in Metavariscite, AlPO4-H3, AlPO4-8 and VPI-5. The framework

Goddard III, William A.

400

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

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401

Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables II. Time-dependent atmospheric structure and observable properties of four M-type model series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......nuclei, and the solid red line corresponds to a...H. , Scholz M., Wood P. R., 1998, AA...218, L75. Lancon A. , Wood P. R., 2000, AAS, 146, 217. Lebzelter T. , Wood P. R., 2007, AA...Pennington D. M., Gates E. L., 2004, Sci......

M. J. Ireland; M. Scholz; P. R. Wood

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Application and modeling of near-infrared frequency domain photon migration for monitoring pharmaceutical powder blending operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of blending. A simulation method was developed which consisted of (i) dynamic simulation for generating the powder structure; (ii) the completely-randommixture model for predicting the spatial distribution of API particles within the powder bed; and (iii...

Pan, Tianshu

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Multi-Assay-Based Structure?Activity Relationship Models: Improving Structure?Activity Relationship Models by Incorporating Activity Information from Related Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a new class of methods for building SAR models, referred to as multi-assay based, that utilize activity information from different targets. ... Depending on the method, this SAR model will be built using either its own activity information (baseline SAR model) or additional information obtained from its set of related targets (multi-assay-based SAR model). ... To illustrate the cross-family nature of the multi-assay-based methods, Figure 3 shows the set of related proteins for the different proteins within and across the different families (Ktkligs and m = 3). ...

Xia Ning; Huzefa Rangwala; George Karypis

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Unified Monte Carlo Treatment of Gas-Grain Chemistry for Large Reaction Networks. II. A Multiphase Gas-surface-layered Bulk Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observed gas-phase molecular inventory of hot cores is believed to be significantly impacted by the products of chemistry in interstellar ices. In this study, we report the construction of a full macroscopic Monte Carlo model of both the gas-phase chemistry and the chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Our model treats icy grain mantles in a layer-by-layer manner, which incorporates laboratory data on ice desorption correctly. The ice treatment includes a distinction between a reactive ice surface and an inert bulk. The treatment also distinguishes between zeroth- and first-order desorption, and includes the entrapment of volatile species in more refractory ice mantles. We apply the model to the investigation of the chemistry in hot cores, in which a thick ice mantle built up during the previous cold phase of protostellar evolution undergoes surface reactions and is eventually evaporated. For the first time, the impact of a detailed multilayer approach to grain mantle formation on the warm-up chemistry is explored. The use of a multilayer ice structure has a mixed impact on the abundances of organic species formed during the warm-up phase. For example, the abundance of gaseous HCOOCH3 is lower in the multilayer model than in previous grain models that do not distinguish between layers (so-called two phase models). Other gaseous organic species formed in the warm-up phase are affected slightly. Finally, we find that the entrapment of volatile species in water ice can explain the two-jump behavior of H2CO previously found in observations of protostars.

A. I. Vasyunin; Eric Herbst

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and mechanisms of Cd(II), Pb(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) by a modified magnetic polyacrylamide microcomposite adsorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel magnetic hydroxamic acid modified polyacrylamide/Fe3O4 adsorbent (M-PAM-HA) was prepared with acrylamide by microemulsion polymerization and then nucleophilic substitution of hydroxamic acid. The morphology, structure of the magnetic adsorbents before (M-PAM) and after modification (M-PAM-HA) were characterized and their adsorption properties for the removal of metal ions by varying test conditions were also investigated. The modified M-PAM exhibited lower swelling property and less magnetic leaching than M-PAM. Their adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second order model. The maximum adsorption capacities of metal ions ranged from 0.11 to 0.29mmolg?1 for M-PAM and 0.881.93mmolg?1 for M-PAM-HA, respectively. Sips model fitting well to experimental data revealed the surface heterogeneity of the prepared adsorbents. In multi-metal systems, M-PAM-HA showed the relative selectivity toward Pb(II), although Pb(II) was adsorbed the least in their corresponding one-metal systems. The adsorption mechanism was proposed based on the results of FTIR and density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

Feiping Zhao; Walter Z. Tang; Dongbo Zhao; Yong Meng; Dulin Yin; Mika Sillanp

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Determining the crystal structure of SseB, a product of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island II Type III Secretion System of Salmonella typhimurium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-epithelial cells. The aim of the research project is to clone, purify the SseB protein from Salmonella typhimurium and obtain a diffracting-quality crystal that will give high resolution data so that the structure of the protein can be determined using x...

Patel, Bhavini Narendrakumar

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

X-ray Structure of the Magnesium(II),ADP,Vanadate Complex of the Dictyostelium discoideum Myosin Motor Domain to 1.9 Resolution,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motor Domain to 1.9 ? Resolution, Clyde A. Smith§ and Ivan Rayment* Institute for Enzyme Research on the -phosphate of ADP and a water molecule at bond distances of 2.1 and 2.3 ?, respectively. The long length ligands and water structure surrounding the -phosphate pocket are oriented to stabilize a water molecule

Rayment, Ivan

409

Focusing future exploration in mature basin: Maturation and migration models integrated with timing of major structural events in Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploration risk can be decreased by highgrading areas where the timing of structural events and maturation of source rocks are nearly coincident. Knowledge of migration fairways further aids in focusing exploration. Four burial-history models have been constructed to accommodate (1) a rift-fill sequence in excess of 24,000 ft, (2) a hypothetical Fairfield basin model, (3) a model using a deep well, and (4) a model on the Sparta shelf. These complex models, which use several variables including compaction, thermal conductivity, kerogen kinetics, and multiple unconformities, indicate a possibility for multiple hydrocarbon-generative events and show that linear geothermal gradients are ineffective in explaining maturation in Illinois. Periods of oil generation determined from the models can be compared with known timing of structural events to predict trapping potential. Depths to the oil phase-out zone are also significant. Exploration risk can be reduced in Illinois by using a simple migration model that uses the basal Upper Devonian Sylamore Sandstone in central and western Illinois as a migration conduit and the New Albany Group as a source. Other migration conduits in the basin are discussed including faults associated with structures and fracture systems such as the Wabash Valley fault system.

Oltz, D.F.; Crockett, J.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Structure and behavior of triad interactions for a Boussinesq system arising in a model for the formation sand ridges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boussinesq system describes weakly nonlinear dispersive long waves plasmas and incompressible irrotational fluids. This study presents some results regarding the structure and behavior of a system of equations that yield the spatial structure of triad interactions in the Boussinesq system. Such a system forms part of a model for the formation and evolution of sand ridges on the continental shelf. The aims of this study are to provide some insight into the behavior of the triad system and into the sand ridge model in particular.

Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Numerical Simulation of the Meso-? Scale Structure and Evolution of the 1977 Johnstown Flood. Part II: Inertially Stable Warm-Core Vortex and the Mesoscale Convective Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mesoscale warm-core vortex associated with the mesoscale convective complex (MCC) that produced the 1977 Johnstown flood is examined using a three-dimensional nested-grid model simulation of the flood episode. In the simulation, the vortex ...

Da-Lin Zhang; J. Michael Fritsch

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The structure of the HIV-1 Vpu ion channel: modelling and simulation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and (ii) W facing the lipids. Two equivalent bundles have been generated using a simulated annealing via in the life cycle of the virus: (i) it controls the release/secretion of virus particles from the cell surface,8]. The TM segment of Vpu is responsible for particle release/secretion [9] whereas the cytoplasmic site

Fischer, Wolfgang

413

Capillary condensation and interface structure of a model colloid-polymer mixture in a porous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¨sseldorf, Universita¨tsstra?e 1, 40225 Du¨sseldorf, Germany Matthias Schmidt Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands Hartmut Lo¨wen Institut fu¨r Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich, the study of adsorbates in porous media is also of great interest in applied fields ranging from industrial

Schmidt, Matthias

414

Abstract -This paper presents a methodology and a tool for the coupled magnetic-structural with semi-analytical models. For this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract - This paper presents a methodology and a tool for the coupled magnetic-structural with semi-analytical models. For this coupling, the magnetic model is available; we developed the structural MODEL Magnetic fields radiated by permanent magnets and conductors are computed through Coulombian

Boyer, Edmond

415

Phase structure and Higgs boson mass in a Higgs-Yukawa model with a dimension-6 operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the impact of a $\\lambda_6 \\varphi^6$ term included in a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model. Such a term could emerge from BSM physics at some larger energy scale. We map out the phase structure of the Higgs-Yukawa model with positive $\\lambda_6$ and negative quartic self coupling of the scalar fields. To this end, we evaluate the constraint effective potential in lattice perturbation theory and also determine the magnetization of the model via numerical simulations which allow us to reach also non-perturbative values of the couplings. As a result, we find a complex phase structure with first and second order phase transitions identified through the magnetization. Further we analyze the effect of such a $\\varphi^6$ term on the lower Higgs boson mass bound to see, whether the standard model lower mass bound can be altered.

Chu, David Y -J; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C -J David; Nagai, Kei-Ichi; Nagy, Attila

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

SWIFT II self-teaching curriculum. Illustrative problems for the Sandia waste-isolation flow and transport model for fractured media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several documents have been written describing SWIFT II, the most current version of the SWIFT (Sandia Waste Isolation Flow and Transport) code. NUREG/CR-3328 describes the theory and implementation, and NUREG/CR-3162 describes the required input of data and parameters. NUREG/CR-3316 describes the comparison of the results from the SWIFT code with field data and other existing codes. This document is devoted to assisting the analyst who desires to use the SWIFT II code. The analyst is referred to the User's Manual for SWIFT II NUREG/CR-3162 for detailed data input instructions. Eight samples are presented to illustrate the use of SWIFT II. The implementation of the numerical simulation of the physical problem is described for each example. For each problem, a listing of the input data and a microfiche listing of the output are provided.

Reeves, M.; Ward, D.S.; Davis, P.A.; Bonano, E.J.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Coordination structures of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato complexes with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dibutylmalonamide. Part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coordination structures of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato complexes with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dibutylmalonamide (DMDBMA) were investigated in terms of 1H, 13C and 14N NMR measurements, infrared spectrum, molar conductivity measurement, absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, magnetic susceptibility measurement and thermal analysis. The chemical formulae of the isolated lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato-DMDBMA complexes are Ln(NO3)3 2DMDBMA and UO2(NO3)2 DMDBMA, respectively. The DMDBMA coordinates to the lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) ions, with the oxygen atoms of carbonyl group and nitrate ions coordinate to the central metal ions in a bidentate manner. For the lanthanide(III) nitrato complexes, the coordination number is ten, and a change of the coordination structure occurs between the lighter and heavier complexes. The uranyl(VI) nitrato-DMDBMA complex has an eight-coordinated structure with the uranyl group surrounded by six oxygen atoms, four from the bidentate nitrate groups and two from the bidentate DMDBMA, lying in the plane perpendicular to the axial uranyl group.

Takashi Nakamura; Chie Miyake

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

An equilibrium double-twist model for the radial structure of collagen fibrils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mammalian tissues contain networks and ordered arrays of collagen fibrils originating from the periodic self-assembly of helical 300 nm long tropocollagen complexes. The fibril radius is typically between 25 to 250 nm, and tropocollagen at the surface appears to exhibit a characteristic twist-angle with respect to the fibril axis. Similar fibril radii and twist-angles at the surface are observed in vitro, suggesting that these features are controlled by a similar self-assembly process. In this work, we propose a physical mechanism of equilibrium radius control for collagen fibrils based on a radially varying double-twist alignment of tropocollagen within a collagen fibril. The free-energy of alignment is similar to that of liquid crystalline blue phases, and we employ an analytic Euler-Lagrange and numerical free energy minimization to determine the twist-angle between the molecular axis and the fibril axis along the radial direction. Competition between the different elastic energy components, together with a surface energy, determines the equilibrium radius and twist-angle at the fibril surface. A simplified model with a twist-angle that is linear with radius is a reasonable approximation in some parameter regimes, and explains a power-law dependence of radius and twist-angle at the surface as parameters are varied. Fibril radius and twist-angle at the surface corresponding to an equilibrium free-energy minimum are consistent with existing experimental measurements of collagen fibrils. Remarkably, in the experimental regime, all of our model parameters are important for controlling equilibrium structural parameters of collagen fibrils.

Aidan I Brown; Laurent Kreplak; Andrew D Rutenberg

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

VLBI FOR GRAVITY PROBE B. II. MONITORING OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE REFERENCE SOURCES 3C 454.3, B2250+194, AND B2252+172  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used 8.4 GHz very long baseline interferometry images obtained at up to 35 epochs between 1997 and 2005 to examine the radio structures of the main reference source, 3C 454.3, and two secondary reference sources, B2250+194 and B2252+172, for the guide star for the NASA/Stanford relativity mission Gravity Probe B (GP-B). For one epoch in 2004 May, we also obtained images at 5.0 and 15.4 GHz. The 35 8.4 GHz images for quasar 3C 454.3 confirm a complex, evolving, core-jet structure. We identified at each epoch a component, C1, near the easternmost edge of the core region. Simulations of the core region showed that C1 is located, on average, 0.18 {+-} 0.06 mas west of the unresolved 'core' identified in 43 GHz images. We also identified in 3C 454.3 at 8.4 GHz several additional components that moved away from C1 with proper motions ranging in magnitude between 0.9 c and 5 c. The detailed motions of the components exhibit two distinct bends in the jet axis located {approx}3 and {approx}5.5 mas west of C1. The spectra between 5.0 and 15.4 GHz for the 'moving' components are steeper than those for C1. The 8.4 GHz images of B2250+194 and B2252+172, in contrast to those of 3C 454.3, reveal compact structures. The spectrum between 5.0 and 15.4 GHz for B2250+194 is inverted while that for B2252+172 is flat. Based on its position near the easternmost edge of the 8.4 GHz radio structure, close spatial association with the 43 GHz core, and relatively flat spectrum, we believe 3C 454.3 component C1 to be the best choice for the ultimate reference point for the GP-B guide star. The compact structures and inverted-to-flat spectra of B2250+194 and B2252+172 make these objects valuable secondary reference sources.

Ransom, R. R.; Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Luca, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lederman, J. I. [Centre for Research in Earth and Space Sciences, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling of two-dimensional interrelated heat and mass transfer problems and structure transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical method to solve interrelated heat and mass transfer problems with structure transformation for easily deformable disperse capillary-porous media is suggested. Structure transformations of bodies of...

G. P. Brovka; V. A. Sychevskii

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stable spatial Langmuir solitons as a model of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study stable spatial Langmuir solitons in plasma based on nonlinear radial oscillations of charged particles. I discuss two situations when a Langmuir soliton can be stable. In the former case the stability of solitons against the collapse is due to electron-electron interactions which result in the nonlocal terms in the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. In the latter situation I derive the new cubic-quintic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with accounts for the interaction of induced dipole moments of diatomic ions with a rapidly oscillating electric field and show that the collapse of Langmuir waves can be also arrested. In both cases I find the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and analyze their stability using the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion. I discuss the application of my results for the description of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures. I show that, using my model, one can explain the existence of atmospheric plasmoids in the upper ionosphere. It is also demonst...

Dvornikov, Maxim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Combinatorial optimization model and MIP formulation for the structural analysis of conditional differential-algebraic systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the structural analysis problem for differential-algebraic systems with conditional equations. This problem consists, given a conditional differential-algebraic system, in verifying if the system is structurally nonsingular ... Keywords: Branch-and-Cut algorithm, Differential-algebraic system, Graph, Integer linear program, Matching, Structural analysis

Mathieu Lacroix; A. Ridha Mahjoub; Sbastien Martin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar proton events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar is possible into regions that are at the moment effectively shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. A two (process, timescale, magnetostratigraphy); 1650 Global Change: Solar variability; 2716 Magnetospheric

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

424

Paper No. 2004-mfb-03 Kelly Page: 1 of 4 Tensile Loading of Model Caisson Foundations for Structures on Sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper No. 2004-mfb-03 Kelly Page: 1 of 4 Tensile Loading of Model Caisson Foundations for Structures on Sand R.B. Kelly, B.W. Byrne, G.T. Houlsby and C.M. Martin Department of Engineering) (see Byrne et al, 2002; Byrne et al, 2003; Kelly et al, 2003). This paper concentrates on the tensile

Byrne, Byron

425

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures Emerald Article: A study of the blast-induced brain white-matter damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures Emerald Article: A study of the blast, (2012),"A study of the blast-induced brain white-matter damage and the associated diffuse axonal injury Abstract Purpose ­ Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a signature injury of the current military

Grujicic, Mica

426

Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Functional-Structural Plant Models, Saariselk, Finland, 9 -14 June  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must the FSPM and pathogen models exchange? Can we identify processes that are common to most foliar at different scales: the Multiscale Tree Graph (MTG: Godin and Caraglio, 1998) is used to circulate variables between pathogen ­ FSPM ­ climate through a central data structure representing the canopy (i.e. MTG

Boyer, Edmond

427

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal and State Structures to Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48685 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Prepared under Task No. CP09.2320

428

Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite I: X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-line ferrihydrite samples precipitated and then exposed to a range of aqueous Zn solutions (10?5 to 10?3 M), and also coprecipitated in similar Zn solutions (pH 6.5), have been examined by Zn and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Typical Zn complexes on the surface have Zn-O distances of 1.97(.02) and coordination numbers of about 4.0(0.5), consistent with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. This contrasts with Zn-O distances of 2.11(.02) and coordination numbers of 6 to 7 in the aqueous Zn solutions used in sample preparation. X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) fits to the second shell of cation neighbors indicate as many as 4 Zn-Fe neighbors at 3.44(.04) in coprecipitated samples, and about two Zn-Fe neighbors at the same distance in adsorption samples. In both sets of samples, the fitted coordination number of second shell cations decreases as sorption density increases, indicating changes in the number and type of available complexing sites or the onset of competitive precipitation processes. Comparison of our results with the possible geometries for surface complexes and precipitates suggests that the Zn sorption complexes are inner sphere and at lowest adsorption densities are bidentate, sharing apical oxygens with adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. Coprecipitation samples have complexes with similar geometry, but these are polydentate, sharing apices with more than two adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 polyhedra. The results are inconsistent with Zn entering the ferrihydrite structure (i.e., solid solution formation) or formation of other Zn-Fe precipitates. The fitted Zn-Fe coordination numbers drop with increasing Zn density with a minimum of about 0.8(.2) at Zn/(Zn + Fe) of 0.08 or more. This change appears to be attributable to the onset of precipitation of zinc hydroxide polymers with mainly tetrahedral Zn coordination. At the highest loadings studied, the nature of the complexes changes further, and a second type of precipitate forms. This has a structure based on a brucite layer topology, with mainly octahedral Zn coordination. Amorphous zinc hydroxide samples prepared for comparison had a closely similar local structure. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS is consistent with surface complexation reactions and surface precipitation at high Zn loadings with little or no Fe-Zn solid solution formation. The formation of Zn-containing precipitates at solution conditions two or more orders of magnitude below their solubility limit is compared with other sorption and spectroscopic studies that describe similar behavior.

G.A Waychunas; C.C Fuller; J.A Davis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

430

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures Exam info (A Hoffman)...

431

Evaluation of ground movement and damage to structures from Chinese coal mining using a new GIS coupling model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, combining a theoretical method of predicting subsidence over time and using a geographical information system (GIS), a GIS-based dynamic model is proposed to rapid simulate the phenomenon of progressive movement distribution from large sequential mining. The theoretical method uses stochastic medium concept involving Knothe time function for basic governing equations to calculate progressive movement because this solutions have been widely developed and used in Chinese mining practice to solve the coal extraction problem under building, railways, and rivers. In order to assess the impact of progressive movement to the surface structures, a fuzzy model is suggested to identify damage classifications with contributions of subsidence calculations and building mesh data. For implementation of the GIS-based prediction and assessment model, a new GIS coupling model is established by implementing tight coupling strategy using the component object model (COM) program to overcome the problems of complex model integration for dynamic prediction and assessment. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the effectiveness of this GIS-based model for prediction and evaluation of subsidence-induced damage from coal mining beneath surface structures in China.

Ibrahim Djamaluddin; Yasuhiro Mitani; Tetsuro Esaki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

On optimizing JacobiDavidson method for calculating eigenvalues in low dimensional structures using eight band k p model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents two ways of improving the JacobiDavidson method for calculating the eigenvalues and eigenvectors described by eight-band k p model for quantum dots and other low dimensional structures. First, the method is extended by the application of time reversal symmetry operator. This extension allows efficient calculations of the twofold degeneracy present in the multiband k p model and other interior eigenvalues. Second, the preconditioner for the indefinite matrix which comes from the discretization of the eight band k p Hamiltonian is presented. The construction of this preconditioner is based on physical considerations about energy band structure in the k p model. On the basis of two real examples, it is shown that the preconditioner can significantly shorten the time needed to calculate the interior eigenvalues, despite the fact that the memory usage of the preconditioner and Hamiltionian is comparable. Finally, some technical details for implementing the eight band k p Hamiltonian and the eigensolver are provided.

Andrzejewski, Janusz, E-mail: Janusz.Andrzejewski@pwr.wroc.pl

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously reported the synthesis and structural characterization of a model membrane protein comprised of an amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptide with a hydrophobic domain based on a synthetic ion channel and a hydrophilic domain with designed cavities for binding the general anesthetic halothane. In this work, we synthesized an improved version of this halothane-binding amphiphilic peptide with only a single cavity and an otherwise identical control peptide with no such cavity, and applied x-ray reflectivity to monolayers of these peptides to probe the distribution of halothane along the length of the core of the 4-helix bundle as a function of the concentration of halothane. At the moderate concentrations achieved in this study, approximately three molecules of halothane were found to be localized within a broad symmetric unimodal distribution centered about the designed cavity. At the lowest concentration achieved, of approximately one molecule per bundle, the halothane distribution became narrower and more peaked due to a component of {approx}19Angstroms width centered about the designed cavity. At higher concentrations, approximately six to seven molecules were found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the bundle, corresponding to approximately one molecule per heptad. Monolayers of the control peptide showed only the latter behavior, namely a uniform distribution along the length of the bundle irrespective of the halothane concentration over this range. The results provide insight into the nature of such weak binding when the dissociation constant is in the mM regime, relevant for clinical applications of anesthesia. They also demonstrate the suitability of both the model system and the experimental technique for additional work on the mechanism of general anesthesia, some of it presented in the companion parts II and III under this title.

Strzalka, J.; Liu, J; Tronin, A; Churbanova, I; Johansson, J; Blasie, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biofoam II  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties. 1 fig.

Morrison, R.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Neutrinos in the holographic dark energy model: constraints from latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The model of holographic dark energy (HDE) with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation is investigated in detail. The background and perturbation evolutions in the HDE model are calculated. We employ the PPF approach to overcome the gravity instability difficulty (perturbation divergence of dark energy) led by the equation-of-state parameter $w$ evolving across the phantom divide $w=-1$ in the HDE model with $c<1$. We thus derive the evolutions of density perturbations of various components and metric fluctuations in the HDE model. The impacts of massive neutrino and dark radiation on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum and the matter power spectrum in the HDE scenario are discussed. Furthermore, we constrain the models of HDE with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation by using the latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure, including the Planck CMB temperature data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the JLA supernova data, the Hubble constant direct measurement, the cosmic shear...

Zhang, Jing-Fei; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Introducing Protein Folding Using Simple Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss recent theoretical developments in the study of simple lattice models of proteins. Such models are designed to understand general features of protein structures and mechanism of folding. Among the topics covered are (i) the use of lattice models to understand the selection of the limited set of viable protein folds; (ii) the relationship between structure and sequence spaces; (iii) the application of lattice models for studying folding mechanisms (topological frustration, kinetic partitioning mechanism). Classification of folding scenarios based on the intrinsic thermodynamic properties of a sequence (namely, the collapse and folding transition temperatures) is outlined. A brief discussion of random heteropolymer model is also presented.

D. Thirumalai; D. K. Klimov

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

437

Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

Damiani, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Causal Gene Network Inference from Genetical Genomics Experiments via Structural Equation Modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The goal of this research is to construct causal gene networks for genetical genomics experiments using expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) mapping and Structural Equation (more)

Liu, Bing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Shliomis model-based magnetic squeeze film in rotating rough curved circular plates: a comparison of two different porous structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to analyse the effect of different porous structures on the performance of a Shliomis model-based magnetic squeeze film in rotating rough porous curved circular plates. For porous structures Kozeny-Carman's formulation and Irmay's model have been adopted. A Shliomis model-based magnetic fluid flow is considered. The stochastically averaging models of Christensen and Tonder have been used for characterising the effect of transverse roughness. The associated stochastically averaged Reynolds type equation is solved to obtain the pressure distribution leading to the calculation of the load carrying capacity. The results presented in graphical form show that the adverse effect of transverse roughness can be compensated by the positive effect of magnetisation in the case of negatively skewed roughness, suitably choosing the rotation ratio and the curvature parameters. Further, this compensation appears to be more in the case of Kozeny-Carman's formulation as compared to that of Irmay's model, which makes the Kozeny-Carman's model a superior choice.

Jimit R. Patel; Gunamani Deheri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quantum-electrodynamic model of the finite-size electron and calculation of the fine-structure constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model of a relativistic string formed by a scalar complex field, acting as electromagnetic field source. An axiosymmetric solutions of the stationary equations for the scalar and electromagnetic fields are found numerically. The mass $m$ is calculated as a function of the charge $e$ and the magnetic moment $\\mu$ of the system. The resulting toroidal structure is interpreted as an electron because the calculated ratio $e^3/(2mc^2\\mu)$ coincides with the fine-structure constant $\\alpha=e^2/(\\hbar c)\\approx e^3/(2m_ec^2\\mu_e)$.

E. P. Likhtman

2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

Review Paper. Interestrate termstructure pricing models: a review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complex trader will enter a transaction with...Interest-rate term-structure pricing...evolution of the term structure of volatilities...More generally, the search for greater and greater...products. In broad terms, however, some...and issuers in search of `advantageous...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Modeling Actuation Forces and Strains in Nastic Structures Luke A. Matthews, Victor Giurgiutiu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted to re-create a membrane using phospholipids and transport proteins extracted from plants [10 a phospholipid bilayer with embedded active transport proteins, which move the water from the low pressure fluid structures; induced strain actuation; active materials; smart structures; biotransport; ion pumps; ATP, SUT-4

Giurgiutiu, Victor

444

ROBUST FAULT DETECTION BASED ON MULTIPLE FUNCTIONAL SERIES TAR MODELS FOR STRUCTURES WITH TIME-DEPENDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Monitoring of operating wind turbines is challenging, as those structures are characterized. The particular case of operating wind turbines is challeng- ing, as those structures are characterized by complex, analyzed and compared within the problem of vibration based fault detection on operating wind turbines

Boyer, Edmond

445

Dynamics of structures coupled with elastic media -a review of numerical models and methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of modification. Basically, the structure is the object of engineering design and concern, while the environment voie des vignes, F-92295 Ch^atenay-Malabry, France bDepartment of Civil Engineering, K in the field of structure-environment interaction problems, in which the environment is an elastic body

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Modeling the Cost Structure of Public Transit Firms: Scale Economies and Functional Form (#09-3435) Michael Iacono, University of Minnesota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the Cost Structure of Public Transit Firms: Scale Economies and Functional Form (#09-3435) Michael Iacono, University of Minnesota Abstract This study analyzes the cost structure of a set of medium in the production of transit services. Short and long-run costs are modeled using two of the more commonly

Levinson, David M.

447

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

448

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during cell division. Preventing topo II from disentangling a cell's DNA is fatal to the cell, which is why drugs that target topo II serve as agents against bacterial infections and some forms of cancer. This first ever structural image of topo II should help in the development of future antibacterial and anticancer drugs that are even more effective and carry fewer potential side effects.

449

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during cell division. Preventing topo II from disentangling a cell's DNA is fatal to the cell, which is why drugs that target topo II serve as agents against bacterial infections and some forms of cancer. This first ever structural image of topo II should help in the development of future antibacterial and anticancer drugs that are even more effective and carry fewer potential side effects.

450

A Chiral Schwinger model, its Constraint Structure and Applications to its Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Jackiw-Rajaraman version of the chiral Schwinger model is studied as a function of the renormalization parameter. The constraints are obtained and they are used to carry out canonical quantization of the model by means of Dirac brackets. By introducing an additional scalar field, it is shown that the model can be made gauge invariant. The gauge invariant model is quantized by establishing a pair of gauge fixing constraints in order that the method of Dirac can be used.

Paul Bracken

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modeling multi-stream flow in collisionless matter: approximations for large-scale structure beyond shell-crossing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generally held view that a model of large-scale structure, formed by collisionless matter in the Universe, can be based on the matter model ``dust'' fails in the presence of multi-stream flow, i.e., velocity dispersion. We argue that models for large-scale structure should rather be constructed for a flow which describes the average motion of a multi-stream system. We present a clearcut reasoning how to approach the problem and derive an evolution equation for the mean peculiar-velocity relative to background solutions of Friedmann-Lema\\^\\i tre type. We consider restrictions of the nonlinear problem and show that the effect of velocity dispersion gives rise to an effective viscosity of non-dissipative gravitational origin. We discuss subcases which arise naturally from this approach: the ``sticky particle model'' and the ``adhesion approximation''. We also construct a novel approximation that features adhesive action in the multi-stream regime while conserving momentum, which was considered a drawback of the standard approximation based on Burger's equation. We finally argue that the assumptions made to obtain these models should be relaxed and we discuss how this can be achieved.

Thomas Buchert; Alvaro Dominguez

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Linking transaction cost and social exchange theory to explain strategic alliance performance: a meta-analytic structural equation model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drawing on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), we develop and test an integrative model of strategic alliance performance using meta-analytic structural equation modelling. Results reveal that TCE's key constructs (e.g., relationship specific investments, opportunism, and environmental uncertainty) influence SET's key constructs (e.g., trust and commitment) which in turn increase different strategic alliance performance outcomes (e.g., satisfaction, goal fulfilment, profitability, and stability). Further, our results show that the different outcome variables are distinct constructs, which measure different facets of strategic alliance performance.

Rodrigo Isidor; Holger Steinmetz; Christian Schwens; Ruediger Kabst

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fundamentals of mechanical behavior in structural intermetallics: A synthesis of atomistic and continuum modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a brief account of the recent advances in computational research on mechanical behavior of structural intermetallics, currently unresolved problems and critical issues are addressed and the knowledge base for potential answers to these problems is discussed. As large-scale problems (e.g., dislocation core structures, grain boundaries, and crack tips) are treated by atomistic simulations, future development of relevant interatomic potentials should be made consistent with the results of first-principles calculations. The bulk and defect properties calculated for intermetallic compounds, both known and as yet untested, can furnish insights to alloy designers in search of new high-temperature structural intermetallics.

Yoo, M.H.; Fu, C.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III2(O2CO)4]3?, Based Molecule-Based Magnets: Three-Dimensional Network Structure and Two-Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Novoa, J.; Stephens, P; Weerasekare, M; Shum, W; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

GWIDD: a comprehensive resource for genome-wide structural modeling of protein-protein interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein-protein interactions are a key component of life processes. The knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of these interactions is important for understanding protein function. Genome-Wide Docking Database ...

Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vakser, Ilya A.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

SecStAnT: secondary structure analysis tool for data selection, statistics and models building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......is calculated 3.2 Structural dataset Two sample datasets were built, one for alpha helical...unstructured fragments. Each dataset was separated in two subsets of X-ray crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR......

Giuseppe Maccari; Giulia L.B. Spampinato; Valentina Tozzini

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Testing turbulent convection theory in solar models I. Structure of the solar convection zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......outer envelope of the Sun, low-temperature opacities from Alexander...SSM. Fig. 9 shows the distribution of the temperature gradient in the solar...on the structure of the Sun, especially the temperature gradient in the convection......

Y. Li; J. Y. Yang

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Direct comparison of Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic and Model Prediction Variable Structure vortex flow controllers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Variable Structure and Fuzzy Logic based controllers for the same benchmark problem. Evaluation criteria consist of closed-loop system performance, activity level of the VFC nozzles, ease of controller synthesis, time required to synthesize...

Joshi, Praveen Sudhakar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Experimental investigation and constitutive modeling of metallic honeycombs in sandwich structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, honeycomb sandwich structures are designed in the elastic range, but recent studies on the crushing of sandwich profiles have shown their potential in crashworthiness applications. Thin sandwich sheets also ...

Mohr, Dirk, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A statistical and structural approach for symbol recognition, using XML modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level, it re- lies on proximity relations between the loops in order to rebuild loop graphs representation of process results. 1 Introduction The current improvements of intranet structures allow large

Boyer, Edmond

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461

A Statistical and Structural Approach for Symbol Recognition, Using XML Modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the problem of symbol recognition in technical document interpretation. We present a system using a statistical and structural approach. This system uses two interpretation levels. In a first level, the system extracts and recognizes ...

Mathieu Delalandre; Pierre Hroux; Sbastien Adam; Eric Trupin; Jean-Marc Ogier

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

A model of the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir based on surface-to-borehole seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

463

First-principles molecular modeling of structure-property relationships and reactivity in the zeolite chabazite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zeolites are crystalline, porous aluminosilicates; while a pure silicate structure is charge-neutral, the substitution of A1? for Si?? creates in the framework a negative charge, which can be compensated by a proton that ...

Lo, Cynthia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Computational approaches to modeling the conserved structural core among distantly homologous proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modem techniques in biology have produced sequence data for huge quantities of proteins, and 3-D structural information for a much smaller number of proteins. We introduce several algorithms that make use of the limited ...

Menke, Matthew Ewald, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Structure model for the () phase in Al-Cr-Si alloys deduced from the phase by the strong-reflections approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two closely related quasicrystal approximants are expected to have similar crystallographic structure-factor amplitudes and phases for the strong reflections so the structure of an unknown quasicrystal approximant can be solved from a related known quasicrystal approximant. This strong-reflections approach is applied to the new ()-AlCrSi phase and a structure model of () is deduced from the structure of the related -Al4Mn phase.

Zhang, H.

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

466

Abstracts ii Schedule....................................................................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................88 Dark Matter & Dark Energy ...............................................................................................3 HAD II Special: Neptune after One Orbit: Reflections on the Discovery of a Planet

Ciotti, Luca

467

Modelling market diffusion of electric vehicles with real world driving data Part I: Model structure and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future market diffusion of electric vehicles (EVs) is of great importance for transport related green house gas emissions and energy demand. But most studies on the market diffusion of \\{EVs\\} focus on average driving patters and neglect the great variations in daily driving of individuals present in real-world driving data. Yet these variations are important for \\{EVs\\} since range limitations and the electric driving share of plug-in hybrids strongly impact the economic evaluation and consumer acceptance of EVs. Additionally, studies often focus on private cars only and neglect that commercial buyers account for relevant market shares in vehicle sales. Here, we propose a detailed, user specific model for the market diffusion of \\{EVs\\} and evaluation of EV market diffusion policies based on real-world driving data. The data and model proposed include both private and commercial users in Germany and allow the calculation of realistic electric driving shares for all usage patterns. The proposed model explicitly includes user heterogeneity in driving behaviour, different user groups, psychological aspects and the effect of charge-at-home options. Our results show that the proposed model reproduces group specific market shares, gives confidence bands of market shares and simulates individual electric driving shares.

Patrick Pltz; Till Gnann; Martin Wietschel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Bootes II ReBooted: An MMT/MegaCam Study of An Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[abridged] We present MMT/Megacam imaging in Sloan $g$ and $r$ of the extremely low luminosity Bo\\"otes II Milky Way companion. We use a bootstrap approach to perform robust measurements of, and uncertainties on, Bo\\"otes II's distance, luminosity, size, and morphology. We show that Bo\\"otes II's stellar population is old and metal-poor ([Fe/H] $\\lta$ -2). Assuming a stellar population like that of M92, Bo\\"otes II is at a distance of 42 $\\pm$ 2 kpc, closer than the initial published estimate of 60 $\\pm$ 10 kpc. This distance revision, combined with a more robust measurement of Bo\\"otes II's structure with a Plummer model (exponential model) results in a more compact half-light size of $r_h\\simeq 36 (33) \\pm 9 (10)$ pc and lower luminosity of $M_V\\simeq-2.4 (-2.2) \\pm 0.7 (0.7)$ mag. This revised size and luminosity move Bo\\"otes II into a region of size-luminosity space not previously known to be occupied by old stellar populations, but also occupied by the recently discovered Milky Way satellites Willman 1 and SEGUE 1. We show that the apparently distorted morphology of Bo\\"otes II is not statistically significant given the present data. We use a tidal argument to support a scenario where Bo\\"otes II is a dwarf galaxy (dark matter dominated) rather than a globular cluster (not dark matter dominated). However, we can not rule out that Bo\\"otes II is a star cluster on the verge of disruption, such as Palomar 5.

S. M. Walsh; B. Willman; D. Sand; J. Harris; A. Seth; D. Zaritsky; H. Jerjen

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

A model study of the forces due to oscillatory waves on submerged structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfies the necessary boundary conditions is sought. Once it 1s found, the dynam1c pressure distribution is determined from the linearized Bernouili equation. The forces are obtained by 1ntegrating the pressure d1stribut1on over the surface... significant linear dimension equal to the height of the model squared divided by the length of the model in the direction of wave propagation for all models except the flat plate height of model for flat plate water depth 10 H = wave height v...

Versowsky, Paul Edward

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

An Isopycnal Box Model with predictive deep-ocean structure for biogeochemical cycling applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To simulate global ocean biogeochemical tracer budgets a model must accurately determine both the volume and surface origins of each water-mass. Water-mass volumes are dynamically linked to the ocean circulation in General Circulation Models, but at the cost of high computational load. In computationally efficient Box Models the water-mass volumes are simply prescribed and do not vary when the circulation transport rates or water mass densities are perturbed. A new computationally efficient Isopycnal Box Model is presented in which the sub-surface box volumes are internally calculated from the prescribed circulation using a diffusive conceptual model of the thermocline, in which upwelling of cold dense water is balanced by a downward diffusion of heat. The volumes of the sub-surface boxes are set so that the density stratification satisfies an assumed link between diapycnal diffusivity, ?d, and buoyancy frequency, N: ?d=c/(N?), where c and ? are user prescribed parameters. In contrast to conventional Box Models, the volumes of the sub-surface ocean boxes in the Isopycnal Box Model are dynamically linked to circulation, and automatically respond to circulation perturbations. This dynamical link allows an important facet of ocean biogeochemical cycling to be simulated in a highly computationally efficient model framework.

Philip Goodwin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano-electronic devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical ... Keywords: Interface model, MOSFET, Mathematical modeling, Nano-electronic device, Poisson-Schrdinger equations, Quantum effects, Random dopant

Duan Chen; Guo-Wei Wei

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

LIKELIHOOD RATIO TESTS FOR THE STRUCTURAL CHANGE OF AN AR(P) MODEL TO A THRESHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or econo- metric model is stable to some possible events, such as the great depres- sion/expansion, oil price shocks and abrupt policy intervention. Due to the well need for model stability, a lot) and Quandt (1960). For the history and more early results, we refer to Horv´ath (1993, 1995) and Cs

Ling, Shiqing