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1

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

S. A. Eide; T. E. Wierman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Dixie Valley is the hottest (> 285°C at 3 km) and one of the largest geothermal systems (63 MW power plant operated for over 20 years) in the Basin and Range province. The heat source is deep circulation in a high heat flow, highly fractured upper crust without a significant magmatic thermal input. Many hot springs in the Basin and Range Province share the characteristics of the Dixie Valley system. Major geothermal resource

3

Upper bound limit analysis model for FRP-reinforced masonry curved structures. Part II: Structural analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A homogenized full 3D limit analysis model for the evaluation of collapse loads of FRP-reinforced masonry vaults is presented. Six-noded rigid infinitely resistant wedges are used to model masonry. Three-noded rigid infinitely resistant triangles are ... Keywords: FRP-reinforcement, Homogenization, Kinematic approach, Limit analysis, Masonry, Vaults

Gabriele Milani; Enrico Milani; Antonio Tralli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillations Appearing in a GFDL General Circulation Model and FGGE Data. Part II: Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Space-time spectral and filter analyses are made of the structure of the tropical intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a GFDL 30-wavenumber spectral general circulation model and the FGGE IIIb data set.

Y. Hayashi; D. G. Golder

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Entropy in Climate Models. Part II: Horizontal Structure of Atmospheric Entropy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global horizontal structure of atmospheric entropy has been investigated. In energy balance models, the horizontal distribution of the atmospheric internal entropy production rate has been obtained. Based on the entropy balance relation, this ...

J. Li; Petr Chylek

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP...

7

Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

8

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

9

Coherent Structures in a Baroclinic Atmosphere. Part II: A Truncated Model Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many recent studies have been devoted to atmospheric Patterns that persist beyond the synoptic time scale, such as those known as blocking events. In the present paper we explore the possibility that blocking patterns can be modeled with a local ...

Piero Malguzzi; Paola Malanotte Rizzoli

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Extratropical 40-Day Oscillation in the UCLA General Circulation Model. Part II: Spatial Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraseasonal oscillations in a 3-yr, perpetual-January simulation are examined using a version of the UCLA GCM that produces no self-sustained Madden–Julian oscillation in the Tropics. A robust, 40-day oscillation is found to arise in the model'...

S. L. Marcus; M. Ghil; J. O. Dickey

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

12

Modelling II and Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption: Marc Dupuis1; Alton ... Modeling the Mass and Energy Balance of Different Aluminium ...

13

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

14

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

15

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

16

Fuel Modeling II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Integrated Computational Modeling of Materials for Nuclear Energy: ... Continuum Theory of Defects and Materials Response to Irradiation: ...

17

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety

18

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

19

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

20

The Vertical Structures of Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies Associated with Two Flavors of El Niño Simulated by AMIP II Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have identified different modes associated with two flavors of El Niño in terms of the three-dimensional structure of atmospheric temperature. The first is a deep-warm mode, which features a coherent zonal mean warming throughout ...

Tianjun Zhou; Jie Zhang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling Mesoscale Cellular Structures and Drizzle in Marine Stratocumulus. Part II: The Microphysics and Dynamics of the Boundary Region between Open and Closed Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two companion papers on modeling of mesoscale cellular structures and drizzle in marine stratocumulus. In the first, aerosol–cloud–precipitation interactions and dynamical feedbacks were investigated to study the formation ...

Hailong Wang; Graham Feingold

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

23

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

24

Development of a Land Surface Model. Part II: Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I described a land surface model, its implementation in the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), and some model evaluation results. Part II describes the indirect soil ...

Jonathan E. Pleim; Aijun Xiu

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microphysical and Thermodynamic Structure and Evolution of the Trailing Stratiform Regions of Mesoscale Convective Systems during BAMEX. Part II: Column Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employed a nondynamic microphysical column model to evaluate the degree to which the microphysical processes of sublimation, melting, and evaporation alone can explain the evolution of the relative humidity (RH) and latent cooling ...

Joseph A. Grim; Greg M. McFarquhar; Robert M. Rauber; Andrea M. Smith; Brian F. Jewett

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microplane constitutive model M4L for concrete. II: Calibration and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper, Part II of a two-part study, presents the numerical calibration and validation of the microplane constitutive model M4L for concrete formulated in the preceding part. The model parameters are firstly calibrated through optimum fitting of ... Keywords: Concrete, Finite elements, Fracture and damage, Microplane model, Structural analysis

Jiabin Li, Nguyen V. Tue, Ferhun C. Caner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Spatial and Temporal Structure of Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75° lat × ° 3.75° long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases ...

J. M. Murphy; J. F. B. Mitchell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proofreading RNA: Structure of Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Proofreading Ensures Functional Proteins Genes encoded in DNA are made up of nucleotides wound into a double helix of complementary nucleotide, or base, pairs. Converting these "instructions" into complementary strands of RNA is termed transcription, and is the first of two steps in expressing genes, or turning them into proteins. Accurate transcription is crucial, because if even 1 in 100,000 bases is transcribed incorrectly it can lead to a mutated, nonfunctional protein, and possibly cell death. RNA is a template for translating nucleotides into amino acids, which are combined and folded in a prescribed manner to form proteins, enzymes, etc. To transcribe DNA to RNA, an enzyme moves along one half of an unwound DNA helix, adding nucleotides to a nascent RNA strand. One such enzyme, pol II, transcribes portions of DNA that specifically encode proteins into messenger RNA. When an incorrect base is attached to a growing RNA chain, the RNA-DNA helix distorts. Pol II shifts into a "backtracked" state and stalls, signalling the need for the mismatched nucleotide to be removed from the strand. This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function. By understanding the structure of pol II in the backtracked state, researchers can better understand this corrective function of the enzyme.

29

Econometric structural models : a model selection approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Using a model selection approach, this thesis proposes a constructive data-and-theory-combined procedure to identify model structures in the framework of a linear simultaneous equations system… (more)

Chen, Pu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

MAS 305 Algebraic Structures II Notes 11 Autumn 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAS 305 Algebraic Structures II Notes 11 Autumn 2006 Ring homomorphisms Definition Let R and S be rings, and let :R S be a function. Then is a ring homomorphism if (r1 +r2) = r1+r2 and (r1r2) = (r1)(r2) for all r1, r2 in R. A ring homomorphism which is a bijection is called an isomorphism

Bailey, R. A.

31

SPAR Model Structural Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are supporting initiatives aimed at improving the quality of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Included in these initiatives are the resolution of key technical issues that are have been judged to have the most significant influence on the baseline core damage frequency of the NRC’s Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and licensee PRA models. Previous work addressed issues associated with support system initiating event analysis and loss of off-site power/station blackout analysis. The key technical issues were: • Development of a standard methodology and implementation of support system initiating events • Treatment of loss of offsite power • Development of standard approach for emergency core cooling following containment failure Some of the related issues were not fully resolved. This project continues the effort to resolve outstanding issues. The work scope was intended to include substantial collaboration with EPRI; however, EPRI has had other higher priority initiatives to support. Therefore this project has addressed SPAR modeling issues. The issues addressed are • SPAR model transparency • Common cause failure modeling deficiencies and approaches • Ac and dc modeling deficiencies and approaches • Instrumentation and control system modeling deficiencies and approaches

John Schroeder; Dan Henry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Structural Materials Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Sponsored by: TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division, TMS ... Fei Gao2; Kiran Solanki3; Xin Sun2; 1Mississippi State University; 2PNNL; ... A Multiscale Metal/Hydride Mechanical Model for Used-Fuel Zircaloy ...

33

Structural Modelling with Sparse Kernels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A widely acknowledged drawback of many statistical modelling techniques, commonly used in machine learning, is that the resulting model is extremely difficult to interpret. A number of new concepts and algorithms have been introduced by researchers to ... Keywords: ANOVA, Kernel methods, model interpretability, sparse structure, transparency

S. R. Gunn; J. S. Kandola

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

LMS-based method for damage detection applied to Phase II of Structural Health Monitoring benchmark problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is the process of monitoring the state of a structure to determine the existence, location, and degree of damage that may exist within the entire structure. A structureÂ?s health or level of damage can be monitored by identifying changes in structural or modal parameters. In this research, the structureÂ?s health is monitored by identifying changes in structural stiffness. The Adaptive Least Mean Square (LMS) filtering approach is used to directly identify changes in structural stiffness for the IASC-ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Task Group Benchmark problem for both Phase I and II. The research focuses primarily on Phase II of the benchmark problem. In Phase II, modeling error and noise is introduced to the problem making the problem more realistic. The research found that the LMS filter approach can be used to detect damage and distinguish relative severity of the damage in Phase II of the benchmark problem in real time. Even though the LMS filter approach identified damage, a threshold below which damage is hard to identify exists. If the overall stiffness changes less than 10%, then identifying the presence and location of damage is difficult. But if the time of damage is known, then the presence and location can be determined. The research is of great interest to those in the structural health monitoring community, structural engineers, and inspection practitioners who deal with structural damage identification problems.

Preston, Robin Huckaby

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling and Simulations of Materials Processing II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... Finite Element Analysis of Erosion for Offshore Structure: Zhigang Liu1; 1Institute of High Performance Computing Erosion wear, which arises ...

36

Type-II seesaw mass models and baryon asymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute and also compare the contributions of canonical and noncanonical mass terms towards baryon asymmetry by considering type-II seesaw mass models of neutrinos: Degenerare(3 varieties), Normal hierarchical and Inverted hierarchical(2 varieties). We have shown that for particular choices of parameter '$\\gamma$'(the so-called discriminator) for different neutrino mass models, the baryon asymmetry is largely dominated by canonical term. Within such type-II seesaw scenario, we find normal hierarchical mass model as the most favourable choice of nature.

Amal Kr. Sarma; H. Zeen Devi; N. Nimai Singh

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Models and Experiments Linking Multiple Scales II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program Organizers: Jonathan Zimmerman, Sandia National Laboratories; ... the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National ... with crystal plasticity model corroborates the fact that slip systems parallel to the ...

38

Microphysical Structure of the Marine Boundary Layer under Strong Wind and Spray Formation as Seen from Simulations Using a 2D Explicit Microphysical Model. Part II: The Role of Sea Spray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sea spray on the thermodynamics and microphysical structure of the lowest 400-m layer under strong wind speeds is investigated using a 2D hybrid Lagrangian–Eulerian model with spectral bin microphysics. A large number of adjacent and ...

J. Shpund; J. A. Zhang; M. Pinsky; A. Khain

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Some Hamiltonian models of friction II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II  

SciTech Connect

The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

Lammel, S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bianchi type-II cosmological model: some remarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of Bianchi type-II (BII) cosmological model the behavior of matter distribution has been considered. It is shown that the non-zero off-diagonal component of Einstein tensor implies some severe restriction on the choice of matter distribution. In particular for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS BII) space-time it is proved that the matter distribution should be strictly isotropic if the corresponding matter field possesses only non-zero diagonal components of the energy-momentum tensor.

Bijan Saha

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Bond Graph Modeling Of Variable Structure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of describing variable structure models in a compact, object--oriented fashion is revisited and analyzed from the perspective of bond graph modeling. Traditionally, bond graphs have always been used to describe continuous-- time physical processes with a fixed structure. Yet, this paper shall demonstrate that bond graphs are equally suitable to describe variable structure models as fixed structure models. Moreover, a bond graph description of variable structure models can teach us a lot about the essential properties of variable structure models, properties that are not easily visible when other modeling approaches are taken. The paper discusses issues related to causality reassignment and conditional index changes as a consequence of switching in a physical system. Keywords: Bond graphs, variable structure system, computational causality, conditional index change, switching, object--oriented modeling, Dymola. INTRODUCTION When the causality strokes were added to the forme...

François E. Cellier; Martin Otter; Hilding Elmqvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF BULK AMORPHOUS ALLOYS: II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray measurements were carried out at the X-7A beamline of the NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results show that the structures are basically ...

45

The Skill of Precipitation and Surface Temperature Forecasts by the NMC Global Model during DERF II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the skill of forecasts of precipitation and surface temperature by the National Meteorological Center's (NMC) global model in the 108 consecutive 30-day forecasts [known as Dynamical Extended Range Forecast II (DERF II)] that ...

Glenn H. White; Eugenia Kalnay; Rodney Gardner; Masao Kanamitsu

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Aircraft Microwave Observations and Simulations of Deep Convection from 18 to 183 GHz. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of the 29 June 1986 case study, a radiative transfer model is used to simulate the aircraft multichannel microwave brightness temperatures presented in Part I and to study the convective storm structure. Ground-based radar data are ...

Hwa-Young M. Yeh; N. Prasad; Robert A. Mack; Robert F. Adler

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modeling char oxidation behavior under Zone II burning conditions at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect

For accurate modeling of the coal combustion process at elevated pressures, account must be made for variations in char-particle structure. As pressure is increased, particle swelling increases during the devolatilization of certain bituminous coals, yielding a variety of char-particle structures, from uniform high-density particles to thin-walled non-uniform low-density particles having large internal void volumes. Since under Zone II burning conditions the char conversion rate depends upon the accessibility of the internal surfaces, the char structure plays a key role in determining particle burnout times. In our approach to characterize the impact of char structure on particle burning rates, effectiveness factors appropriate for thin-walled cenospherical particles and thick-walled particles having a few large cavities are defined and related to the effectiveness factor for uniform high-density particles that have no large voids, only a random distribution of pores having a mean pore size in the sub-micron range. For the uniform case, the Thiele modulus approach is used to account for Zone 11 type burning in which internal burning is limited by the combined effects of pore diffusion and the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the carbonaceous material. In the paper, the impact of having a variety of char structures in a mix of particles burning under Zone II burning conditions is demonstrated.

Ma, L.Q.; Mitchell, R. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

I. Structural studies of termite defense secretions. II. Structural studies of natural products of marine nudibranchs. [Kempene, tridachione  

SciTech Connect

Three families of termites have the ability to produce a sticky secretion that envelopes and immobilizes the enemy. In the family Termitidae the secretion contains the diterpenoid hydrocarbons, kempene I and kempene II. The molecular structure of kempene II from the termite, Nasutitermes kempae, is described in detail. Another species of termite, Cubitermes umbratus, contained the diterpenoid hydrocarbon biflora-4,10-19,15-triene in the secretion and this compound is described. Studies were also conducted on the mucous secretion of the pedal gland of the marine nudibranch, Tidachiella diomedea. Tridachione, a substituted ..gamma..-pyrone, was isolated in the pure state and its molecular structure is described in detail. (HLW)

Solheim, B.A.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA cleavage chemistry used to resolve these altered DNA structures can also operate as a weak link that can be exploited to kill cells-in a good way. A variety of small molecules...

50

On the Evolution of the QE II Storm. II: Dynamic and Thermodynamic Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of convection and the hurricane-like structure in the explosively-developing cyclone studied in Part I motivates us to assess the importance heating had on this cyclogenesis. To accomplish this, a method to evaluate the three-...

John R. Gyakum

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Neutrino masses and mixings with non-zero $?_{13}$ in Type I+II Seesaw Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the survivability of neutrino mass models with normal as well as inverted hierarchical mass patterns in the presence of both type I and type II seesaw contributions to neutrino mass within the framework of generic left-right symmetric models. At leading order, the Dirac neutrino mass matrix is assumed to be diagonal with either charged lepton (CL) type or up quark (UQ) type structure which gets corrected by non-leading effects giving rise to deviations from tri-bi-maximal (TBM) mixing and hence non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$. Using the standard form of neutrino mass matrix which incorporates such non-leading effects, we parametrize the neutrino mass matrix incorporating both oscillation as well as cosmology data. Also considering extremal values of Majorana CP phases such that the neutrino mass eigenvalues have the structure $(m_1, -m_2, m_3)$ and $(m_1, m_2, m_3)$, we then calculate the predictions for neutrino parameters in the presence of both type I and type II seesaw contributions, taking one of them dominant and the other sub-dominant. We show that these mass models can survive in our framework with certain exceptions.

Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wake II model for hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines for the wave plus current case.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The concept of the Wake II model for the determination of the hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines is extended to include the wave plus current… (more)

Ramirez Sabag, Said

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermohaline Circulation Stability: A Box Model Study. Part II: Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thorough analysis of the stability of a coupled version of an interhemispheric three-box model of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured analysis of an uncoupled version of the same model ...

Valerio Lucarini; Peter H. Stone

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Quantum chaos in the nuclear collective model: II. Peres lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a continuation of our preceding paper devoted to signatures of quantum chaos in the geometric collective model of atomic nuclei. We apply the method by Peres to study ordered and disordered patterns in quantum spectra drawn as lattices in the plane of energy vs. average of a chosen observable. A good qualitative agreement with standard measures of chaos is manifested. The method provides an efficient tool for studying structural changes of eigenstates across quantum spectra of general systems.

Pavel Stransky; Petr Hruska; Pavel Cejnar

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

56

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

57

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience Model: For fellow technocrats: "Climate" was a guise, using prurient interest to gain attention. Sorry! "Old King Coal II" and "Civil Disobedience" are accurate headings. Old King Coal II: Thanks for comments/suggestions re my "Old King Coal" e-mail. Main

Hansen, James E.

58

Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II  

SciTech Connect

Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coastal Structures Modeling Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structures Modeling Complex Structures Modeling Complex Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Structures Modeling Complex Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 54.9 Beam(m) 35.4 Depth(m) 1.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

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61

Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Typhoon Structure as Revealed by Aircraft Reconnaissance. Part II: Structural Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two papers on the structure of northwest Pacific tropical cyclones as revealed by U.S. Air Force aircraft reconnaissance. This paper describes the varying structure of the tropical cyclone's outer-radius wind profile in ...

Candis L. Weatherford; William M. Gray

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

TURBULENT CONVECTION MODEL IN THE OVERSHOOTING REGION. II. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Turbulent convection models (TCMs) are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied to calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of TCMs, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the TCM in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting. (1) The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power-law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations k, u{sub r}'T'-bar, and T'T'-bar are only determined by the parameters of the TCM, and there is an equilibrium value of the anisotropic degree {omega}. (2) The overshooting length of the turbulent heat flux u{sub r}'T'-bar is about 1H{sub k} (H{sub k} = |dr/dln k|). (3) The value of the turbulent kinetic energy at the convective boundary k{sub C} can be estimated by a method called the maximum of diffusion. Turbulent correlations in the overshooting region can be estimated by using k{sub C} and exponentially decreasing functions with the decaying indices.

Zhang, Q. S.; Li, Y., E-mail: zqs@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress was made this period on a number of tasks. A significant advance was made in the incorporation of macrostructural ideas into high temperature combustion models. Work at OSU by R. Essenhigh in collaboration with the University of Stuttgart has led to a theory that the zone I / II transition in char combustion lies within the range of conditions of interest for pulverized char combustion. The group has presented evidence that some combustion data, previously interpreted with zone II models, in fact takes place in the transition from zone II to zone 1. This idea was used at Brown to make modifications to the CBK model (a char kinetics package specially designed for carbon burnout prediction, currently used by a number of research and furnace modeling groups in academia and industry). The resulting new model version, CBK8, shows improved ability to predict extinction behavior in the late stages of combustion, especially for particles with low ash content. The full development and release of CBK8, along with detailed descriptions of the role of the zone 1/2 transition will be reported on in subsequent reports. ABB-CE is currently implementing CBK7 into a special version of the CFD code Fluent for use in the modeling and design of their boilers. They have been appraised of the development, and have expressed interest in incorporating the new feature, realizing full CBK8 capabilities into their combustion codes. The computational chemistry task at OSU continued to study oxidative pathways for PAH, with emphasis this period on heteroatom containing ring compounds. Preliminary XPS studies were also carried out. Combustion experiments were also carried out at OSU this period, leading to the acquisition of samples at various residence times and the measurement of their oxidation reactivity by nonisothermal TGA techniques. Several members of the project team attended the Carbon Conference this period and made contacts with representatives from the new FETC Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal. Possibilities for interactions with this new center will be explored. Also this period, an invited review paper was prepared for the 27th International Symposium on Combustion, to be held in Boulder, Colorado in August. The paper is entitled; "Structure, Properties, and Reactivity of Solid Fuels," and reports on a number of advances made in this collaborative project.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Linear Stochastic Dynamical Model of ENSO. Part II: Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of a linear, intermediate model of ENSO is examined under stochastic forcing. The model was developed in a companion paper (Part I) and is derived from the Zebiak–Cane ENSO model. Four variants of the model are used ...

C. J. Thompson; D. S. Battisti

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Modeling interval order structures with partially commutative monoids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interval order structures are useful tools to model abstract concurrent histories, i.e. sets of equivalent system runs, when system runs are modeled with interval orders. The paper shows how interval order structures can be modeled by partially ...

Ryszard Janicki; Xiang Yin; Nadezhda Zubkova

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Inverse Ocean Modeling System. Part II: Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inverse Ocean Modeling (IOM) System is a modular system for constructing and running weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation (W4DVAR) for any linear or nonlinear functionally smooth dynamical model and observing array. ...

J. C. Muccino; H. Luo; H. G. Arango; D. Haidvogel; J. C. Levin; A. F. Bennett; B. S. Chua; G. D. Egbert; B. D. Cornuelle; A. J. Miller; E. Di Lorenzo; A. M. Moore; E. D. Zaron

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl  

SciTech Connect

A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

Jin Tengteng [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu Wei [Institute of Science and Engineering of Materials, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Zhao Jingtai [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.hoffmann@cpfs.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

1951-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

70

STRUCTURE FORMATION IN THE SYMMETRON MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Scalar fields, strongly coupled to matter, can be present in nature and still be invisible to local experiments if they are subject to a screening mechanism. The symmetron is one such mechanism that relies on restoration of a spontaneously broken symmetry in regions of high density to shield the scalar fifth force. We have investigated structure formation in the symmetron model by using N-body simulations and find observable signatures in both the linear and nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the halo mass function. The mechanism for suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions is also found to work very well.

Davis, Anne-Christine; Li Baojiu [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Phenomenology of heterotic and type II orientifold string models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryptons are metastable bound states of fractionally-charged particles that arise generically in the hidden sectors of models derived from heterotic string. We study their properties and decay modes in a speci?c ?ipped SU(5) model with long-lived four-particle spin-zero bound states called tetrons. The expected masses and lifetimes of the neutral tetrons make them good candidates for cold dark matter (CDM), and a potential source of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) which have been observed, whereas the charged tetrons would have decayed in the early Universe. We calculate the spectra of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) in an ex¬plicit top-down model based on the decays of metastable neutral ‘crypton’ states. For all the decay operators, the total UHECR spectra are compatible with the available data. Also, the fractions of photons are compatible with all the published upper limits, but may be detectable in future experiments. We also construct several intersecting D-brane models on a variety of orientifold backgrounds. In particular, we construct ?ipped SU(5), Pati-Salam, and MSSM-like models. The phenomenological properties of these models are studied. For one model in particular, we ?nd that we may explain the quark masses and mixings, the tau lepton mass, and generate small neutrino masses via the see-saw mechanism.

Mayes, Van Eric

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Exploring Gravity and Gravitational Wave Dynamics Part II: Gravity Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for a new gravity model may explain anomalous behavior exhibited by several recent experiments described in Part I. Although Newtonian gravity is adequate for predicting the motion of celestial bodies

P. A. Murad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Transpose-AMIP II Experiment and Its Application to the Understanding of Southern Ocean Cloud Biases in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transpose-Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international model intercomparison project in which climate models are run in “weather forecast mode.” The Transpose-AMIP II experiment is run alongside phase 5 of the Coupled ...

K. D. Williams; A. Bodas-Salcedo; M. Déqué; S. Fermepin; B. Medeiros; M. Watanabe; C. Jakob; S. A. Klein; C. A. Senior; D. L. Williamson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling the Flash Rate of Thunderstorms. Part II: Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part paper a new method of predicting the total lightning flash rate in thunderstorms was introduced. In this paper, the implementation of this method into the convection-permitting Consortium for Small Scale Modeling (COSMO) ...

Johannes M. L. Dahl; Hartmut Höller; Ulrich Schumann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

Manohar Motwani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Qunatum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime II: Thermodynamics of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this second part of our series of two papers, where spacetime is modelled by a graph, where Planck size quantum black holes lie on the vertices, we consider the thermodynamics of spacetime. We formulate an equation which tells in which way an accelerating, spacelike two-surface of spacetime interacts with the thermal radiation flowing through that surface. In the low temperature limit, where most quantum black holes constituting spacetime are assumed to lie in the ground state, our equation implies, among other things, the Hawking and the Unruh effects, as well as Einstein's field equation with a vanishing cosmological constant for general matter fields. We also consider the high temperature limit, where the microscopic black holes are assumed to lie in highly excited states. In this limit our model implies, among other things, that black hole entropy depends logarithmically on its area, instead of being proportional to the area.

Makela, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The formation of IRIS diagnostics I. A quintessential model atom of Mg II and general formation properties of the Mg II h&k lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h&k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h&k line formation from 3D radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h&k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h&k can be modeled accurately with a 4-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use 1D PRD computations to model the line profile up ...

Leenaarts, J; Carlsson, M; Uitenbroek, H; de Pontieu, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Magnetic Bianchi type II string cosmological model in loop quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The loop quantum cosmology of the Bianchi type II string cosmological model in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field is studied. We present the effective equations which provide modifications to the classical equations of motion due to quantum effects. The numerical simulations confirm that the big bang singularity is resolved by quantum gravity effects.

Victor Rikhvitsky; Bijan Saha; Mihai Visinescu

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Anomalous Stoichiometry Layered Structure and Magnetic Ordering of the Prussian Blue Analog [NEt4]2MnII3(CN)8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atypical of Prussian blue structured materials, Mn{sup II} and [NEt{sub 4}]CN react to form [NEt{sub 4}]{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}(CN){sub 8} possessing layers of octahedral [Mn{sup II}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-} bonded to two high-spin tetrahedral Mn{sup II} sites.

J Her; P Stephens; C Kareis; J Moore; J Miller

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Numerical Prediction of Convectively Driven Mesoscale Pressure Systems. Part II. Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 20-level, three-dimensional, primitive equation model with 20 km horizontal resolution is used to predict the development of convectively driven mesoscale pressure systems. Systems produced by the model have life histories and structural ...

J. M. Fritsch; C. F. Chappell

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Breakup of Temperature Inversions in Deep Mountain Valleys: Part II. Thermodynamic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model is developed to simulate the evolution of vertical temperature structure during the breakup of nocturnal temperature inversions in mountain valleys. The primary inputs to the model are the valley floor width, sidewall ...

C. David Whiteman; Thomas B. McKee

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Component-Based Modelling of RNA Structure Folding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RNA structure is fundamentally important for many biological processes. In the past decades, diverse structure prediction algorithms and tools were developed but due to missing descriptions in clearly defined modelling formalisms it's difficult or even ... Keywords: DEVS, RNA folding, model components, multi-level, secondary structure

Carsten Maus

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fast Flexible Modeling of RNA Structure Using Internal Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling the structure and dynamics of large macromolecules remains a critical challenge. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are expensive because they model every atom independently, and are difficult to combine with experimentally derived knowledge. ... Keywords: Internal coordinate mechanics, molecular, structure, dynamics, RNA, modeling, prediction, linear, scaling.

Samuel Coulbourn Flores; Michael Sherman; Christopher M. Bruns; Peter Eastman; Russ B. Altman

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ideal, real and virtual textile structure modelling and visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usually the software for textile visualization uses ideal model based on simplified structure assumptions that may not be in a good agreement with reality. Real model reconstructs a small volume of structure from 2D parallel cuts. Proposed virtual model ... Keywords: FFT, OpenGL, VRML, image processing, virtual reality

Miloslav Kosek; Tomas Mikolanda; Bohumila Koskova

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S{sub 2} state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2} state with the g{approx}4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S{sub 2}-g4 state) was compared with that in the S{sub 2} state with multiline signal (S{sub 2}-MLS state) and the S{sub 1} state. The S{sub 2}-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S{sub 1} state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S{sub 1} to the S{sub 2}-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2}-g4 state is different from that in the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. In the S{sub 2}-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 {angstrom} and 2.85 {angstrom}. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S{sub 1} or S{sub 2}-MLS states. The third shell of the S{sub 2}-g4 state at about 3.3 {angstrom} also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 2} transition.

Liang, W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... After a brief review of the available knowledge on {Am,Np,Pu,U,Zr} that are the basis for candidate metallic fuels, we focus on two examples, ...

88

Developing Models and Test Structures of Next-Generation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, We are developing models and test structures of next-generation photovoltaics. In order to flexibly treat 2D and 3D nanostructures, with full ...

89

Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Metrologies for Protein Structure, Function, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Based on its established expertise, infrastructure, and resources for structure ... A primary aim of this program area is to ... Source of Extramural Funding: ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Cerveny, Vlastislav

92

Vertical Velocity Structures in an Axisymmetric, Nonhydrostatic Tropical Cyclone Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of several experiments with different microphysical parameterizations in an axisymmetric, nonhydrostatic tropical cyclone model illustrates the impact of icc-phase microphysics on model vertical velocity structure. The ...

Stephen J. Lord; Jacqueline M. Lord

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Global models of document structure using latent permutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a novel Bayesian topic model for learning discourse-level document structure. Our model leverages insights from discourse theory to constrain latent topic assignments in a way that reflects the underlying ...

Chen, Harr

94

Jet Structure and Scaling in Southern Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jet structure of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) simulated by two general circulation models (GCMs), FRAM (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model) and POP (Parallel Ocean Program), is examined in relation to the bottom topography field. ...

B. Sinha; K. J. Richards

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of AMIP II Global Climate Model Simulations of the Land Surface Water Budget and Its Components over the GEWEX-CEOP Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface water balance components simulated by 20 atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) participating in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II) are analyzed globally and over seven Global Energy and ...

P. Irannejad; A. Henderson-Sellers

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper.

Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An Analysis of Systematic Cyclone Errors in the NMC LFM-II Model During the 1978–79 Cool Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of systematic errors in the 24 and 48 hour forecasts of cyclones by the currently operational NMC LFM-II model has been completed for the 1978–79 winter season (1 October 1978–30 April 1979). All available LFM-II 0000 and 1200 GMT ...

Steven R. Silberberg; Lance F. Bosart

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Dark energy model with variable $q$ and $?$ in LRS Bianchi-II space-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study deals with spatial homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi-II dark energy model in general relativity. The Einstein's field equations have been solved exactly by taking into account the proportionality relation between one of the components of shear scalar $(\\sigma^{1}_{1})$ and expansion scalar $(\\vartheta)$, which, for some suitable choices of problem parameters, yields time dependent equation of state (EoS) and deceleration parameter (DP), representing a model which generates a transition of universe from early decelerating phase to present accelerating phase. The physical and geometrical behavior of universe have been discussed in detail.

Bijan Saha; Anil Kumar Yadav

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed cropland and grazing land, land-applied dairy waste, and effluent discharge from eight wastewater treatment plants. The first phase of the project developed an effective methodology for determining priority areas in the watershed where best management practice (BMP) implementation would likely yield the greatest improvements in water quality. The objectives of this project (Phase II) are to apply the Soil and Watershed Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to simulate and evaluate the impacts of implementing several best management practices (a) in the entire watershed, and (b) at incremental levels in high, medium, and low priority areas of the watershed, identified using three different impact indices. Initially, the SWAT model was calibrated for long-term annual and monthly flow at a USGS gaging station located in the lower portion of the watershed for the period from 1980 through 2005 and was validated at the same location for the period 1960 through 1979. The model was also calibrated, at a monthly time step, for water quality parameters including sediment, organic and mineral nitrogen, and phosphorus at two locations, Hico and Valley Mills. Model performance statistics (coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency) indicated that model performance was satisfactory and could be used for evaluating the impacts of alternative management scenarios to reduce nonpoint source pollution. BMPs including streambank stabilization, gully plugs, recharge structures, conservation tillage, terraces, contour farming, grazing management, manure incorporation, edge-of-field filter strips, and PL-566 reservoirs were simulated as being implemented in the watershed areas that met the respective practice’s specific criteria for implementation. These BMPs were simulated individually and the resulting farm level (HRU level), subwatershed level, and watershed outlet level impacts were quantified for each BMP. Reductions in sediment load at the watershed outlet, as a result of implementing these BMPs individually, was as much as 37 percent while reductions in total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 1 percent to 24 percent and total phosphorus (TP) varied from a 3 percent increase to a 30 percent decrease. The 3 percent increase is indicative of conservation tillage and is likely caused by the lack of soil inversion and mixing, which yields an accumulation of dissolved (mineral) phosphorus in the soil’s surface layer. At subwatershed levels, reductions brought about by implementing the BMPs were relatively greater as compared to the watershed outlet reductions. Reductions in sediment were as high as 47 percent and reductions in TN and TP were 37 percent and 32 percent, respectively. Subwatersheds were categorized into “high,” “medium,” and “low” priority based on calibrated simulation results. Considering sediment, TN, and TP (as pollutants), three types of total impact indices were estimated. The “Concentration Impact Index” is based on pollutant concentrations (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘reach output file’), considers contributions from the subwatershed as well as the entire upstream watershed, and is effective in determining priority areas for addressing localized pollution problems in low and high flow conditions. The “Load Per Unit Area Impact Index” is based on the total pollutant load coming from a specific area (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘subbasin output file’), considers contributions from an individual subwatershed, and is used to effectively assign a priority to each subwatershed. The “Load Impact Index” is based on pollutant loads from subwatersheds and upstream areas (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘reach output file’) and portrays the cumulative effects of pollutant loading throug

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind Turbine Investment and Disinvestment: A Structural Econometric Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Turbine Investment and Disinvestment: A Structural Econometric Model Jonathan A. Cook C model of wind turbine owners' decisions about whether and when to add new turbines to a pre profit structure for wind producers and evaluate the impact of technology and government policy on wind

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

102

Bayesian spatial models with a mixture neighborhood structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Bayesian disease mapping, one needs to specify a neighborhood structure to make inference about the underlying geographical relative risks. We propose a model in which the neighborhood structure is part of the parameter space. We retain the Markov ... Keywords: 62H11, 62H20, 62J12, 62M40, Disease mapping, Markov random field, Spatial hierarchical models

E. C. Rodrigues; R. Assunção

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

DIVALENT LANTHANIDE CHEMISTRY; BIS (PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II) DERIVATIVES: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF BIS(PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) YTTERBIUM (II)TETRAHYDROFURAN HEMI (TOLUENE) AT 176K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Red, paramagnetic ({mu}{sub B} = 7.99 B.M., 5-50K) bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) europium (II)(tetrahydrofuran)(diethylether), (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Eu(THF)(Et{sub 2}O) is isolated from reaction of three molar equivalents of sodium pentamethylcyclopentadienide and europium trichloride in refluxing tetrahydrofuran, after crystallization from diethyl ether. The monotetrahydrofuran complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Eu(THF), may be isolated by use of toluene rather than diethyl ether as the crystallization solvent. Red, diamagnetic bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium(II)(tetrahydrofuran) is isolated from the reaction of ytterbium dichloride and sodium pentamethylcyclopentadienide in refluxing tetrahydrofuran. The diethyl ether complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(OEt{sub 2}), may be isolated by crystallization of the tetrahydrofuran complex from diethylether, The hemi-toluene complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2} Yb(THF) {center_dot} 1/2 toluene, can be isolated by recrystallization of the tetrahydrofuran complex from toluene. As these divalent metallocenes are the first hydrocarbon-soluble lanthanide derivatives to be isolated we have examined the latter complex by X-ray crystallography. Crystals of (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(OC{sub 4}H{sub 8}) {center_dot} 1/2(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}cH{sub 3}) crystalline in the monoclinic system, P2{sub 1}/n, with a = 11.358(8) {angstrom}, b = 21.756(19) {angstrom}, c = 10.691(7) {angstrom}, and {beta} = 101.84(5){sup o} at 176K. For Z = 4 the calculated density is 1.37 g cm{sup -3}. The ytterbium atom is coordinated to the oxygen atom of a tetrahydrofuran molecule and to two pentamethyl cyclopentadienyl rings. The molecule has approximate c{sub 2} symmetry about the Yb-0 bond. The Yb-0 distance is 2.41 {angstrom}, the Yb-C distances average 2.66 {angstrom}, and the Yb-Cp (centroid) distances average 2.37 {angstrom}. The Me{sub 5}C{sub 5} rings are in a staggered configuration with respect to each other. The methyl groups of the Me{sub 5}C{sub 5} groups are displaced by .03 to .21 {angstrom} from the planes of the five-membered rings away from the ytterbium atom. The toluene molecule is not coordinated to the complex and is on a center of symmetry in a disordered configuration. The 3466 data with F{sup 2} > 3{sigma} refined by full matrix least-squares to a conventional R factor of 0.036.

Tilley, T.Don; Andersen, Richard A.; Spencer, Brock; Ruben, Helena; Zalkin, Allan; Templeton, David H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets - Vol. II, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The second volume provides a data implementation guide that lists all naming conventions and model constraints. In addition, Volume 1 has two appendixes that provide a schematic of the SAGE structure and a listing of the source code, respectively.

Barry Kapilow-Cohen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Parameterization of Inversion Breakup in Idealized Valleys. Part II: Thermodynamic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple thermodynamic parameterization based on a modified version of the Whiteman and McKee inversion destruction model is presented to simulate the evolution of vertical temperature structure during the inversion breakup period in idealized ...

N. M. Zoumakis; G. A. Efstathiou

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Role of structural Fe in nontronite NAu-1 and dissolved Fe(II) in redox transformations of arsenic and antimony  

SciTech Connect

Oxidation state is a major factor affecting the mobility of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in soil and aquatic systems. Metal (hydr)oxides and clay minerals are effective sorbents, and may also promote redox reactions on their surfaces via direct or indirect facilitation of electron transfer. Iron substituted for Al in the octahedral sites of aluminosilicate clay minerals has the potential to be in variable oxidation states and is a key constituent of electron transfer reactions in clay minerals. This experimental work was conducted to determine whether structural Fe in clays can affect the oxidation state of As and Sb adsorbed at the clay surface. Another goal of our study was to compare the reactivity of clay structural Fe(II) with systems containing Fe(II) present in dissolved/adsorbed forms. The experimental systems included batch reactors with various concentrations of As(III), Sb(III), As(V), or Sb(V) equilibrated with oxidized (NAu-1) or partially reduced (NAu-1-Red) nontronite, hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) and kaolinite (KGa-1b) suspensions under oxic and anoxic conditions. The reaction times ranged from 0.5 to 720 h, and pH was constrained at 5.5 (for As) and at 5.5 or 8.0 (for Sb). The oxidation state of As and Sb in the liquid phase was determined by liquid chromatography in line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and in the solid phase by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our findings show that structural Fe(II) in NAu-1-Red was not able to reduce As(V)/Sb(V) under the conditions examined, but reduction was seen when aqueous Fe(II) was present in the systems with kaolinite (KGa-1b) and nontronite (NAu-1). The ability of the structural Fe in nontronite clay NAu-1 to promote oxidation of As(III)/Sb(III) was greatly affected by its oxidation state: if all structural Fe was in the oxidized Fe(III) form, no oxidation was observed; however, when the clay was partially reduced ({approx}20% of structural Fe was reduced to Fe(II)), NAu-1-Red promoted the most extensive oxidation under both oxic and anoxic conditions. Electron balance considerations suggest that structural Fe(III) in the NAu-1-Red was the sole oxidant in the anoxic setup, while dissolved O{sub 2} also contributes in oxic conditions. Long-term batch experiments revealed the complex dynamics of As aqueous speciation in anoxic and oxic systems when reduced arsenic was initially added: rapid disappearance of As(III) was observed due to oxidation to As(V) followed by a slow increase of aqueous As(III). This behavior is explained by two reactions: fast initial oxidation of As(III) by structural Fe(III) (anoxic) or Fe(III) and dissolved O2 (oxic) followed by the slow reduction of As(V) by dissolved Fe(II). The resulting re-mobilization of As due to As(V) reduction by aqueous Fe(II) occurs on time scales on the order of days. These reactions are likely significant in a natural soil or aquifer environment with seasonal cycling or slightly reducing conditions with an abundance of clay minerals and dissolved Fe(II).

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Foster, Andrea L.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks); (USGS)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Merchant Commodity Storage and Term Structure Model Error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Merchants operations involves valuing and hedging the cash flows of commodity and energy conversion assets as real options based on stochastic models that inevitably embed model error. In this paper we quantify how empirically calibrated model errors about the futures price term structure affect the valuation and hedging of commodity storage assets, specifically the storage of natural gas, an important energy source. We also explore ways to mitigate the impact of these errors. Our analysis demonstrates the differential impact of term structure model error on natural gas storage valuation versus hedging. We also propose an effective approach to deal with the negative effect of such model error on factor hedging, a specific hedging approach. More generally, our work suggests managerial principles for option valuation and hedging in the presence of term structure model error. These principles should have relevance for the merchant management of other commodity conversion assets and for the management of financial options that also depend on term structure dynamics

Nicola Secom; Guoming Lai; François Margot; Alan Scheller-wolf

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

Splettstoesser, Thomas [University of Heidelberg; Holmes, Kenneth [Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg, Germany; Noe, Frank [DFG Research Center Matheon, FU Berlin, Germany; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Analysis of five forest harvesting simulation models. II. Paths, pitfalls, and other considerations  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two papers describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy were identified and illustrated. This included a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/nonproductive times, performance variables used, and the different harvesting systems modelable. In Part II user implementation problems are discussed. Those dealt with in detail are the following: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to work effectively with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent useable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. Design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 22).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The IMPACTT model: Structure and technical description  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies model, or IMPACTT, is a spreadsheet model that calculates the effect of advanced-technology vehicles and market penetration on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs include estimates of the quantity and value of oil displaced and emissions reduced by advanced-technology vehicles, the quantity of alternative fuels they consume, and the total incremental costs bome by purchasers of advanced-technology vehicles. In the current version of IMPACTT, up to eight fuel or engine technologies applicable to light-duty vehicles can be modeled by using a three-phase approach. First, the vehicle stock and miles traveled by the advanced-technology vehicle are determined. Second, assumptions about efficiency and fuel shares are used to estimate substitution-fuel use and oil displacement. Third, changes in emissions of carbon monoxide, non-methane hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide are computed.

Mintz, M.M.; Tompkins, M.M.; Camp, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Successive-Order-of-Interaction Radiative Transfer Model. Part II: Model Performance and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models for scattering atmospheres that are accurate yet computationally efficient are required for many applications, such as data assimilation in numerical weather prediction. The successive-order-of-interaction (SOI) model is ...

Christopher W. O’Dell; Andrew K. Heidinger; Thomas Greenwald; Peter Bauer; Ralf Bennartz

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Efficient Three-Dimensional Global Models for Climate Studies: Models I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmospheric model is developed with a computational efficiency which allows long-range climate experiments. The model solves the simultaneous equations for conservation of mass, energy and momentum, and the equation of state on a grid. ...

J. Hansen; G. Russell; D. Rind; P. Stone; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; R. Ruedy; L. Travis

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures  

SciTech Connect

More accurate fission cross section calculations in presence of underlying intermediate structure are strongly desired. This paper recalls the common approximations used below the fission threshold and quantifies their impact. In particular, an exact expanded R-matrix Monte Carlo calculation of the intermediate structure, deeply mixed with the fluctuations of the class-I and II decay amplitudes, is shown. This paper also insists on the microscopic structure of the level densities as a function of the nucleus deformation and show preliminary neutron induced fission cross section calculations for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu using newly calculated combinatorial level densities. Comparisons with recent evaluated and measured fission cross sections are made.

Bouland, Olivier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynn, J. Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Experimental-based modeling of a support structure as part of a full system model  

SciTech Connect

Structural dynamic systems are often attached to a support structure to simulate proper boundary conditions during testing. In some cases the support structure is fairly simple and can be modeled by discrete springs and dampers. In other cases the desired test conditions necessitate the use of a support structural that introduces dynamics of its own. For such cases a more complex structural dynamic model is required to simulate the response of the full combined system. In this paper experimental frequency response functions, admittance function modeling concepts, and least squares reductions are used to develop a support structure model including both translational and rotational degrees of freedom at an attachment location. Subsequently, the modes of the support structure are estimated, and a NASTRAN model is created for attachment to the tested system.

CARNE,THOMAS G.; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Method for Adaptive Habit Prediction in Bulk Microphysical Models. Part II: Parcel Model Corroboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common for cloud microphysical models to use a single axis length to characterize ice crystals. These methods use either the diameter of an equivalent sphere or mass–size equations in conjunction with the capacitance model to close the ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Kara Sulia; Hugh Morrison

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A PDF-Based Model for Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new single-column model for the cloudy boundary layer, described in a companion paper, is tested for a variety of regimes. To represent the subgrid-scale variability, the model uses a joint probability density function (PDF) of vertical ...

Jean-Christophe Golaz; Vincent E. Larson; William R. Cotton

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Structural Model of Demand for Apprentices ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is a widely held opinion that apprenticeship training represents a net investment for training firms, and that therefore firms only train if they have the possibility to recoup these investments after the training period. A recent study using a new firm-level dataset for Switzerland showed, however, that for 60 percent of the firms, the apprenticeship training itself does not result in net cost. In this context it seems important to examine the question whether the potential net cost of training (during the training period) are a major determinant for the demand for apprentices. Different count data models, in particular hurdle models, are used to estimate the effect of net cost on the demand for apprentices. The results show that the net cost have a significant impact on the training decision but no significant influence on the demand for apprentices, once the firm has decided to train. For policy purposes, these results indicate that subsidies for firms that already train apprentices would not boost the demand for apprentices. JEL Classification: J24, C25

Samuel Mühlemann; Jürg Schweri; Rainer Winkelmann; Stefan C. Wolter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hierarchical Neutrino Masses and Leptogenesis in Type I+II Seesaw Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The baryon to photon ratio in the present Universe is very accurately measured to be $6.19 \\times 10^{-10}$. We study the possible origin of this baryon asymmetry in the neutrino sector through the generic mechanism of baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We consider both type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses within the framework of left right symmetric models (LRSM). Using the latest best fit global neutrino oscillation data and assuming the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be either charged lepton (CL) or up quark (UQ) type, we compute the predictions for baryon to photon ratio keeping the lightest active neutrino mass eigenstate a free parameter for both normal and inverted hierarchical cases. We show that in inverted hierarchical scenario with type I seesaw, observed baryon asymmetry can not be generated for both CL and UQ type Dirac neutrino mass matrices. We also study the predictions for baryon asymmetry when the neutrino masses arise from a combination of both type I and type II seesaw (with one of them dominant at a time) as well as different combinations of Majorana neutrino phases and show that the observed baryon asymmetry can be generated within these models upto certain exceptions.

Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oceanic Data Analysis Using a General Circulation Model. Part II: A North Atlantic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general circulation model and North Atlantic climatological data of temperature salinity, wind stress, evaporation minus precipitation, and air–sea heat fluxes are used to examine the possibility of solving inverse problems using a full-scale ...

Eli Tziperman; William Carlisle Thacker; Robert Bryan Long; Show-Ming Hwang; Stephen R. Rintoul

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities were provided by SSRL, supported by DOE, BES.The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Program is supported

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Model for heat-up of structures in VICTORIA  

SciTech Connect

VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code that treats fission product behavior in the reactor coolant system during a severe accident. During an accident, fission products that deposit on structural surfaces produce heat loads that can cause fission products to revaporize and possibly cause structures, such as a pipe, to fail. This mechanism had been lacking from the VICTORIA model. This report describes the structural heat-up model that has recently been implemented in the code. A sample problem shows that revaporization of fission products can occur as structures heat up due to radioactive decay. In the sample problem, the mass of deposited fission products reaches a maximum, then diminishes. Similarly, temperatures of the deposited film and adjoining structure reach a maximum, then diminish.

Bixler, N.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Effects of Assimilation on the Physics of an Ocean Model. Part II: Baroclinic Identical-Twin Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I has shown that a simple assimilation scheme can have a significant effect on the physics of the model. Part II concentrates on the effects of nudging assimilation in a full primitive equation model, the Free Surface Cox Code, illustrating ...

Rebecca A. Woodgate

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lagrangian Coherent Structure Analysis of Terminal Winds Detected by Lidar. Part II: Structure Evolution and Comparison with Flight Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using observational data from coherent Doppler light detection and ranging (lidar) systems situated at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA), the authors extract Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) intersecting the flight path of landing ...

Wenbo Tang; Pak Wai Chan; George Haller

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electromagnetic field radiation model for lightning strokes to tall structures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes observation and analysis of electromagnetic field radiation from lightning strokes to tall structures. Electromagnetic field waveforms and current waveforms of lightning strokes to the CN Tower have been simultaneously measured since 1991. A new calculation model of electromagnetic field radiation is proposed. The proposed model consists of the lightning current propagation and distribution model and the electromagnetic field radiation model. Electromagnetic fields calculated by the proposed model, based on the observed lightning current at the CN Tower, agree well with the observed fields at 2km north of the tower.

Motoyama, H. [CRIEPI, Tokyo (Japan); Janischewskyj, W.; Hussein, A.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chisholm, W.A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chang, J.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rusan, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modelling Solar Oscillation Power Spectra: II. Parametric Model of Spectral Lines Observed in Doppler Velocity Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudo modes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

Vorontsov, Sergei V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Wind parks equivalent models using system identification techniques based on nonlinear model structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper models of Wind Parks (WPs) appropriate for simulation purposes of large power systems with high wind power penetration are developed. The proposed models of the WPs are developed using system identification theory with NARX model structures. ... Keywords: modeling, system identification, wind integration, wind parks, wind turbines

F. D. Kanellos; G. J. Tsekouras; N. E. Mastorakis

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

David P. Colton

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

A geometric modelling framework for conceptual structural design from early digital architectural models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer support for conceptual structural design is still ineffective. This is due, in part, to the fact that current computer applications do not recognize that structural design and architectural design are highly interdependent processes, particularly ... Keywords: Architectural design, Conceptual structural design, Geometric modeling, Integrated design

Rodrigo Mora; Claude Bédard; Hugues Rivard

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Crystalline Structure of Ice Formed by Droplet Accretion. II: Annealed Samples and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structure of annealed samples of dry growth accreted ice grown on cylinders rotating in an icing tunnel has been determined using the techniques of McCappin and Macklin (Part I). The rate of change of the crystal structure is strongly ...

C. J. McCappin; W. C. Macklin

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field is a blind geothermalprospect (i.e., no surface hot springs) along the west flank of BlueMountain in southern Humboldt County, Nevada. Developmentwells in the system have high flow rates and temperatures above190°C at depths of ~600 to 1,070 m. Blue Mountain is a small~8-km-long east-tilted fault block situated between the EugeneMountains and Slumbering Hills. The geothermal field occupiesthe intersection between a regional NNE- to ENE-striking,west-dipping

134

Advances on statistical/thermodynamical models for unpolarized structure functions  

SciTech Connect

During the eights and nineties many statistical/thermodynamical models were proposed to describe the nucleons' structure functions and distribution of the quarks in the hadrons. Most of these models describe the compound quarks and gluons inside the nucleon as a Fermi / Bose gas respectively, confined in a MIT bag with continuous energy levels. Another models considers discrete spectrum. Some interesting features of the nucleons are obtained by these models, like the sea asymmetries {sup -}d/{sup -}u and {sup -}d-{sup -}u.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Campus do Mucuri, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl II Barra Funda, 01140070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

Wang, C.Y.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

External Influences on Hurricane Intensity. Part II: Vertical Structure and Response of the Hurricane Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of the interaction of Hurricane Elena (1985) with a baroclinic wave was evaluated using analyses from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. During the period of interaction, azimuthal eddies produced a ...

John Molinari; David Vollaro

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Vertical Structure of TOGA COARE Convection. Part II: Modulating Influences and Implications for Diabatic Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temporal variability of western Pacific warm pool convection, especially its vertical structure, is examined in this study. Distributions of convective echo top heights and 30-dBZ contour heights have been produced from shipboard radar data ...

Charlotte A. DeMott; Steven A. Rutledge

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part II: Meridional Structures and Poleward Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meridional structure and transports of energy in the atmosphere, ocean, and land are evaluated holistically for the mean and annual cycle zonal averages over the ocean, land, and global domains, with discussion and assessment of uncertainty. At ...

John T. Fasullo; Kevin E. Trenberth

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Life Cycle of an Extratropical Marine Cyclone. Part II: Mesoscale Structure and Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two articles describing the evolving structure and selected physical processes within an intense extratropical marine cyclone observed during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) field ...

Paul J. Neiman; M. A. Shapiro; L. S. Fedor

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Kinematic and Moisture Characteristics of a Nonprecipitating Cold Front Observed during IHOP. Part II: Alongfront Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinematic and thermodynamic structures of a nonprecipitating cold front observed in west-central Kansas on 10 June 2002 during the International H2O Project (IHOP) are examined with dropsondes and airborne instrumentation that includes Doppler ...

Katja Friedrich; David E. Kingsmill; Cyrille Flamant; Hanne V. Murphey; Roger M. Wakimoto

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The 29 June 2000 Supercell Observed during STEPS. Part II: Lightning and Charge Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second part of a two-part study examines the lightning and charge structure evolution of the 29 June 2000 tornadic supercell observed during the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS). Data from the National ...

Kyle C. Wiens; Steven A. Rutledge; Sarah A. Tessendorf

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part II: Proper Orthogonal Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proper orthogonal decomposition technique is applied to 74 snapshots of 3D wind and temperature fields to study turbulent coherent structures and their interplay in the urban boundary layer over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. These snapshots of ...

Ching-Long Lin; Quanxin Xia; Ronald Calhoun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia, Engenharia e Tecnologia - ICET, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri - UFVJM, Campus do Mucuri, Rua do Cruzeiro 01, Jardim Sao Paulo, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

A partitioner-centric model for SAMR partitioning trade-off optimization : Part II.  

SciTech Connect

Optimal partitioning of structured adaptive mesh applications necessitates dynamically determining and optimizing for the most time-inhibiting factor, such as data migration and communication volume. However, a trivial monitoring of an application evaluates the current partitioning rather than the inherent properties of the grid hierarchy. We present a model that given a structured adaptive grid, determines ab initio to what extent the partitioner should focus on reducing the amount of data migration to reduce execution time. This model contributes to the meta-partitioner, our ultimate aim of being able to select and configure the optimal partitioner based on the dynamic properties of the grid hierarchy and the computer. We validate the predictions of this model by comparing them with actual measurements (via traces) from four different adaptive simulations. The results show that the proposed model generally captures the inherent optimization-need in SAMR applications. We conclude that our model is a useful contribution, since tracking and adapting to the dynamic behavior of such applications lead to potentially large decreases in execution times.

Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES. II. KINEMATIC STRUCTURE FROM SINGLE-DISH AND INTERFEROMETRIC MOLECULAR LINE MAPPING  

SciTech Connect

We present a study of dense molecular gas kinematics in 17 nearby protostellar systems using single-dish and interferometric molecular line observations. The non-axisymmetric envelopes around a sample of Class 0/I protostars were mapped in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0) tracer with the IRAM 30 m, CARMA, and Plateau de Bure Interferometer, as well as NH{sub 3} (1,1) with the Very Large Array. The molecular line emission is used to construct line-center velocity and linewidth maps for all sources to examine the kinematic structure in the envelopes on spatial scales from 0.1 pc to {approx}1000 AU. The direction of the large-scale velocity gradients from single-dish mapping is within 45{sup 0} of normal to the outflow axis in more than half the sample. Furthermore, the velocity gradients are often quite substantial, the average being {approx}2.3 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}. The interferometric data often reveal small-scale velocity structure, departing from the more gradual large-scale velocity gradients. In some cases, this likely indicates accelerating infall and/or rotational spin-up in the inner envelope; the median velocity gradient from the interferometric data is {approx}10.7 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}. In two systems, we detect high-velocity HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0) emission inside the highest-velocity N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission. This enables us to study the infall and rotation close to the disk and estimate the central object masses. The velocity fields observed on large and small scales are more complex than would be expected from rotation alone, suggesting that complex envelope structure enables other dynamical processes (i.e., infall) to affect the velocity field.

Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Masque, Josep M. [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Maret, Sebastien [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Heitsch, Fabian, E-mail: jjtobin@umich.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Adsorption of Myoglobin to Cu(II)-IDA and Ni(II)-IDA Functionalized Langmuir Monolayers: Study of the Protein Layer Structure during the Adsorption Process by Neutron and X-Ray Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure and orientation of adsorbed myoglobin as directed by metal-histidine complexation at the liquid-film interface was studied as a function of time using neutron and X-ray reflectivity (NR and XR, respectively). In this system, adsorption is due to the interaction between iminodiacetate (IDA)-chelated divalent metal ions Ni(II) and Cu(II) and histidine moieties at the outer surface of the protein. Adsorption was examined under conditions of constant area per lipid molecule at an initial pressure of 40 mN/m. Adsorption occurred over a time period of about 15 h, allowing detailed characterization of the layer structure throughout the process. The layer thickness and the in-plane averaged segment volume fraction were obtained at roughly 40 min intervals by NR. The binding constant of histidine with Cu(II)-IDA is known to be about four times greater than that of histidine with Ni(II)-IDA. The difference in interaction energy led to significant differences in the structure of the adsorbed layer. For Cu(II)-IDA, the thickness of the adsorbed layer at low protein coverage was {le} 20 {angstrom} and the thickness increased almost linearly with increasing coverage to 42 {angstrom}. For Ni(II)-IDA, the thickness at low coverage was 38 {angstrom} and increased gradually with coverage to 47 {angstrom}. The in-plane averaged segment volume fraction of the adsorbed layer independently confirmed a thinner layer at low coverage for Cu(II)-IDA. These structural differences at the early stages are discussed in terms of either different preferred orientations for isolated chains in the two cases or more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption in the case of Cu(II)-IDA. Subphase dilution experiments provided additional insight, indicating that the adsorbed layer was not in equilibrium with the bulk solution even at low coverages for both IDA-chelated metal ions. We conclude that the weight of the evidence favors the interpretation based on more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption to Cu(II)-IDA.

Kent, M.S.; Yim, H.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Satija, Sushil; Seo, Young-Soo; Majewski, J. (SNL); (NIST); (LANL)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The structural model is based on the role of subsurface igneous dikes providing a buttressing effect in a regional strain field such that permeability is greatly enhanced. The basic thermal anomaly at McCoy was defined by substantial U.S. Department of Energy-funded temperature gradient drilling and geophysical studies conducted during the period 1978 to 1982. This database will be augmented with modern magnetotelluric, controlled-source audio-magnetotelluric, and 2D/3D reflection seismic surveys to define likely fluid up-flow plumes that will be drilled with slant-hole technology. Two sites for production-capable wells will be drilled in geothermally prospective areas identified in this manner. The uniqueness of this proposal lies in the use of a full suite of modern geophysical tools, use of slant-hole drilling, and the extensive technical database from previous DOE funding.

148

An incremental structured part model for image classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art image classification methods usually require many training samples to achieve good performance. To tackle this problem, we present a novel incremental method in this paper, which learns a part model to classify objects using only ... Keywords: image classification, incremental learning, semantic parts, structural relationship

Huigang Zhang; Xiao Bai; Jian Cheng; Jun Zhou; Huijie Zhao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Non-parametric modelling of a rectangular flexible plate structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigates the performance of dynamic modelling using non-parametric techniques for identification of a flexible structure system for development of active vibration control. In this paper, the implementation details are described and ... Keywords: ANFIS, Active vibration control, Flexible plate, Neural network, System identification

Intan Z. M. Darus; Ali A. M. Al-Khafaji

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

Xie, Si

151

A Multiscale Numerical Study of Hurricane Andrew (1992). Part II: Kinematics and Inner-Core Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite considerable research, understanding of the temporal evolution of the inner-core structures of hurricanes is very limited owing to the lack of continuous high-resolution observational data of a storm. In this study, the results of a 72-h ...

Yubao Liu; Da-Lin Zhang; M. K. Yau

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The crystal and molecular structure of bis[1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane] dichlororuthenium(II)  

SciTech Connect

The title compound, trans-[Ru(dpp){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}], crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1, with a = 9.529(1), b = 11.071(1), c = 11.936(1) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 71.967(9), {beta} = 72.879(6), {gamma} = 88.703(9){degrees}, V = 1141.1(2) {angstrom}{sup 3} and Z = 1. The structure was solved and refined to a final R = 0.039, for 3126 independently observed reflections with I > 3{sigma} (I). The ruthenium(II) ion is located on a crystallographic centre of symmetry and shows a distorted octahedral coordination with the chloride atoms in an exactly trans configuration. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Fontes, M.R.M.; Oliva, G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Cordeiro, L.A.C. [Universidade Federal do Para, Belem (Brazil); Batista, A.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Japan Sea Thermohaline Structure and Circulation. Part II: A Variational P-Vector Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of this work investigates the seasonal variabilities of the Japan/East Sea (JES) circulation using the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatological temperature and salinity dataset (public domain) on a ...

Peter C. Chu; Jian Lan; Chenwu Fan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Universality of one-dimensional Fermi systems, II. The Luttinger liquid structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We complete the proof started in "Universality of one-dimensional Fermi systems, I." of the universal Luttinger liquid relations for a general model of spinning fermions on a lattice, by making use of the Ward Identities due to asymptotically emerging symmetries. This is done by introducing an effective model verifying extra symmetries and by relating its critical exponents to those of the fermion lattice gas by suitable fine tuning of the parameters.

Giuseppe Benfatto; Pierluigi Falco; Vieri Mastropietro

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

A data modeling approach to the seamless information exchange among structured documents and databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: data models, heterogeneous information resource management, multidatabase system, structured documents

Atsuyuki Morishima; Hiroyuki Kitagawa

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II  

SciTech Connect

This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.  

SciTech Connect

During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

Hurt, R.; Colo, J [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Three parallel efforts were initiated on the modeling of carbon structural evolution. Structural ordering during carbonization was studied by a numerical simulation scheme proposed by Alan Kerstein involving molecular weight growth and rotational mobility. Work was also initiated to adapt a model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally developed under parallel NSF funding, to the prediction of coke texture. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. Boston University has initiated molecular dynamics simulations of carbonization processes and Ohio State has begun theoretical treatment of surface reactions. Experimental work has also begun on model compound studies at Brown and on pilot-scale combustion systems with widely varying flame types at OSE. The work on mobility / growth models shows great promise and is discussed in detail in the body of the report.

Hurt, R.; Calo, J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do you see what I see? Do you see what I see? Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects The team tried developing a computer model based on human neural structure and function, to do what we do, and possibly do it better. December 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

160

Structural Time Series Models and Trend Detection in Global and Regional Temperature Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified statistical approach to identify suitable structural time series models for annual mean temperature is proposed. This includes a generalized model that can represent all the commonly used structural time series models for trend ...

Xiaogu Zheng; Reid E. Basher

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed technical discussion organized into chapters whose organization is dictated by the nature of the research performed. Chapter 2 is entitled 'Experimental Work on Char Structure, Properties, and Reactivity', and focuses on fundamental structural studies at Brown using both phenollformaldehyde resin chars as model carbons and real coal chars. This work includes the first known in site high resolution TEM studies of carbonization processes, and some intriguing work on 'memory loss', a form of interaction between annealing and oxidation phenomena in chars. Chapter 3 entitled 'Computational Chemistry of Aromatic Oxidation Pathways' presents in detail the OSU work targeted at understanding the elementary molecular pathways of aromatic oxidation. Chapter 4 describes the 'Mesoscale Structural Models', using a combination of thermodynamic (equilibrium) approaches based on liquid crystal theory and kinetic simulations accounting for the effects of limited layer mobility in many fossil fuel derived carbons containing cross-linking agents. Chapter 5 entitled 'Combustion Modeling' presents work on extinction in the late stages of combustion and the development and features of the CBK8 model.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

2000-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected economic events on market demand and supply using econometric models. Structural changes can be modeled according to the types of changes. For an abrupt and instantaneous break, a dummy variable model can be used. For a smooth and gradual movement, proxy variables which represent the event can be applied, if we know the variables. If we don?t know the appropriate proxy variables, a smooth transition regression model can be employed. The BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) outbreak in the U.S. in 2003 is assumed to make abrupt and instantaneous changes in Korean meat consumption. To analyze the effect on Korean meat consumption, the Korean demands of beef, pork, chicken, and U.S. beef are estimated using an LA/AIDS (Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System) model with the dummy variable specifying the time before and after the BSE. From the results we can confirm that food safety concerns caused by the BSE case changed Korean meat consumption structure. Korean beef and U.S. beef became less elastic, and pork and chicken got more elastic to budget. Korean beef became less price elastic, but pork and U.S. beef got more price elastic. The changes of U.S. natural gas supply caused by technology development and depletion in reserves are analyzed using a smooth transition regression model. From the results, we can confirm that the productivity improvement by technology development is greater than the labor cost increase by depletion, but not greater than the capital cost increase by depletion in mid-2000s. The effects of posting the winning bid in a repeated Vickrey auction are examined using a proxy variable. By applying an unobserved effect Tobit model to the experimental auction done by Corrigan and Rousu (2006) for a candy bar, we can confirm that the changes of bidding behavior are significant, especially when the winning bid is high. By extracting the bid affiliation effects, we showed that true willingness to pay can be estimated.

Park, Beom Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The structural coupling between ATPase activation and recovery stroke in the myosin II motor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before the myosin motor head can perform the next power stroke, it undergoes a large conformational transition in which the converter domain, bearing the lever arm, rotates {approx} 65{sup o}. Simultaneous with this 'recovery stroke', myosin activates its ATPase function by closing the Switch-2 loop over the bound ATP. This coupling between the motions of the converter domain and of the 40 {angstrom}-distant Switch-2 loop is essential to avoid unproductive ATP hydrolysis. The coupling mechanism is determined here by finding a series of optimized intermediates between crystallographic end structures of the recovery stroke (Dictyostelium discoideum), yielding movies of the transition at atomic detail. The successive formation of two hydrogen bonds by the Switch-2 loop is correlated with the successive see-saw motions of the relay and SH1 helices that hold the converter domain. SH1 helix and Switch-2 loop communicate via a highly conserved loop that wedges against the SH1-helix upon Switch-2 closing.

Koppole, Sampath [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Fischer, S. [University of Heidelberg

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SIMULATIONS OF EARLY BARYONIC STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH STREAM VELOCITY. II. THE GAS FRACTION  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the gas content of high-redshift halos is crucial for studying the formation of the first generation of galaxies and reionization. Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that the relative 'stream' velocity between the dark matter and baryons at the time of recombination-formally a second-order effect, but an unusually large one-can influence the later structure formation history of the universe. We quantify the effect of the stream velocity on the so-called characteristic mass-the minimum mass of a dark matter halo capable of retaining most of its baryons throughout its formation epoch-using three different high-resolution sets of cosmological simulations (with separate transfer functions for baryons and dark matter) that vary in box size, particle number, and the value of the relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons. In order to understand this effect theoretically, we generalize the linear theory filtering mass to properly account for the difference between the dark matter and baryonic density fluctuation evolution induced by the stream velocity. We show that the new filtering mass provides an accurate estimate for the characteristic mass, while other theoretical ansatzes for the characteristic mass are substantially less precise.

Naoz, Smadar [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yoshida, Naoki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: snaoz@cfa.harvard.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sach...

Batista, R C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Operational CMC–MRB Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) Model. Part II: Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated forecasting and data assimilation system has been and is continuing to be developed by the Meteorological Research Branch (MRB) in partnership with the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) of Environment Canada. Part II of this two-...

Jean Côté; Jean-Guy Desmarais; Sylvie Gravel; André Méthot; Alain Patoine; Michel Roch; Andrew Staniforth

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new disk code, called ProDiMo, to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling balance with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include FeII and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant for the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape probability treatment. The models are characterized by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5AU to 500AU, the models are featured by a puffed-up inner rim and show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r<0.1, Tg~Td) is surrounded by a layer of hot (5000K) and thin (10^7 to 10^8 cm^-3) atomic ga...

Woitke, Peter; Thi, Wing-Fai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of title complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties and electrochemical behaviors have been reported.

Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Creating suites of models with system entity structure: global warming example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how to develop a suite of models in the MS4 Modeling Environment. The approach employs the operation of merging of System Entity Structures supported by the environment. After construction, the suite of models can be hosted on Model Store, ... Keywords: component-based modeling, suite of models, system entity structure, systems of systems

Bernard P. Zeigler, Chungman Seo, Robert Coop, Doohwan Kim

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparison of Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arabinoxylan Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses Ameya R. Kulkarni, 1 Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Michael G. Hahn, 1,2 William S. York, 1,3 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 1 1 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and US Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, 2 Department of Plant Biology, and 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Abstract Heteroxylans were solubilized from the alcohol-insoluble residue of switchgrass, rice, Brachypodium, Miscanthus, foxtail millet, and poplar with 1 M KOH. A combination of enzymatic, chemical, nu- clear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopic, and immu- nological techniques indicated that grass arabinoxylans have comparable structures and contain no discernible amount of the reducing end sequence present in dicot glucuronoxylan. Our data suggest that rice, Brachypodium, and foxtail

172

Goa, India Soil-structure Interface Modelling: Influence of Impregnation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Information on the influence of impregnation of cementitious slurry at the soil-structure interface of bored cast in-situ foundation is inadequate in available literatures. Moreover, influence of such impregnation on negating the detrimental effects of smear zone, formed by construction tools, surrounding the borehole is also unknown. In classical foundation engineering, influences of smear and impregnation are neither considered as dependent functions in determining contributory or negative shaft resistances, nor in shaft and base resistance interaction. This ignorance contributes empiricism in bearing capacity evaluation recognising it as one of the possible causes of variation of field performance with respect to prediction. Solution to these problems has been explored through field and simulated laboratory studies of smear and impregnation, developing new device and technique. Further, an approach to interface modelling of soil-structure is presented considering impregnation. 1

D. Sarma; M. D Sarma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

STRUCTURE BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

This report is part on the ongoing effort at Brown University and Ohio State University to develop structure based models of coal combustion. A very fundamental approach is taken to the description of coal chars and their reaction processes, and the results are therefore expected to have broad applicability to the spectrum of carbon materials of interest in energy technologies. This quarter, the project was in a period no-cost extension and discussions were held about the end phase of the project and possible continuations. The technical tasks were essentially dormant this period, but presentations of results were made, and plans were formulated for renewed activity in the fiscal year 2001.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Phase structure in a chiral model of nuclear matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase structure of symmetric nuclear matter in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (ENJL) model is studied by means of the effective potential in the one-loop approximation. It is found that chiral symmetry gets restored at high nuclear density and a typical first-order phase transition of the liquid-gas transition occurs at zero temperature, T=0, which weakens as T grows and eventually ends up with a second-order critical point at T=20 MeV. This phase transition scenario is confirmed by investigating the evolution of the effective potential versus the effective nucleon mass and the equation of state.

Phat, Tran Huu [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, 59 Ly Thuong Kiet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Dong Do University, 8 Nguyen Cong Hoan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Anh, Nguyen Tuan [Electric Power University, 235 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tam, Dinh Thanh [University of Taybac, Sonla (Viet Nam); Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, 59 Ly Thuong Kiet, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A strategic model using structural equation modeling and fuzzy logic in supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supplier selection attained the state of paramount importance for companies in the current scenario because of increasing global competition. Improper selection of suppliers will have an adverse impact on the overall performance of the company. The number ... Keywords: Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Sensitivity analysis, Structural equation modeling (SEM)

M. Punniyamoorthy; P. Mathiyalagan; P. Parthiban

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A transfer model using a typed feature structure rewriting system with inheritance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a model for transfer in machine translation which uses a rewriting system for typed feature structures. The grammar definitions describe transfer relations which are applied on the input structure (a typed feature structure) by the ...

Rémi Zajac

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Structural Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Materials Corrosion in Molten Fluoride Salts: Kumar Sridharan1; Robert Sellers1; Guiqiu Zheng1; Guoping Cao1; Mark Anderson1; Todd ...

182

F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effective HEV power train: case study of the 2nd generation Toyota Prius. It presents the simulation work of the overall operation of the Toyota Hybrid System (THS-II) of the Prius, and explores not only its power with road test measurements realized on a MY06 Prius in Ile-de-France, in terms of the power train

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

183

Reduced Order Structural Modeling of Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional three dimensional structural analysis methods prove to be expensive for the preliminary design of wind turbine blades. However, wind turbine blades are large slender members with complex cross sections. They can be accurately modeled using beam models. The accuracy in the predictions of the structural behavior using beam models depends on the accuracy in the prediction of their effective section properties. Several techniques were proposed in the literature for predicting the effective section properties. Most of these existing techniques have limitations because of the assumptions made in their approaches. Two generalized beam theories, Generalized Timoshenko and Generalized Euler-Bernoulli, for the static analysis based on the principles of the simple 1D-theories are developed here. Homogenization based on the strain energy equivalence principle is employed to predict the effective properties for these generalized beam theories. Two efficient methods, Quasi-3D and Unit Cell, are developed which can accurately predict the 3D deformations in beams under the six fundamental deformation modes: extension, two shears, torsion and two flexures. These methods help in predicting the effective properties using the homogenization technique. Also they can recover the detailed 3D deformations from the predictions of 1D beam analysis. The developed tools can analyze two types of slender members 1) slender members with invariant geometric features along the length and 2) slender members with periodically varying geometric features along the length. Several configurations were analyzed for the effective section properties and the predictions were validated using the expensive 3D analysis, strength of materials and Variational Asymptotic Beam Section Analysis (VABS). The predictions from the new tools showed excellent agreement with full 3D analysis. The predictions from the strength of materials showed disagreement in shear and torsional properties. Explanations for the same are provided recalling the assumptions made in the strength of materials approach.

Jonnalagadda, Yellavenkatasunil

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EASY-II: a system for modelling of n, d, p, ? and ? activation and transmutation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EASY-II is designed as a functional replacement for the previous European Activation System, EASY-2010. It has extended nuclear data and new software, FISPACT-II, written in object-style Fortran to provide new capabilities for predictions of activation, transmutation, depletion and burnup. The new FISPACT-II code has allowed us to implement many more features in terms of energy range, up to GeV; incident particles: alpha, gamma, proton, deuteron and neutron; and neutron physics: self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, pathways analysis, sensitivity and error estimation using covariance data. These capabilities cover most application needs: nuclear fission and fusion, accelerator physics, isotope production, waste management and many more. In parallel, the maturity of modern general-purpose libraries such as TENDL-2012 encompassing thousands of target nuclides, the evolution of the ENDF format and the capabilities of the latest generation of processing codes PREPRO-2012, NJOY2012 and CALENDF-2010 have allowed the FISPACT-II code to be fed with more robust, complete and appropriate data: cross-sections with covariance, probability tables in the resonance ranges, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and 24 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are placed in evaluated data files up to an incident energy of 200 MeV. The resulting code and data system, EASY-II, includes many new features and enhancements. It has been extensively tested, and also benefits from the feedback from wide-ranging validation and verification activities performed with its predecessor.

Jean-Christophe Sublet; James Eastwood; Guy Morgan; Arjan Koning; Dimitri Rochman

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analytical modeling and parameter extraction of top and bottom contact structures of organic thin film transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a structure based model of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) and analyzes its device physics. The analytical model is developed for the top contact structure by mapping the overlap region to the resistance (in the vertical direction) ... Keywords: Analytical modeling, Contact resistance, Organic thin film transistor, Overlap region, Parameter extraction, Top and bottom contact structure, Vertical resistance

Brijesh Kumar, B. K. Kaushik, Y. S. Negi, S. Saxena, G. D. Varma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past quarter of this project, significant progress continued was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made at OSU on advancing the application of computational chemistry to oxidative attack on model polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and graphitic structures. This work is directed at the application of quantitative ab initio molecular orbital theory to address the decomposition products and mechanisms of coal char reactivity. Previously, it was shown that the ?hybrid? B3LYP method can be used to provide quantitative information concerning the stability of the corresponding radicals that arise by hydrogen atom abstraction from monocyclic aromatic rings. In the most recent quarter, these approaches have been extended to larger carbocyclic ring systems, such as coronene, in order to compare the properties of a large carbonaceous PAH to that of the smaller, monocyclic aromatic systems. It was concluded that, at least for bond dissociation energy considerations, the properties of the large PAHs can be modeled reasonably well by smaller systems. In addition to the preceding work, investigations were initiated on the interaction of selected radicals in the ?radical pool? with the different types of aromatic structures. In particular, the different pathways for addition vs. abstraction to benzene and furan by H and OH radicals were examined. Thus far, the addition channel appears to be significantly favored over abstraction on both kinetic and thermochemical grounds. Experimental work at Brown University in support of the development of predictive structural models of coal char combustion was focused on elucidating the role of coal mineral matter impurities on reactivity. An ?inverse? approach was used where a carbon material was doped with coal mineral matter. The carbon material was derived from a high carbon content fly ash (Fly Ash 23 from the Salem Basin Power Plant. The ash was obtained from Pittsburgh #8 coal (PSOC 1451). Doped samples were then burned in a high temperature flame reactor fitted with rapid quench extractive sampling. It was found that the specific reaction rate decreased with increasing ash content by about an order of magnitude over the ash content range investigated. In this case, it was concluded that at least one of the primary reasons for the resultant observation was that an increasing amount of carbon becomes inaccessible to oxygen by being covered with a fused, ?protective,? ash layer. Progress continued on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at OSU.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

This report is part on the ongoing effort at Brown University and Ohio State University to develop structure based models of coal combustion. A very fundamental approach is taken to the description of coal chars and their reaction processes, and the results are therefore expected to have broad applicability to the spectrum of carbon materials of interest in energy technologies. This quarter, our work on structure development in carbons continued. A combination of hot stage in situ and ex situ polarized light microscopy was used to identify the preferred orientational of graphene layers at gas interfaces in pitches used as carbon material precursors. The experiments show that edge-on orientation is the equilibrium state of the gas/pitch interface, implying that basal-rich surfaces have higher free energies than edge-rich surfaces in pitch. This result is in agreement with previous molecular modeling studies and TEM observations in the early stages of carbonization. The results may have important implications for the design of tailored carbons with edge-rich or basal-rich surfaces. In the computational chemistry task, we have continued our investigations into the reactivity of large aromatic rings. The role of H-atom abstraction as well as radical addition to monocyclic aromatic rings has been examined, and a manuscript is currently being revised after peer review. We have also shown that OH radical is more effective than H atom in the radical addition process with monocyclic rings. We have extended this analysis to H-atom and OH-radical addition to phenanthrene. Work on combustion kinetics focused on the theoretical analysis of the data previously gathered using thermogravametric analysis.

Robert H. Hurt; Eric M. Suuberg

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Mathematical Model of Sea Breezes Along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Coast: Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear, time-dependent, two-dimensional sea breeze model allowing imposition of prevailing large-scale wind conditions has been developed. The model is an extension of Estoque's model with modifications in the treatment of the continuity ...

Thomas L. Kozo

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Some remarks on Bianchi type-II, VIII and IX models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the scope of anisotropic non-diagonal Bianchi type-II, VIII and IX spacetime it is shown that the off-diagonal components of the corresponding metric impose severe restrictions on the components of the energy momentum tensor in general. If the energy momentum tensor is considered to be diagonal one, the spacetime, expect a partial case of BII, becomes locally rotationally symmetric.

Bijan Saha

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sputtered II-VI Alloys and Structures forTandem PV: Final Subcontract Report, 9 December 2003 - 30 July 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report elaborates on Phase 3 and provides summaries of the first two Phases. Phase 3 research work was divided into five task areas covering different aspects of the II-VI tandem cell.

Compaan, A. D.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Giolando, D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), 2003 Vol. II, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Defines the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model's basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

Information Center

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley is the hottest (> 285C at 3 km) and one of the largest geothermal systems (63 MW power plant operated for over 20 years) in the Basin and Range province. The heat source...

195

Cumulonimbus Vertical Velocity Events in GATE. Part II: Synthesis and Model Core Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of convective drafts and cores are presented in Part I. By our definition a convective updraft must have a positive vertical velocity for 0.5 km, and exceed 0.5 m s?1 for 1 s; a convective updraft core must exceed 1 m s?1 for 0.5 ...

E. J. Zipser; M. A. LeMone

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Pierre Auger Observatory II: Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Hadronic Interaction models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers.

The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; U. Cotti; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. -H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodríguez-Frías; G. Ros; J. Rosado

2011-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Bianchi Type-II String Cosmological Models in Normal Gauge for Lyra's Manifold with Constant Deceleration Parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study deals with a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi-II cosmological models representing massive strings in normal gauge for Lyra's manifold by applying the variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. The variation law for Hubble's parameter generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. Using these two forms, Einstein's modified field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The energy-momentum tensor for such string as formulated by Letelier (1983) is used to construct massive string cosmological models for which we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the component $\\sigma^{1}_{~1}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_{i}$. This condition leads to $A = (BC)^{m}$, where A, B and C are the metric coefficients and m is proportionality constant. Our models are in accelerating phase which is consistent to the recent observations. It has been found that the displacement vector $\\beta$ behaves like cosmological term $\\Lambda$ in the normal gauge treatment and the solutions are consistent with recent observations of SNe Ia. It has been found that massive strings dominate in the decelerating universe whereas strings dominate in the accelerating universe. Some physical and geometric behaviour of these models are also discussed.

Shilpi Agarwal; R. K. Pandey; Anirudh Pradhan

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Prognostic Modeling Studies of the Keweenaw Current in Lake Superior. Part II: Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Keweenaw Current, observed along the coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula in Lake Superior during July 1973, was simulated using a 3D, nonorthogonal coordinate transformation, primitive equation coastal ocean model. The model domain covered the ...

Jianrong Zhu; Changsheng Chen; Elise Ralph; Sarah A. Green; Judith Wells Budd; Frank Y. Zhang

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pseudo-orbit Data Assimilation Part II: Assimilation with Imperfect Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data assimilation and state estimation for nonlinear models is a challenging task mathematically. Performing this task in real time, as in operational weather forecasting, is even more challenging as the models are imperfect: the mathematical ...

Hailiang Du; Leonard A. Smith

200

AERMOD: A Dispersion Model for Industrial Source Applications. Part II: Model Performance against 17 Field Study Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model (AERMOD) Improvement Committee’s applied air dispersion model against 17 field study databases is described. AERMOD is a ...

Steven G. Perry; Alan J. Cimorelli; Robert J. Paine; Roger W. Brode; Jeffrey C. Weil; Akula Venkatram; Robert B. Wilson; Russell F. Lee; Warren D. Peters

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of Operational Model Cyclone Structure Forecasts during Extratropical Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclone structure is known to be directly linked to the sensible weather effects produced by the weather system. The extratropical transition (ET) process leads to immense changes in cyclone structure and therefore to changes in the associated ...

Jenni L. Evans; Justin M. Arnott; Francesca Chiaromonte

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Primitive Equation Model. Part II: Nonaxisymmetric Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of baroclinic eddies on the structure of the Hadley cell. Self-consistent calculations of both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric circulations allow an unambiguous estimate of baroclinic eddy effects on the ...

Hyun-kyung Kim; Sukyoung Lee

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ensemble Forecasting of Tropical Cyclone Motion Using a Barotropic Model. Part II: Perturbations of the Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, the technique of ensemble forecasting is applied to the problem of tropical cyclone motion prediction by perturbing the environmental flow. In this part, the focus is shifted to perturbation of the vortex structure. The ...

Kevin K. W. Cheung; Johnny C. L. Chan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Recovery of 3D Solar Magnetic Field Model Parameter Using Image Structure Matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach to recover a 3D solar magnetic field model parameter using intensity images of the Sun's corona is introduced. The approach is a quantitative approach in which the 3D model parameter is determined via an image structure matching scheme. The ... Keywords: 3D Parameter Recovery, Image-based Modeling, Structure Matching

Jong Kwan Lee; G. Allen Gary

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling proteins, making scientists : an ethnography of pedagogy and visual cultures in contemporary structural biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This ethnography tracks visualization and pedagogy in the burgeoning field of structural biology. Structural biologists are a multidisciplinary group of researchers who produce models and animations of protein molecules ...

Myers, Natasha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report  

SciTech Connect

To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

Not Available

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Causes and explanations in the structural-model approach: Tractable cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper continues the research on the computational aspects of Halpern and Pearl's causes and explanations in the structural-model approach. To this end, we first explore how an instance of deciding weak cause can be reduced to an equivalent instance ... Keywords: ?-partial explanation, Actual cause, Blame, Computational complexity, Explanation, Explanatory power, Partial explanation, Probabilistic structural causal model, Responsibility, Structural causal model, Tractability, Weak cause

Thomas Eiter; Thomas Lukasiewicz

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Stellar Models with Microscopic Diffusion and Rotational Mixing II: Application to Open Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar models with masses ranging from 0.5 to $1.3~M_\\odot$ were constructed in order to compare to young cluster observations of Li and of rotation velocities. The amount of Li depletion in cool stars is sensitive to the amount of overshoot at the base of the surface convection zone, and the exact metallicity of the models. Even when this uncertainty is taken into account, the Li observations are a severe constraint for the models and rule out standard models, and pure diffusion models. Stellar models which include diffusion and rotational mixing in the radiative regions of stars are able to simultaneously match the Li abundances observed in the Pleiades, UMaG, Hyades, Praesepe, NGC 752 and M67. They also match the observed rotation periods in the Hyades. However, these models are unable to simultaneously explain the presence of the rapidly rotating late G and K stars in the Pleiades and the absence of rapidly rotating late F and early G stars.

Brian Chaboyer; P. Demarque; M. H. Pinsonneault

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Data Assimilation with Gaussian Mixture Models Using the Dynamically Orthogonal Field Equations. Part II: Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties and capabilities of the Gaussian Mixture Model–Dynamically Orthogonal filter (GMM-DO) are assessed and exemplified by applications to two dynamical systems: 1) the double well diffusion and 2) sudden expansion flows; both of which ...

Thomas Sondergaard; Pierre F. J. Lermusiaux

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of Radar Multiple-Scattering Effects from a GPM Perspective. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple-scattering effects as sensed by radars in configurations useful in the context of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) are evaluated for a range of meteorological profiles extracted from four different cloud-resolving model ...

A. Battaglia; M. O. Ajewole; C. Simmer

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Variational Data Assimilation in the Tropics Using Precipitation Data. Part II: 3D Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global primitive equation model is used to examine the performance of four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-VAR) with moist processes and to assess the impact of assimilating precipitation data in the Tropics. Several types of ...

Tadashi Tsuyuki

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Numerical Investigations with a Hybrid Isentropic?Sigma Model. Part II: The Inclusion of Moist Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goals of this paper are 1) to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating a prognostic equation for water vapor and diabatic processes in the University of Wisconsin ??? model discussed in Part I, 2) to document methods applied to ...

Tom H. Zapotocny; Fred M. Reames; R. Bradley Pierce; Donald R. Johnson; Bart J. Wolf

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Sensitivity of Precipitation to Circulation Details. Part II: Mesoscale Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A base case and the best time-coherent, regional analog to that case, identified in Part I, were analyzed to determine the precise mechanisms responsible for the differences in precipitation amounts. This analysis was conducted using two modeling ...

Paul J. Roebber; Gerhard W. Reuter

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

LMODEL: A Satellite Precipitation Methodology Using Cloud Development Modeling. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new satellite-based rainfall monitoring algorithm that integrates the strengths of both low Earth-orbiting (LEO) and geostationary Earth-orbiting (GEO) satellite information has been developed. The Lagrangian Model (LMODEL) algorithm combines a ...

Kuo-lin Hsu; Tim Bellerby; S. Sorooshian

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Aerosol–Cloud Interactions in a Mesoscale Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Aqueous-Phase Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feedbacks between aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud chemistry are investigated in a mesoscale model. A simple bulk aqueous-phase sulfur chemistry scheme was fully coupled to the existing aerosol and microphysics schemes. The ...

Irena T. Ivanova; Henry G. Leighton

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part II: Comparison of Measurements with Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) models of disturbed micrometeorological winds, steady-state computations using a second-order closure are compared with observations (see Part I) in which the surface layer wind was disturbed by ...

John D. Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Interaction of Katabatic Flow and Mountain Waves. Part II: Case Study Analysis and Conceptual Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via numerical analysis of detailed simulations of an early September 1993 case night, the authors develop a conceptual model of the interaction of katabatic flow in the nocturnal boundary layer with mountain waves (MKI). A companion paper (Part I)...

Gregory S. Poulos; James E. Bossert; Thomas B. McKee; Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Diurnal Patterns of Rainfall in Northwestern South America. Part II: Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second paper of a three-part series documents the ability of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to successfully replicate some known aspects of the rainfall of northwestern South America. The ...

Thomas T. Warner; Brian E. Mapes; Mei Xu

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CTDMPLUS: A Dispersion Model for Sources near Complex Topography. Part II: Performance Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDMPLUS), described in Part I of this paper, was evaluated using the SO2 field-study data from the Lovett generating station in southeastern New York state. For perspective, CTDMPLUS estimates were also ...

James O. Paumier; Donna J. Burns; Steven G. Perry

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Subtidal Response of Scotian Shelf Circulation to Local and Remote Forcing. Part II: Barotropic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, barotropic numerical model that features realistic bathymetry of the Scotian Shelf provides solutions forced by steady and periodic wind stress that are generally incoherent on spatial scales of the shelf width. Closed circulation cells ...

Franklin B. Schwing

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modeling Coastally Trapped Wind Surges over Southeastern Australia. Part II: Intensity and Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical weather prediction (NWP) model at the School of Mathematics, University of New South Wales, has been used to simulate the southerly buster, a southerly wind surge along the coast of New South Wales (NSW), which occurs during the ...

Helen J. Reid

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Probabilistic Bulk Model of Coupled Mixed Layer and Convection. Part II: Shallow Convection Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probabilistic bulk convection model (PBCM) developed in a companion paper is here extended to shallow nonprecipitating convection. The PBCM unifies the clear-sky and shallow convection boundary layer regimes by obtaining mixed-layer growth, ...

Pierre Gentine; Alan K. Betts; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Fabio D’Andrea

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Shear, Strain, and Richardson Number Variations in the Thermocline. Part II: Modeling Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gregg has provided observational evidence that averaged estimates of dissipation, ?, vary approximately as the square of the internal wave field energy level ? E2. He notes that the finding is consistent with a specific model for energy ...

Robert Pinkel; Steven Anderson

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

GFDL's CM2 Global Coupled Climate Models. Part II: The Baseline Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current generation of coupled climate models run at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) as part of the Climate Change Science Program contains ocean components that differ in almost every respect from those contained in previous ...

Anand Gnanadesikan; Keith W. Dixon; Stephen M. Griffies; V. Balaji; Marcelo Barreiro; J. Anthony Beesley; William F. Cooke; Thomas L. Delworth; Rudiger Gerdes; Matthew J. Harrison; Isaac M. Held; William J. Hurlin; Hyun-Chul Lee; Zhi Liang; Giang Nong; Ronald C. Pacanowski; Anthony Rosati; Joellen Russell; Bonita L. Samuels; Qian Song; Michael J. Spelman; Ronald J. Stouffer; Colm O. Sweeney; Gabriel Vecchi; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Fanrong Zeng; Rong Zhang; John P. Dunne

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Syntheses, crystal structures and fluorescent properties of Cd(II), Hg(II) and Ag(I) coordination polymers constructed from 1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acetic acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three new d{sup 10} coordination polymers, namely [Cd(taa)Cl]{sub n}1, [Hg(taa)Cl]{sub n}2, and [Ag{sub 1.5}(taa)(NO{sub 3}){sub 0.5}]{sub n}3 (taa=1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acatate anion) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 consists of two-dimensional layers constructed by carboxyl-linked helical chains, which are further linked through carboxyl group to generate a unique 3D open framework. Topological analysis reveals that the structure of 1 can be classified as an unprecedented (3,8)-connected network with the Schlaefli symbol (4.5{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.5{sup 8}.6{sup 14}.7{sup 3}.8). Compound 2 manifests a doubly interpenetrated decorated alpha-polonium cubic network with the Schlaefli symbol of (4{sup 10}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 3}). Compound 3 consists of 2D puckered layers made up of Ag centers and taa{sup -} bridges. In addition, all of these compounds are photoluminescent in the solid state with spectra that closely resemble those of the ligand precursor. - Graphical abstract: Three new compounds based on 1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-acetic acid and Cd(II), Hg(II) and Ag(I) salts display luminescent properties and may be potential candidates for luminescent materials.

Ding Degang [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Department of Quality Examination and Management, Zhengzhou College of Animal Husbandry Engineering, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Xie Lixia [College of Sciences, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450002 (China); Fan Yaoting, E-mail: yt.fan@zzu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Hou Hongwei; Xu Yan [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Entropy in Climate Models. Part I: Vertical Structure of Atmospheric Entropy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical atmospheric entropy structure has been investigated using one-dimensional radiative–convective models. A method for evaluating radiation entropy is proposed. In the models, the entropy radiation is dealt with in a way parallel to the ...

J. Li; Petr Chýlek; G. B. Lesins

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Stochastic-Dynamic Model for the Spatial Structure of Forecast Error Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model that yields the spatial correlation structure of global atmospheric mass-field forecast errors is derived. The model states that the relative potential vorticity of the forecast error is forced by spatially multi-dimensional white ...

R. Balgovind; A. Dalcher; M. Ghil; E. Kalnay

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Model studies of the structures, reactivities, and reaction mechanisms of metalloenzymes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic structure theory, which in recent years has been actively and effectively applied to the modeling of chemical reactions involving transition-metal complexes, is now also being applied to the modeling of biological processes involving metalloenzymes. ...

K. Morokuma; D. G. Musaev; T. Vreven; H. Basch; M. Torrent; D. V. Khoroshun

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Maintenance of the stratospheric structure in an idealized general circulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the maintenance of the stratospheric structure in a primitive equation model that is forced by a Newtonian cooling with a prescribed radiative equilibrium temperature field. Models such as this are well suited to analyze and address ...

M. Jucker; S. Fueglistaler; G. K. Vallis

231

Thermohaline Structure in the Subarctic North Pacific Simulated in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model configured with 1° horizontal resolution and 23 layers is used to examine processes that maintain the mesothermal structure, a subsurface temperature inversion, in the subarctic North Pacific. The model ...

Takahiro Endoh; Humio Mitsudera; Shang-Ping Xie; Bo Qiu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of inverter models and harmonic propagation. Part II. Harmonic propagation  

SciTech Connect

Part II of a three part study describes the harmonic propagation in the photovoltaic power system consisting of the solar cell array, the inverter, and the ac side of the inverter up to the infinite bus of the utility. Propagation of the harmonics in the utility system are not addressed. Two main problems are analyzed: power in the converter system and harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms of the single-phase, dependent inverter. Relationships between the different components of the converter power - active, reactive and disturbance - are discussed. All formulas necessary for calculating the power components are given, assuming the harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms are known. The theoretical and experimental investigation of the single-phase, dependent inverter is described. The ac and dc terminal voltage of the inverter are analyzed and their harmonics are obtained. These data determine the harmonic propagation on both the dc and ac sides and may be useful for equipment design. Part I of the study (SAND 7040/1) contains a detailed description of the microcomputer based simulator that represents the output characteristics of the five commercially available types of solar cell arrays under different environmental conditions, and Part III (SAND 7040/3) presents an analysis of the transient and steady-state processes of inverter modules.

Slonim, M.A.; Stanek, E.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluating Low-Cloud Simulation from an Upgraded Multiscale Modeling Framework Model. Part II: Seasonal Variations over the Eastern Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern Pacific is a climatologically important region. Conventional coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models produce positive sea surface temperature biases of 2–5 K in this region because of insufficient stratocumulus clouds. In ...

Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}5.5H{sub 2}O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (4) and [Cd{sub 2}(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2 Prime -bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1 Prime -yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2 Prime -bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {l_brace}Cd{sub 2}Na{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {l_brace}Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Five new d{sup 10} metal(II) coordination polymers based on H{sub 3}BOABA ligand were obtained and characterized. They display different topological structures and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five d{sup 10} metal(II) polymers based on 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymers were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymers 1-5 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They show strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state.

Jiang Xianrong; Yuan Hongyan [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

The photometric evolution of dissolving star clusters: II. Realistic models. Colours and M/L ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary synthesis models are the prime method to construct models of stellar populations, and to derive physical parameters from observations. One of the assumptions for such models so far has been the time-independence of the stellar mass function. However, dynamical simulations of star clusters in tidal fields have shown the mass function to change due to the preferential removal of low-mass stars from clusters. Here we combine the results from dynamical simulations of star clusters in tidal fields with our evolutionary synthesis code GALEV to extend the models by a new dimension: the total cluster disruption time. We reanalyse the mass function evolution found in N-body simulations of star clusters in tidal fields, parametrise it as a function of age and total cluster disruption time and use this parametrisation to compute GALEV models as a function of age, metallicity and the total cluster disruption time. We study the impact of cluster dissolution on the colour (generally, they become redder) and ma...

Anders, P; Baumgardt, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling of the thermal degradation of structural wood ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 37. Koufopanos C, Papayannakos N. Modeling the pyrolysis of biomass particles: studies on kinetics, thermal and heat transfer effects. ...

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Modeling of Magnetic and Structural Phase Transformations in Co ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications -III. Presentation Title, Modeling ... Advances in Rare-earth Free Permanent Magnets · Anisotropic Curie

239

Modeling and Simulation of Process-Structure-Property of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Different Generations of Gamma Prime Precipitates in a Commercial Nickel ...

240

Automatic Building of Structured Geological Models Sylvain Brandel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological models used for oil and gas exploration. We present a prototype of a "geological pilot" which Modeling for oil and gas exploration Hydrocarbon reservoir models are a major tool currently used involved in oil and gas exploration have acquired a huge amount of seismic data, which are neither

Brandel, Sylvain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modelling of nonlinear behaviour of masonry structures: phenomenological approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with modeling of mechanical behavior of masonry walls submitted to in-plane loading. The adopted strategy consists of modelling separately the appropriate local failure mechanisms of brick units and mortar joints. A particular attention ... Keywords: displacement discontinuities, masonry, multisurface plasticity, numerical modeling

J. B. Colliat; L. Davenne; A. Ibrahimbegovi?

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Star Clusters with Primordial Binaries: II. Dynamical Evolution of Models in a Tidal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[abridged] We extend our analysis of the dynamical evolution of simple star cluster models, in order to provide comparison standards that will aid in interpreting the results of more complex realistic simulations. We augment our previous primordial-binary simulations by introducing a tidal field, and starting with King models of different central concentrations. We present the results of N-body calculations of the evolution of equal-mass models, starting with primordial binary fractions of 0 - 100 %, and N values from 512 to 16384. We also attempt to extrapolate some of our results to the larger number of particles that are necessary to model globular clusters. We characterize the steady-state `deuterium main sequence' phase in which primordial binaries are depleted in the core in the process of `gravitationally burning'. In this phase we find that the ratio of the core to half-mass radius, r_c/r_h, is similar to that measured for isolated systems. In addition to the generation of energy due to hardening and depletion of the primordial binary population, the overall evolution of the star clusters is driven by a competing process: the tidal disruption of the system. We find that the depletion of primordial binaries before tidal dissolution of the system is possible only if the initial number is below 0.05 N, in the case of a King model with W_0=7 and N=4096 (which is one of our longest living models). We compare our findings, obtained by means of direct N-body simulations but scaled, where possible, to larger N, with similar studies carried out by means of Monte Carlo methods.

M. Trenti; D. C. Heggie; P. Hut

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Diurnal Winds in the Himalayan Kali Gandaki Valley. Part II: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Penn State–NCAR mesoscale model MM5 is used to simulate and better understand the wind observations in the Kali Gandaki Valley reported in the first part of this paper. The Kali Gandaki River originates in Nepal near Tibet, flows southward ...

Günther Zängl; Joseph Egger; Volkmar Wirth

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TeV-scale Type-II Seesaw Models and Possible Collider Signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural extension of the standard model to accommodate massive neutrinos is to introduce one Higgs triplet and three right-handed Majorana neutrinos, leading to a 6 \\times6 neutrino mass matrix. We show that three light Majorana neutrinos (i.e., the mass eigenstates of \

Wei Chao; Shu Luo; Zhi-zhong Xing; Shun Zhou

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Local Mass Conservation and Velocity Splitting in PV-Based Balanced Models. Part II: Numerical Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of enforcing local mass conservation on the accuracy of non-Hamiltonian potential-vorticity- based balanced models (PBMs) are examined numerically for a set of chaotic shallow-water f-plane vortical flows in a doubly periodic square ...

Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; Michael E. McIntyre

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. II. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MODEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model 'Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops' (EBTEL) proposed by Klimchuk et al., which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating, especially impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modeling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region (TR) and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of the TR to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. The new features in EBTEL are important for accurate tracking of, in particular, the density. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad) with generally good agreement. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (1) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function, (2) extensive parameter surveys, and (3) situations where the modeling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Diagnostic Modeling of the Indian Monsoon Onset. Part II: Budget and Sensitivity Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional diagnostic coupled air–sea model (described in the companion paper) is applied to the analysis of the heat and moisture budgets over the Arabian Sea during the 1979 monsoon onset period. The surface energy budget, which is ...

Sam F. Iacobellis II; Richard C. J. Somerville

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Exploring social structure effect on language evolution based on a computational model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compositionality-regularity coevolution model is adopted to explore the effect of social structure on language emergence and maintenance. Based on this model, we explore language evolution in three experiments, and discuss the role of a popular agent ... Keywords: computational simulation, language evolution, power-law distribution, social structure

Tao Gong; James W. Minett; William S. -Y. Wang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A new coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture in pressurized pipelines has been developed. The pipe material and fracture propagation have been modeled using the finite-element method with a ductile fracture criterion. The ... Keywords: CFD, FEM, Fluid-structure, Fracture, Leak, Pipeline

H. O. Nordhagen; S. Kragset; T. Berstad; A. Morin; C. Dørum; S. T. Munkejord

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Diffusion Follows Structure ¾ A Network Model of the Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By conducting simulations, we show that the structure of the personal networks significantly influences the diffusion processes in network effect markets like the software market. Varying connectivity (number of links to other participants), the heterogeneity ...

Falk v. Westarp; Oliver Wendt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modelling structured domains using description graphs and logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although OWL 2 is widely used to describe complex objects such as chemical molecules, it cannot represent ‘structural' features of chemical entities (e.g., having a ring). A combination of rules and description graphs (DGs) has been proposed ...

Despoina Magka; Boris Motik; Ian Horrocks

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Modeling the Trade-Wind Cumulus Boundary Layer. Part II: A High-Order One-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of the trade-wind cumulus layer observed in the region of Puerto Rico is presented. The model is one-dimensional with a higher-order turbulence closure scheme (quasi-Gaussian assumption in the third-order moments equations)...

Ph Bougeault

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling  

SciTech Connect

Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

PARS II FAQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PARS 3.0 Data Model Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

255

A Simple Quantum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime II: Thermodynamics of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this second part of our series of two papers, where spacetime is modelled by a graph, where Planck size quantum black holes lie on the vertices, we consider the thermodynamics of spacetime. We formulate an equation which tells in which way an accelerating, spacelike two-surface of spacetime interacts with the thermal radiation flowing through that surface. In the low temperature limit, where most quantum black holes constituting spacetime are assumed to lie in the ground state, our equation implies, among other things, the Hawking and the Unruh effects, as well as Einstein's field equation with a vanishing cosmological constant for general matter fields. We also consider the high temperature limit, where the microscopic black holes are assumed to lie in highly excited states. In this limit our model implies, among other things, that black hole entropy depends logarithmically on its area, instead of being proportional to the area.

J. Makela

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Kurucz model energy distributions: a comparison with real stars. II. Metal-deficient stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy distributions of synthetic spectra for Kurucz model atmospheres are compared with observed energy distributions of metal-deficient stars of the blue horizontal-branch (BHB), F-G-K subdwarf (SD) and G-K giant (MDG) types. The best coincidence of the synthetic and observed energy curves is found for BHB stars. The largest differences are found in the ultraviolet wavelengths for subdwarfs and cool MDGs. The influence of errors of effective temperatures, gravities and metallicities is estimated.

V. Straizys; R. Lazauskaite; G. Valiauga

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Compromise between Neutrino Masses and Collider Signatures in the Type-II Seesaw Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural extension of the standard $SU(2)_{\\rm L} \\times U(1)_{\\rm Y}$ gauge model to accommodate massive neutrinos is to introduce one Higgs triplet and three right-handed Majorana neutrinos, leading to a $6\\times 6$ neutrino mass matrix which contains three $3\\times 3$ sub-matrices $M_{\\rm L}$, $M_{\\rm D}$ and $M_{\\rm R}$. We show that three light Majorana neutrinos (i.e., the mass eigenstates of $\

Wei Chao; Shu Luo; Zhi-zhong Xing; Shun Zhou

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cosmological evolution of the cosmological plasma with interpartial scalar interaction. II. Formulation of mathematical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of the relativistic kinetic theory the relativistic statistical systems with scalar interaction particles are investigated. The self-consistent system of the equations describing self-gravitating plasma with interpartial scalar interaction is formulated, macroscopical laws of preservation are received. The closed system of the equations describing cosmological models to which the matter is presented by plasma with interpartial scalar interaction is received.

Yu. G. Ignat'ev

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Extended Grid of Nova Models: II. The Parameter Space of Nova Outbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a sequel to an earlier paper devoted to multiple, multicycle nova evolution models (Prialnik & Kovetz 1995, first paper of the series), which showed that the different characteristics of nova outbursts can be reproduced by varying the values of three basic and independent parameters: the white dwarf mass-M_{WD}, the temperature of its isothermal core-T_{WD} and the mass transfer rate-Mdot. Apart from being the largest computational classical novae parameter-space survey, we show here that the parameter space is constrained by several analytical considerations and find its limiting surfaces. Consequently, we extend the grid of multicycle nova evolution models presented in Paper I almost to its limits, adding multicycle nova outburst calculations for a considerable number of new parameter combinations. In particular, the extended parameter pace that produces nova eruptions includes low mass transfer rates down to 5e-13 Msun/yr, and more models for low T_{WD}. Resulting characteristics of these...

Yaron, O; Shara, M M; Kovetz, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Structuring of Large-scale Complex Hybrid Systems: from Illustrative Analysis toward Modelization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System structuring is paramount to the development of large-scale complex hybrid systems (LCHS). However, there is no well-established and effective methodology for the structuring of LCHS. Using the approach of illustrating and abstracting, this paper ... Keywords: autonomous system, block-diagram-based model, distributed system, hierarchical system, large-scale complex hybrid system (LCHS), multiple gradation, nested system, nesting, perception–decision link, system geometry, system modelization, system structuring

Huaglory Tianfield

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Bayesian model averaging using k-best bayesian network structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bayesian networks are being widely used in various data mining tasks for probabilistic inference and causual modeling [Pearl (2000), Spirtes et al. (2001)]. Learning the… (more)

Ram, Lavanya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

RESISTIVITY MODELING FOR ARBITRARILY SHAPED THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full utilization of the electrical resistivity method ingeologic models for electrical resistivity applications, theResistivity In electrical resistivity surveys a current

Dey, Abhijit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Modeling and Characterization of Structure at or Near Grain ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... moderate ductility) opens the doors to new applications for these materials. ... The described model increases the mobility and decreases the ...

265

An Extended Grid of Nova Models: II. The Parameter Space of Nova Outbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a sequel to an earlier paper devoted to multiple, multicycle nova evolution models (Prialnik & Kovetz 1995, first paper of the series), which showed that the different characteristics of nova outbursts can be reproduced by varying the values of three basic and independent parameters: the white dwarf mass-M_{WD}, the temperature of its isothermal core-T_{WD} and the mass transfer rate-Mdot. Apart from being the largest computational classical novae parameter-space survey, we show here that the parameter space is constrained by several analytical considerations and find its limiting surfaces. Consequently, we extend the grid of multicycle nova evolution models presented in Paper I almost to its limits, adding multicycle nova outburst calculations for a considerable number of new parameter combinations. In particular, the extended parameter pace that produces nova eruptions includes low mass transfer rates down to 5e-13 Msun/yr, and more models for low T_{WD}. Resulting characteristics of these runs are added to the former parameter combination results, to provide a full grid spanning the entire parameter space for Carbon-Oxygen white dwarfs. The full grid covers the entire range of observed nova characteristics, even those of peculiar objects, which have not been numerically reproduced until now. Most remarkably, runs for very low Mdot lead to very high values for some characteristics, such as outburst amplitude A>~20, high super-Eddington luminosities at maximum, heavy element abundance of the ejecta Z_{ej}~0.63 and high ejected masses m_{ej}~7e-4 Msun.

O. Yaron; D. Prialnik; M. M. Shara; A. Kovetz

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

Visible and dark matter in M 31 - II. A dynamical model and dark matter density distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper we derive the density distribution of dark matter (DM) in a well-observed nearby disc galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy. From photometrical and chemical evolution models constructed in the first part of the study (Tamm, Tempel & Tenjes 2007 (arXiv:0707.4375), hereafter Paper I) we can calculate the mass distribution of visible components (the bulge, the disc, the stellar halo, the outer diffuse stellar halo). In the dynamical model we calculate stellar rotation velocities along the major axis and velocity dispersions along the major, minor and intermediate axes of the galaxy assuming triaxial velocity dispersion ellipsoid. Comparing the calculated values with the collected observational data, we find the amount of DM, which must be added to reach an agreement with the observed rotation and dispersion data. We conclude that within the uncertainties, the DM distributions by Moore, Burkert, Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) and the Einasto fit with observations nearly at all distances. The NFW and Einasto density distributions give the best fit with observations. The total mass of M 31 with the NFW DM distribution is 1.19*10^12 M_sun, the ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass is 10.0. For the Einasto DM distribution, these values are 1.28*10^12 M_sun and 10.8. The ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass inside the Holmberg radius is 1.75 for the NFW and the Einasto distributions. For different cuspy DM distributions, the virial mass is in a range 6.9-7.9*10^11 M_sun and the virial radius is ~150 kpc. The DM mean densities inside 10 pc for cusped models are 33 and 16 M_sun pc^-3 for the NFW and the Einasto profiles, respectively. For the cored Burkert profile, this value is 0.06 M_sun pc^-3.

Elmo Tempel; Antti Tamm; Peeter Tenjes

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Information content in the halo-model dark-matter power spectrum II: Multiple cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological Fisher information in the non-linear dark-matter power spectrum in the context of the halo model. We find that there is a plateau in information content on translinear scales which is generic to all cosmological parameters we tried. There is a rise in information on smaller scales, but we find that it is quite degenerate among different cosmological parameters (except, perhaps, the tilt). This suggests that it could be difficult to constrain cosmological parameters using the non-linear regime of the dark-matter power spectrum. We suggest ways to get around this problem, such as removing the largest haloes from consideration in survey analysis.

Mark C. Neyrinck; István Szapudi

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Visible and dark matter in M 31 - II. A dynamical model and dark matter density distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper we derive the density distribution of dark matter (DM) in a well-observed nearby disc galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy. From photometrical and chemical evolution models constructed in the first part of the study (Tamm, Tempel & Tenjes 2007 (arXiv:0707.4375), hereafter Paper I) we can calculate the mass distribution of visible components. In the dynamical model we calculate stellar rotation velocities along the major axis and velocity dispersions along the major, minor and intermediate axes of the galaxy. Comparing the calculated values with the collected observational data, we find the amount of DM, which must be added to reach an agreement with the observed rotation and dispersion data. We conclude that within the uncertainties, the DM distributions by Moore, Burkert, isothermal, Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) and Navarro et al. 2004 (N04) fit with observations. The NFW and N04 density distributions give the best fit with observations. The total mass of M 31 with the NFW DM distributio...

Tempel, Elmo; Tenjes, Peeter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Quasi-Fixed Points and Periodic Orbits in the Zebiak–Cane ENSO Model with Applications in Kalman Filtering. Part II. Periodic Orbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this study on the application of the interactive Kalman filter to higher-dimensional systems, a modification suited to periodically forced systems is introduced. As in Part I, the object of study here is the ENSO model of Zebiak and ...

Gerd Bürger; Stephen E. Zebiak; Mark A. Cane

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Spatiotemporal Structure of Twentieth-Century Climate Variations in Observations and Reanalyses. Part II: Pacific Pan-Decadal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatiotemporal structure of Pacific pan-decadal variability (PDV) is isolated in global long-term surface temperature (ST) datasets and reanalysis atmospheric parameter fields from which El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) effects have been ...

Junye Chen; Anthony D. Del Genio; Barbara E. Carlson; Michael G. Bosilovich

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Structure and Evolution of Hurricane Elena (1985). Part II: Convective Asymmetries and Evidence for Vortex Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable data recorder attached to the Weather Surveillance Radar-1957 (WSR-57) in Apalachicola, Florida, collected 313 radar scans of the reflectivity structure within 150 km of the center of Hurricane Elena (in 1985) between 1310 and 2130 UTC ...

Kristen L. Corbosiero; John Molinari; Anantha R. Aiyyer; Michael L. Black

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Experimental Study of an Artificial Thermal Plume in the Boundary Layer. Part II: Some Aspects of the Plume Thermodynamical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some aspects of the mean and turbulent structures of artificial thermal plumes in the boundary layer (BL) are presented. This analysis is based mainly on measurements with an instrumented aircraft. As initial conditions for plume rise, the ...

J. Noilhan; B. Bénech; G. Letrenne; A. Druilhet; A. Saab

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Origin, Evolution, and Finescale Structure of the St. Valentine’s Day Mesoscale Gravity Wave Observed during STORM-FEST. Part II: Finescale Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents observations of the finescale three-dimensional kinematic and thermodynamic structure of a long-lived mesoscale gravity wave that occurred on 14–15 February 1992 during the Storm-scale Operational and Research Meteorology-...

Muqun Yang; Robert M. Rauber; Mohan K. Ramamurthy

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Organization and Structure of Clouds and Precipitation on the Mid-Atlantic Coast of the United States. Part II: The Mesoscale and Microscale Structures of Some Frontal Rainbands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale and microscale structures of the clouds and precipitation associated with a frontal system on the mid-Atlantic Coast of the United States are investigated using radar reflectivity and Doppler velocity data, surface mesonet, ...

Joseph M. Sienkiewicz; John D. Locatelli; Peter V. Hobbs; Bart Geerts

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear spirals in galaxies: gas response to asymmetric potential. II. Hydrodynamical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spirals naturally form as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the galactic potential, even if the degree of this asymmetry is very small. Linear wave theory well describes weak nuclear spirals, but spirals induced by stronger asymmetries in the potential are clearly beyond the linear regime. Hydrodynamical models indicate spiral shocks in this latter case that, depending on how the spiral intersects the x2 orbits, either get damped, leading to the formation of the nuclear ring, or get strengthened, and propagate towards the galaxy centre. Central massive black hole of sufficient mass can allow the spiral shocks to extend all the way to its immediate vicinity, and to generate gas inflow up to 0.03 M_sun/yr, which coincides with the accretion rates needed to power luminous local Active Galactic Nuclei.

Maciejewski, Witold

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nuclear spirals in galaxies: gas response to asymmetric potential. II. Hydrodynamical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spirals naturally form as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the galactic potential, even if the degree of this asymmetry is very small. Linear wave theory well describes weak nuclear spirals, but spirals induced by stronger asymmetries in the potential are clearly beyond the linear regime. Hydrodynamical models indicate spiral shocks in this latter case that, depending on how the spiral intersects the x2 orbits, either get damped, leading to the formation of the nuclear ring, or get strengthened, and propagate towards the galaxy centre. Central massive black hole of sufficient mass can allow the spiral shocks to extend all the way to its immediate vicinity, and to generate gas inflow up to 0.03 M_sun/yr, which coincides with the accretion rates needed to power luminous local Active Galactic Nuclei.

Witold Maciejewski

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

Bottom-up generative modeling of tree-structured data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a compositional probabilistic model for treestructured data that defines a bottom-up generative process from the leaves to the root of a tree. Contextual state transitions are introduced from the joint configuration of the children to the ...

Davide Bacciu; Alessio Micheli; Alessandro Sperduti

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stochastic Modeling of Solidification Structure in Alloy 718 Remelt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure 1 - Flow diagram showing modeling requirements for secondary ... and heat transfer during the ingot solidification process, (2) a stochastic ..... and Advanced Solidification Processes, edited by M. Cross and J. Campbell, TMS, 1995, pp.

279

Computational tools for modeling and measuring chromosome structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA conformation within cells has many important biological implications, but there are challenges both in modeling DNA due to the need for specialized techniques, and experimentally since tracing out in vivo conformations ...

Ross, Brian Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Multiscale Modeling of Ingot Solidification Structure Controlled by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for Mathematical and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

language that resembles mathematical notation, and offer convenient ..... Therefore, it is fundamental that the way a stochastic programming problem ..... [ 14] E. Fragni`ere and J. Gondzio, Optimization modeling languages, in Handbook of Ap-.

282

Graphene nanoribbon conductance model in parabolic band structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many experimental measurements have been done on GNR conductance. In this paper, analytical model of GNR conductance is presented. Moreover, comparison with published data which illustrates good agreement between them is studied. Conductance of GNR as ...

Mohammad Taghi Ahmadi; Zaharah Johari; N. Aziziah Amin; Amir Hossein Fallahpour; Razali Ismail

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analytic Models for the Mechanical Structure of the Solar Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All stars exhibit universal central behavior in terms of new homology variables (u,w). In terms of these variables, we obtain simple analytic fits to numerical standard solar models for the core and radiative zones of the ZAMS and present Suns, with a few global parameters. With these analytic fits, different theoretical models of the solar core, neutrino fluxes, and helioseismic observations can be parametrized and compared.

Dallas C. Kennedy; Sidney A. Bludman

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

High dimensional model representation based formulations for fuzzy finite element analysis of structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical approach based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) for analyzing the response of structures with fuzzy parameters. The proposed methodology involves integrated finite element modeling, HDMR based response surface ... Keywords: Explicit formulation, Finite element, Fuzzy analysis, High dimensional model representation, Implicit formulation, Response surface

A. S. Balu; B. N. Rao

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dynamical modeling of transport in MOS structures containing silicon nanocrystals for memory applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact model that can be used to reproduce both quasi-static and dynamic characteristics of basic MOS cells with embedded Si-nc is presented. The structure is modeled through a device-like complex matrix of tunnel junctions, resulting in a time-dependent ... Keywords: Flash memories, Nanocrystals, Nonvolatile memories, Silicon, Silicon nanocrystals, Transport modeling

Josep Carreras; O. Jambois; M. Perálvarez; Y. Lebour; B. Garrido

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part II: System-Scale and Mesoscale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel was simulated reasonably well in the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model. The evolution of the large-scale circulation and the storm-scale structure ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mirage Models Confront the LHC: II. Flux-Stabilized Type IIB String Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We continue the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in light of current data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this installment we consider Type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau orientifold in the presence of fluxes, in the manner originally formulated by Kachru, et al. We allow for a variety of potential uplift mechanisms and embeddings of the Standard Model field content into D3 and D7 brane configurations. We find that an uplift sector independent of the Kahler moduli, as is the case with anti-D3 branes, is inconsistent with data unless the matter and Higgs sectors are localized on D7 branes exclusively, or are confined to twisted sectors between D3 and D7 branes. We identify regions of parameter space for all possible D-brane configurations that remain consistent with PLANCK observations on the dark matter relic density and measurements of the CP-even Higgs mass at the LHC. Constraints arising from LHC searches at 8 TeV center-of-mass energies, and the LUX dark matter detection experiment, are discussed. The discovery prospects for the remaining parameter space at dark matter direct detection experiments are described, and signatures for detection of superpartners at the LHC, with center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, are analyzed.

Bryan Kaufman; Brent D. Nelson

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mathematical modeling of irreversible dynamic deformation, micro- and macrofracture of materials and structures  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7: Material Phase Transition, Modeling, and Others 7: Material Phase Transition, Modeling, and Others Mathematical Modeling of Irreversible Dynamic Deformation, Micro- and Macrofracture of Materials and Structures P. P. Zakharov and A. B. Kiselev All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow 125412, Russia Thermomechanical processes, which proceed in deformable solids under intensive dynamic loading, consist of mechanical, thermal and structural ones, which correlate themselves. The structural processes involve the formation, motion and interaction of defects in metallic crystals, phase transitions, the breaking of bonds between molecules in polymers, the accumulation of microstructural damages (pores, cracks), etc. Irreversible deformations, zones of adiabatic shear and microfractures are caused by these

289

On Type II Strings in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider type IIA/B strings in two-dimensions and their projection with respect to the nilpotent space-time supercharge. Based on the ground ring structure, we propose a duality between perturbed type II strings and the topological B-model on deformed Calabi-Yau singularities. Depending on the type II spectra, one has either the conifold or the suspended pinch point geometry. Using the corresponding quiver gauge theory, obtained by D-branes wrapping in the resolved suspended pinch point geometry, we propose the all orders perturbative partition function.

Harald Ita; Harald Nieder; Yaron Oz

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hyper and structural Markov laws for graphical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Notation and definitions Throughout the chapter, (X, Y) will be a single joint observation from the specified model, and (X(n), Y(n)) to be a sequence of n such independent observations. p will be the density of the model (with respect to the appro- priate... to denote the density of the prior law, and pipro and piret to denote the densities of the posterior laws £pro and £ret under prospective and retrospective likelihoods, respectively: pipro(?, ? | x(n), y(n)) ? pi(?, ?) p(y(n) | x(n), ?, ?) piret(?X|Y=0, ?...

Byrne, Simon

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nonlinear fluid---structure interaction problem. Part II: space discretization, implementation aspects, nested parallelization and application examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main focus of the present article is the development of a general solution framework for coupled and/or interaction multi-physics problems based upon re-using existing codes into software products. In particular, we discuss how to build this software ... Keywords: CTL implementation, Finite element, Finite volume, Fluid---structure interaction

Christophe Kassiotis; Adnan Ibrahimbegovic; Rainer Niekamp; Hermann G. Matthies

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Vortex Rossby Waves in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone. Part II: The Role in Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the author analyzed the asymmetric structure in the inner core of a numerically simulated tropical cyclone and found that the asymmetry near the eyewall in the mid–lower troposphere is dominated by wavenumber-1 and -2 vortex Rossby ...

Yuqing Wang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure and the Western North Pacific Category 5 Typhoons. Part II: Dependence on Translation Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using new in situ ocean subsurface observations from the Argo floats, best-track typhoon data from the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center, an ocean mixed layer model, and other supporting datasets, this work systematically explores the ...

I-I. Lin; Iam-Fei Pun; Chun-Chieh Wu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Structure and Evolution of a Continental Winter Cyclone. Part II: Frontal Forcing of an Extreme Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of a narrow, heavy, occasionally convective snowband that fell within a modest surface cyclone on 19 January 1995 is examined using gridded model output from a successful numerical simulation performed using the University of ...

Jonathan E. Martin

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands  

SciTech Connect

Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular architectures. {yields} The thermal and fluorescence properties of title complexes have also been reported.

Wang Xiuli, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.c [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Structure-Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress was made this period on a number of separate experimental and modelling activities. At Brown, the models of carbon nanostructure evolution were expanded to consider high-rank materials with initial anisotropy. The report presents detailed results of Monte Carlo simulations with non-zero initial layer length and with statistically oriented initial states. The expanded simulations are now capable of describing the development of nanostructure during carbonization of most coals. Work next quarter will address the remaining challenge of isotropic coke-forming coals. Experiments at Brown yielded important data on the "memory loss" phenomenon in carbon annealing, and on the effect of mineral matter on high-temperature reactivity. The experimental aspects of the Brown work will be discussed in detail in the next report.

Christopher Hadad; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Robert Hurt

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quasigeostrophic Turbulence in a Three-Layer Model: Effects of Vertical Structure in the Mean Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-layer, horizontally homogeneous, quasigeostrophic model is selected as one of the simplest environments in which to study the sensitivity of baroclinic eddy fluxes in the atmosphere to the vertical structure of the basic-state temperature ...

Isaac M. Held; Enda O'Brien

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Statistics and Horizontal Structure of Anomalous Weather Regimes in the Community Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistics, horizontal structure, and linear barotropic dynamics of anomalous weather regimes are evaluated in a 15-winter integration of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2). Statistical and ensemble analyses of simulated regimes are ...

Robert X. Black; Katherine J. Evans

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Model for a Shear-Free Convective Boundary Layer with Parameterized Capping Inversion Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper extends Deardorff's general structure parameterization for a shear-free convective boundary layer. The model suggested employs the mixed layer hypothesis that the buoyancy (which is defined as b = g(?0 ? &rho)/?0, where ? is the density,...

E. E. Fedorovich; D. V. Mironov

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Fractal Interfacial Entrainment Model for Dry Convective Boundary Layers. Part II: Discussion of Model Behavior and Comparison with Other Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the fractal interfacial entrainment (FIE) model recently presented by Kamada are compared to those of previous models, water tank results, and atmospheric data from the Wangara experiment. Effects of capping inversion resolution and ...

Ray F. Kamada

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coupling an Advanced Land Surface–Hydrology Model with the Penn State–NCAR MM5 Modeling System. Part II: Preliminary Model Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of short-term numerical experiments conducted by the Penn State–NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) coupled with an advanced land surface model, alongside the simulations coupled with a simple slab model, are verified with ...

Fei Chen; Jimy Dudhia

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermal Structure and Airflow in a Model Simulation of an Occluded Marine Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very fine mesh model simulation of the Ocean Ranger storm of February 1982 is used to study the thermal structure and airflow in an intense marine cyclone. In particular, the study investigates the structures of the occluded front and the ...

Ying-Hwa Kuo; Richard J. Reed; Simon Low-Nam

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications. The electrical and mechanical power analysis at the PWAS structure interface indicates all on the tuning effects. Second, we studied the PWAS receiver structural interface acoustic and electrical energy1 Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

Giurgiutiu, Victor

305

Dynamic thermal modelling of a power integrated circuit with the application of structure functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dynamic thermal analyses of a power integrated circuit with a cooling assembly. The investigations are based on the examination of the cumulative and differential structure functions obtained from the circuit cooling curves recorded ... Keywords: Contact thermal resistance, Heat transfer coefficient, Structure function, Thermal modelling and simulation

Marcin Janicki; Jedrzej Banaszczyk; Gilbert De Mey; Marek Kaminski; Bjorn Vermeersch; Andrzej Napieralski

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Reviewing progress in PJM's capacity market structure via the new reliability pricing model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Reliability Pricing Model introduces significant changes to the capacity market structure of PJM. The main feature of the RPM design is a downward-sloping demand curve, which replaces the highly volatile vertical demand curve. The authors review the latest RPM structure, results of the auctions, and the future course of the implementation process. (author)

Sener, Adil Caner; Kimball, Stefan

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeling of ultrasonic and acoustic waves propagation through 2D lattice structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective non-destructive testing techniques for modern lattice structural materials are in great demand. Amongst the more successful tecniques are ultrasonic and acoustic testing. The focus of this paper is the simulation of wave propagation through ... Keywords: finite element methods, modeling and simulation methodologies, ultrasonic testing of lattice structural materials, visualization

Ales Michtchenko; James A. Smith; Massimo Ruzzene

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Resolving stereo matching errors due to repetitive structures using model information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study regards the problem of incorrect stereo matches due to the occurrence of repetitive structures in the scene. In stereo vision, repetitive structures may lead to ''phantom objects'' in front of or behind the true scene which cause severe problems ... Keywords: Correspondence analysis, Model-based 3D scene analysis, Stereo vision

Björn Barrois; Marcus Konrad; Christian Wöhler; Horst-Michael Groí

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Finite element modelling and analysis of bolted joints of three dimensional tubular structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Hungarian "Steel Cooling Tower Consortium" aimed to develop a new type steel cooling tower, in the framework of a governmental R&D project. Members of the structure are prefabricated tubular elements characterized by high radius-to-thickness ratio. ... Keywords: bolted endplate connection, gusset plate, model development, non-linear FEM, steel cooling tower, thin-walled section, tubular structure, virtual experiment

L. G. Vigh; L. Dunai

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress continued to be made during the past reporting quarter on both major technical tasks. During the reporting period at OSU, computational investigations were conducted of addition vs. abstraction reactions of H, O(3 P), and OH with monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The potential energy surface for more than 80 unique reactions of H, O ( 3 P), and OH with aromatic hydrocarbons were determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The calculated transition state barriers and reaction free energies indicate that the addition channel is preferred at 298K, but that the abstraction channel becomes dominant at high temperatures. The thermodynamic preference for reactivity with aromatic hydrocarbons increases in the order O(3 P) < H < OH. Abstraction from six-membered aromatic rings is more facile than abstraction from five-membered aromatic rings. However, addition to five-membered rings is thermodynamically more favorable than addition to six-membered rings. The free energies for the abstraction and addition reactions of H, O, and OH with aromatic hydrocarbons and the characteristics of the respective transition states can be used to calculate the reaction rate constants for these important combustion reactions. Experimental work at Brown University on the effect of reaction on the structural evolution of different chars (i.e., phenolic resin char and chars produced from three different coals) have been investigated in a TGA/TPD-MS system. It has been found that samples of different age of these chars appeared to lose their "memory" concerning their initial structures at high burn-offs. During the reporting period, thermal desorption experiments of selected samples were conducted. These spectra show that the population of low temperature oxygen surface complexes, which are primarily responsible for reactivity, are more similar for the high burn-off than for the low burn-off samples of different ages; i.e., the population of active sites are more similar for the ?younger? and ?older? chars at high burn-offs. Progress continued on experimental work at OSU. Another furnace run was conducted with a Pittsburgh seam coal. Temperature profiles were obtained, as well as char samples from three sampling ports. Nonisothermal TGA reactivities were also obtained for these samples. Work is continuing on final ?fine-tuning? of the gas analysis section.

CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis of Structural MtrC Models Based on Homology with the Crystal Structure of MtrF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome MtrC is part of the transmembrane MtrCAB complex required for mineral respiration by Shewanella oneidensis. MtrC has significant sequence similarity to the paralogous decahaem cytochrome MtrF, which has been structurally solved through X-ray crystallography. This now allows for homology-based models of MtrC to be generated. The structure of these MtrC homology models contain ten bis-histidine-co-ordinated c-type haems arranged in a staggered cross through a four-domain structure. This model is consistent with current spectroscopic data and shows that the areas around haem 5 and haem 10, at the termini of an octahaem chain, are likely to have functions similar to those of the corresponding haems in MtrF. The electrostatic surfaces around haem 7, close to the ?-barrels, are different in MtrF and MtrC, indicating that these haems may have different potentials and interact with substrates differently.

Edwards, Marcus; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A new 3D nickel(II) framework composed of large rings: Ionothermal synthesis and crystal structure  

SciTech Connect

Ionothermal reaction between Ni{sup 2+} and 1,3,5-benzentricarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}BTC) with [AMI]Cl (AMI=1-amyl-3-methylimidazolium) as the reaction medium produced a novel 3D mixed-ligand metal-organic framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] (1) (MI=1-methylimidazole) with [AMI]{sup +} incorporated in the framework. The framework is formed by connecting 2D planes, made up of 32- and 48-membered rings, through 1D chains composed of 32-membered rings. The two BTC{sup 3-} ligands in 1 show the same connectivity mode with two bidentate and one {mu}{sub 2} bridging carboxylic groups. This is a new connectivity mode to the already existing 17 in the Ni-BTC system. The role of MI and [AMI]Cl in the structure formation is discussed. - Graphical Abstract: A novel 3D framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] is obtained in ionothermal system with [AMI]{sup +} incorporating in the cavities as structure directing template and BTC{sup 3-} showing a new coordination fashion. The 3D framework is constructed by 2D layers linked with 1D double chains. The title compound has the middle thermal stability at ca. 280 deg. C.

Xu Ling [Department of Chemistry, BK-21 School of Chemical Materials Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun-Young [Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Uk [Department of Chemistry, BK-21 School of Chemical Materials Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ywkwon@skku.edu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Chemistry and structure of coal-derived asphaltenes, Phase II. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1977. [15 refs  

SciTech Connect

Separations of Synthoil liquefied coal by solvent fractionation and high pressure liquid chromatography have been compared. Solvent fractionation is believed to give more distinctive fractions. The asphaltene fraction obtained by use of hplc was found to be a mixture of resin, asphaltene, carbene, and carboid. Solvent elution chromatrogrphy of asphaltenes on silica gel has been scaled up, and recoveries of 98-99 wt. % are generally obtained. VPO molecular weight studies of coal asphaltenes, as a function of concentration, in the solvents benzene and THF indicate that association of asphaltenes takes place in both solvents, but is more significant in benzene. Structural parameters obtained from modified Brown-Ladner treatment of proton NMR data suggest that solvent fractions: oil, resin, asphaltene, and carboid have structural characteristics which are sequentially related. X-ray diffraction patterns for asphaltene, carbene, and carboid fractions reveal progressively sharpened (002) and (11) bands indicative of increasing carbonization in this series. Methyl iodide addition to a basic fraction of Synthoil asphaltene (diethyl ether-eluted from silica gel) suggests, in conjunction with infrared results, that essentially all of the nitrogen in this fraction is present in basic pyridine-like compounds.

Yen, T. F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Remote robotic underwater grinding system and modeling for rectification of hydroelectric structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A submersible grinding robot has been designed to automate the dam gate metallic structure repair process. In order to measure and control the amount of material removed during the process, an empirical approach for modeling the material removal rate ... Keywords: Air injector, Grinding modeling, Material removal rate (MRR), Robotic grinding, Underwater grinding process, Water drag effect

Dominique Thuot; Zhaoheng Liu; Henri Champliaud; Julien Beaudry; Pierre-Luc Richard; Michel Blain

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Model and Seismic Analysis of Large-scale Wind Turbine Tower Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The working condition of wind turbine tower structure with a massive engine room and revolving wind wheels is very complex. The paper simplify the wind turbine tower model with finite element analysis software --ANSYS, completed modal analysis firstly, ... Keywords: wind turbine tower, model analysis, resonance, time-history analysis, dynamic

Xiang Liu; Jiangtao Kong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Recovering structured data types from a legacy data model with overlays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legacy systems are often written in programming languages that support arbitrary variable overlays. When migrating to modern languages, the data model must adhere to strict structuring rules, such as those associated with an object oriented data model, ... Keywords: Legacy systems, Program transformations, Reengineering

Mariano Ceccato; Thomas Roy Dean; Paolo Tonella

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Distributed backbone structure for algorithms in the SINR model of wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Signal-to-Interference-and-Noise-Ratio (SINR) physical model is one of the most popular models of wireless networks. Despite of the vast amount of study done in design and analysis of centralized algorithms supporting wireless communication under ... Keywords: SINR, backbone structure, distributed algorithms, leader election, multi-message broadcast, wireless networks

Tomasz Jurdzinski; Dariusz R. Kowalski

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

{gamma}-ray spectroscopy of neutron-deficient {sup 110}Te. II. High-spin smooth-terminating structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spin states have been populated in {sub 52}{sup 110}Te via {sup 58}Ni({sup 58}Ni,{alpha}2p{gamma}) reactions at 240 and 250 MeV. The Gammasphere {gamma}-ray spectrometer was used in conjunction with the Microball charged-particle detector. The high-spin (I>30) collective level scheme of {sup 110}Te, up to {approx}45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), is discussed in this paper. Four new decoupled ({delta}I=2) high-spin structures have been observed for the first time, together with two strongly coupled ({delta}I=1) bands. These bands all show the characteristics of smooth band termination, and are discussed within the framework of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky approach.

Paul, E. S.; Evans, A. O.; Boston, A. J.; Nolan, P. J.; Semple, A. T. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lane, G. J.; Sears, J. M.; Starosta, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Freeman, S. J.; Leddy, M. J. [Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Smith, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Afanasjev, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, LV 2169 Salaspils, Miera str. 31 (Latvia); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan By Remote Sensing Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Hot Spring Law of Taiwan was passed in legislative assembly on 3 June 2003. Hot springs would become one of the most important natural resources for recreation purposes. Both public and private sectors will invest large amount of capital in this area in the near future. The value of remote sensing technology is to give a critical tool for observing the landscape to find out mega-scaled geological structures, which may not be able to be found by conventional approaches. The occurrences of the hot

320

"Relaxing" - A Symbolic Sparse Matrix Method Exploiting the Model Structure in Generating Efficient Simulation Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new method for symbolically solving large sets of algebraically coupled equations as they are frequently encountered in the formulation of mathematical models of physical systems in object-- oriented modeling. The method, called "relaxing," enables the modeler to exploit the special matrix structure of the type of system under study by simply placing the keyword relax at appropriate places in the model class libraries. This procedure defines an evaluation sequence for a sparse matrix Gaussian elimination scheme. The method is demonstrated at hand of several broad classes of physical systems: drive trains, electrical circuits, and tree--structured multibody systems. In particular, relaxing allows a model compiler, such as Dymola, to start from a declarative, object-- oriented description of the model, and to automatically derive the recursive O(f) algorithm used in modern multibody programs. Keywords: Sparse matrices; symbolic formulae manipulation; object--orient...

Martin Otter; Hilding Elmqvist François E. Cellier; Hilding Elmqvist; Francois E. Cellier

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Synthesis and X-ray structure analysis of a new binuclear Schiff base Co(II) complex with the ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-butanediamine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title binuclear complex, tris[N,N-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane] dicobalt(II), C{sub 60}H{sub 70}Co{sub 2}N{sub 6}O{sub 15}, was prepared by the reaction of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane and Co(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} . 4H{sub 2}O in a ethanol solution and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This complex has a dinuclear structure where two Co(II) ions are bridged by one N{sup 0},N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane. The two Co(II) ions, have two distorted octahedral coordination involving two O and two N atoms.

Nasr-Esfahani, M., E-mail: m-nasresfahani@iaun.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. Part II: Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of collisionless oblique propagating slow shocks have revealed the existence of a transition associated with a critical temperature anisotropy epsilon=1-mu_0(P_parallel-P_perpendicular)/ B^2 = 0.25 (Liu, Drake and Swisdak (2011)). An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed here based on anisotropic fluid theory, in particular the Anisotropic Derivative Nonlinear-Schrodinger-Burgers equation, with an intuitive model of the energy closure for the downstream counter-streaming ions. The anisotropy value of 0.25 is significant because it is closely related to the degeneracy point of the slow and intermediate modes, and corresponds to the lower bound of the coplanar to non-coplanar transition that occurs inside a compound slow shock (SS)/rotational discontinuity (RD) wave. This work implies that it is a pair of compound SS/RD waves that bound the outflows in magnetic reconnection, instead of a pair of switch-off slow shocks as in Petschek's model. This fact might explain the rareness of in-situ obse...

Liu, Yi-Hsin; Swisdak, Marc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Modeling H2 adsorption in carbon-based structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage has been identified as a primary bottleneck in the large-scale implementation of a hydrogen-based economy. Many research efforts are underway to both improve the capacity of existing hydrogen storage systems and develop new systems. One promising area of research is hydrogen physi-sorbed into carbonbased structures such as nanotubes and graphene. Two novel systems consisting of a phthalocyanine salt with a large cation were studied. Ab initio, density functional theory, and molecular dynamics simulations of tetramethylammonium lithium phthalocyanine (TMA-LiPc) and trimethyl-(2-trimethylazaniumylethyl) azanium phthalocyanine (TMA2-Pc) were undertaken to estimate the H2 gas-solid adsorption uptake (wt/wt) as a function of pressure and temperature. For TMA-LiPc, the maximum H2 binding energy was approximately 0.9 kcal/mol for an isolated system and 1.2 kcal/mol for a crystal. H2 adsorption at the optimal inter-layer distance of 8.49 Å ranged from 2.1% to 6.0% (wt/wt) at 300 K, 2.5% to 6.5% at 273K, 3.3% to 7.2% at 236K, 5.2% to 8.6% at 177K, and 10.4% to 11.7% at 77K. At ILD 10 Å H2 adsorption was about 1.5% (wt/wt) higher at all points. For TMA2-Pc, the maximum H2 binding energy was approximately 1.3 kcal/mol for an isolated system and 1.2 kcal/mol for a crystal. H2 adsorption at the optimal inter-layer distance of 8.12 Å ranged from 0.5% to 2.6% (wt/wt) at 300 K, 0.6% to 2.8% at 273K, 0.8% to 3.2% at 236K, 1.4% to 3.9% at 177K, and 4.5% to 6.0% at 77K. At ILD 10 Å H2 adsorption ranged from about 0.1% (wt/wt) at 40 bar to 0.5% higher at 250 bar. The behavior of H2 adsorption for both TMA-LiPc and TMA2-Pc were compared. The adsorbed H2 probability density was compared to pair correlation function data and surfaces of constant binding energy. Regions of relatively high H2 density appear to correlate well with the binding energy, but the total adsorption does not, indicating that the adsorption is driven by factors other than binding energetics. Lithium ion transport in TMA2-Pc was also investigated for suitability as an electrolyte medium for use in lithium ion battery systems.

Lamonte, Kevin Anthony

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of atmospheric transport models for use in Phase II of the historical public exposures studies at the Rocky Flats Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five atmospheric transport models were evaluated for use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant. Models included a simple straight-line Gaussian plume model (ISCST2), several integrated puff models (RATCHET, TRIAD, and INPUFF2), and a complex terrain model (TRAC). Evaluations were based on how well model predictions compared with sulfur hexafluoride tracer measurements taken in the vicinity of Rocky Flats in February 1991. Twelve separate tracer experiments were conducted, each lasting 9 hr and measured at 140 samplers in arcs 8 and 16 km from the release point at Rocky Flats. Four modeling objectives were defined based on the endpoints of the overall study: (1) the unpaired maximum hourly average concentration, (2) paired time-averaged concentration, (3) unpaired time-averaged concentration, and (4) arc-integrated concentration. Performance measures were used to evaluate models and focused on the geometric mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-observed ratio and the correlation coefficient between predicted and observed concentrations. No one model consistently outperformed the others in all modeling objectives and performance measures. The overall performance of the RATCHET model was somewhat better than the other models.

Rood, A.S.; Killough, G.G.; Till, J.E.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Syntheses, structures and luminescent properties of zero-/two-dimensional Cd(II) and Eu(III) complexes  

SciTech Connect

Three metal-organic complexes Cd(HBIDC)(phen){sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(BIC)(phen)]{sub n} (2) and {l_brace}[Eu(HBIDC)(H{sub 2}BIDC)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (3) (H{sub 3}BIDC=benzimidazole-5,6-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}BIC=benzimidazole-6-carboxylic acid, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. With similar reaction conditions, reactions of the same ligand with different metal cations selected from different blocks (d-block and f-block) result in different coordination modes of carboxylate groups and final frameworks of complexes 1 and 3. The decarboxylation was observed in complex 2 and resulted in the formation of BIC{sup 2-} ligand. Complexes 1-3 have intense fluorescent emissions at room temperature in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution and in the solid-state, which indicate they are potential fluorescence materials. The quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of these three complexes were systematically studied. - Graphical abstract: With similar reaction conditions, reactions of the same ligand with different metal cations selected from different blocks (d-block and f-block) result in different coordination modes of carboxylate groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three metal-organic complexes have been synthesized under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactions of the same ligand with different metal cations result in different coordination modes of carboxylate groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexes 1-3 have intense fluorescent emissions in DMSO solution and in the solid-state.

Fan, Rui-Qing, E-mail: fanruiqing@hit.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, West Da-Zhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, West Da-Zhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ping; Chen, Hong; Sun, Cun-fa; Yang, Yu-Lin [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, West Da-Zhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, West Da-Zhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Su, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, School of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, School of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Projective Model Structure on Pro Simplicial Sheaves, and the Relative \\'Etale Homotopy Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In \\cite{Isa}, Isaksen showed that a proper model category $\\cC$, induces a model structure on the pro category $Pro(\\cC)$. In this paper we generalize Isaksen's theorem to the case when $\\cC$ possess a weaker structure, which we call a "weak fibration category". Namely, we show that if $\\mcal{C}$ is a weak fibration category, that satisfies an extra condition, there is a naturally induced model structure on $Pro(\\cC)$. We then apply our theorem to the case when $\\cC$ is the weak fibration category of simplicial sheafs on a Grothendieck site, where both weak equivalences and fibrations are local as in \\cite{Jar}. This gives a new model structure on the category of pro simplicial sheaves. Using this new model structure we give a definition of the \\'etale homotopy type of Artin and Mazur \\cite{AM}, as the result of applying a derived functor. Our definition actually gives as object in $Pro(\\cS)$ and not just in $Pro(Ho(\\cS))$ as in \\cite{AM}. Our definition also extends naturally to a relative notion of the \\'e...

Barnea, Ilan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Putative Liquid-Liquid Transition is a Liquid-Solid Transition in Atomistic Models of Water, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and arXiv:1107.0337v2]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, SW silicon and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate u...

Limmer, David T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Covariant analysis of Newtonian multi-fluid models for neutron stars: II Stress - energy tensors and virial theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 4-dimensionally covariant approach to multiconstituent Newtonian fluid dynamics presented in the preceding article of this series is developed by construction of the relevant 4-dimensional stress energy tensor whose conservation in the non-dissipative variational case is shown to be interpretable as a Noether identity of the Milne spacetime structure. The formalism is illustrated by the application to homogeneously expanding cosmological models, for which appropriately generalised local Bernouilli constants are constructed. Another application is to the Iordanski type generalisation of the Joukowski formula for the Magnus force on a vortex. Finally, at a global level, a new (formally simpler but more generally applicable) version of the ``virial theorem'' is obtained for multiconsituent -- neutron or other -- fluid star models as a special case within an extensive category of formulae whereby the time evolution of variously weighted mass moment integrals is determined by corresponding space integrals of stress tensor components, with the implication that all such stress integrals must vanish for any stationary equilibrium configuration.

Brandon Carter; Nicolas Chamel

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Structural Model Guide For Geothermal Exploration In Ancestral Mount Bao, Leyte, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Tongonan Geothermal Field is the largest producing geothermal field in the Philippines having an installed capacity of 700 MW. It hosts several major power plants that tap geothermal power from the northern flank of the eroded Ancestral Mount Bao (AMB) volcano in Leyte Island, Philippines. A structural model guide is presented to delineate exploration targets in other flanks of the 1200 km2 area of the AMB volcano. If applied, the model constrains the coverage of geothermal exploration to

330

The Putative Liquid-Liquid Transition is a Liquid-Solid Transition in Atomistic Models of Water, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and arXiv:1107.0337v2]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, SW silicon and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative nonequilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

David T. Limmer; David Chandler

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface downward far-infrared (far-IR) spectra were collected from NASA’s Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument from August to October 2009 at an altitude of 5.4 km near the summit of Cerro Toco, Chile. This region is known for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-IR with differences as small as +/- 0.7% for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky simulations. Clear sky model analysis demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to atmospheric conditions is between 300 and 500 cm-1. The cloudy-sky simulations demonstrated that the far-IR radiation has minimal sensitivity to cloud particle effective radius, yet is very sensitive to cloud optical thickness at wavenumbers between 400 - 600 cm-1. In fact, cirrus optical thickness found to be inferred from the brightness temperature differences at 250 and 559.5 cm-1. Aerosols proved to reduce downwelling radiance by half that a clear-sky would emit, but had little effect on the total far-IR radiative forcing. Furthermore, these far-IR measurements open a new window to understanding the radiative impacts of various atmospheric constituents such as water vapor and clouds, and to understanding and modeling the Earth’s climate and energy budget.

Baugher, Elizabeth

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Abstract In the western Great Basin, the Walker Lane is a system of right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodating ~15-25% of relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Relatively high rates of recent (<10 Ma) west-northwest extension absorb northwestward declining dextral motion in the Walker Lane, diffusing that motion into the Basin-Range. Abundant geothermal fields cluster in several northeasttrending belts in the

334

The GISS Global Climate-Middle Atmosphere Model. Part I: Model Structure and Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GISS global climate model (Hansen et al.) has been extended to include the middle atmosphere up to an altitude of approximately 85 km. The model has the full array of processes used for climate research, i.e., numerical solutions of the ...

D. Rind; R. Suozzo; N. K. Balachandran; A. Lacis; G. Russell

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Change of Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure of the Transition Region as an Indicator of Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar activity during 2007--2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) onboard of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycles 22/23 minimum when a yearly running mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a larger concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008--2011. We interpret this larger concentration of spatial power in the transition reg...

Didkovsky, Leonid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A three-dimensional gravity model of the geologic structure of Long Valley caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several attempts to define and interpret this anomaly have been made in the past using 2-D and 3-D models. None of the previous interpretations have yielded definitive results, but in fairness, the interpretation here has benefited from a larger gravity data base and more subsurface control than available to previous workers. All published 3-D models simplistically assumed constant density of fill. All 2-D models suffered from the inherent three-dimensionality of the complicated density structure of Long Valley caldera. In addition, previous interpreters have lacked access to geological data, such as well lithologies and density logs, seismic refraction interpretations, suface geology, and structural geology interpretations. The purpose of this study is to use all available gravity data and geological information to constrain a multi-unit, 3-D density model based on the geology of Long Valley caldera and its vicinity. Insights on the geologic structure of the caldera fill can help other geophysical interpretations in determining near-surface effects so that deeper structure may be resolved. With adequate control on the structure of the caldera fill, we are able to examine the gravity data for the presence of deeper density anomalies in the crust. 20 refs., 7 figs.

Carle, S.F.; Goldstein, N.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

338

IIS5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1) enabled/disabled, (1) Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager GUI: Right Click on Server > Properties > Home Directory tab > Read, Chapter 2 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Simulating Cellulose Structure, Properties, Thermodynamics, Synthesis, and Deconstruction with Atomistic and Coarse-Grain Models  

SciTech Connect

Cellulose is still a mysterious polymer in many ways: structure of microfibrils, thermodynamics of synthesis and degradation, and interactions with other plant cell wall components. Our aim is to uncover the details and mechanisms of cellulose digestion and synthesis. We report the details of the structure of cellulose 1-beta under several temperature conditions and report here the results of these studies and connections to experimental measurements and the measurement in-silico the free energy of decrystallization of several morphologies of cellulose. In spatially large modeling, we show the most recent work of mapping atomistic and coarse-grain models into tomographic images of cellulose and extreme coarse-grain modeling of interactions of large cellulase complexes with microfibrils. We discuss the difficulties of modeling cellulose and suggest future work both experimental and theoretical to increase our understanding of cellulose and our ability to use it as a raw material for fuels and materials.

Crowley, M. F.; Matthews, J.; Beckham, G.; Bomble, Y.; Hynninen, A. P.; Ciesielski, P. F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Constraints on Field Theoretical Models for Variation of the Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant alpha may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which alpha is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating alpha, monotonic time variation of alpha, and time-independent alpha that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and ``fifth force'' experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation, but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo sub-nuclear reactor on models with monotonic time-like variation of alpha. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

Charles L. Steinhardt

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fractional models for modeling complex linear systems under poor frequency resolution measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When modeling a linear system in a parametric way, one needs to deal with (i) model structure selection, (ii) model order selection as well as (iii) an accurate fit of the model. The most popular model structure for linear systems has a rational form ... Keywords: Continuous-time modeling, Fractional order systems, Linear systems, Non-asymptotic, Nonlinear least squares, Parametric models, Poor frequency resolutions, Statistical signal processing, Transfer function

Kurt Barbé, Oscar J. Olarte Rodriguez, Wendy Van Moer, Lieve Lauwers

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN(II) coordination by gp32 employs a metal ligand donor set unrelated to any known zinc-finger motif thus far described and is derived from the His64-XI2-Cys77-Xg-Cys87-X2-CYS90 sequence in the ssDNA-binding core domain of the molecule. Crystallographic studies reveal that His64 and Cys77 are derived from two independent p-strands and are relatively more buried from solvent than are Cys87 and Cys9O, which combine to nucleate an (X-helix. In an effort to understand the origin of the stability of the metal complex, we have employed an anaerobic optical spectroscopic, competitive metal binding assay to determine the coordination geometry and association constants (Ka) for the binding of CO(II) to wild-type gp32 and a series of zinc ligand substitution mutants. We find that all non-native metal complexes retain tetrahedral coordination geometry but are greatly destabilized in a manner essentially independent of whether a new protein-derived coordination bond is forfned (e.g., in H64C gp32) or not. Quantitative Co(H) binding isotherms for the His64 mutants reveal that these gp32s form a dimeric CYS4 tetrathiolate intermediate complex of differing affinities at limiting [Co]f; each then rearranges at high [Co]f to form a monomolecular site of the expected geometry and Ka=IXIO4 M-1. C87S and C90A gp32s, in contrast, form a single complex at all [Co]f, consistent with CYS2-His-H20 tetrahedral geometry of Ka=1-2xlo5 M-1. The susceptibility of all mutant metal sites to oxidation by 02 is far greater than the wild-type protein; none appear to be functional ssDNA binding proteins. These studies reveal that the local protein structure greatly limits accommodation of an altered complex in a ligand-specific manner. The implications of this work for de novo design of zinc complexes in proteins will be discussed.

Guo, Juqian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The structure of the free energy surface of coarse-grained off-lattice protein models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed multicanonical simulations of hydrophobic-hydrophilic heteropolymers with a simple effective, coarse-grained off-lattice model to study the structure and the topology of the energy surface. The multicanonical method samples the whole rugged energy landscape, in particular the low-energy part, and enables one to better understand the critical behaviors and visualize the folding pathways of the considered protein model.

E. Akturk; H. Arkin Olgar; T. Celik

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Application of the TEMPEST computer code for simulating hydrogen distribution in model containment structures. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

In this study several aspects of simulating hydrogen distribution in geometric configurations relevant to reactor containment structures were investigated using the TEMPEST computer code. Of particular interest was the performance of the TEMPEST turbulence model in a density-stratified environment. Computed results illustrated that the TEMPEST numerical procedures predicted the measured phenomena with good accuracy under a variety of conditions and that the turbulence model used is a viable approach in complex turbulent flow simulation.

Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Causes and Explanations in the Structural-Model Approach: Tractable Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue our research on the algorithmic aspects of Halpern and Pearl's causes and explanations in the structural-model approach. To this end, we present new characterizations of weak causes for certain classes of causal models, which show that under suitable restrictions deciding causes and explanations is tractable. To our knowledge, these are the first explicit tractability results for the structuralmodel approach.

Thomas Eiter; Thomas Lukasiewicz

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

3-D Radiative Transfer Modeling of Structured Winds in Massive Hot Stars with Wind3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop 3-D models of the structured winds of massive hot stars with the Wind3D radiative transfer (RT) code. We investigate the physical properties of large-scale structures observed in the wind of the B-type supergiant HD 64760 with detailed line profile fits to Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) and rotational modulations observed with IUE in Si IV {\\lambda}1395. We develop parameterized input models Wind3D with large-scale equatorial wind density- and velocity-structures, or so-called `Co-rotating Interaction Regions' (CIRs) and `Rotational Modulation Regions' (RMRs). The parameterized models offer important advantages for high-performance RT calculations over ab-initio hydrodynamic input models. The acceleration of the input model calculations permits us to simulate and investigate a wide variety of physical conditions in the extended winds of massive hot stars. The new modeling method is very flexible for constraining the dynamic and geometric wind properties of RMRs in HD 64760. We compute that t...

Lobel, A; Blomme, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

349

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals that leave noticeable voids in the crystal structure. At the ALS, researchers from the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S. have now obtained definitive experimental evidence that this lone-pair model must be revised. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have clarified the subtle electronic origins of the prototypical distortions in these crystal structures. The results have important implications for the tantalizing possibility of spintronic or superconducting devices combining ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.

350

Structures and Mechanical Properties II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1National Central University; 2Taiyuan University of Technology; 3National Center for High-Performance Computing; 4University of Tennessee; 5University of ...

351

Structures and Other Properties II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Remarkably, even an atomic chain was formed after sample necking, .... of Science and Technology Beijing; 2City University of Hong Kong

352

Effect of project characteristics on project performance in construction projects based on structural equation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most past studies that analyze project performance and the characteristics that affect such performance consist of a simple form, in which they present the brief relationship between project performance and a few characteristics that affect it. Furthermore, ... Keywords: Project characteristics, Project performance, Structural equation model

KyuMan Cho; TaeHoon Hong; ChangTaek Hyun

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy University, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Free energy potentials, combining molecular mechanics of discrimination that in- clude the correlation coefficient between RMSD and free energy, and a new measure labeled

Vajda, Sandor

354

Bayesian network model of overall print quality: Construction and structural optimisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of overall visual quality based on instrumental measurements is a challenging task. Despite the several proposed models and methods, there exists a gap between the instrumental measurements of print and human visual assessment of natural images. ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, Overall visual quality, Print quality assessment, Structural optimisation

Tuomas Eerola; Lasse Lensu; Joni-Kristian Kamarainen; Tuomas Leisti; Risto Ritala; Göte Nyman; Heikki Kälviäinen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Beneficial changes in dependence structures and two-moment decision models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the comparative static effects of beneficial changes in the dependence structure between risks. In a quasi-linear decision model with an endogenous risk and a dependent background risk, a mean-variance decision maker will choose a lower level ... Keywords: Concordance order, Correlation, Elasticity of risk aversion, Prudence

Thomas Eichner; Andreas Wagener

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme Print Structure of the Kinase Domain of CaMKII and Modeling the Holoenzyme Print The rate and intensity of calcium (Ca2+) currents that oscillate through the plasma membrane around a cell affect such diverse phenomena as fertilization, the cardiac rhythm, and even the formation of memories. How does the cell sense these digital oscillations and transduce them into a cellular signal, such as changes in phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group to a protein) or gene transcription? A group from the University of California, Berkeley, the Yale University School of Medicine, and Berkeley Lab has combined protein crystallography and small-angle x-ray scattering to give a first glimpse into what this conversion may look like as well as the structural consequences of the conversion.

357

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The phase structure of a chirally-invariant Higgs-Yukawa model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results of our ongoing project on the investigation of the phase structure of the Higgs-Yukawa model at small and large bare Yukawa couplings. The critical exponents of the second order bulk phase transitions of this model are determined from finite-size analyses and compared to the pure O(4)-model to test for triviality and the possibility of having a non-Gaussian fixed point. In addition, we will present a first study of Higgs boson masses and fermion correlation functions.

Prasad Hegde; George W. -S. Hou; Karl Jansen; Bastian Knippschild; C. -J. David Lin; Kei-Ichi Nagai; Attila Nagy; Kenji Ogawa

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Combined Stellar Structure and Atmosphere Models: Exploratory Results for Wolf-Rayet Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present Complete Stellar models (CoStar) for massive stars, which treat the stellar interior and atmosphere, including its wind. Particular emphasis is given to Wolf-Rayet stars. We address the question of the effective temperatures of WNE and WC stars. Our first results show a satisfactory agreement between the CoStar models and the simple temperature correction method applied by Schaller et al. (1992). An analyses of the subphotospheric structure of the WR star models shows the importance of metal opacity. This may be essential for understanding the driving mechanism of Wolf-Rayet winds.

D. Schaerer; A. de Koter; W. Schmutz

1994-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model  

SciTech Connect

We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by {Delta}u and {Delta}d of the polarized functions.

Trevisan, Luis A. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84010-790, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Mirez, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia, Engenharia e Tecnologia - ICET, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri - UFVJM, Campus do Mucuri, Rua do Cruzeiro 01, Jardim Sao Paulo, 39803-371, Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Structure and Energetics of Standing Eddies in the Winter Northern Hemisphere Simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model and the GLA Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM) and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) Climate Model (CM) differ from each other both in numerical structure and in forcing scheme. Since a proper ...

Yen-Huei Lee; Tsing-Chang Chen

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

ISLSCP II Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISLSCP II The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project, Initiative II (ISLSCP II) Overview ISLSCP II Logo The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology...

364

Structure and Formation of an Annular Hurricane Simulated in a Fully Compressible, Nonhydrostatic Model—TCM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure and formation of an annular hurricane simulated in a fully compressible, nonhydrostatic tropical cyclone model—TCM4—are analyzed. The model is initialized with an axisymmetric vortex on an f plane in a quiescent environment, and ...

Yuqing Wang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

FOUR-FLUID MODEL AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first part of this paper extends the three-fluid model of Avinash and Zank for magnetic structures in the heliosheath to a four-fluid model consisting of electrons, pick-up ions (PUIs), solar wind ions (SWIs), and neutral hydrogen. The PUIs are generated by neutrals via charge exchange with SWI. Since the kinetic pressure of PUI is nearly three to four times the pressure of SWI, these are more suited to mediate small-scale structures in the heliosheath such as magnetic holes (MH)/humps etc. The constant energy exchange between these two fluids drives them nonadiabatic. The PUIs are isothermal ({gamma} = 1) while SWIs are nonadiabatic with an index {gamma} {approx} 1.25. The four-fluid model captures these effects via a modified equation of state for PUI and SWI. The phase space of time-independent solutions in terms of the Mach numbers of PUI and SWI is constructed to delineate the parameter space which allows structure formation in the heliosheath. The second part of the paper examines the stability of the time-independent solutions computed in the first part by evolving them via a full system of Hall-MHD equations. The simulation results show that these solutions are not quite stable. As the structure propagates it develops growing oscillations in the wings. Concomitantly, there are changes in the amplitude and width of the structure. This instability could be due to local changes in the velocity of the structure and reflects an exchange between the kinetic and magnetic parts of the total energy. Our results about the presence of growing oscillations in the wings of solitary wave solutions are consistent with the recent analysis of MHs in the heliosheth by Burlaga et al. Their analysis also shows evidence for the presence of oscillations and instabilities in the wings of MHs in the heliosheath.

Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, 110007, India. (India); Cox, Sean M.; Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P. [Centre for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Hunstville, AL 35899 (United States)

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

367

A Latent Heat Retrieval and Its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part II: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, a new algorithm for retrieving the latent heat field in tropical cyclones from airborne Doppler radar was presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) were shown. In Part II, the usefulness and ...

Stephen R. Guimond; Jon M. Reisner

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of Aircraft, Radiosonde, and Radar Observations in Cirrus Clouds Observed during FIRE II: The Interactions between Environmental Structure, Turbulence, and Cloud Microphysical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ways to determine the turbulence intensity and the horizontal variability in cirrus clouds have been investigated using First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment II aircraft, radiosonde, and radar data. ...

Samantha A. Smith; Anthony D. DelGenio

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Essays on empirical time series modeling with causality and structural change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, three related issues of building empirical time series models for financial markets are investigated with respect to contemporaneous causality, dynamics, and structural change. In the first essay, nation-wide industry information transmission among stock returns of ten sectors in the U.S. economy is examined through the Directed Acyclical Graph (DAG) for contemporaneous causality and Bernanke decomposition for dynamics. The evidence shows that the information technology sector is the most root cause sector. Test results show that DAG from ex ante forecast innovations is consistent with the DAG fro m ex post fit innovations. This supports innovation accounting based on DAGs using ex post innovations. In the second essay, the contemporaneous/dynamic behaviors of real estate and stock returns are investigated. Selected macroeconomic variables are included in the model to explain recent movements of both returns. During 1971-2004, there was a single structural break in October 1980. A distinct difference in contemporaneous causal structure before and after the break is found. DAG results show that REITs take the role of a causal parent after the break. Innovation accounting shows significantly positive responses of real estate returns due to an initial shock in default risk but insignificant responses of stock returns. Also, a shock in short run interest rates affects real estate returns negatively with significance but does not affect stock returns. In the third essay, a structural change in the volatility of five Asian and U.S. stock markets is examined during the post-liberalization period (1990-2005) in the Asian financial markets, using the Sup LM test. Four Asian financial markets (Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Singapore) experienced structural changes. However, test results do not support the existence of structural change in volatility for Thailand and U.S. Also, results show that the Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) persistent coefficient increases, but the Autoregressive Conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH) impact coefficient, implying short run adjustment, decreases in Asian markets. In conclusion, when the econometric model is set up, it is necessary to consider contemporaneous causality and possible structural breaks (changes). The dissertation emphasizes causal inference and structural consistency in econometric modeling. It highlights their importance in discovering contemporaneous/dynamic causal relationships among variables. These characteristics will likely be helpful in generating accurate forecasts.

Kim, Jin Woong

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Madden–Julian Oscillation, Barotropic Dynamics, and North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part II: Stochastic Barotropic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic barotropic model linearized about the 850-mb flow is used to investigate the relationship between wind variations associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) and eddy kinetic energy variations in the Tropics. Such a model is ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Eric D. Maloney

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Dynamically Consistent Formulations in Meteorological and Air Quality Models for Multiscale Atmospheric Studies. Part II: Mass Conservation Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eulerian air quality models that require gridded meteorological inputs have to adapt to recent advances in meteorological models for fully compressible atmosphere. When the input meteorological data are recast with a robust fully compressible ...

Daewon W. Byun

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electrification of Stratiform Regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems. Part II: Two-Dimensional Numerical Model Simulations of a Symmetric MCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model simulations of a symmetric mesoscale convective system (MCS; observations discussed in Part I) were conducted using a 2D, time-dependent numerical model with bulk microphysics. A number of charging mechanisms were considered based on ...

Terry J. Schuur; Steven A. Rutledge

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Predictability of Linear Coupled Systems. Part II: An Application to a Simple Model of Tropical Atlantic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictability analysis developed within a general framework of linear stochastic dynamics in a companion paper is applied to a simple coupled climate model of tropical Atlantic variability (TAV). The simple model extends the univariate ...

Ping Chang; R. Saravanan; Faming Wang; Link Ji

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Feedbacks of Vegetation on Summertime Climate Variability over the North American Grasslands. Part II: A Coupled Stochastic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled linear model is derived to describe interactions between anomalous precipitation and vegetation over the North American Grasslands. The model is based on biohydrological characteristics in the semiarid environment and has components to ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Robert K. Kaufmann; Christopher Potter; Ranga B. Myneni

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Simulation of the Tropical Pacific Climate with a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model. Part II: Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two multiyear simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GCM)-totaling 45 years-are used to investigate interannual variability at the equator. The model consists of the UCLA global atmospheric GCM coupled to the GFDL ...

A. W. Robertson; C-C. Ma; M. Ghil; C. R. Mechoso

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Semigeostrophic Eady-Wave Frontal Model Incorporating Momentum Diffusion. Part II: Kinetic Energy and Enstrophy Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Momentum diffusion has been introduced into a semigeostrophic Eady-wave frontal model by Blumen (Part I). This model is used to determine the kinetic energy and enstrophy dissipations within a frontal zone that extends from the ground to a ...

William Blumen

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Downslope Flows on a Low-Angle Slope and Their Interactions with Valley Inversions. Part II: Numerical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of well-developed downslope winds observed by tethered balloon soundings at multiple locations over a low-angle slope in the Salt Lake Valley are studied using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The model ...

Shiyuan Zhong; C. David Whiteman

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Modeling of complex oxide materials from the first principles: systematic applications to vanadates RVO3 with distorted perovskite structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Realistic modeling" is a new direction of electronic structure calculations, where the main emphasis is made on the construction of some effective low-energy model entirely within a first-principle framework. Ideally, it is a model in form, but with ... Keywords: Effective models, First-principle calculations, Perovskite vanadates, Spin-orbital order

Igor Solovyev

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling the Effect of Land Surface Evaporation Variability on Precipitation Variability. Part II: Time- and Space-Scale structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a two-part article investigating the impact of variations of land surface evaporability on the interannual variability of precipitation. The first goal of this part is to analyze the relationship between the atmospheric ...

Oreste Reale; Paul Dirmeyer; Adam Schlosser

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Resitivity modeling for arbitrarily shaped two dimensional structures. Part II. User's guide to the FORTRAN algorithm RESIS2D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a numerical solution technique is described to obtain the potential distribution in three-dimensional space due to a point source of charge injection in or on the surface of a half space containing any arbitrary two-dimensional conductivity distribution. Finite difference approximations are made to discretize the governing Poisson's equation with appropriate boundary conditions. The discretization of Poisson's equation by elemental area brought about a numerical formulation for a more effective matrix technique to be utilized to solve for the potential distribution at each node of a discretized half-space. A FORTRAN algorithm named RESIS2D was written to implement the generalized solution method. A brief description of the FORTRAN program in terms of its construction is given. The formal input and output parameters for the relevant subroutines are discussed. The program is designed to be implemented on a CDC 7600 machine. The language of the algorithm is FORTRAN IV; certain programming norms for the CDC 7600 machine and the RUN76 compiler are routinely used. Some variables are stored in the LCM (Large Core Memory) of this machine, and their calling sequence and usage apply to the CDC7600 alone. The resulting solution of the potential distribution can be obtained for a current source or sink located on the surface or at any arbitrary surface location. Any arbitrary configuration of transmitter or receiver electrode arrays, therefore, could be simulated to obtain the resistivity response over arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional geologic bodies. For brevity, in the source deck provided in this report, only two electrode arrays commonly used in geothermal reservoir delineation are illustrated. (JGB)

Dey, A.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Numerical Forecasting of Radiation Fog. Part II: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Several Observed Fog Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1D model adapted for forecasting the formation and development of fog, and forced with mesoscale parameters derived from a 3D limited-area model, was used to simulate three fog event observations made during the Lille 88 campaign. The model ...

Daniel Guedalia; Thierry Bergot

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM). Part II: Formulation and Tests of the Nonhydrostatic Dynamic Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic core of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), which is a new global model that is partly based on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is described and tested. OLAM adopts many features of its predecessor, but its ...

Robert L. Walko; Roni Avissar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies on the structure and stability of model catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An atomic level understanding of the structure and stability of model catalysts is essential for surface science studies in heterogeneous catalysis. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can operate both in UHV and under realistic pressure conditions with a wide temperature span while providing atomic resolution images. Taking advantage of the ability of STM, our research focuses on 1) investigating the structure and stability of supported Au catalysts, especially under CO oxidation conditions, and 2) synthesizing and characterizing a series of alloy model catalysts for future model catalytic studies. In our study, Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been used to model supported Au catalysts. Our STM studies in UHV reveal surface structures of TiO2(110) and show undercoordinated Ti cations play a critical role in the nucleation and stabilization of Au clusters on TiO2(110). Exposing the TiO2(110) surface to water vapor causes the formation of surface hydroxyl groups and subsequently alters the growth kinetics of Au clusters on TiO2(110). STM studies on Au/TiO2(110) during CO oxidation demonstrate the real surface of a working catalyst. Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) sinter rapidly during CO oxidation, but are mostly stable in the single component reactant gas, either CO or O2. The sintering kinetics of supported Au clusters has been measured during CO oxidation and gives an activation energy, which supports the mechanism of CO oxidation induced sintering. CO oxidation was also found to accelerate the surface diffusion of Rh(110). Our results show a direct correlation between the reaction rate of CO oxidation and the diffusion rate of surface metal atoms. Synthesis of alloy model catalysts have also been attempted in our study with their structures successfully characterized. Planar Au-Pd alloy films has been prepared on a Rh(100) surface with surface Au and Pd atoms distinguished by STM. The growth of Au-Ag alloy clusters have been studied by in-situ STM on a cluster-to-cluster basis. Moreover, the atomic structure of a solution-prepared Ru3Sn3 cluster has been resolved on an ultra-thin silica film surface. The atomic structure and adsorption sites of the ultrathin silica film have also been well characterized in our study.

Yang, Fan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

386

A multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a generic multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model, and to assess its mathematical well-posedness. An initial-boundary-value problem is formulated. Existence and uniqueness of a positive weak solution is proved. Eventually, a comparison result is derived: the population of all regions decreases as the mortality rate increases in at least one region.

Faugeras, Blaise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Probing The Electronic Structure of the Di-iron Subsite of[Fe] -hydrogenase: A Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Fe(I)- Fe(I) Model Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structures of a series of Fe(I)-Fe(I) model complexes of the di-iron subsite of[Fe]-hydrogenase,[(mu- PDT)Fe-2(CO)(4)(CN)(2)](2-) (1),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(MeSCH2C(Me)(CH2S)(2))(CN)(2)](2-) (II),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(PhCH2SCH2C(Me)-(CH2S)(2))(CN)(2)](2-) (III),[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(PhCH2SCH2C(Me) (CH2S)(2))(CN)](-) (IV), and[Fe- 2(CO)(4)(MeSCH2C(Me)(CH2S)(2))(CN)](-) (V), were investigated in the gas phase using photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic electron detachment energy (ADE) of each species and the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion for the doubly charged species were obtained. The ADEs correspond to the intrinsic redox potentials (in vacuo) of reactions involving the Fe(I)-Fe(I)/Fe(I)-Fe(II) couples in these compounds. The photoelectron spectra were understood and qualitatively assigned by comparing with that of Fe-2(CO)(6)S- 2, which has been well studied previously and exhibits similar valence spectral features as I-V. A''normal level scheme'' is suggested for the electronic structure of these low spin di- iron compounds, in which all occupied 3d levels lie above all occupied ligand levels. We also observed subtle differences in the electronic structures of the five di-iron complexes due to the slightly different ligand environments.

Yang, Xin; Razavet, Mathieu; Wang, Xue B.; Pickett, Chris J.; Wang, Lai S.

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a User's Guide for the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the second of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC01-79EI10579. The three volumes are entitled: Model Overview and Description; User's Guide; and Software Description. This volume describes each necessary input file, discusses user options, and describes the job stream necessary to run the model.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Global Climate Model (GENESIS) with a Land-Surface Transfer Scheme (LSX). Part II: CO2 Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the equilibrium climate to doubled atmospheric CO2 is investigated using the GENESIS global climate model version 1.02. The atmospheric general circulation model is a heavily modified version of the NCAR CCM1 and is coupled to ...

Starley L. Thompson; David Pollard

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A nonlocal model for fluid-structure interaction with applications in hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling important engineering problems related to flow-induced damage (in the context of hydraulic fracturing among others) depends critically on characterizing the interaction of porous media and interstitial fluid flow. This work presents a new formulation for incorporating the effects of pore pressure in a nonlocal representation of solid mechanics. The result is a framework for modeling fluid-structure interaction problems with the discontinuity capturing advantages of an integral based formulation. A number of numerical examples are used to show that the proposed formulation can be applied to measure the effect of leak-off during hydraulic fracturing as well as modeling consolidation of fluid saturated rock and surface subsidence caused by fluid extraction from a geologic reservoir. The formulation incorporates the effect of pore pressure in the constitutive description of the porous material in a way that is appropriate for nonlinear materials, easily implemented in existing codes, straightforward in i...

Turner, Daniel Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

DETERMINANTS OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN IRAN: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY USING STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper examines the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Iran by applying the structural equation modelling (SEM). Using the annual time series data for the 1991-2006 period, two models were developed. In the first model the correlation between 12 determining factors and FDI in Iran were analyzed and in the second model the 12 factors were fit into five categories of determinants namely: Business, Economic, Infrastructural, Oil and Science and Technology and the impact of each of the mentioned groups of factors was investigated. The results derived through the first model indicated that openness of trade and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita have a significant positive impact on FDI in Iran, while along with inflation, oil extraction and production had a surprisingly negative correlation with FDI. The results also suggested that infrastructural factors pertaining to telecommunications in addition to market size, research and development (R&D), education and the scientific output encourage FDI inflows in Iran. The second model output estimates revealed that the business factors promote FDI most and interestingly once more the oil factor proved to have a negative impact on the FDI inflows to Iran.

Ahmad Jafarnejad; Arash Golnam; Naderale Ebrahim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sea Ice Brightness Temperature as a Function of Ice Thickness, Part II: Computed curves for thermodynamically modelled ice profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice thickness is an important variable for climate scientists and is still an unsolved problem for satellite remote sensing specialists. There has been some success detecting the thickness of thin ice from microwave radiometers, and with this in mind this study attempts to model the thickness-radiance relation of sea ice at frequencies employed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) radiometer and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR): between 1.4 and 89 GHz. In the first part of the study, the salinity of the ice was determined by a pair of empirical relationships, while the temperature was determined by a thermodynamic model. Because the thermodynamic model can be used as a simple ice growth model, in this, second part, the salinities are determined by the growth model. Because the model uses two, constant-weather scenarios representing two extremes ("fall freeze-up" and "winter cold snap"), brine expulsion is modelled with a single correction-step founded on mass conservation. The growt...

Mills, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Validation of the Coupled NCEP Mesoscale Spectral Model and an Advanced Land Surface Model over the Hawaiian Islands. Part II: A High Wind Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high wind event (14–15 February 2001) over the Hawaiian Islands associated with a cold front is simulated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Mesoscale Spectral Model (MSM) coupled with an advanced land surface model (...

Yongxin Zhang; Yi-Leng Chen; Kevin Kodama

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Quantifying the Predictive Skill in Long-Range Forecasting. Part II: Model Error in Coarse-Grained Markov Models with Application to Ocean-Circulation Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An information-theoretic framework is developed to assess the predictive skill and model error in imperfect climate models for long-range forecasting. Here, of key importance is a climate equilibrium consistency test for detecting false predictive ...

Dimitrios Giannakis; Andrew J. Majda

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An Intercomparison of a Bryan-Cox-Type Ocean Model and an Isopycnic Ocean Model. Part II: The Subtropical Gyre and Meridional Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, two ocean general circulation models were implemented in order to simulate and intercompare the main features of the North Atlantic circulation: the Atlantic Isopycnic Model (AIM) and the Hadley Centre Bryan-Cox-type ocean ...

Robert Marsh; Adrian L. New; Malcolm J. Roberts; Richard A. Wood

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transient Planetary Waves Simulated by GFDL Spectral General Circulation Models. Part II: Effects of Nonlinear Energy Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study how transient planetary waves in the midlatitude troposphere are maintained, a space-time spectral analysis over a 1-year data set is made of a GFDL spectral general circulation model.

V. Hayashi; D. G. Golder

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part II: Application to Land Surface Modeling with Satellite Rainfall Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this series of studies developed procedures to implement the multiscale filtering algorithm for land surface hydrology and performed assimilation experiments with rainfall ensembles from a climate model. However, a most important ...

Ming Pan; Eric F. Wood

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Global Multilevel Atmospheric Model Using a Vector Semi-Lagrangian Finite-Difference Scheme. Part II: Version with Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full physical parameterzations have been incorporated into the global model using a two-time-level, semi-Lagrangian, semi-implicit finite-difference integration scheme that was described in Part I of this work. Virtual temperature effects have ...

S. Moorthi; R. W. Higgins; J. R. Bates

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Agent models II: search theory, agent-based simulation, and U-boats in the Bay of Biscay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, most search theory study has focused either on analytical models of specific situations requiring rigid assumptions, or, as in the case of search and rescue, operational experiments aimed at obtaining detection probabilities for a variety of ...

Lance Champagne; R. Greg Carl; Raymond Hill

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Interdecadal and Interannual Variability in the Northern Extratropical Circulation Simulated with the JMA Global Model. Part II: Summertime Leading Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interdecadal and interannual) variations of a model atmosphere in the northern extratropics is examined using a T42 GCM forced with observed near-global SSTs from January 1955 to December 1988.

Ryuichi Kawamura; Masato Sugi; Nobuo Sato

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mapping Frost-Sensitive Areas with a Three-Dimensional Local-Scale Numerical Model. Pad II: Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional numerical model was developed to predict the microclimate near the ground surface of local-scale domains during radiative frost events. Its performances are compared with an observational topo-climatological survey of minimum ...

R. Avissar; Y. Mahrer

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Air–Sea Interaction Theory for Tropical Cyclones. Part II: Evolutionary Study Using a Nonhydrostatic Axisymmetric Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study an analytical model for a steady-state tropical cyclone is constructed on the assumption that boundary-layer air parcels are conditionally neutral to displacements along the angular momentum surfaces of the hurricane ...

Richard Rotunno; Kerry A. Emanuel

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Three-Dimensional Numerical Model of an Isolated Thunderstorm. Part II: Dynamics of Updraft Splitting and Mesovortex Couplet Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the dynamics of an isolated convective storm embedded within marked ambient vertical wind shear dominated by low-level veering, as simulated by a three-dimensional anelastic numerical modeling experiment. Two particular ...

Robert E. Schlesinger

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

On the Dynamics of Planetary Flow Regimes. Part II: Results from a Hierarchy of Orographically Forced Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between steady states of the large-scale flow regimes revealed by multimodality in phase space and quasi-resonant axes of a linearized atmospheric model (neutral vectors) is investigated by means of a hierarchy of three ...

Franco Molteni

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of an Operations and Maintenance Cost Model for LWST; Global Energy Concepts  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Global Energy Concepts to evaluate real-world data on O&M costs and to develop a working model to describe these costs for low wind speed sites.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pacific Northwest Climate Sensitivity Simulated by a Regional Climate Model Driven by a GCM. Part II: 2×CO2 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global climate change due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases has stimulated numerous studies and discussions about its possible impacts on water resources. Climate scenarios generated by climate models at spatial resolutions ranging ...

L. R. Leung; S. J. Ghan

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Zonally Averaged Ocean Model for the Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Interocean Circulation in the Pacific-Atlantic Basin System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zonally averaged, latitude-depth ocean model, developed in Part I, is extended to a two-basin system representing the Atlantic and Pacific. Steady states are calculated under two different surface boundary conditions to study a possible ...

Thomas F. Stocker; Daniel G. Wright

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Moisture Mode in the Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model. Part II: Nonlinear Behavior on an Equatorial ? Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical calculations of a simplified quasi-equilibrium tropical circulation model (QTCM) on the equatorial ? plane have been performed to explore the nonlinear regime of the moisture mode. Sensitivity tests have examined the effects of ...

Masahiro Sugiyama

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Development of Midlatitude Cirrus Models for MODIS Using FIRE-I, FIRE-II, and ARM In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed in situ data from cirrus clouds have been collected during dedicated field campaigns, but the use of the size and habit distribution data has been lagging in the development of more realistic cirrus scattering models. In this study, the ...

Shaima L. Nasiri; Bryan A. Baum; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Ping Yang; Michael R. Poellot; David P. Kratz; Yongxiang Hu

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Investigation of Droplet Size Distributions and Drizzle Formation Using A New Trajectory Ensemble Model. Part II: Lucky Parcels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel trajectory ensemble model of the cloud-topped boundary layer containing 1340 Lagrangian parcels moving with a turbulent-like flow with the observed statistical properties was applied to investigate the formation of the microphysical ...

L. Magaritz; M. Pinsky; O. Krasnov; A. Khain

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Improving Global Model Precipitation Forecasts over India Using Downscaling and the FSU Superensemble. Part II: Seasonal Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses seasonal forecasts of rains over India using the following components: high-resolution rain gauge–based rainfall data covering the years 1987–2001, rain-rate initialization, four global atmosphere–ocean coupled models, a ...

Arindam Chakraborty; T. N. Krishnamurti

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Inert Trace Constituent Transport in Sigma and Hybrid Isentropic–Sigma Models. Part II: Twelve Semi-Lagrangian Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this paper examined nine trace constituent advection algorithms as applied in channel versions of the University of Wisconsin hybrid isentropic–sigma (?–?) and sigma (?) models. This paper examines the performance of 12 semi-Lagrangian ...

Fred M. Reames; Tom H. Zapotocny

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Greenland Surface Mass Balance as Simulated by the Community Earth System Model. Part II: Twenty-First-Century Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first twenty-first-century projections of surface mass balance (SMB) changes for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which includes a new ice sheet component. For glaciated surfaces, ...

Miren Vizcaíno; William H. Lipscomb; William J. Sacks; Michiel van den Broeke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DNA folding: structural and mechanical properties of the two-angle model for chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical analysis of the structural and mechanical properties of the 30-nm chromatin fiber. Our study is based on the two-angle model introduced by Woodcock et al. (Woodcock, C. L., S. A. Grigoryev, R. A. Horowitz, and N. Whitaker. 1993. PNAS 90:9021-9025) that describes the chromatin fiber geometry in terms of the entry-exit angle of the nucleosomal DNA and the rotational setting of the neighboring nucleosomes with respect to each other. We explore analytically the different structures that arise from this building principle, and demonstrate that the geometry with the highest density is close to the one found in native chromatin fibers under physiological conditions. On the basis of this model we calculate mechanical properties of the fiber under stretching. We obtain expressions for the stress-strain characteristics which show good agreement with the results of recent stretching experiments (Cui, Y., and C. Bustamante. 2000. PNAS 97:127-132) and computer simulations (Katritch, V., C. Bustamante, and W. K. Olson. 2000. J. Mol. Biol. 295:29-40), and which provide simple physical insights into correlations between the structural and elastic properties of chromatin.

H. Schiessel; W. M. Gelbart; R. Bruinsma

2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure Structure functions 1 NOTE: THE FIGURES IN THIS SECTION ARE INTENDED TO SHOW THE REPRESENTATIVE DATA. THEY ARE NOT MEANT TO BE COMPLETE COMPILATIONS OF ALL THE WORLD'S RELIABLE DATA. Q 2 (GeV 2 ) F 2 (x,Q 2 ) * 2 i x H1 ZEUS BCDMS E665 NMC SLAC 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 Figure 16.6: The proton structure function F p 2 measured in electromagnetic scattering of positrons on protons (collider experiments ZEUS and H1), in the kinematic domain of the HERA data, for x > 0.00006 (cf. Fig. 16.9 for data at smaller x and Q 2 ), and for electrons (SLAC) and muons (BCDMS, E665, NMC) on a fixed target. Statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature are shown. The data are plotted as a function of Q 2 in bins of fixed x. Some points have been slightly offset in Q 2 for clarity. The ZEUS binning in x is used in this plot; all other data are rebinned to the x values of

420

Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of High-Aspect Ratio Nuclear Fuel Plates Using COMSOL  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Lab is in the research stage of converting its fuel from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Due to different physical properties of the new fuel and changes to the internal fuel plate design, the current safety basis must be re-evaluated through rigorous computational analyses. One of the areas being explored is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon due to the interaction of thin fuel plates (50 mils thickness) and the cooling fluid (water). Detailed computational fluid dynamics and fluid-structure interaction simulations have only recently become feasible due to improved numerical algorithms and advancements in computing technology. For many reasons including the already built-in fluid-structure interaction module, COMSOL has been chosen for this complex problem. COMSOL's ability to solve multiphysics problems using a fully-coupled and implicit solution algorithm is crucial in obtaining a stable and accurate solution. Our initial findings show that COMSOL can accurately model such problems due to its ability to closely couple the fluid dynamics and the structural dynamics problems.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL] ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL] ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effect of Multiple Higgs Fields on the Phase Structure of the SU(2)-Higgs Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SU(2)-Higgs model, with a single Higgs field in the fundamental representation and a quartic self-interaction, has a Higgs region and a confinement region which are analytically connected in the parameter space of the theory; these regions thus represent a single phase. The effect of multiple Higgs fields on this phase structure is examined via Monte Carlo lattice simulations. For the case of N ? 2 identical Higgs fields, there is no remaining analytic connection between the Higgs and confinement regions, at least when Lagrangian terms that directly couple different Higgs flavours are omitted. An explanation of this result in terms of enhancement from overlapping phase transitions is explored for N = 2 by introducing an asymmetry in the hopping parameters of the Higgs fields. It is found that an enhancement of the phase transitions can still occur for a moderate (10%) asymmetry in the resulting hopping parameters. The phase structure of the basic SU(2)-Higgs model (i.e. an SU(2) gauge theory coupled to a single scalar field with a quartic self-interaction and a quadratic term) is clearly of direct relevance to the Higgs sector of the Standard Model, where discussions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and the transition from a symmetric phase to a Higgs phase are paramount. The addition of extra Higgs fields occurs in a

Mark Wurtz; Y Lewis; T. G. Steele

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

In Situ Experiment and Modelling of RC-Structure Using Ambient Vibration and Timoshenko Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, several experiments were reported using ambient vibration surveys in buildings to estimate the modal parameters of buildings. Their modal properties are full of relevant information concerning its dynamic behaviour in its elastic domain. The main scope of this paper is to determine relevant, though simple, beam modelling whose validity could be easily checked with experimental data. In this study, we recorded ambient vibrations in 3 buildings in Grenoble selected because of their vertical structural homogeneity. First, a set of recordings was done using a 18 channels digital acquisition system (CityShark) connected to six 3C Lennartz 5s sensors. We used the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique to extract the modal parameters of these buildings. Second, it is shown in the following that the experimental quasi-elastic behaviour of such structure can be reduced to the behaviour of a vertical continuous Timoshenko beam. A parametric study of this beam shows that a bijective relation exists bet...

Michel, Clotaire; Guéguen, Philippe; Boutin, Claude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Structural characterization and dehydration kinetics of Kirka inderite mineral: Application of non-isothermal models  

SciTech Connect

Coats-Redfern, Arrhenius, Ozawa, Kissinger, and Doyle non-isothermal kinetic models were used to calculate the dynamic kinetic parameters for dehydration reaction of Mg-borate mineral, inderite (Kirka - Turkey) based on thermogravimetric analysis, derivative thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Dehydration experiments were carried out at different heating rates of 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 deg. C/min in a pure nitrogen atmosphere. Structural and morphological properties have been characterized by X-Ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy techniques.

Figen, Aysel Kantuerk, E-mail: akanturk@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Yilmaz, Muege Sari, E-mail: mugesari@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Piskin, Sabriye, E-mail: piskin@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulent flows and coherent structures emerging within turbulent flow fields have been extensively studied for the past few decades and a wide variety of experimental and numerical techniques have been developed for measurement and analysis of turbulent flows. The complex nature of turbulence requires methods that can accurately estimate its highly chaotic spatial and temporal behavior. Some of the classical cases of turbulent flows with simpler geometries have been well characterized by means of the existing experimental techniques and numerical models. Nevertheless, since most turbulent fields are of complex geometries; there is an increasing interest in the study of turbulent flows through models with more complicated geometries. In this dissertation, characteristics of turbulent flows through two different facilities with complex geometries are studied applying two different experimental methods. The first study involves the investigation of turbulent impinging jets through a staggered array of rods with or without crossflow. Such flows are crucial in various engineering disciplines. This experiment aimed at modeling the coolant flow behavior and mixing phenomena within the lower plenum of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Matched Index of Refraction (MIR) techniques were applied to acquire the turbulent velocity fields within the model. Some key flow features that may significantly enhance the flow mixing within the test section or actively affect some of the structural components were identified in the velocity fields. The evolution of coherent structures within the flow field is further investigated using a Snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique. Furthermore, a comparative POD method is proposed and successfully implemented for identification of the smaller but highly influential coherent structures which may not be captured in the full-field POD analysis. The second experimental study portrays the coolant flow through the core of an annular pebble bed VHTR. The complex geometry of the core and the highly turbulent nature of the coolant flow passing through the gaps of fuel pebbles make this case quite challenging. In this experiment, a high frequency Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA) system is applied for velocity measurements and investigation of the bypass flow phenomena within the near wall gaps of the core. The velocity profiles within the gaps verify the presence of an area of increased velocity close to the outer reflector wall; however, the characteristics of the coolant flow profile is highly dependent on the gap geometry and to a less extent on the Reynolds number of the flow. The time histories of the velocity are further analyzed using a Power Spectra Density (PSD) technique to acquire information about the energy content and energy transfer between eddies of different sizes at each point within the gaps.

Amini, Noushin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Quasi-geostrophic Circulation Model of the Northeast Pacific. Part II: Effects of Topography and Seasonal Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-geostrophic regional model of the northeast Pacific is used to investigate the effects of bottom topography and seasonal wind forcing on the circulation of the Alaskan Gyre. In a numerical experiment with a flat bottom and steady forcing ...

Patrick F. Cummins

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Data Constraints Applied to Models of the Ocean General Circulation. Part II: The Transient, Eddy-Resolving Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of the present work we performed assimilation experiments with a multilayer, quasi-geostrophic (QG) eddy-resolving model of the ocean general circulation. In Part I we studied the quasi-linear, steady state and the assimilated data were ...

Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli; William R. Holland

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

An Experiment with an Advanced Surface Parameterization in a Mesobeta-Scale Model. Part II: The 16 June 1986 Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part, we report on a one-day simulation with the French Weather Service limited-area model PERIDOT, including the new parameterization of land-surface energy budget. The emphasis is put on the assessment of the general quality of ...

P. Bougeault; B. Bret; P. Lacarrère; J. Noilhan

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics II: Application to type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of the explosive burning process is highly sensitive to the flame speed model in numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae. Based upon the hypothesis that the effective flame speed is determined by the unresolved turbulent velocity fluctuations, we employ a new subgrid scale model which includes a localised treatment of the energy transfer through the turbulence cascade in combination with semi-statistical closures for the dissipation and non-local transport of turbulence energy. In addition, subgrid scale buoyancy effects are included. In the limit of negligible energy transfer and transport, the dynamical model reduces to the Sharp-Wheeler relation. According to our findings, the Sharp-Wheeler relation is insuffcient to account for the complicated turbulent dynamics of flames in thermonuclear supernovae. The application of a co-moving grid technique enables us to achieve very high spatial resolution in the burning region. Turbulence is produced mostly at the flame surface and in the interior ash regions. Consequently, there is a pronounced anisotropy in the vicinity of the flame fronts. The localised subgrid scale model predicts significantly enhanced energy generation and less unburnt carbon and oxygen at low velocities compared to earlier simulations.

W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt; F. K. Roepke

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Model of the Asian Summer Monsoon.Part II: Cross-Equatorial Flow and PV Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The model developed and tested in Part I of this paper is used to investigate the mechanisms that sustain the low-level East African jet. The East African Highlands and a land/sea contrast in surface friction are shown to be essential for the ...

Mark J. Rodwell; Brian J. Hoskins

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Greenland surface mass balance as simulated by the Community Earth System Model. Part II: 21st century changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first 21st-century projections of surface mass balance (SMB) changes for the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which includes a new ice-sheet component. For glaciated surfaces, CESM ...

Miren Vizcaíno; William H. Lipscomb; William J. Sacks; Michiel van den Broeke

433

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part II: Spectral Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part paper, the spectral response of the interaction between gases, cloud droplets, and solar radiation is investigated using a Monte Carlo-based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model with a spectral ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling the large-scale structure of a barchan dune field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed patterns self-organize, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that obey known empirical relationships and interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations. A rich array of patterns, similar to those observed in nature, emerge from these relatively simple behaviors and interactions, offering a cohesive depiction and a potential explanation of field-scale phenomena. This is the first model to integrate calving and results support the hypothesis that it exerts a first order control on the system; It is fundamental to the formation and stability of field patterns and when the process is disabled, all dunes in all runs grow without bound on short time-scales. Insights derived from this synthesis of dune-scale p...

Worman, S; Littlewood, R; Andreotti, B; Claudin, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fitting Dynamic Models to the Geosat Sea Level Observations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Part II: A Linear, Wind-driven Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geosat altimeter sea level observations in the tropical Pacific Ocean are used to evaluate the Performance of a linear wind-driven equatorial wave model. The question posed is the extent to which such a model can describe the observed sea ...

Lee-Lueng Fu; Ichiro Fukumori; Robert N. Miller

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Combined Local and Nonlocal Closure Model for the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. Part II: Application and Evaluation in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new combined local and nonlocal closure atmospheric boundary layer model called the Asymmetric Convective Model, version 2, (ACM2) was described and tested in one-dimensional form and was compared with large-eddy simulations and field data in ...

Jonathan E. Pleim

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Kinetic model of electric potentials in localized collisionless plasma structures under steady quasi-gyrotropic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as 'U' or 'S' shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

Schindler, K. [Ruhr University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Birn, J. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Hesse, M. [Nasa Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Numerical Simulation of the Meso-? Scale Structure and Evolution of the 1977 Johnstown Flood. Part I: Model Description and Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model, originally developed by Anthes and Warner, is modified to simulate the meso-? scale structure and evolution of convectively driven weather systems. The modifications include: (i) two-way ...

Da-Lin Zhang; J. Michael Fritsch

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Characterization of the Thermal Structure inside an Urban Canyon: Field Measurements and Validation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of measurement campaigns are analyzed to investigate the thermal structure in an urban canyon and to validate a simplified model simulating the air and surface temperatures from surface energy budgets. Starting from measurements at ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Simulation of the tropical Pacific climate with a coupled ocean - atmosphere general circulation model. Part II: Interannual variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two multiyear simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GCM)-totaling 45 years-are used to investigate interannual variability at the equator. The model consists of the UCLA global atmospheric GCM coupled to the GFDL oceanic GCM, dynamically active over the tropical Pacific. Multichannel singular spectrum analysis along the equator identifies ENSO-like quasi-biennial (QB) and quasi-quadrennial (QQ) modes. Both consist of predominantly standing oscillations in sea surface temperature and zonal wind stress that peak in the central or east Pacific, accompanied by an oscillation in equatorial thermocline depth that is characterized by a phase shift of about 90{degrees} across the basin, with west leading east. Simulated interannual variability is weaker than observed in both simulations. One of these is dominated by the QB, the other by the QQ mode, although the two differ only in details of the surface-layer parameterizations. 42 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Robertson, A.W.; Ma, C.C.; Ghil, M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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441

HST STIS Ultraviolet Spectral Evidence of Outflow in Extreme Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxies: II. Modeling and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present modeling to explore the conditions of the broad-line emitting gas in two extreme Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies, using the observational results described in the first paper of this series. Photoionization modeling using Cloudy was conducted for the broad, blueshifted wind lines and the narrow, symmetric, rest-wavelength-centered disk lines separately. A broad range of physical conditions were explored for the wind component, and a figure of merit was used to quantitatively evaluate the simulation results. Of the three minima in the figure-of-merit parameter space, we favor the solution characterized by an X-ray weak continuum, elevated abundances, a small column density (log(N_H)\\approx 21.4), relatively high ionization parameter (log(U)\\approx -1.2 - -0.2), a wide range of densities (log(n)\\approx 7 - 11), and a covering fraction of ~0.15. The presence of low-ionization emission lines implies the disk component is optically thick to the continuum, and the SiIII]/CIII] ratio implies a density of 10^10 - 10^10.25 cm^-3. A low ionization parameter (log(U)=-3) is inferred for the intermediate-ionization lines, unless the continuum is ``filtered'' through the wind before illuminating the intermediate-line emitting gas, in which case log(U)=-2.1. The location of the emission regions was inferred from the photoionization modeling and a simple ``toy'' dynamical model. A large black hole mass (1.3 x 10^8 M_\\odot) radiating at 11% of the Eddington luminosity is consistent with the kinematics of both the disk and wind lines, and an emission radius of ~10^4 R_S is inferred for both. We compare these results with previous work and discuss implications.

Karen M. Leighly

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Integrated modeling and testing of a micro hinged structure for sliding friction measurement  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the design, modeling, and initial evaluation of a hinged structure for friction measurement in surface micromachining technology. While the area requirements are small, the present structure allows a much larger velocity and pressure range to be evaluated as compared to comb drive structures. The device consists of a cantilevered driver beam connected to a friction pad through a strategically located hinge. AC excitation of the beam flexure forces axial sliding of the friction pad due to beam foreshortening. Normal force is controlled by DC voltage on wings adjacent to the friction pad. While the achievable slip is small (10--30 nm), it is sufficient to disengage contacting asperities and engage new points of contact, and thus should be representative of frictional processes. Furthermore, the design enables the friction pad contact area to remain relatively constant over the excitation cycle. Computer simulation results are provided to mimic on-going experimental work. Increased friction forces are shown to enhance the size of hysteresis loops relating beam deflection to driver voltage.

Redmond, J.M.; Boer, M.P. de; Michalske, T.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Simulation of microphysical structure associated with tropical cloud clusters using mesoscale model and comparison with TRMM observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt has been made in the present study to examine the microphysical structure of a non-squall Tropical Cloud Cluster (TCC). Three-dimensional model simulations of cloud microphysical structure associated with a non-squall TCC occurred on 26 October ...

S. Abhilash; K. Mohankumar; S. Das

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Research on Regional Differences of Urban Resident Consumption Structure in China Based on Fuzzy Matter Element Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of residents’ consumption structure plays an important role in macroeconomic policy formulation. Based on per capita annual consumption expenditure of urban households, the fuzzy matter element model is used to evaluate urban resident consumption ... Keywords: comsumption structure, fuzzy matter-element, Euclid approach degree, government consumption expenditure

Hong Li; Bo Zhou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Cloud Properties Simulated by a Single-Column Model. Part II: Evaluation of Cumulus Detrainment and Ice-Phase Microphysics Using a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series in which kilometer-scale-resolving observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and output from the University of California, Los Angeles/Colorado State University cloud-resolving model (CRM)...

Yali Luo; Steven K. Krueger; Kuan-Man Xu

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF DIGITAL BUILDING MODELS FOR COMPLEX STRUCTURES FROM LIDAR DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated and reliable 3D reconstruction of man-made structures is important for various applications in virtual reality, city modeling, military training, etc. This paper is concerned with the automated generation of Digital Building Models (DBM) associated with complex structures comprised of small parts with different slopes, sizes, and shapes, from a LiDAR point cloud. The proposed methodology consists of a sequence of four steps: ground/non-ground point separation; building hypothesis generation; segmentation of planar patches and intermediate boundary generation; and boundary refinement and 3D wire frame generation. First, a novel ground/non-ground point classification technique is proposed based on the visibility analysis among ground and non-ground points in a synthesized perspective view. Once the LiDAR point cloud has been classified into ground and non-ground points, the non-ground points are analyzed and used to generate hypotheses of building instances based on the point attributes and the spatial relationships among the points. The third step of the proposed methodology segments each building hypothesis into a group of planar patches while simultaneously considering the attribute similarity and the spatial proximity among the points. The intermediate boundaries for segmented clusters are produced by using a modified convex hull algorithm. These boundaries are used as initial approximations of the planar surfaces comprising the building model of a given hypothesis. The last step of the proposed methodology utilizes these initial boundaries to come up with a refined set of boundaries, which are connected to produce a wire frame representing the DBM. The performance of the proposed methodology has been evaluated using experimental results from real data.

Changjae Kim; Ayman Habib; Yu-chuan Chang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

449

Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

450

HST STIS Ultraviolet Spectral Evidence of Outflow in Extreme Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxies: II. Modeling and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) This is the second of two papers on the UV emission-line properties of Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxies (NLS1s). In the first paper, HST STIS spectra from two extreme NLS1s, IRAS 13224-3809 and 1H 0707-495, were analyzed in detail. In this paper, we present modeling intended to explore the physical conditions of the line-emitting gas. Photoionization modeling using Cloudy was conducted for the broad, blueshifted wind component and the narrow, symmetric, rest-wavelength-centered disk component of the lines separately. For the wind component, a broad range of ionizing flux, column density, density, covering fraction, and a limited range of continuum shape and metallicity were explored. A figure of merit was used to quantitatively evaluate the results of the simulations. We found three minima of the figure of merit in parameter space. We favor the solution characterized by an X-ray weak continuum, metallicity enhanced by a factor of 5 and nitrogen enhanced by a factor of 10 over solar, a small column de...

Leighly, K M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrodes II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Fuel Cells: Materials, Processing, Manufacturing, Balance of Plant and ... and structural degradation of the cell during 400 hrs of testing.

452

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades ’ worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 1986–2005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

454

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Regional Model Simulation of the 1991 Severe Precipitation Event over the Yangtze–Huai River Valley. Part II: Model Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a study investigating the 1991 severe precipitation event over the Yangtze–Huai River valley (YHRV) in China using both observations and regional model simulations. While Part I reported on the Mei-yu front and its ...

Wei Gong; Wei-Chyung Wang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Zuidema, Paquita

457

Effect of Multiple Higgs Fields on the Phase Structure of the SU(2)-Higgs Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SU(2)-Higgs model, with a single Higgs field in the fundamental representation and a quartic self-interaction, has a Higgs region and a confinement region which are analytically connected in the parameter space of the theory; these regions thus represent a single phase. The effect of multiple Higgs fields on this phase structure is examined via Monte Carlo lattice simulations. For the case of N>=2 identical Higgs fields, there is no remaining analytic connection between the Higgs and confinement regions, at least when Lagrangian terms that directly couple different Higgs flavours are omitted. An explanation of this result in terms of enhancement from overlapping phase transitions is explored for N=2 by introducing an asymmetry in the hopping parameters of the Higgs fields. It is found that an enhancement of the phase transitions can still occur for a moderate (10%) asymmetry in the resulting hopping parameters.

Mark Wurtz; Randy Lewis; T. G. Steele

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Spectral Element Approach for Modeling of Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. As the setup of wave based SHM systems may be very difficult and time consuming there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore a flat shell spectral element approach is presented in this contribution. By including electromechanical coupling an SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. The focus of this contribution is the analysis of the effect of delaminations on propagating waves. A forward increment Lagrange multiplier method is used to simulate contact within the delaminated area. A model validation is performed using measured data of an anisotropic CFRP-plate.

Schulte, Rolf T.; Fritzen, Claus-Peter [Institute of Mechanics and Control-Mechatronics, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Str. 9-11, 57076 Siegen (Germany)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Managerial Coaching Behavior and Employee Outcomes: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last two decades, managerial coaching has become increasingly popular in organizations. Despite its popularity, there is a paucity of empirical evidence in the study of managerial coaching outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived managerial coaching behavior and employee self-reported affective and performance-related outcomes based on perceptions of selected organization employees. Three theories, path-goal leadership, career motivation, and organization support, were used to frame the hypothesized conceptual model of managerial coaching outcomes for the current study. The systematic review of relevant literature identified satisfaction with work, role ambiguity, satisfaction with manager, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment for the potential outcomes of managerial coaching. A 36-item survey including seven existing instruments was utilized to collect data. An estimation of the readability level for the survey was Flesh-Kincaid Grade Level 7.1. The survey was sent electronically to all employees in the selected government organization. The sample included 431 respondents representing a population of 1,399 employees. Descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, Cronbach‘s alpha estimates for reliability, correlation analysis, two-step modeling techniques for structural equation modeling, and Sobel tests were the analysis methods used in the study. The results of the analyses indicated that the hypothesized conceptual model was adequately supported by the empirical data of the study sample (?2/df = 3.53; CFI = .91; IFI = .91; RMSEA = .08). The further investigations suggested that managerial coaching had a direct impact on employee satisfaction with work and role clarity and an indirect impact on satisfaction with work, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment. Role clarity, as a direct outcome of managerial coaching, influenced job performance—such mediation was consistent with the hypothesized model for the study. The hypothesized model had clear and comprehensive illustrations of how managerial coaching affects work and organization-related variables, satisfaction with work, role clarity, career commitment, job performance, and organization commitment. This study provides empirical support to the proposed benefits of managerial coaching in organizations, and enhances the selected theories by offering additional empirical support to them.

Kim, Sewon

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Stokes imaging of AM Her systems using 3D inhomogeneous models-II. Modelling X-ray and optical data of CP Tucanae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viewing geometry of the polar CP Tuc that better explains its optical and X-ray light curves is controversial. Previous modelling of white-light polarimetric data considered the partial self-eclipse of an extended inhomogeneous emitting region. Alternatively, phase-dependent absorption has been used to reproduce the X-ray data. This paper presents new optical polarimetric data of CP Tuc and a model that consistently explains its optical and X-ray data. The model was based on an extension of the CYCLOPS code that added X-ray bremsstrahlung emission and pre-shock region absorption to the original version, which only accounted for cyclotron emission. The new code creates the possibility of simultaneous optical and X-ray fitting. We show that self-eclipse and absorption data have distinct signatures on the X-ray spectra. Although we were able to reasonably fit the CP Tuc optical data to cases of absorption and self-eclipse, we were only able to reproduce the X-ray orbital modulation after considering the abso...

Silva, K M G; Costa, J E R; de Souza, C A; Cieslinski, D; Hickel, G R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii structural model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of