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1

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

2

BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS FOR THE SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS WITH TOPOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS FOR THE SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS WITH TOPOGRAPHY MING-CHENG SHIUE, JACQUES LAMINIE, ROGER TEMAM, AND JOSEPH TRIBBIA Abstract. In this article, the nonviscous shallow water equations) for subcritical and supercritical flows are associated with these equations. The semi- discrete cental

Temam, Roger

3

Alfalfa water use pinpointed in saline, shallow water tables of Imperial Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shallow water tables of Imperial Valley Khaled M. Bali Qin water user in the Imperial Valley several western states.shallow, use in the Imperial Valley, where it moderately

Bali, Khaled M.; Grismer, Mark E.; Snyder, Richard L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Oceanography DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Robust Source Localization in a Random Shallow Water Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses source localization problem in a random shallow water channel. We present an extension of the generalized MUSIC method to the case, %in which when the signal correlation matrix is imprecisely known. The algorithm is validated by %simulations and its application to the experimental data observed in the Barents Sea. It has been found that the approach proposed demonstrates its excellent performance.

Sazontov, Alexander; Matveyev, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Relationships between shallow-water cumacean assemblages and sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf daniel martin1 , ulla fernandez-arcaya1 , paula tirado1 , e'ric dutrieux on a shallow water tropical cumacean assemblage from the Persian Gulf, where 50% of the existing species were assemblages, sediment characteristics, Persian Gulf Submitted 20 November 2008; accepted 25 May 2009; first

Martin, Daniel

8

Survey of the Shallow-water Echinoderms of Nauru, Micronesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of the Shallow-water Echinoderms of Nauru, Micronesia Results of a Survey Performed 28 July to 1 August 1998 by Alexander M. Kerr February 2014 University of Guam Marine Laboratory Technical to AMK. Tubwa! #12;#12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The island of Nauru in eastern Micronesia potentially

Mcilwain, Jenny

9

Symmetry group analysis of the shallow water and semi-geostrophic equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......model for describing atmospheric motions on a synoptic...dimensional shallow water theory ( 8 ), a...symmetries of the shallow water equations Substituting...The infinitesimal generator associated with...The infinitesimal generator is and so we have...laws for shallow water equations 4.1......

Nicoleta Bîla; Elizabeth L. Mansfield; Peter A. Clarkson

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Transport Theory for Shallow Water Propagation with Rough Boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At frequencies of about 1 kHz and higher, forward scattering from a rough sea surface (and/or a rough bottom) can strongly affect shallow water propagation and reverberation. The need exists for a fast, yet accurate method for modeling such propagation where multiple forward scattering occurs. A transport theory method based on mode coupling is described that yields the first and second moments of the field. This approach shows promise for accurately treating multiple forward scattering in one-way propagation. The method is presently formulated in two space dimensions, and Monte-Carlo rough surface PE simulations are used for assessing the accuracy of transport theory results.

Thorsos, Eric I.; Henyey, Frank S.; Elam, W. T.; Hefner, Brian T.; Reynolds, Stephen A.; Yang Jie [Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Finite Volume Implementation of the Shallow Water Equations for Boussinesq Gravity Currents.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The shallow water equations (SWE) are a powerful tool for modeling the propagation of gravity currents (GC) because of their relative simplicity, computational efficiency and… (more)

Hatcher, Thomas Jr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

THE EXACT RIEMANN SOLUTIONS TO SHALLOW WATER EE HAN AND GERALD WARNECKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EXACT RIEMANN SOLUTIONS TO SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS EE HAN AND GERALD WARNECKE Abstract. We determine completely the exact Riemann solutions for the shallow water equations with a bottom step on the subcritical and supercritical Froude number of the Riemann initial data as well as the jump of the bottom step

13

THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS WITH TRANSPARENT BOUNDARY CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS WITH TRANSPARENT BOUNDARY CONDITIONS MADALINA PETCU the question of the local in time well-posedness of the one-dimensional Shallow Water on an interval, these equations being supplemented with suitable boundary conditions. The flows considered are subcritical

Temam, Roger

14

Some approximate Godunov schemes to compute shallow-water equations with topography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some approximate Godunov schemes to compute shallow-water equations with topography Thierry the computation of shallow-water equations with topography by Finite Volume methods, in a one method. Some test cases are presented: convergence towards steady states in subcritical and supercritical

Herard, Jean-Marc

15

Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the behaviour of the hydrocarbon plume at the groundwater/surface water transition zone to be strongly B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ground water; Surface water; Hydrocarbons; Discharge; TidesInteraction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge

Clement, Prabhakar

16

Mechanism for the formation of equatorial superrotation in forced shallow-water turbulence with Newtonian cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forced shallow-water turbulence on a rotating sphere with Newtonian cooling is examined with the aim of elucidating the mechanism of the robust formation of equatorial superrotation reported by Scott and Polvani in 2008 (Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, ...

Izumi Saito; Keiichi Ishioka

17

Idealized annually averaged Macroturbulent Hadley 3 Circulation in a Shallow Water Model 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 2 Idealized annually averaged Macroturbulent Hadley 3 Circulation driven Hadley 25 circulation is studied using an idealized shallow water model, is predicted by an effective macroturbulent Hadley circulation 32 Prandtl number, Pr

Harnik, Nili

18

Accounting for water-column variability in shallow-water waveguide characterizations based on modal eigenvalues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of water-column variability on the characterization of shallow-water waveguides using modal eigenvalue information is considered. This work is based on the relationship between the acoustic pressure field in shallow water and the depth-dependent Green's function through the Hankel transform. In many practical situations, the Hankel transform can be approximated by a Fourier transform, in which case the Green's function is approximated by a horizontal wave number spectrum with discrete peaks corresponding with individual modal eigenvalues. In turn, the wave number data can be used in inverse algorithms to determine geoacoustic properties of the waveguide. Wave number spectra are estimated from measurements of a point-source acoustic field on a horizontal aperture array in the water column. For range-dependent waveguides, techniques analogous to using a short-time Fourier transform are employed to estimate range-dependent wave number spectra. In this work, water-column variability due to linear internal waves and mesoscale features are considered. It will be shown that these two types of variability impact the estimation of range-dependent modal eigenvalues in different ways. Approaches for accounting for these different types of variability will be discussed as they apply to waveguide characterization.

Becker, Kyle M. [Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States); Ballard, Megan S. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

A shallow-water system for sampling macrobenthic infauna  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oct 1, 1973 ... of materials between water and sediments. ... water estuarine areas penetrated to a depth of 2O- .... pelled by a 7 hp outboard motor, which.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Shallow Water Model which Admit a Propagation of Shocks over a Dry Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for modeling the propagation of hydraulic bores over a dry bed using the first approximation of shallow water theory is proposed. The method is based on a modified conservation law of total momentum that takes into account the concentrated momentum losses due to the formation of local turbulent vortex structures in the fluid surface layer at a hydraulic bore front. A quantitative estimate of these losses is obtained by deriving the shallow water equations from the Navier?Stokes equations with allowance for viscosity which has a rapidly increasing effect in the turbulent flow regions described in theory as shocks. A comparative analysis is performed for the modeling of the dam?break problem experimentally and theoretically by the help of the classical and modified shallow water equations. Numerical results are presented for the propagation over a dry bed of a two?dimensional shock arising in a partial dam break in a channel with sloping bottom in the lower pool.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

22

ACKLESON, STEVEN G. Light in shallow waters: A brief research ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22043 ... ecosystems, such as coral reefs or seagrasses, the in-water light field is often ...

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

A guide to RBF-generated finite differences for nonlinear transport: shallow water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A guide to RBF-generated finite differences for nonlinear transport: shallow water simulationsInstitute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences, National Center for Atmospheric Research , Boulder, CO 80305 USA b of nodes. RBF- generated finite differences (RBF-FD) are conceptually similar to standard finite

Wright, Grady B.

24

A perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a limited-area numerical weather prediction model, the lateral boundaries are not physical boundaries interest since the early days of numerical weather prediction. Several good reviews are availableA perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split

Navon, Michael

25

Vorticity Generation in the Shallow-Water Equations as Applied to Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors attempt to find a bridge between the vorticity dynamics of a finite cross-stream length hydraulic jump implied by the Navier-Stokes equations and that given by the shallow-water approximation (SWA) with the turbulence of the hydraulic ...

Richard Rotunno; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Survey of the Shallow-water Sea Cucumbers of Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of the Shallow-water Sea Cucumbers of Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia Results and Technology January 2014 University of Guam Marine Laboratory Technical Report 155 #12;#12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS and ! #12;#12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The islands of Chuuk in the Caroline Islands of central Micronesia

Mcilwain, Jenny

27

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges and furrows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges Abstract We introduce a new Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow with furrow conservation (decreases soil thickness by erosion and causes nutrient loss), infrastruc- tures (flooding

d'Orléans, Université

28

A mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy conserving lateral fluid-land boundary scheme for the shallow water equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical scheme for treating fluid-land boundaries in inviscid shallow water flows is derived that conserves the domain-summed mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy in domains with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. The boundary scheme is derived ... Keywords: Boundary conditions, Conservation, Energy, Potential enstrophy, Shallow water equations, Vorticity

G. S. Ketefian; M. Z. Jacobson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The influence of mesoscale eddies on shallow water acoustic propagation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic propagation measurements in 150 m depth on the Florida escarpment observe the effects of the passage of a cyclonic eddy. As the stream core of the Florida Current meanders the eddy is formed and propagates along the shelf edge. The sequence over a roughly a fortnight is as follows: ahead of the eddy warm surface water and cold bottom water are swept onto the terrace forming a steep thermocline and corresponding strong downward refracting C(z). The gradient produce intense focused RBR arrivals and the thermocline becomes a duct for internal waves to propagate shoreward. At first the internal wave energy is minimal and propagation is stable and coherent. As the internal tides attempt to propagate on shelf the sound speed field and the acoustic signals become increasingly variable. The variability reaches a crescendo as the 200 m long internal tide is blocked from propagating on to the narrower shelf and begins to break and overturn producing small?scale variability. As the eddy passes nearly iso?thermal conditions are restored along with quiescent internal wave fields and reduced signal variability. Here the effects are quantized with data from fixed?system acoustic and oceanographic measurements demonstrating that the mesoscale determines acoustic propagation conditions days in advance.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Panama City 2003 Broadband Shallow?water Acoustic Coherence Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In June 2003 a series of acoustic propagation experiments were conducted off the coast of Panama City Florida. The experiments were designed to measure and provide an understand of signal phase and amplitude fluctuations and signal spatial and temporal coherence over several large horizontal and vertical arrays. The propagation measurements were conducted in a water depth of 8.8m and at ranges of 70 m and 150 m. The acoustic measurements cover frequencies from 1 to 140 kHz. The propagation measurements were supported by data obtained by wave rider buoys CTD’s thermister chains and current meters. Bottom penetration data was also obtained using a buried hydrophone array. The experiments will be outlined and the data sets described.

Steve Stanic; Edgar Kennedy; Dexter Malley; Bob Brown; Roger Meredith; Robert Fisher; Howard Chandler; Richard Ray; Ralph Goodman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin Accelerated ELP Method for the Shallow Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new approach to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. The addition of multiwavelets to discontinuous Galerkin method, which has the benefit of being scalable, flexible, and conservative, provides a hierarchical scale structure that can be exploited to improve computational efficiency in both the spatial and temporal dimensions. This paper explains how combining a multiwavelet discontinuous Galerkin method with exact linear part time-evolution schemes, which can remain stable for implicit-sized time steps, can help increase the time-step size for shallow water equations on the sphere.

White III, James B [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Drake, John [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Risø Air–Sea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Experimental investigation of factors controlling the calcium carbonate ion activity product of shallow water carbonate-rich sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE-RICH SEDIMENTS A Thesis by LAWRENCE DOUGLAS BERNSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Oceanography EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE...

Bernstein, Lawrence Douglas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Removal of water from a shallow bath under laser pulse irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was made of water removal from a shallow bath under the action of a CO{sub 2}-laser radiation pulse focused to a spot of size substantially smaller than the bath length. We showed that the specific expenditure of energy is determined by the intensity of laser radiation at the water surface for different values of the focal spot area and pulse duration. The removal dynamics was studied by single-frame photography technique. It was determined that the water is removed layerwise only from the walls of the cavern, which expands in the horizontal direction upon cessation of the radiation pulse. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were made of the water removal, and a mechanism was proposed to explain the experimentally observed removal pattern. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Antonova, L I; Gladush, G G; Glova, A F; Drobyazko, S V; Krasyukov, A G; Mainashev, V S; Rerikh, V L; Taran, M D [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling shallow?water propagation with an appropriate sea?surface roughness spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictions for shallow?water acoustic propagation are usually accomplished assuming a deep?water spectrum for the sea surface roughness. In addition the effect of surface roughness is normally included through a loss mechanism. However for waveguide propagation the surface roughness mainly causes a redistribution of energy and therefore the use of an accurate model to handle roughness is essential to obtaining accurate results. In order to properly model shallow?water surface roughness the parametric spectrum GONO [Sanders and Bruinsma Wave Dynamics and Radio Probing of the Ocean Surface edited by O. M. Phillips and K. Hassemann (Plenum New York 1986) pp. 615–637] has been implemented. This spectrum is appropriate for wind?driven surfaces in waters ranging in depth from 15 to 100 m. To investigate the impact that different spectra has on the propagating field predictions using GONO and Pierson–Moskowitz spectra are compared for different environments and at frequencies typical of active and passive sonars. An acoustic propagationmodel which includes a conformal mapping algorithm to properly handle sea surface roughness [Norton et al. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97 2173–2180 (1995)] is used to generate the numerical results. [Work supported by ONR.

Guy V. Norton; Jorge C. Novarini

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The representation of boundary currents in a finite element shallow water model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the influence of local resolution, eddy viscosity, coastline structure, and boundary conditions on the numerical representation of boundary currents in a finite element shallow-water model. The use of finite element discretization methods offers a higher flexibility compared to finite difference and finite volume methods, that are mainly used in previous publications. This is true for the geometry of the coast lines and for the realization of boundary conditions. For our investigations we simulate steady separation of western boundary currents from idealized and realistic coast lines. The use of grid refinement allows a detailed investigation of boundary separation at reasonable numerical cost.

Düben, Peter D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nonlinear effects on hydrodynamic pressure field caused by ship moving at supercritical speed in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on the shallow-water wave potential flow theory and the assumption of a slender ship, a mathematical model has been established for the pressure field caused by ship moving at supercritical speed in shallow water, with nonlinear and dispersive effects taken into account. The finite difference method is used for the numerical calculation of the ship hydrodynamic pressure field (SHPF), with the central and upwind difference schemes as a combination for the second derivative of the nonlinear term. And the artificial viscous terms are added in the hull and upstream boundary conditions to ensure the stability of solving the nonlinear equation. The comparison between the calculated results and the experimental results shows that both the mathematical model and the calculation method are effective and feasible. The analysis of the nonlinear effects of different-depth water, different depth Froude number and different-width channel on SHPF indicates that the closer to the critical speed the ship in sailing, the narrower the channel becomes, the greater the nonlinear effects on SHPF are.

Hui Deng; Zhi-hong Zhang; Ju-bin Liu; Jian-nong Gu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Probing the thermal character of analogue Hawking radiation for shallow water waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study and numerically compute the scattering coefficients of shallow water waves blocked by a stationary counterflow. When the flow is transcritical, the coefficients closely follow Hawking's prediction according to which black holes should emit a thermal spectrum. We study how the spectrum deviates from thermality when reducing the maximal flow velocity, with a particular attention to subcritical flows since these have been recently used to test Hawking's prediction. For such flows, we show that the emission spectrum is strongly suppressed, and that its Planckian character is completely lost. For low frequencies, we also show that the scattering coefficients are dominated by elastic hydrodynamical channels. Our numerical results reproduce rather well the observations made by S. Weinfurtner {\\it et al.} in the Vancouver experiment. Nevertheless, we propose a new interpretation of what has been observed, as well as new experimental tests.

Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

On the exponential power law for low frequency attenuation in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reviews of measured shallow-water sound transmission over sandy-silty bottoms show the intrinsic attenuation for low frequencies (energy downwards out of the waveguide is considered. Since the intrinsic attenuation and the apparent attenuation due to shear wave conversion are small the observed attenuation can have a different frequency dependence. If the removal of energy from the field due to shear wave conversion is comparable to the intrinsic attenuation at the lower frequencies but less than the intrinsic attenuation at the higher frequencies; the inferred frequency dependence can be less than quadratic. Inversions with fluid sediments account for this effect by the site-specific factors that accounts for the loss of energy from the compressible field due shear wave conversion.

William M. Carey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hodograph Method and Numerical Integration of Two Hyperbolic Quasilinear Equations. Part I. The Shallow Water Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In paper [S.I. Senashov, A. Yakhno. 2012. SIGMA. Vol.8. 071] the variant of the hodograph method based on the conservation laws for two hyperbolic quasilinear equations of the first order is described. Using these results we propose a method which allows to reduce the Cauchy problem for the two quasilinear PDE's to the Cauchy problem for ODE's. The proposed method is actually some similar method of characteristics for a system of two hyperbolic quasilinear equations. The method can be used effectively in all cases, when the linear hyperbolic equation in partial derivatives of the second order with variable coefficients, resulting from the application of the hodograph method, has an explicit expression for the Riemann-Green function. One of the method's features is the possibility to construct a multi-valued solutions. In this paper we present examples of method application for solving the classical shallow water equations.

E. V. Shiryaeva; M. Yu. Zhukov

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Discontinuous Galerkin Global Shallow Water Model RAMACHANDRAN D. NAIR, STEPHEN J. THOMAS, AND RICHARD D. LOFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as total energy and potential enstrophy, conservation of these quantities is better preserved than, without any filter or limiter. Numerical results are reported for the standard shallow water test suite attractive features such as high-order accuracy, parallel efficiency, and the ability to accommodate adaptive

Nair, Ramachandran D.

42

Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin-Accelerated Exact Linear Part (ELP) Method for the Shallow-Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a new approach is presented to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. ...

Rick Archibald; Katherine J. Evans; John Drake; James B. White III

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commentary Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun Paul D. Williams Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK a r t i c l e i n f integration of the shallow-water equa- tions using the leapfrog time-stepping scheme [Sun Wen-Yih, Sun Oliver

Williams, Paul

44

DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right Watch the video or view the...

45

Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical-water platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Cretaceous benthic associations (foraminifera and calcareous algae) of a shallow tropical of benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae in order to establish a precise, combined benthic biozonation species of calcareous algae, distributed among 11 genera, were recovered from the Lower Cretaceous shallow

Husinec, Antun

46

A conservative adaptive wavelet method for the shallow water equations on the sphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce an innovative wavelet-based approach to dynamically adjust the local grid resolution to maintain a uniform specified error tolerance. Extending the work of Dubos and Kevlahan (2013), a wavelet multi-scale approximation is used to make dynamically adaptive the TRiSK model (Ringler et al. 2010) for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere. This paper focuses on the challenges encountered when extending the adaptive wavelet method to the sphere and ensuring an efficient parallel implementation using MPI. The wavelet method is implemented in Fortran95 with an emphasis on computational efficiency and scales well up to O(10^2) processors for load-unbalanced scenarios and up to at least O(10^3) processors for load-balanced scenarios. The method is verified using standard smooth test cases (Williamson et al. 1992) and a nonlinear test case proposed by (Galewsky te al. 2004). The dynamical grid adaption provides compression ratios of up to 50 times in a challenging homogenous turbulence test cas...

Aechtner, Matthias; Dubos, Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ecological Values of Shallow-Water Habitats: Implications for the Restoration of Disturbed Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A presumed value of shallow-habitat enhanced pelagic productivity derives from the principle that in nutrient-rich aquatic systems phytoplankton growth rate is controlled by light availability, which varies in...

Cary B. Lopez; James E. Cloern; Tara S. Schraga; Amy J. Little; Lisa V. Lucas…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Z .Marine Chemistry 64 1999 229252 The chemical composition of shallow-water hydrothermal fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; accepted 1 September 1998 Abstract Z .Submarine, hydrothermal venting occurs at Tutum Bay in shallow 5­10 m in Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea and their effect on ambient seawater Thomas Pichler a,) , Jan Veizer a,b , Gwendy E.M. Hall c a Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, Uni�ersity of Ottawa, Ottawa

Pichler, Thomas

50

Applying Single-Layer Shallow-Water Theory to Gap Flows in the Brenner Pass Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. pressure mean deviation of pot. temperature mean wind speed cross-section of topography shallow foehn jump;Doppler wind lidar FOEHN 30 Oct 1999 20 Oct 1999 gap flow ambient flow ridge lidar location LIDAR NOAA InnsbruckBrenner wind speed #12;SWM simulations FOEHN valley exit Ellboegen Tienzens Brenner Steinach/ Gries

Gohm, Alexander

51

Shallow-water sloshing in rotating vessels undergoing prescribed rigid-body motion in two dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there are the attendant problems of fluid-ship interaction, hydroelastic effects, bubble formation, wave breaking] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 12.3 Effect of centre of rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 12: the shipping of liquid natural gas, sloshing of trapped water on the deck of a ship, liquid transport along

Bridges, Tom

52

Special challenges in design and construction of concrete structures in shallow water and soft soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes briefly the trends in offshore concrete structures in the North Sea and reviews the main decisive design requirements. General design process and foundation design with emphasis on soft soil conditions are described and discussed. Further the paper presents 3 gravity based concrete platforms for soft soil in 145 m, 75 m and 20 m water depths, respectively. Particulars on the construction site and work, and main items on project execution model are discussed.

Loset, O. [Kvaerner Concrete Construction, Hovik (Norway); Schroder, K. [Norwegian Geotechnical Inst., Oslo (Norway)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimal Boussinesq model for shallow-water waves interacting with a microstructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the propagation of water waves in a long-wave asymptotic regime, when the bottom topography is periodic on a short length scale. We perform a multiscale asymptotic analysis of the full potential theory model and of a family of reduced Boussinesq systems parametrized by a free parameter that is the depth at which the velocity is evaluated. We obtain explicit expressions for the coefficients of the resulting effective Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equations. We show that it is possible to choose the free parameter of the reduced model so as to match the KdV limits of the full and reduced models. Hence the reduced model is optimal regarding the embedded linear weakly dispersive and weakly nonlinear characteristics of the underlying physical problem, which has a microstructure. We also discuss the impact of the rough bottom on the effective wave propagation. In particular, nonlinearity is enhanced and we can distinguish two regimes depending on the period of the bottom where the dispersion is either enhanced or reduced compared to the flat bottom case.

Josselin Garnier; Roberto A. Kraenkel; André Nachbin

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Investigation of modal processing for low frequency acoustic communications in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic receptions at a vertical line array collected during the SW06 experiment were processed to show the feasibility of broadband mode decomposition as a preprocessing method to shorten time-spread and concentrate received signal energy in a small number of independent channels. The vertical array spanned the water column from 12 m depth to the bottom. PSK m-sequence modulated signals with different carrier frequencies were transmitted from a distance of 19.2 km. Signals were processed for both the case of ordinary internal waves activity and the case with abnormally strong internal wave solitons. The measured sound velocity and known bottom properties were accounted for. Mode filtering was based on a broadband pseudo-inverse processing of the received VLA signals. The broadband mode filtering decomposed the received signal into a number of independent signals with a reduced time-spread. The constellation of signals from the output of mode filters showed that a simple demodulator can achieve a high quality reception. Even during strong internal waves activity the acoustic energy was concentrated in a small number of the first acoustical modes. The receiver estimated the mode-time intensity distribution and used the strongest modes for demodulation. High quality reception is demonstrated with the data.

Andrey K. Morozov; James C. Preisig; Joseph C. Papp

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of modal processing for low frequency acoustic communications in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic receptions at a vertical line array collected during the SW06 experiment were processed to show the feasibility of broadband mode decomposition as a preprocessing method to shorten time?spread and concentrate received signal energy in a small number of independent channels. The vertical array spanned the water column from 12 m depth to the bottom. PSK m?sequence modulated signals with different carrier frequencies were transmitted from a distance of 19.2 km. Signals were processed for both the case of ordinary internal waves activity and the case with abnormally strong internal wavesolitons. The measured sound velocity and known bottom properties were accounted for. Mode filtering was based on a broadband pseudo?inverse processing of the received VLA signals. The broadband mode filtering decomposed the received signal into a number of independent signals with a reduced time?spread. The constellation of signals from the output of mode filters showed that a simple demodulator can achieve a high quality reception. Even during strong internal waves activity the acoustic energy was concentrated in a small number of the first acoustical modes. The receiver estimated the mode?time intensity distribution and used the strongest modes for demodulation. High quality reception is demonstrated with the data.

Andrey Morozov; James Preisig; Joseph Papp

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Water adsorption on SrTiO3(001): II. Water, water, everywhere A.E. Becerra-Toledo a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water adsorption on SrTiO3(001): II. Water, water, everywhere A.E. Becerra-Toledo a, , J January 2012 Available online 17 January 2012 Keywords: Strontium titanate Density functional theory Water adsorption Surface reconstruction X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Oxide surfaces The role of water

Marks, Laurence D.

58

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) shallow water hydrocarbon seeps from Snow Hill and Seymour Islands, James Ross Basin, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fossil hydrocarbon seeps are present in latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) volcaniclastic shallow shelf sediments exposed on Snow Hill and Seymour Islands, James Ross Basin, Antarctica. The seeps occur in the Snow Hill Island Formation on Snow Hill Island and are manifest as large-sized, cement-rich carbonate bodies, containing abundant thyasirid bivalves and rarer ammonites and solemyid bivalves. These bodies have typical seep cement phases, with ?13C values between ? 20.4 and ? 10.7‰ and contain molecular fossils indicative of terrigenous organic material and the micro-organisms involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane, including methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria. On Seymour Island the seeps occur as micrite-cemented burrow systems in the López de Bertodano Formation and are associated with thyasirid, solemyid and lucinid bivalves, and background molluscan taxa. The cemented burrows also have typical seep cement phases, with ?13C values between ? 58.0 and ? 24.6‰. There is evidence from other data that hydrocarbon seepage was a common feature in the James Ross Basin throughout the Maastrichtian and into the Eocene. The Snow Hill and Seymour Island examples comprise the third known area of Maastrichtian hydrocarbon seepage. But compared to most other ancient and modern seep communities, the James Ross Basin seep fauna is of very low diversity, being dominated by infaunal bivalves, all of which probably had thiotrophic chemosymbionts, but which were unlikely to have been seep obligates. Absent from the James Ross Basin seep fauna are ‘typical’ obligate seep taxa from the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic. Reasons for this may have been temporal, palaeolatitudinal, palaeobathymetric, or palaeoecological.

Crispin T.S. Little; Daniel Birgel; Adrian J. Boyce; J. Alistair Crame; Jane E. Francis; Steffen Kiel; Jörn Peckmann; Duncan Pirrie; Gavyn K. Rollinson; James D. Witts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Under consideration for publication in Euro. Jnl of Applied Mathematics 1 Dynamic coupling between shallow-water sloshing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the dynamics and control of liquid transport, e.g. the terrestrial transport of liquids, oil and liquid natural gas in ships, and fuel in aviation and astrodynamics, has motivated a wide range of research for industrial control [10, 11, 12, 24], sloshing in automobile fuel tanks [29], and motion of water waves

Bridges, Tom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence and related phenomena for 1D shallow-water waves in a finite basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different regimes of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) recurrence are simulated numerically for fully nonlinear 'one-dimensional' potential water waves in a finite-depth flume between two vertical walls. In such systems, the FPU recurrence is closely related to the dynamics of coherent structures approximately corresponding to solitons of the integrable Boussinesq system. A simplest periodic solution of the Boussinesq model, describing a single soliton between the walls, is presented in analytic form in terms of the elliptic Jacobi functions. In the numerical experiments, it is observed that depending on the number of solitons in the flume and their parameters, the FPU recurrence can occur in a simple or complicated manner, or be practically absent. For comparison, the nonlinear dynamics of potential water waves over nonuniform beds is simulated, with initial states taken in the form of several pairs of colliding solitons. With a mild-slope bed profile, a typical phenomenon in the course of evolution is the appearance of relatively high (rogue) waves, while for random, relatively short-correlated bed profiles it is either the appearance of tall waves or the formation of sharp crests at moderate-height waves.

Ruban, V. P., E-mail: ruban@itp.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Resuspension in a shallow eutrophic lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The frequency and the importance of wind-induced resuspension were studied in the shallow, eutrophic Lake...2, mean depth 3 m). During storm events in autumn 1988 lake water samples were collected every 2–8 hours...

Peter Kristensen; Martin Søndergaard; Erik Jeppesen

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

65

Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-14 1968 Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall J.L. Machemehl Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Machemehl, J. L.

66

Different approximations of shallow fluid flow over an obstacle B. T. Nadiga and L. G. Margolin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sets of shallow water equations, representing different levels of approximation are considered the dispersive shallow water DSW solutions and those of the highly simplified, hyperbolic shallow water SW; it is only when the flows are entirely subcritical or entirely supercritical and when the obstacles are very

Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

67

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II-- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, Efficient Hot Water Distribution II -- How to Get it Right, presented in January2014.

68

VOL. II, NO.6 WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH DECEMBER 1975 Factors Influencing Infiltration and Sediment Production of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOL. II, NO.6 WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH DECEMBER 1975 Factors Influencing Infiltration and Sediment. College Station. Texas 77843 Simulated rainfall was used to study infiltration rates and sedimentIOn rates and sediment production of the various soils are largely controlled by extent and surface

Ahmad, Sajjad

69

Global Change II Water is central to life on Earth. Energy is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change II Energy Nasa/JPL #12;#12;Water is central to life on Earth. Energy is central of Lectures Today's state of global energy oil, gas, coal Alternatives to fossil fuels renewables, nuclear will be lost as heat (efficiency). Energy Laws Primary Energy #12;Everything that moves has KINETIC ENERGY

70

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallelplate electrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel­plate electrolysis Yilong Han Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania 209, they appear to result from an underlying electroconvective instability during electrolysis in the parallel

Grier, David

71

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallelplate electrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel­plate electrolysis Yilong Han Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania 209 electrolysis in the parallel plate geometry. This contrasts with recent theoretical results suggesting

Grier, David

72

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

Steeples, Don W.

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Integration Of Shallow Solar-Pond and Swimming Pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A way of integration of shallow solar-pond into swimming pool is proposed for collecting, storage and utilizing ... solar-pond part can heat the water of swimming pool, share the heat loads of ventilation and...

Haijun Qiao; Diankui Gao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The effect of methane hydrate morphology and water saturation on seismic wave attenuation in sand under shallow sub-seafloor conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A better understanding of seismic wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments is needed for the improved geophysical quantification of seafloor methane hydrates, important for climate change, geohazard and economic resource assessment. Hence, we conducted a series of small strain (hydrate-bearing sands under excess-water seafloor conditions. The results show a complex dependence of P- and S-wave attenuation on hydrate saturation and morphology. P- and S-wave attenuation in excess-water hydrate-bearing sand is much higher than in excess-gas hydrate-bearing sand and increases with hydrate saturation between 0 and 0.44 (the experimental range). Theoretical modelling suggests that load-bearing hydrate is an important cause of heightened attenuation for both P- and S-waves in gas and water saturated sands, while pore-filling hydrate also contributes significantly to P-wave attenuation in water saturated sands. A squirt flow attenuation mechanism, related to microporous hydrate and low aspect ratio pores at the interface between sand grains and hydrate, is thought to be responsible for the heightened levels of attenuation in hydrate-bearing sands at low hydrate saturations (<0.44).

Angus I. Best; Jeffrey A. Priest; Christopher R.I. Clayton; Emily V.L. Rees

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile is supplied mainly by rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile in the main city of region II, Antofagasta, was approximately 90 µg/L (1), nearly twice the drinking water.permissions@oxfordjournals.org. Fifty-Year Study of Lung and Bladder Cancer Mortality in Chile Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water

California at Berkeley, University of

76

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

79

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

80

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Rates of water exchange for two cobalt(II) heteropoly-oxotungstate compounds in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyoxometalate ions are used as ligands in water-oxidation processes related to solar energy production. An important step in these reactions is the association and dissociation of water from the catalytic sites, the rates of which are unknown. Here we report the exchange rates of water ligated to Co{sup II} atoms in two polyoxotungstate sandwich molecules using the {sup 17}O-NMR-based Swift–Connick method. The compounds were the [Co{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(B-{alpha}-PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{sup 10?} and the larger {alpha}??{alpha}-[Co{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(P{sub 2}W{sub 15}O{sub 56}){sub 2}]{sup 16?} ions, each with two water molecules bound trans to one another in a Co{sup II} sandwich between the tungstate ligands. The clusters, in both solid and solution state, were characterized by a range of methods, including NMR, EPR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, and EXAFS spectroscopy, ESI-MS, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and potentiometry. For [Co{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(B-{alpha}-PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{sup 10?} at pH?5.4, we estimate: k{sup 298}=1.5(5)±0.3×10{sup 6}?s{sup ?1}, ?H{sup ?}=39.8±0.4?kJ?mol{sup ?1}, ?S{sup ?}=+7.1±1.2?J?mol{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and ?V{sup ?}=5.6 ±1.6?cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}. For the Wells–Dawson sandwich cluster ({alpha}??{alpha}-[Co{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(P{sub 2}W{sub 15}O{sub 56}){sub 2}]{sup 16?}) at pH?5.54, we find: k{sup 298}=1.6(2)±0.3×10{sup 6}?s{sup ?1}, ?H{sup ?}=27.6±0.4?kJ?mol{sup ?1} ?S{sup ?}=?33±1.3?J?mol{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and ?V{sup ?}=2.2±1.4?cm{sup 3}mol{sup ?1} at pH?5.2. The molecules are clearly stable and monospecific in slightly acidic solutions, but dissociate in strongly acidic solutions. This dissociation is detectable by EPR spectroscopy as S=3/2 Co{sup II} species (such as the [Co(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} monomer ion) and by the significant reduction of the Co–Co vector in the XAS spectra.

Ohlin, C. A.; Harley, S. J.; McAlpin, J. G.; Hocking, R. K.; Mercado, B. Q.; Johnson, Rene L.; Villa, Eric M.; Fidler, M. K.; Olmstead, M. M.; Spiccia, L.; Britt, R. D.; Casey, William H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Spin Topological Model for the g ) 4.1 S2 State Photosystem II Water Oxidase Manganese Aggregate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ReceiVed NoVember 30, 1998 The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes*, Departments of Chemistry Eugene F. Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 photosynthetic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Although the precise structure of the OEC is unknown

Hendrich, Mike

84

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel-plate electrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel-plate electrolysis Yilong Han Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania 209, they appear to result from an underlying electroconvective instability during electrolysis in the parallel

Grier, David

85

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel-plate electrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell: II. Bulk electroconvection of water during parallel-plate electrolysis Yilong Han Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania 209 electrolysis in the parallel plate geometry. This contrasts with recent theoretical results suggesting

Grier, David

86

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution, pressure drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by externally humidified air and hydrogen gas streams, must be present within the fuel cell to maintain 4 5 6 #12;a fuel cell blocks gas transport pathways in the catalyst layers, gas diffusion layersWater management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution

Kandlikar, Satish

87

Mechanistic Study of the Oxidation of a Methyl Platinum(II) Complex with O2 in Water: PtII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scavenger TEMPO do not support a homolytic mechanism. A SN2 mechanism was proposed for the formation. At pH 8, the reaction leads to a C1-symmetric monomethyl PtIV complex (dpms)PtIV Me(OH)2 (5) with high selectivity 97%; the reaction rate is first-order in [PtII Me] and fastest at pH 8.0. This behavior

Goddard III, William A.

88

Dispersive shallow water magnetohydrodynamics Paul J. Dellar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with density h and equation of state p = 1 2 gh2 , the SWMHD equations differ from the barotropic fluid MHD propagating from midlatitudes towards the solar equator, as suggested by the "butterfly diagram" of observed

Dellar, Paul J.

89

Efficiency and Evolution of Water Transport Systems in Higher Plants: A Modelling Approach. II. Stelar Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...July 1994 research-article Efficiency and Evolution of Water Transport Systems in Higher...protostele and siphonostele in water conduction was analysed numerically...identical with regard to water transport efficiency. The Royal Society is collaborating...

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance.  Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems – affecting energy use , water...

91

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shallow Carbon SequeStration Shallow Carbon SequeStration DemonStration ProjeCt Background The Shallow Carbon Sequestration Pilot Demonstration Project is a cooperative effort involving City Utilities of Springfield (CU); Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR); Missouri State University (MSU); Missouri University of Science & Technology (MS&T); AmerenUE; Aquila, Inc.; Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc.; Empire District Electric Company; and Kansas City Power & Light. The purpose of this project is to assess the feasibility of carbon sequestration at Missouri power plant sites. The six electric utilities involved in the project account for approximately 90 percent of the electric generating capacity in Missouri. Description The pilot demonstration will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the Lamotte and

92

1Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amplitude · Mid-point binning OR · 3D pre-stack Kirchhoff migration · Move reflection energy to correct location · Output to regular grid #12;11Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Engineering case studyBerth 204 Port of Southampton cofferdam · Survey for Associated British Ports (ABP) · Buried cofferdam ­ sheet steel

Southampton, University of

93

Heterogeneous reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) at the solid–water interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were performed herein to investigate the rates and products of heterogeneous reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) adsorbed to hematite and goethite, and by Fe(II) associated with a dithionite–citrate–bicarbonate (DCB) reduced natural phyllosilicate mixture [structural, ion-exchangeable, and edge-complexed Fe(II)] containing vermiculite, illite, and muscovite. The heterogeneous reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) adsorbed to the Fe(III) oxides increased with increasing pH and was coincident with a second event of Fe 2 + (aq) adsorption. The reaction was almost instantaneous above pH 7. In contrast, the reduction rates of Tc(VII) by DCB-reduced phyllosilicates were not sensitive to pH or to added Fe 2 + (aq) that adsorbed to the clay. The reduction kinetics were orders of magnitude slower than observed for the Fe(III) oxides, and appeared to be controlled by structural Fe(II). The following affinity series for heterogeneous Tc(VII) reduction by Fe(II) was suggested by the experimental results: aqueous Fe(II) ? adsorbed Fe(II) in phyllosilicates [ion-exchangeable and some edge-complexed Fe(II)] ? structural Fe(II) in phyllosilicates ? Fe(II) adsorbed on Fe(III) oxides. Tc-EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were virtually identical on hematite and goethite that were comprised primarily of sorbed octahedral TcO2 monomers and dimers with significant Fe(III) in the second coordination shell. The nature of heterogeneous Fe(III) resulting from the redox reaction was ambiguous as probed by Tc-EXAFS spectroscopy, although Mössbauer spectroscopy applied to an experiment with 56Fe-goethite with adsorbed 57Fe(II) implied that redox product Fe(III) was goethite-like. The Tc(IV) reduction product formed on the DCB-reduced phyllosilicates was different from the Fe(III) oxides, and was more similar to Tc(IV) oxyhydroxide in its second coordination shell. The heterogeneous reduction of Tc(VII) to less soluble forms by Fe(III) oxide-adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(II) in phyllosilicates may be an important geochemical process that will proceed at very different rates and that will yield different surface species depending on subsurface pH and mineralogy.

T. Peretyazhko; J.M. Zachara; S.M. Heald; B.-H. Jeon; R.K. Kukkadapu; C. Liu; D. Moore; C.T. Resch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid Mark R. McCoy, Zheng Yang, Xun Fu,§ Ki Chang Ahn, Shirley J. Gee an alternative method that converts the type II pyrethroids to a common chemical product, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid

Hammock, Bruce D.

95

PII S0016-7037(01)00595-6 Spectroscopic studies of Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the goethite-water interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PII S0016-7037(01)00595-6 Spectroscopic studies of Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the goethite molecular scale studies on Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the solid-water interface of goethite at pH 4.5, 5 the formation Pb-SO4 ternary complexes at the goethite surface. Based on the combined information from the IR

Sparks, Donald L.

96

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent studies suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from the Albano crater lake. Alban Hills are presently characterized by high PCO2 in groundwaters and by several cold gas emissions usually in sites where excavations removed the

97

The role of water in generation of group II kimberlite magmas: Constraints from multiple saturation experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...segregation occurred within the studied range of water concentrations, the water solubility in the kimberlite melt exceeded 9 wt%, and...Surovtsev, N.V. (2007) Incongruent melting of gallium nitride at 7.5 GPa. Diamond and Related Materials...

Alexander G. Sokol; Alexey N. Kruk; Yury N. Palyanov

98

Inversion for subbottom sound velocity profiles in the deep and shallow ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the application of acoustic measurements in the deep and shallow ocean to infer the sound velocity profile (svp) in the seabed. For the deep water ocean, an exact method based on the Gelfand-Levitan ...

Souza, Luiz Alberto Lopes de

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling of shallow stabilization ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is used to simulate shallow stabilization ponds. The model computes the flow field and the concentration distribution of a conservative tracer in the entire area of a pond. The location and the size of the dead zones, the bypassing, and the recirculating areas are also determined by the model. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained in the laboratory.

Babarutsi, S.; Marchand, P.; Safieddine, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impact Of Standing Water On Saltstone Placement II - Hydraulic Conductivity Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes was prepared and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. Report SRNL-STI-2012-00546 was issued detailing the experimental procedure, results, and conclusions related to density and leachability. In the previous report, it was concluded that: density tends to increase toward the bottom of the samples. This effect is pronounced with excess bleed water; drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Index (more leaching) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate; there is no noticeable effect on saltstone oxidation/leachability by changing the water to premix ratio (over the range studied), or by pouring into standing water (when tested up to 10 volume percent). The hydraulic conductivity data presented in this report show that samples cured exposed to the atmosphere had about three orders of magnitude higher hydraulic conductivity than any of the other samples. Considering these data, along with the results presented in the previous report, leads to the conclusion that small changes in water to premix ratio and the inclusion of up to 10 volume percent standing water should not be expected to have a detrimental effect on saltstone grout quality. The hydraulic conductivity results further demonstrate that curing in a moist environment is critical to maintaining saltstone quality.

Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thursday, March 16, 2006 POSTER SESSION II: WATER ON THE MOON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice validation missions may be landed in areas with direct line-of-sight to Earth, eliminating. Asphaug E. Plesko C. Water Delivered to the Moon by Comet Impacts [#2450] We calculate the fate

Rathbun, Julie A.

102

Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. II. The halide-water and alkali metal-water interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scaled forms of the newly introduced generalized potential energy functions (PEFs) describing intermolecular interactions [J. Chem. Phys. xx, yyyyy (2011)] have been used to fit the ab-initio minimum energy paths (MEPs) for the halide- and alkali metal-water systems X-(H2O), X=F, Cl, Br, I, and M+(H2O), M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. These generalized forms produce fits to the ab-initio data that are between one and two orders of magnitude better in the ?2 than the original forms of the PEFs. They were found to describe both the long-range, minimum and repulsive wall of the potential energy surface quite well. Overall the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) and generalized Buckingham exponential-6 (gB-e6) potentials were found to best fit the ab-initio data. Furthermore, a single set of parameters of the reduced form was found to describe all candidates within each class of interactions. The fact that in reduced coordinates a whole class of interactions can be represented by a single PEF, yields the simple relationship between the molecular parameters associated with energy (well depth, ?), structure (equilibrium distance, rm) and spectroscopy (anharmonic frequency, ?):€? = A? (? /?)1/ 2 /rm + B?? /rm 3 , where A and B are constants depending on the underlying PEF. This more general case of Badger’s rule has been validated using the experimentally measured frequencies of the hydrogen bonded OH stretching vibrations in the halide-water series.

Werhahn, Jasper C.; Akase, Dai; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alternatives to shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY79 and FY80 the Los Alamos National Laboratory and its contractors performed a preliminary assessment of several alternatives to shallow land burial of low-level waste, including deeper burial, mined cavities, specially engineered storage buildings, well injection of liquid waste, and seabed disposal. Only deeper burial and mined cavities seem acceptable as near-term alternatives. A waste management program using a combination of disposal alternatives is recommended. Research needed to implement the deeper burial and mined cavity options is identified.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SPECIAL ISSUE Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

samples of water were collected from 10 shallow monitoring wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep) installed 1­6 m from through a perforated pipe placed horizontally 2­2.3 m deep during July 9­August 7, 2008 at the MSU- ZERT to the subsurface storage and potential leakage of CO2. As part of this multidisciplinary research project, 80

105

Trench water-soil chemistry and interactions at the Maxey Flats Site-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry of leachates in the Maxey Flats trenches is an important factor in evaluating the site's effectiveness for retaining radionuclides. Trench water composition reflects interactions of the buried waste with infiltrating groundwater and the effects of bacterial decomposition of organic material. Aerobic, anaerobic, sulfate reducing, denitrifying and methanogenic bacteria are present in the leachates. Bacterial processes cause decreases in redox potential (Eh), sulfate and nitrate concentrations, as well as increases in alkalinity and ammonia relative to local groundwater compositions. The major radionuclides of concern present in trench waters include: /sup 3/H, /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 134, 137/Cs, /sup 241/Am, and /sup 238, 239, 240/Pu. Several additional laboratory and field analyses were performed on the fourth sampling of trench waters to better characterize the waters and to assure the reliability of some procedures. New procedures include: sulfide ion measurement in the field; laboratory ion chromatographic determinations of sulfate, chloride, and bromide; Eh and pH measurements in the laboratory; and ferrous-ferric concentration ratios by a colorimetric procedure. No overall systematic change in any disposal trench was observed. Analysis of water collected from the experimental interceptor trenches at Maxey Flats shows a chemical composition intermediate between disposal trench water and local groundwater. The existence of organo-radionuclide complexes that may enhance radionuclide mobility is a subject of much concern in waste management. Low concentrations of free EDTA, NTA, and DTPA are present in some leachates. Sorption experiments demonstrated the ability of EDTA to lower the apparent sorption capacity of Maxey Flats shale. 21 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Weiss, A.J.; Czyscinski, K.S.; Pietrzak, R.F.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Trends in water quality variability for coalbed methane produced water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy production from unconventional natural gas resources, such as coalbed methane, has the potential to generate significant water quantities for use in water-stressed areas to augment existing water supplies. Coalbed methane (CBM) produced water is generated from shallower formations than traditional oil and gas resources where water quality may be influenced by fresh water supplies in the area. Variability in produced water quality between wells and across geologic basins must be characterized in order to categorize water types appropriate for beneficial use. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to a composite geochemical database to identify indicators of variability in water composition and quality. Component analysis revealed that water quality indicators of variability were related to: (i) aquifer recharge that dilutes constituent concentrations (37%), (ii) dissolution of soluble aquifer minerals such as sodium and exchange of calcium and magnesium (13.8%), and (iii) coal depositional environment influence on chloride and trace metal fractions (14% of variability). Ternary relationships between Na–Cl–HCO3 and Na–Ca–Mg correlate to marine influence in the coal depositional environment and well proximity to recharge, respectively. Relationships identified in this study highlight water quality compositions with opportunities for beneficial use.

Katharine G. Dahm; Katie L. Guerra; Junko Munakata-Marr; Jörg E. Drewes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Shallow seismic investigations in the Valles Caldera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type · Complex shallow structure Davidson, M. Thesis, Perdue Univ. 1999 unconsolidated sediments fill Davidson, M. Thesis, Perdue Univ. 1999 unconsolidated sediments Permian/tertiary sediments

West, Michael

109

Can fracking contaminate drinking water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tiny cracks link deep shale gas reservoirs to shallow aquifers, but they may not be to blame for reports of contaminated drinking water

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Water Mass Formation and Circulation in the Persian Gulf and Water Exchange with the Indian Ocean.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Persian Gulf is a shallow, semi-enclosed marginal sea where the Persian Gulf Water (PGW), one of the most saline water masses in the world,… (more)

Yao, Fengchao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integrated Policy and Planning for Water and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................... 24 II.1.3. Water Consumption by Hydroelectric Power Plants................................ 25 II.1

Delaware, University of

112

Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Combinatorial Development of Water Splitting Catalysts Based on the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of methods to create large arrays of potential catalysts for the reaction H2O ���������������¯�������������������������������  �������������������������������½ O2 + 2H+ on the anode of an electrolysis system were investigated. This reaction is half of the overall reaction involved in the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This method consisted of starting with an array of electrodes and developing patterned electrochemical approaches for creating a different, defined peptide at each position in the array. Methods were also developed for measuring the rate of reaction at each point in the array. In this way, the goal was to create and then tests many thousands of possible catalysts simultaneously. This type of approach should lead to an ability to optimize catalytic activity systematically, by iteratively designing and testing new libraries of catalysts. Optimization is important to decrease energy losses (over-potentials) associated with the water splitting reaction and thus for the generation of hydrogen. Most of the efforts in this grant period were focused on developing the chemistry and analytical methods required to create pattern peptide formation either using a photolithography approach or an electrochemical approach for dictating the positions of peptide bond formation. This involved testing a large number of different reactions and conditions. We have been able to find conditions that have allowed us to pattern peptide bond formation on both glass slides using photolithographic methods and on electrode arrays made by the company Combimatrix. Part of this effort involved generating novel approaches for performing mass spectroscopy directly from the patterned arrays. We have also been able to demonstrate the ability to measure current at each electrode due to electrolysis of water. This was performed with customized instrumentation created in collaboration with Combimatrix. In addition, several different molecular designs for peptides that bound metals (primarily Mn) were developed and synthesized and metal binding was demonstrated. Finally, we investigated a number of methods. We have shown that we can create surfaces on glass slides appropriate for patterning peptide formation and have made arrays of peptides as large as 30,000 using photolithographic methods. However, side reactions with certain amino acid additions greatly limited the utility of the photolithographic approach. In addition, we found that transferring this patterned chemistry approach to large arrays was problematic. Thus, we turned to direct electrochemical patterning using the Combimatrix electrode arrays. Here we were also able to demonstrate patterned peptide bond forming chemistry, but yield and consistency of the reaction remains insufficient to create the quality of array required for realistic optimization of catalytic peptide sequences. We are currently exploring both new polymerization chemistries for generating catalysts on surface as well as adopting methods developed at Intel for creating peptide arrays directly on electronic substrates (silicon wafers).

Woodbury, Neal [Arizona State University

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Wild-induced resuspension in a small shallow lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resuspension of inorganic sediments in a very shallow ... measurements of suspended matter. Theoretical aspects of resuspension dynamics is discussed emphasizing special shallow lake...

Lars Bengtsson; Thomas Hellström

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Shallow gas off the Rhone prodelta, Gulf of Lions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in press. What controls shallow gas in Western Adriatic Sea?L. , Arntsen, B. , 2003. Gas chimneys – indicating aseismic maping of shallow gas in the Belgian coastal zone.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Different approximations of shallow fluid flow over an obstacle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different sets of shallow water equations, representing different levels of approximation are considered. The numerical solutions of these different equations for flow past bottom topography in several different flow regimes are compared. For several cases the full Euler solutions are computed as a reference, allowing the assessment of the relative accuracies of the different approximations. Further, the differences between the dispersive shallow water (DSW) solutions and those of the highly simplified, hyperbolic shallow water (SW) equations is studied as a guide to determining what level of approximation is required for a particular flow. First, the Green-Naghdi (GN) equations are derived as a vertically-integrated rational approximation of the Euler equations, and then the generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations are obtained under the further assumption of weak nonlinearity. A series of calculations, each assuming different values of a set of parameters{emdash}undisturbed upstream Froude number, and the height and width of the obstacle, are then presented and discussed. In almost all regions of the parameter space, the SW and DSW theories yield different results; it is only when the flows are entirely subcritical or entirely supercritical and when the obstacles are very wide compared to the depth of the fluid that the SW and DSW theories are in qualitative and quantitative agreement. It is also found that while the gB solutions are accurate only for small bottom topographies (less than 20{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth), the GN solutions are accurate for much larger topographies (up to 65{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth). The limitation of the gB approximation to small topographies is primarily due to the generation of large amplitude upstream propagating solitary waves at transcritical Froude numbers, and is consistent with previous analysis. (Abstract Truncated)

Nadiga, B.T.; Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb Accepted 1 May 2003 Abstract An analysis of groundwater hydraulic head in the vicinity of a horizontal well in fractured or porous aquifers considering confined, leaky confined, and water-table aquifer boundary

Zhan, Hongbin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Larger diverters safer for shallow gas control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on reducing the back pressure buildup on the wellhead during shallow gas control which minimizes the risk of the gas broaching the seabed around the conductor pipe. This allows for an orderly procedure to divert the gas. Most diverter systems cause the gas/sand mixture to approach critical velocity, resulting in extreme wear and short life expectancy of the surface piping. Calculations based on standard drilling programs indicate that only a few existing diverter systems can handle a sizeable volume of shallow gas without creating excess back pressure on the wellhead.

Mills, D. (Glasgow Polytechnic, Glasgow (GB)); Dyhr, E. (Copeman Engineering, Copenhagen (DK))

1991-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Remediation of Soil and Ground Water Contaminated with PAH using Heat and Fe(II)-EDTA Catalyzed Persulfate Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of degrading 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic (PAH) hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heat and Fe(II)-EDTA catalyzed persulfate oxidation was investigated in the laboratory. The experiments were co...

Farhad Nadim; Kun-Chang Huang; Amine M. Dahmani

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council The Coordinated Water Resources Database Technical Committee with funding support provided by the El Paso Water Utilities http://www.pdnwatershed.org The work documented in this report was supported in part...

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

124

Heat transfer to a horizontal cylinder in a shallow bubble column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Heat transfer coefficient correlations for tall bubble columns are unable to predict heat transfer in shallow bubble columns, which have unique geometry and fluid dynamics. In this work, the heat transfer coefficient is measured on the surface of a horizontal cylinder immersed in a shallow air–water bubble column. Superficial velocity, liquid depth, and cylinder height and horizontal position with respect to the sparger orifices are varied. The heat transfer coefficient is found to increase with height until reaching a critical height, and a dimensionless, semi-theoretical correlation is developed that incorporates superficial velocity, liquid properties, and height. Additionally, the more minor effects of flow regime, column region, and bubble impact are discussed. Notably, the heat transfer coefficient can be as high in the region of bubble coalescence as in the bulk of the column, but only if bubbles impact the cylinder. The correlation and discussion provide a framework for modeling and designing shallow, coil-cooled bubble columns.

Emily W. Tow; John H. Lienhard V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II: A hydrogen bonded water network switch is observed between pH 7.8 and 10.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron structure of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II at pH 7.8 has been determined to 2.0 resolution. Detailed analysis and comparison to the previous determined structure at pH 10.0 shows important differences in protonation of key catalytic residues in the active site as well as a rearrangement of the hydrogen bonded water network. For the first time, a completed hydrogen bonded network stretching from the Zn-bound solvent to the proton shuttling residue His64 has been directed observed.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Langan, Paul [ORNL; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Low-level waste shallow burial assessment code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Exposures from Shallow Trench Operationns) is a computer code developed under United States Environmental Protection Agency funding to evaluate possible health effects from radionuclide releases from shallow, radioctive-waste disposal trenches and from areas contaminated with operational spillage. The model is intended to predict radionuclide transport and the ensuing exposure and health impact to a stable, local population for a 1000-year period following closure of the burial grounds. Several classes of submodels are used in PRESTO to represent scheduled events, unit system responses, and risk evaluation processes. The code is modular to permit future expansion and refinement. Near-surface transport mechanisms considered in the PRESTO code are cap failure, cap erosion, farming or reclamation practices, human intrusion, chemical exchange within an active surface soil layer, contamination from trench overflow, and dilution by surface streams. Subsurface processes include infiltration and drainage into the trench, the ensuing solubilization of radionuclides, and chemical exchange between trench water and buried solids. Mechanisms leading to contaminated outflow include trench overflow and downwad vertical percolation. If the latter outflow reaches an aquifer, radiological exposure from irrigation or domestic consumption is considered. Airborne exposure terms are evaluated using the Gaussian plume atmospheric transport formulation as implemented by Fields and Miller (1980).

Fields, D.E.; Little, C.A.; Emerson, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Undrained sliding resistance of shallow foundations subjected to torsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. New offshore applications of shallow foundations for LNG facilities and other subsea structures have underscored the importance of the behavior of shallow embedded foundations subjected to combined in-plane translation and torsion. This study...

Nouri, Hamidreza; Biscontin, Giovanna; Aubeny, Charles P.; ASCE, M.

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley 30 km south...

129

A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Shallow...

130

Polymer anion-selective membranes for electrolytic splitting of water. Part II: Enhancement of ionic conductivity and performance under conditions of alkaline water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attempt was made to increase the ionic conductivity of novel, heterogeneous, anion-selective membranes by increasing the porosity of their surface skin. This was based on the addition of a water-soluble compon...

Jaromír Hnát; Martin Paidar; Jan Schauer; Jan Žitka…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Zoogeography and systematics of the shallow water echinodermata of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Curacao, Florida, Jamaica, Mexico, sippi, Montserrat, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South na, St. Thomas, Surinam, Texas, Venezuela, West Africa 15), Bathymetric range - to 80 M, Discus but do sion: This species is not as common as L. clathrata, es...

Pomory, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Methane Production in Shallow-Water, Tropical Marine Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...influences methane production rates. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY...University ofMiami, Miami, Florida 33149 Received for publication...located in Caesar Creek (Florida Keys) exhibited the...methanogenic activity (initial rates = 1.81 to 1.86 gmol...useful in the design of fuel-producing systems...

Ronald S. Oremland

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modelling of thermal plume dishcarge into shallow and still water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The concerns of global warming are guiding most industries and commercial properties towards addressing their energy usage. In large buildings where air conditioning is required,… (more)

Ali, Jafar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Response of a shallow-water sediment system to warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the exception of an earlier development of floating microalgal mats at raised temperature, dividing the autotrophic compartment into a benthic and pelagic ...

136

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was the first U.S. Government fisheries research vessel permitted to enter the port of Havana, Cuba, since the Castro regime came to power in the late 1950's. The ship was in Cuban waters to conduct a cooperative of exploring the world's deepest ocean, to smaller ships responsible for charting the shallow bays and inlets

138

An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wagner, K.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Quantitative characterization of the water trimer torsional manifold by terahertz laser spectroscopy and theoretical analysis. II. ,,H2O...3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative characterization of the water trimer torsional manifold by terahertz laserLaughlin,c) Christy J. Keoshian, Ernest Michael, Jeff D. Cruzan,d) and Richard J. Saykallye) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Ad van der Avoirdf) Institute of Theoretical Chemistry

Cohen, Ronald C.

140

Effects of oil and gas exploration and production of shallow groundwater in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon completion of an oil and gas well in North Dakota, the drilling fluid is commonly buried in shallow trenches near the bore hole. These drilling fluids are salt-water based (approx. =250,000 mg/1 NaCl) and may contain high levels of chromium, lead, and other toxic trace elements. During the 1950s and 1960s, brines produced with the oil were generally disposed of in evaporation ponds. Currently, these produced waters are disposed of in brine-injection wells. A 5-year ongoing study funded by NDGS and later supported by ND Water Resources Research Institute through NDMMRRI was initiated to determine the effects of these oil-field wastes on shallow aquifers in the glaciated and nonglaciated portions of North Dakota. The areal and vertical extent of groundwater contamination was delineated using chemical analyses of water and sediment samples from the saturated and unsaturated zones, in combination with earth-resistivity surveys. Degradation of groundwater by leachate generated from buried drilling fluids is generally localized, due primarily to the relatively low volumes of wastes. However, the toxicity of these fluids makes disposal near shallow aquifers potentially hazardous. Migration of saline leachate from an abandoned brine-disposal pond has contaminated the shallow subsurface zone beneath an area of 3-5 ha at one study site. Leakage from brine-injection wells is potentially the most serious contamination problem. At one location, brine and hydrocarbon migration from an injection well has contaminated an aquifer beneath an area of several km/sup 2/.

Murphy, E.C.; Kehew, A.E.; Beal, W.A.; Groenewold, G.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ENVXR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W) 25 Feb 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVXR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W) 25 Feb 2003 As we said about water and in deep water, watching the increase in amplitude of the motion when waves approach a shore...and make waves in deep water (at least 25 cm deep). How do they differ from waves in shallower water, say 5

142

Low-threshold analysis of CDMS shallow-site data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four ~224 g germanium and two ~105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of ~1 keV and ~2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c^2. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments' data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 GeV/c^2 and 4 GeV/c^2.

CDMS Collaboration; D. S. Akerib; M. J. Attisha; L. Baudis; D. A. Bauer; A. I. Bolozdynya; P. L. Brink; R. Bunker; B. Cabrera; D. O. Caldwell; C. L. Chang; R. M. Clarke; J. Cooley; M. B. Crisler; P. Cushman; F. DeJongh; R. Dixon; D. D. Driscoll; J. Filippini; S. Funkhouser; R. J. Gaitskell; S. R. Golwala; D. Holmgren; L. Hsu; M. E. Huber; S. Kamat; R. Mahapatra; V. Mandic; P. Meunier; N. Mirabolfathi; D. Moore; S. W. Nam; H. Nelson; R. W. Ogburn; X. Qiu; W. Rau; A. Reisetter; T. Saab; B. Sadoulet; J. Sander; C. Savage; R. W. Schnee; D. N. Seitz; T. A. Shutt; G. Wang; S. Yellin; J. Yoo; B. A. Young

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Geothermal Area Regions (0) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHigh-ResolutionAeromagneticSurveytoImageShallowFaults,DixieValleyGeothermalField...

145

Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

none,

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer via synthetic ammonia was a national project in Japan just after World War II, and water electrolysis as the source of hydrogen was active....3 of hydrogen and 700 Nm3 of...

Fumio Hine

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fast neutron background measurements at shallow depths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on measurements of the neutron backgrounds for neutrino experiments at shallow depth (such as the proposed San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment). A detector capable of pulse-shape discrimination measured the flux of fast neutrons at 20 mwe depth in the Stanford Underground Facility to be (1.07 {+-} 0.30) X 10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. An experiment, situated in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor. studied spallation neutrons from muons traversing Pb and Cu. An underground experiment in the SUF, employing a detector filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, is measuring the neutron production rate and multiplicity for muon spallation in low-A material (hydrocarbon-based liquid scintillator).

Chen, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Novikov, V. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dougherty, B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NREL: Learning - Solar Hot Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hot Water Hot Water Photo of solar collectors on a roof for a solar hot water system. For solar hot water systems, flat-plate solar collectors are typically installed facing south on a rooftop. The shallow water of a lake is usually warmer than the deep water. That's because the sunlight can heat the lake bottom in the shallow areas, which in turn, heats the water. It's nature's way of solar water heating. The sun can be used in basically the same way to heat water used in buildings and swimming pools. Most solar water heating systems for buildings have two main parts: a solar collector and a storage tank. The most common collector is called a flat-plate collector. Mounted on the roof, it consists of a thin, flat, rectangular box with a transparent cover that faces the sun. Small tubes

150

Participation of Glutamate-354 of the CP43 Polypeptide in the Ligation of Mn and the Binding of Substrate Water in Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the current X-ray crystallographic structural models of photosystem II, Glu354 of the CP43 polypeptide is the only amino acid ligand of the oxygen-evolving Mn4Ca cluster that is not provided by the D1 polypeptide. To further explore the influence of this structurally unique residue on the properties of the Mn4Ca cluster, the CP43-E354Q mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was characterized with a variety of biophysical and spectroscopic methods, including polarography, EPR, X-ray Absorption, FTIR, and mass spectrometry. The kinetics of oxygen release in the mutant were essentially unchanged from those in wild-type. In addition, the oxygen flash-yields exhibited normal period-four oscillations having normal S state parameters, although the yields were lower, correlating with the mutant?s lower steady-state rate (approx. 20percent compared to wild-type). Experiments conducted with H218O showed that the fast and slow phases of substrate water exchange in CP43-E354Q thylakoid membranes were accelerated 8.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively, in the S3 state compared to wild-type. Purified oxygen-evolving CP43-E354Q PSII core complexes exhibited a slightly altered S1 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum, a slightly altered S2 state multiline EPR signal, a substantially altered S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum, and an unusually long lifetime for the S2 state (> 10 hours) in a substantial fraction of reaction centers. In contrast, the S2 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum was nearly indistinguishable from that of wild-type. The S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum showed alterations throughout the amide and carboxylate stretching regions. Global labeling with 15N and specific labeling with L-[1-13C]alanine revealed that the mutation perturbs both amide II and carboxylate stretching modes and shifts the symmetric carboxylate stretching modes of the ?-COO? group of D1-Ala344 (the C-terminus of the D1 polypeptide) to higher frequencies by 3 ? 4 cm-1 in both the S1 and S2 states. The EPR and FTIR data implied that 76 -82 percent of CP43-E354Q PSII centers can achieve the S2 state and that most of these can achieve the S3 state, but no evidence for advancement beyond the S3 state was observed in the FTIR data, at least not in a majority of PSII centers. Although the X-ray absorption and EPR data showed that the CP43-E354Q mutation only subtly perturbs the structure and spin state of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S2 state, the FTIR and H218O exchange data show that the mutation strongly influences other properties of the Mn4Ca cluster, altering the response of numerous carboxylate and amide groups to the increased positive charge that develops on the cluster during the S1 to S2 transition and weakening the binding of both substrate water molecules (or water derived ligands), especially the one that exchanges rapidly in the S3 state. The FTIR data provide evidence that CP43-Glu354 coordinates to the Mn4Ca cluster in the S1 state as a bridging ligand between two metal ions, but provide no compelling evidence that this residue changes its coordination mode during the S1 to S2 transition. The H218O exchange data provide evidence that CP43-Glu354 interacts with the Mn ion that ligates the substrate water molecule (or water-derived ligand) that is in rapid exchange in the S3 state.

Service, Rachel; Yano, Junko; McConnell, Iain; Hwang, Hong Jin; Niks, Dimitri; Hille, Russ; Wydrzynski, Tom; Burnap, Robert; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Annotation of the Shallow and the Deep Siegfried Handschuh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annotation of the Shallow and the Deep Web Siegfried Handschuh½ and Steffen Staab½ ¾ ½ Institute a framework,CREAM, that allows the creation of semantic annotation on the Shallow and the Deep Web. Hence with the simultaneous creation of metadata, and the deep annotation. 1 Introduction The semantic web ­ the web

Staab, Steffen

152

Trees as indicators of subterranean migration of tritium at a commercial shallow land radioactive waste disposal site. [Maxey Flats, KY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leaf water and tree sap collected from deciduous trees in a natural forest growing outside the fenced exclusion area of the Maxey Flats Waste Disposal Facility in eastern Kentucky, USA were radiochemically analyzed to detect movement of tritium via subterranean flows of water at depths of three meters. These data indicate that trees can be used to detect the subterranean migration of tritium from shallow land burial sites. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Rickard, W.H.; Kirby, L.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Author Richard Zehner Organization U.S. Department of Energy Published U.S. Department of Energy, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Citation Richard Zehner (U.S. Department of Energy). 2010. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously

154

The shallow shelf approximation as a "sliding law" in a thermomechanically coupled ice sheet model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shallow shelf approximation is a better ``sliding law'' for ice sheet modeling than those sliding laws in which basal velocity is a function of driving stress. The shallow shelf approximation as formulated by \\emph{Schoof} [2006a] is well-suited to this use. Our new thermomechanically coupled sliding scheme is based on a plasticity assumption about the strength of the saturated till underlying the ice sheet in which the till yield stress is given by a Mohr-Coulomb formula using a modeled pore water pressure. Using this scheme, our prognostic whole ice sheet model has convincing ice streams. Driving stress is balanced in part by membrane stresses, the model is computable at high spatial resolution in parallel, it is stable with respect to parameter changes, and it produces surface velocities seen in actual ice streams.

Bueler, Ed

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October, 1984). 38. Water Purification Associates, "Waterthrough a MiIli-Q water purification system (Milliporethrough a Milli-Q water purification system ( Millipore

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty for the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor II: Full core analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Uncertainties in nuclear data are a fundamental source of uncertainty in reactor physics calculations. To determine their contribution to uncertainties in calculated reactor physics parameters, a nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty study is performed on the Canadian supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to the neutron multiplication factor k eff are 6.31  mk for the SCWR at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and 6.99  mk at the end of cycle (EOC). Both of these uncertainties have a statistical uncertainty of 0.02  mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) are 1.0  mk and 0.9  mk for BOC and EOC, respectively, both with statistical uncertainties of 0.1  mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to other reactivity parameters range from as low as 3% of to as high as ten times the values of the reactivity coefficients. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in the reactor physics parameters are Pu-239, Th-232, H-2, and isotopes of zirconium.

S.E. Langton; A. Buijs; J. Pencer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related to the 2008 injection of CO2 at the ZERT field site, Bozeman, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project, approximately 80 water samples were collected from 10 observation wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep)project, 80 samples of water were collected from 10 shallow monitoring wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related to the 2008 injection of CO2 at the ZERT Field Site, Bozeman, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project, approximately 80 water samples were collected from 10 observation wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep)project, 80 samples of water were collected from 10 shallow monitoring wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep)

Kharaka, Y.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Experimental measurements of the diffusion parameters of light hydrocarbons in water-saturated sedimentary rocks: II. Results and geochemical significance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion parameters (diffusion coefficient, diffusion permeability, solubility coefficient) for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, methylpropane and 2,2-dimethylpropane were measured on 21 samples of water-saturated sedimentary rocks at different temperatures (30, 50, and 70 C). The rock samples include sandstones, siltstones, and claystones with porosities ranging from 0.4 to 16.5% and permeabilities from <0.005 to 33.4 millidarcy. Experimental diffusion coefficients ranged from c. 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} to 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, solubility coefficients covered a range from c. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and diffusion permeabilities lay between c. 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s. Diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing molecular weight of the hydrocarbon compound, the decrease depending on the petrophysical properties and the mineralogy of the rocks and being most drastic in shales. None of the petrophysical parameters examined in this study (porosity, permeability, formation resistivity factor) gave a good correlation with the nonsteady-state diffusion coefficient, D. An excellent correlation was found between the formation resistivity factor, F, and the steady-state diffusion permeability. P. A possibly useful-though less significant-relation bearing some resemblance with Archie's law appears to exist between the porosity and the diffusion permeability. The temperature dependence of the diffusion parameters was determined on two calcareous sandstones. Based on an activated diffusion model activation energies for the diffusion process ranging around 50 kJ/mol were calculated for all hydrocarbons examined.

Krooss, B.M.; Leythaeuser, D. (Institute of petroleum and Organic Geochemistry, Juelich (Germany, F.R.))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we added numerical solution along streamline subroutines to our streamline compositional simulator. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We studied the wettability of the reservoir oil and formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The effect of new relative permeability formulations on a five-spot pattern WAG recovery was evaluated. Effect of horizontal wells on pattern sweep has been initiated. A model quarter five-spot experiment is being designed. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, evaluation of complex well-architecture and design of model quarter five-spot experiment.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a MiIli-Q water purification system (Millipore Corp. ).a Milli-Q water purification system ( Millipore Corp. ) was

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has ...

Joshua L. Bandfield

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Seminar 4 Water shader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water shader Na8ve OpenGL project ­ no RenderChimp! · Star8ng point 50x50 Shallow & deep color Waves Fresnel reflec%on Fresnel refrac%on Animated bump mapping · Na8ve OpenGL project #12;Waves · Sum of sines · Form sharper

165

Carbon Emissions from Smouldering Peat in Shallow and Strong Fronts   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of experiments of shallow and strong smouldering fronts in boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to study the CO and CO2 emissions. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm in cross section and 50 ...

Rein, Guillermo; Cohen, Simon; Simeoni, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Mapping for Zagreb Hilly Area, Croatia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to map the landslide susceptibility of the hilly area of Mt. Medvednica located in the northwestern part of the City of Zagreb, Croatia. Landslides in this region are mostly shallow mo...

Chunxiang Wang; Snjezana Mihali? Arbanas…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Abstract The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy has been working on improvements in shallow (two-meter) temperature surveys in two areas: overcoming limitations posed by difficult ground conditions with the use of a portable rock drill, and improvements in temperature measurements and interpretations Previous 2-meter temperature surveys conducted by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy have been limited to areas that were not excessively rocky. This limitation has been overcome by the use of a

168

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by anDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing", Proceedings, 2ndWastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

Dor Ben-Amotz

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

U.S. DEP.'\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

'\RTMENT OF ENERGY '\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :Freshwater Wind I. lLC PROJECT TITLE: Shallow Water Offshore Wind System Optimization for the Great Lakes Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instl"ument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA.Q000415 DE-EEOOOO5488 GFO-OOO5488-001 0 Based on my nview or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SUA),. have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathertng, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site Visits, and audits). data analysis

171

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semi-annual technical report Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for

173

Nonlinear control problems and their approximations for thin dynamic shallow shells in aerospace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlinear system describing the vibrations of a thin shallow shell win be considered. These equations arise in the modeling of large flexible structures such as solar collectors and reflective mirrors. This paper will address questions related to well-posedness: existence, uniqueness and regularity of solutions. However, the main goals of the paper are (i) to examine the asymptotic behavior of solutions subject to a suitable dissipative mechanism applied to the model, and (ii) to provide a framework for numerical approximations of stabilizing solutions. Of particular interest are problems associated with dissipation acting on the boundary of the shell. The paper will detail conditions under which uniform decay of the energy function can be achieved. This is related to avoiding everted states, a phenomenon involving the ratio of thickness to curvature for which there is no analogue in plate theory.

Marchand, R.J.; Lasiecka, I. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Impact of Homeowner Association Landscape Guidelines on Residential Water Use Sandra Rode1, Elizabeth A. Wentz2, Xiaoxiao Li2 , Billie L. Turner II2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shown that lot size, grass, presence of pools, and the urban heat island effect, control water use the question whether an HOA can influence water conservation strategies. The Turner and Ibes study, as well. Recognizing that pool usage contributes to water consumption and that HOA guidelines focus on vegetation, we

Hall, Sharon J.

175

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19,20). In the coking step, coal is heated III the absencethe "coking" process in In the second step the which coal isCoal Liquefaction Wastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters from Petroleum Refining Sour Waters from Coking

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Studies on unsaturated zone hydrology and radionuclide migration at a shallow-land burial site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied unsaturated zone hydrology and the migration of radionuclides at a shallow-land burial site located at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. The initial results indicate that the principal pathway of water entry into the trench was by percolation through the trench caps. Tritium-bearing water was found to be moving upward from a saturated waste-burial trench through the trench cap to the soil surface. Evidence of tritium movement at a depth of 3 to 4 meters was observed to a distance of about 5 meters laterally. No /sup 137/Cs migration was observed, but very small amounts of /sup 238/Pu and /sup 60/Co were found to have migrated short distances from the trench.

Schulz, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fowler, E.B.; Essington, E.H.; Polzer, W.L.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009... Major Subject: Ocean Engineering LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree...

Whilden, Kerri Ann

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

iiSHAREDAMBITION The Universityof Illinois at Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iiSHAREDAMBITION The Universityof Illinois at Chicago and NorthLawndalearehonoredto presentTheBarackObama Foundation withourproposal tohost the Barack Obama Presidential Library #12;3 2 The University of Illinois. This is not its destination but rather the origination of something greater: energy emanating outward in shallow

Illinois at Chicago, University of

179

Numerical simulation of solitary wave generation in a wind-water annular tunnel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We briefly describe laboratory experiments demonstrating wind-water solitary wave generation in a wind-water annular tunnel. A mathematical model of this phenomenon is constructed in the context of a shallow-w...

T. G. Elizarova; M. A. Istomina…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to decrease the residual oil saturation. In calcareous rocks, water from various resources (deep formation, seawater, shallow beds, lakes and rivers) is generally injected in different oil fields. The ions interactions between water molecules, salts ions, oil...

Alotaibi, Mohammed

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development Practices for Optimized MEOR in Shallow Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas using a combination of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and hydraulic fracturing of vertical wells.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Typed Calculus Supporting Shallow Embeddings of Abstract Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Typed Calculus Supporting Shallow Embeddings of Abstract Machines Aaron Bohannon Zena M. Ariola taken by abstract machines and reductions in a system of proof terms for a version the sequent calculus. We believe that by doing so we shed light on some essential characteristics of abstract machines

Ariola, Zena M.

183

The Influence of Wind Speed on Shallow Marine Cumulus Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role of wind speed on shallow marine cumulus convection is explored using large-eddy simulations and concepts from bulk theory. Focusing on cases characteristic of the trades, the equilibrium trade wind layer is found to be deeper at stronger ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Epifaunal Assemblages on Deep-water Corals in Roatan, Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep-water corals provide complex habitat structure for diverse assemblages of invertebrates and fishes. Similar to shallow coral reefs, oyster reefs, and seagrass beds, these complex biogenic structures serve many ecosystem functions: (a) as prey...

Lavelle, Katherine

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Formation mechanism and geochemical characteristics of shallow natural gas in heavy oil province, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shallow gas reservoirs are distributed widely in Chinese heavy oil-bearing basins. At present, shallow gas resources have opened up giant potentials. The previous researches indicate the intimate genetic relat...

GuangYou Zhu; ShuiChang Zhang; WenZhi Zhao…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A depth-averaged debris-flow model that includes the effects of evolving dilatancy. II. Numerical predictions and experimental tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...satisfies numerical conservation by using a similarity...details). Numerical conservation of quantities transported...include a motionless pool of water lying over variable...2003 Shallow-water theory for arbitrary...1960 Systems of conservation laws. Comm. Pure...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

present gases, the shale decompose and oil, residual areupgrade oil derived from oil-shale and tar sands are similarof Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by an

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Inversion of shallow-seismic wavefields: II. Inferring subsurface properties from wavefield transforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fig. 18). The fundamental mode above 70 Hz and...excitation for a vertical force and vertical geophones...apparently with a single fundamental mode up to 100 Hz...properties of rocks: Fundamentals and principles of petrophysics, Vol. 18, of Handbook of Geophysical Exploration......

Thomas Forbriger

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the deficiency was removed. Total water used efficiency (TWUE), as dry matter: water use (DM:WU) and water use efficiency (WUE); as seed yield: water use (SY:WU), were significantly higher for the second year. A timeBioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth of soybeans. II. Water use and water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Shallow Injection Well Verification and Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed verification of the shallow injection well inventory for Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC and Argonne National Laboratory-West-operated facilities was performed in 2003. Fourteen wells, or 20%, were randomly selected for the verification. This report provides updated information on the 14 shallow injection wells that were randomly selected for the 2003 verification. Where applicable, additional information is provided for shallow injection wells that were not selected for the 2003 verification. This updated information was incorporated into the 2003 Shallow Injection Wells Inventory, Sixty-eight wells were removed from the 2003 Shallow Injection Well Inventory.

Lewis, M.G.

2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Shallow Injection Well Verification and Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed verification of the shallow injection well inventory for Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC and Argonne National Laboratory-West-operated facilities was performed in 2003. Fourteen wells, or 20%, were randomly selected for the verification. This report provides updated information on the 14 shallow injection wells that were randomly selected for the 2003 verification. Where applicable, additional information is provided for shallow injection wells that were not selected for the 2003 verification. This updated information was incorporated into the 2003 Shallow Injection Wells Inventory. Sixty-eight wells were removed from the 2003 Shallow Injection Well Inventory.

Mike Lewis

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effect of small concentrations of water on ethylbenzene oxidation with molecular oxygen catalyzed by iron(II, III) acetylacetonate complexes with 18-crown-6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic effects of small amounts of water (?10?3 mol/l) added to the ethylbenzene oxidation reaction with molecular oxygen catalyzed by the system {Fe(III)(acac)3 + 18-crown-6 (18C6)} were revealed. An incr...

L. I. Matienko; L. A. Mosolova

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Direct measurement of the energy thresholds to conformational isomerization. II. 3-indole-propionic acid and its water-containing complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-propionic acid IPA and its water-containing complex. By contrast with tryptamine Paper I , IPA has only two energies of the A and B minima, with E B -E A =46­210 cm-1 . Like the IPA monomer, the IPA-H2O complex.D. thesis, UCLA, 1991 have determined that these complexes retain the same IPA conformational structure

Zwier, Timothy S.

194

Shallow quantum well excitons: 2D or 3D?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new regime is obtained in semiconductor heterostructures with constituents of nearly identical band gaps. Previously, it has been shown that even extremely shallow quantum wells (SHQWs) exhibit excitonic and electroabsorption properties typical of a 2D system, but 3D transport features. We show that, surprisingly, even when carriers are two-dimensionally confined in SHQWs, the hole spin relaxation is extremely fast (?400 fsec) as in the bulk (3D) limit and that a 2D-3D transition in the hole spin dynamics in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs SHQWs takes place at x?5%.

I. Brener; W. H. Knox; K. W. Goossen; J. E. Cunningham

1993-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

199

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Abstract N/A Author V. J. S. Grauch Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2002 Report Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Citation V. J. S. Grauch. 2002. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada. (!) : U.S. Geological Survey. Report No.: 02-384. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=High-Resolution_Aeromagnetic_Survey_to_Image_Shallow_Faults,_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field,_Nevada&oldid=682601"

200

The effect of resuspension on algal production in a shallow lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves cause erosion and resuspension of bottom sediments. In shallow lakes resuspension can take place over most of the ... would have been without increased turbidity due to resuspension.

Thomas Hellström

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic shallow aquifer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the characteristics of the shallow aquifers (depth, thickness, transmisivity, chemical... energy exploitability1 of aquifers; one talks about the ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

202

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

203

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

204

A strip theory approximation for wave forces on submerged vehicles in finite depth water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) are becoming of increasing use in shallow waters for oceanographic data collection, coastal mapping, and military operations such as mine surveillance along enemy coastlines. Currently ...

Rybka Jan A. (Jan Andrzej)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Second technical report Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe

207

Development of a shallow heavy-oil deposit in Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow deposits of heavy-oil in western Missouri have become more attractive to exploit recently. Aside from problems of producing the low-gravity, viscous oil, part of the difficulty in successfully developing these deposits has been the geologic nature of the reservoir sandstone. Recognition of the origin of the reservoir sandstone in Eastburn field as a series of point bars in an upper deltaic, fluvial distributary environment has affected the selection of drilling locations, drilling and coring procedures, estimation of reserves, and location of producing facilities. Recognition of the uneven distribution of permeability, the intergranular type of porosity, and the presence of potentially troublesome clays and iron-bearing minerals in this sandstone influenced the methods selected for evaluation, completion, and stimulation of producing wells. This teamwork approach between geologists and engineers is important in maximizing the chances for success of technically difficult enhanced oil recovery projects.

Ebanks, J.W.J.; Weber, J.F.

1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Alternative techniques for low-level waste shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience to date relative to the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) indicates that the physical stability of the disposal unit and the hydrologic isolation of the waste are the two most important factors in assuring disposal site performance. Disposal unit stability can be ensured by providing stable waste packages and waste forms, compacting backfill material, and filling the void spaces between the packages. Hydrologic isolation can be achieved though a combination of proper site selection, subsurface drainage controls, internal trench drainage systems, and immobilization of the waste. A generalized design of a LLW disposal site that would provide the desired long-term isolation of the waste is discussed. While this design will be more costly than current practices, it will provide additional confidence in predicted and reliability and actual site performance.

Levin, G.B.; Mezga, L.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Shallow Drilling In The Salton Sea Region, The Thermal Anomaly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 C/m) to extreme (0.83 C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is >600 mW/m{sup 2} and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m{sup 2}. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes. These observations of the thermal anomaly provide important constraints for models of the circulation of the hydrothermal system. Thermal budgets based on a simple model for this hydrothermal system indicate that the heat influx rate for local ''hot spots'' in the region may be large enough to account for the rate of heat flux from the entire Salton Trough.

Newmark, R. L.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Younker, L. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Understanding the thermal evolution of deep-water continental margins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... exploration risks are potentially much higher. The bulk of major hydrocarbon fields located in shallow-water depths (that is, up to 200 m) have probably been located, if one ... Over the past ten years, there has been a relentless drive to explore ever-increasing water depths. This drive has been stimulated by an engineering technology that has allowed us ...

Nicky White; Mark Thompson; Tony Barwise

2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

212

Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water Volumes I & II (October 1996) Optical character recognition has been applied to these files, but full search capabilities...

213

Supercritical Shallow Granular and Slurry Flows through a Contraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and outcrops: mixture of tephra and Rhine water, dam formation at nozzle near Andernach in Rhine Valley, lake, subcritical phenomena: F0

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

214

Some Limnological Features of a Shallow Saline Meromictic Lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

high temperatures at subsurface depths of the lake. ..... sun was stored in the saline waters im- mediately below .... A typical profile of salt distribution in 1955 is

215

Identification of technical problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes has been made in support of the technical aspects of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being administered by the Low-Level Waste Management Program Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The operating histories of burial sites at six major DOE and five commercial facilities in the US have been examined and several major problems identified. The problems experienced st the sites have been grouped into general categories dealing with site development, waste characterization, operation, and performance evaluation. Based on this grouping of the problem, a number of major technical issues have been identified which should be incorporated into program plans for further research and development. For each technical issue a discussion is presented relating the issue to a particular problem, identifying some recent or current related research, and suggesting further work necessary for resolving the issue. Major technical issues which have been identified include the need for improved water management, further understanding of the effect of chemical and physical parameters on radionuclide migration, more comprehensive waste records, improved programs for performance monitoring and evaluation, development of better predictive capabilities, evaluation of space utilization, and improved management control.

Jacobs, D.G.; Epler, J.S.; Rose, R.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER management decisions? II--WATERWATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere,Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems resource issues. #12;I-WATER: Vision and Goals ¤ I-WATER will provide a new generation of Ph.D. students

217

Determining the Fate of Methane Released from the Seafloor in Deep and Shallow Water Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) concentration, CH4 concentration and stable isotopic ratios were conducted at two contrasting sites: the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and the natural seep field near Coal Oil Point (COP), CA. The investigation of 1316 DO...

Du, Mengran

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

In situ measurement of transverse isotropy in shallow-water marine sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......almost all marine sediments anisotropic, the form of anisotropy being...refraction profiles. We use an anisotropic reflectivity program to produce...wave propagation in layered anisotropic media, J. geophys. Res...1984. Velocity anisotropy of shales and depth estimation in the......

Patricia A. Berge; Subhashis Mallick; Gerard J. Fryer; Noël Barstow; Jerry A. Carter; George H. Sutton; John I. Ewing

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Seabirds live in a variety of habitats in and around shallow water and coastal environments. They  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They represent an important part of the marine environment or food web and are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Depending on the geographic region, and how far offshore you are fishing, fishermen

220

Generalized Riemann problems for the shallow water system with a constraint on the height of flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Fd represents the drag force. We detail Fd and we recall...experiences a lower drag force, which moves it down further...471472. 10. K. Shinohara, Fundamental and Rheologival Properties of Powders, Handbook of Powder Science and Technology......

Laurent Plantié

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A new method for moving–boundary hydrodynamic problems in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...moving-boundary simulations: (a) fully wet...element; (d) flooding-type partly wet...for river flood simulation. Proc. Inst...M. 1994 Plain flooding: near and far field simulations. In Modelling flood...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Comparative utilization of shallow water habitats at Galveston, Texas by immature marine fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary production and protection from predators Format and style follow that of the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. L studies have contributed to an increased knowledge of larval marine Comparatively few studies have investigated...

Guillen, George Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evolution of the suborder Blennioidei : phylogeny and phylogeography of a shallow water fish clade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

north of the Isthmus of Panama. United States Nationalfrom the Gulf of Panama. Bull. Mar. Sci. Hastings, P. A.across the Isthmus of Panama. Proceedings of the Royal

Lin, Hsiu-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Deep-and shallow-water slamming at small and zero deadrise angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first for small penetration depths in finite or infinite depth fluids (which we call Wagner flows), and secondly when the penetration is comparable to the fluid depth (which we call Korobkin flows). We also , but expands its length at a rate O(V/ ). 1 #12;x Thin Jet Small turnover region Turnover point y Outer region

Howison, Sam

225

Abstract Presented at The Marine and Estuarine Shallow Water Science and Management Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the startup time of the commercialization process. It is expected that the end result of the project work Commercialization in New York/New Jersey Harbor* E. A. Stern US Environmental Protection Agency - Region 2 New York Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 A unique federal project aimed at the commercialization of different

Brookhaven National Laboratory

226

Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theories and their explanations have been proposed and many predictive methods have been advocated via technical journals. In this section, the basic formation pressure and stress concepts will be introduced and analyzed for both hydrostatic and non... environment of the GOM. 2.3 Stress The depositional environments are the basis for formation stresses and along with the earth?s gravitational forces, stress fields were developed around the globe. There are many possibilities which lead...

Tu, Yong B.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

A ROBUST WELL-BALANCED SCHEME FOR MULTI-LAYER SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the overall property of being conservative in the total momentum. It is based on a source-centered hydro of the layers with respect to horizontal scales, small viscosity, hydrostatics, small slope for the topography-centered hydro- static reconstruction scheme for the one-layer system, a variant of the hydrostatic

228

A FULLY IMPLICIT DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION ALGORITHM FOR SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS ON THE CUBED-SPHERE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the study of the earth's climate, the understanding of flood, etc. SWE is difficult to solve because its (caojianwen@gmail.com) §Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309

Cai, Xiao-Chuan

229

MEASUREMENTS OF SHALLOW WATER BREAKING WAVE ROLLERS Merrick C. Haller and Patricio Cataln  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roller vertical cross-sections and angles of inclination for a pair of laboratory wave conditions. Yet) that the roller area and its angle of inclination on the wave front are important quantities #12;2 governing. (1991), Stive and Wind (1986), Dally and Brown (1995), and Lippmann et al. (1996); excepting Dally

Haller, Merrick

230

Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deposits (including glacial and fluvial deposits), we use DC electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential mapping to identify preferential fluid flow pathways. The...

231

Original article Photochemical efficiency of photosystem II in rapidly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- chemical efficiency of dark-adapted disks, and after 10 min at 220 ?mol m-2 s-1, up to relative water and temperature. photosynthesis / chlorophyll fluorescence / PS II photochemical efficiency / water stress / deOriginal article Photochemical efficiency of photosystem II in rapidly dehydrating leaves of 11

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Water, water everywhere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... available water resources, either locally or globally, are by no means exhausted. At present desalination -- the removal of salt from sea water or brackish water -- is very ... or brackish water -- is very expensive, mainly because it consumes so much energy. Desalination provides less than 0.2 per cent of all the water used in the world ...

Philip Ball

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and ‘‘tickler chain,’’ excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Evidence of Intense Archaeal and Bacterial Methanotrophic Activity in the Black Sea Water Column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...al. (36). Water samples (1...degassing. The gas phase was subsequently...integrator. Nitrogen was used as the carrier gas, and separation...of methane, water was transferred...Crozier. 1976. Solubility of methane in distilled water and seawater...shallow and deep gas seeps methane...

Edith Durisch-Kaiser; Lucia Klauser; Bernhard Wehrli; Carsten Schubert

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largestCoastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary G. Curtis Roegner1 States of America Abstract Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water

238

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

239

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

240

Biofoam II  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties. 1 fig.

Morrison, R.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ENVIR 202: EARTH, AIR, WATER PERSPECTIVES ON EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS for Water (W)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the basic questions from the first hand-out (25 Feb 2003..on the class web-page), please pose some of your-water' and `deep-water' waves. This shallow and deep is measured in comparison to the wavelength. The wavespeed that the fastest gravity waves in the deep ocean can move at (9.8 x 4000) or 200 m/sec (450 m.p.h.). When

242

Bearing capacity and settlement of circular shallow foundations using a non-linear constitutive relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Page 5 of 26 INTRODUCTION Shallow foundations are widely used to support lightly loaded structures on clay soils, as well as more heavily loaded structures such as fluid storage tanks. These are typically designed using the classical Prandtl...

McMahon, B.T.; Haigh, Stuart; Bolton, M.D.

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Natural convection in shallow porous cavities near the density maximum: the conduction and intermediate regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and to the design of solar energy collectors. Convection in shallow...where x and y are the horizontal and vertical coordinates, and u and v are the horizontal and vertical Darcy...central core regions horizontal changes will occur......

D. M. Leppinen; D. A. S. Rees

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lunar floor-fractured craters: Classification, distribution, origin and implications for magmatism and shallow crustal structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) are a class of lunar craters characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures; additional interior features are moats, ridges, and patches of ...

Jozwiak, Lauren M.

245

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles,

246

Surface and bottom boundary layer dynamics on a shallow submarine bank : southern flank of Georges Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis investigates the circulation at a 76-m deep study site on the southern flank of Georges Bank, a shallow submarine bank located between the deeper Gulf of Maine and the continental slope. Emphasis is placed on ...

Werner, Sandra R. (Sandra Regina)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement Ventilation By Benjamin Piers Hume-2758 #12;#12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 i A man of genius makes Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 ii #12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters

Hickman, Mark

249

The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

Keating, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fessenden, Julianna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kanjorski, Nancy [NON LANL; Koning, Dan [NM BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES; Pawar, Rajesh [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Model for deposition of bedded halite in a shallow shelf setting, San Andres Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing depositional models for evaporites do not adequately describe facies relationships, halite fabrics, and trace element geochemistry of halite from the Permian San Andres Formation. Interbedding of anhydritic halite and mudstone with disrupted bedding records alternation between marine-dominated brine pool and subaerial environments. Chevron structures and hopper crystal cumulates in the halite indicate subaqueous deposition. Abundant anhydrite partings within halite, which thicken and become interbedded with marine shelf carbonates to the south, demonstrate the facies equivalence and physical connection of evaporite and marine environments. Maintenance of marine character in trace element profiles through halite sequences documents the episodic influx of marine water. Haloturbated structure in mudstone interbeds within the halite is produced by displacive growth of halite within mudstone and dissolution and collapse of this halite as ground-water chemistry fluctuates in response to conditions of alternating desiccation and wetting. Karst features cutting the halite also imply subaerial exposure. Mapping of the fine-scale sedimentary structures, geochemical signature, and insoluble component mineralogy of halite sequences indicates that the brine pool environment extended over areas in excess of 100 km/sup 2/. Sabkha, salina, playa, and deep water basin models of halite-precipitating environments do not satisfactorily describe the shallow marine shelf depositional environment of the San Andres halite.

Hovorka, S.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Capture zone design for a contaminated shallow unconfined aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the early 1950's to 1987. The extent of the ground water contamination has impacted City of Austin properties, private residential areas, and is migrating towards the Colorado River to the South. A capture zone is proposed to stop the contaminants...

Cann, Eric Roy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

SPECIAL ISSUE A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA S. M. Benson Global Climate and Energy Project effectiveness of carbon capture and storage under deep injection conditions have already been implemented

253

Water Efficiency  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com Topics * Performance contracting analysis * Water industry terms * Federal reduction goals * Water balance * Water...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - arginase ii restricts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the oxidation of water... on Earth. The process is carried out only at the oxygen-evolving com- plex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII... - tosystem II have homologs in the...

255

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI...

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures · Exam info (A Hoffman) ...

257

The Reactor engineering of the MITR-II : construction and startup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor, MITR-I, has been replaced with a light water cooled, heavy water reflected reactor called the MITR-II. The MITR-II is designed to operate at 5 thermal megawatts. The ...

Allen, G. C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Using small molecule complexes to elucidate features of photosynthetic water oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cofactors. In Photosystem II: the light-driven water: plastoquinone...Springer. Vincent, J.B , Christmas, C, Chang, H.R, Li, Q...Wydrzynski, T Photosystem II: the light-driven water: plastoquinone...ions. In Photosystem II: the light-driven water: plastoquinone...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ~ 8, 14 and 20 Hz.

260

A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Spectral ratios of teleseismic direct and scattered P waves observed in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, show a systematic pattern of low amplitudes at sites inside the caldera relative to sites on or outside the ring fracture. Waveforms recorded at caldera stations are considerably more complex than those recorded outside the caldera. The data used in this study were collected during a passive seismic monitoring experiment conducted in 1987. Twenty-four teleseismic events were recorded on two

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water Management Technologies from Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation Potato processing plant UV/Ozone for phase I, water contaminated and aerobic biological with herbicide, BOD pretreatment plant for and micro-organisms phase II expansion Contaminated gas Operation of transportable holder water from cross... is injected at an offshore platform. Methanol (hydrate inhibitor) is regenerated onshore by distillation. The corrosion inhibitor was accumulating in the methanol still bottoms. The waste streams were being discharged into coastal water via an outfall...

Woinsky, S. G.

262

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses: Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses inorganic carbon (d13 C-DIC) were carried out in shallow water carbonate sediments of the Great Bahamas Bank (GBB) to further examine sediment­seagrass relationships and to more quantitatively describe the cou

Burdige, David

263

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

264

Shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHALLOW GEOLCGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTI~wAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by TOK~ EDWIN TATUM, JR. Submitted to the Graduate ColleSe of Texas A&N University in partial fulfill . ent of the requirement fo= the deenee cf i...%STER F SCIENCE December. 1977 Najoz Subject: 3c ano~phy SHALLOW GEOLOGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTINENTAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GUIZ OF ?EXICO A Thesis by TOMMY EDWIN TATUM, JR. Approved as to sty'e and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head...

Tatum, Tommy Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Selective Capture of Cesium and Thallium from Natural Waters...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

evaluated against iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) (insoluble Prussian blue) for the sorption of cesium (Cs+) and thallium (Tl+) from natural waters and simulated wastes. The...

266

Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 ii Colorado Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Climate Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents On Being a Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Colorado Climate in Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 A Review of the 2001 WaterYear in Colorado

267

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality Considerations and Regulations by Susan Mc Management Competency Area II: Nutrient movement in soil and water. Objectives After completing this module issues 3.Become familiar with federal and state water quality regulations 4.Identify Best Management

Lawrence, Rick L.

268

ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents An Unusually Heavy Snowfall in North Central Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 A Brief History of Colorado's Most Notable Snowstorms" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Colorado Climate Water Year 2003 Vol. 4, No. 1-4 If you have a photo or slide that your would like

269

Abstracts ii Schedule....................................................................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................88 Dark Matter & Dark Energy ...............................................................................................3 HAD II Special: Neptune after One Orbit: Reflections on the Discovery of a Planet

Ciotti, Luca

270

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Late Jurassic shallow marine limestone in western Palaeo-Pacific, northwest Borneo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Late Jurassic shallow marine limestone in western-Pacific a b s t r a c t Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy was applied to a 202 m-thick shallow marine, which was deposited in the western Palaeo-Pacific. Strontium isotopic ratios of rudist specimens suggest

Gilli, Adrian

271

Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad-hoc trigger function used in the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization with a trigger function related to the distribution of temperature and humidity in the convective boundary layer via probability density functions (PDFs). An additional modification to the default version of WRF is the computation of a cumulus cloud fraction based on the time scales relevant for shallow cumuli. Results from three case studies over the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma are presented. These days were selected because of the presence of shallow cumuli over the ARM site. The modified version of WRF does a much better job predicting the cloud fraction and the downwelling shortwave irradiance thancontrol simulations utilizing the default Kain-Fritsch scheme. The modified scheme includes a number of additional free parameters, including the number and size of bins used to define the PDF, the minimum frequency of a bin within the PDF before that bin is considered for shallow clouds to form, and the critical cumulative frequency of bins required to trigger deep convection. A series of tests were undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters. Overall, the scheme was found to be relatively insensitive to each of the parameters.

Berg, Larry K.; Gustafson, William I.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Deng, Liping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Shallow marine benthic invertebrates of the Seychelles Plateau: high diversity in a tropical oligotrophic environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmosphere-ocean-ecology dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean organized by Tom Spencer...extensive in the shallow Western Indian Ocean, especially on the Seychelles...minology of four scales (point, sample, large area and geographical...benthos nor that of the Western Indian Ocean geographical province...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Wind-wave measurements in a shallow estuary: Trinity Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations and follow the current proposed asymptotic limit to wave growth in shallow depth. The depth range for this empirical formulation is extended from 0.5–2m out to 3.5m. The model does not work for wind speeds less than 1m/s and during rapid wind...

Dupuis, Keith Wade

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

Piepke, Andreas G.

275

Parallelization of a relaxation scheme modelling the bedload transport of sediments in shallow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallelization of a relaxation scheme modelling the bedload transport of sediments in shallow the cohesive strength of the soil particles. Once detached, the sediments can be transported downstream as non-cohesive sediment before its deposition. BANG Project, INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt & LAGA, Universiy Paris 13 Nord

Boyer, Edmond

276

ELECTRONICS' 2008 24 26 September, Sozopol, BULGARIA RESPONSE TIME OF SHALLOW JUNCTION SILICON PHOTODIODES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHOTODIODES Lei Shi1 , Sha Xia1 , Francesco Sarubbi1 , Rik Naulaerts2 , Stoyan Nihtianov1,2 , Lis Nanver1 1, shape and location of the illuminated part of a shallow-junction photodiode, and its series resistance for which the photo-generated charge will be removed from the photodiode) with the illuminated spot size

Technische Universiteit Delft

277

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore sampled in the continental margins offshore India (Fig 1). A volcanic ash layer was recovered below seafloor Surrounding Sediments: Grey sediment in A is a nannofossil and plant debris bearing clay

New Hampshire, University of

278

The Life Cycle of an Undular Bore and Its Interaction with a Shallow, Intense Cold Front  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the horizontal wind and a local minimum in surface pressure. Despite the conceptual appeal of the classical model of an undular bore and its associated wind shift, spawned by the passage of a shallow surface cold front over the wind shift and thermodynamic properties of the front was induced by the formation of a bore over south

Williams, Justin

279

Seismic hazard due to small-magnitude, shallow-source, induced earthquakes in The Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic hazard due to small-magnitude, shallow-source, induced earthquakes in The Netherlands Torild van Eck*, Femke Goutbeek, Hein Haak, Bernard Dost Seismology Division, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) PO Box 201, 3730 AE De Bilt, The Netherlands. E-mail: vaneck@knmi.nl Revised

Haak, Hein

280

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaporite deposition in a shallow perennial lake, Qaidam basin, western China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaporites accumulate in ephemeral saline-pans, shallow perennial lakes or lagoons, and deep perennial systems. Continuous brine trench exposures of Holocene evaporites from the Qaidam basin provide criteria for the recognition of shallow perennial lake sediments. Based on Landsat photographs, lateral extent of beds (at least 7 km), and sequence thicknesses (maximum 2.5 m), the paleolake is interpreted to have been less than 2.5 m deep and at least 120 km{sup 2} in area. Sediments consist of laminated siliciclastic mud overlain by mud-halite couplets (mm- to cm-scale layers), which represent one vertical shallowing- and concentrating-upwards sequence. The basal laminite marks the onset of deposition in this shallow perennial paleolake. Syndepositional halite textures and fabrics in the overlying mud-halite couplets include cumulates, rafts, and chevrons, draped by mud laminae, and halite layers truncated by horizontal dissolution surfaces (increasing in frequency upwards). Paleolake brines, determined from fluid inclusion melting temperatures, are Na-Mg-Cl-rich and evolve from 0.84 m Mg{sup 2} to 1.52 m Mg{sup 2+} (near the surface). Combinations of the following criteria may be used for the recognition of shallow, nonstratified, perennial lake sediments: lateral continuity of layers; muds undisrupted by subaerial exposure; vertical bottom-growth of halite; halite layers conformably overlain by mud; halite layers truncated by nonuniformly spaced horizontal dissolution surfaces; erosional scours and channels filled with cross-laminated gypsum, halite, and siliciclastic sand and mud; and salinity fluctuations over small stratigraphic intervals within an overall concentrating-upwards sequence.

Schubel, K.A.; Lowenstein, T.K. (SUNY, Binghampton, NY (United States)); Spencer, R.J. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Pengxi, Z. (Institute of Salt Lakes, Xining (China))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

283

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that this project will show that the application of the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates can be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. The selected site for the demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Work is nearing completion on the reservoir characterization components of the project. The near-term emphasis is to, (1) provide an accurate distribution of original oil-in-place on a waterflood pattern entity level, (2) evaluate past recovery efficiencies, (3) perform parametric simulations, and (4) forecast performance for a site specific field demonstration of the proposed technology. Macro zonation now exists throughout the study area and cross-sections are available. The Oil-Water Contact has been defined. Laboratory capillary pressure data was used to define the initial water saturations within the pay horizon. The reservoir`s porosity distribution has been enhanced with the assistance of geostatistical software. Three-Dimensional kriging created the spatial distributions of porosity at interwell locations. Artificial intelligence software was utilized to relate core permeability to core porosity, which in turn was applied to the 3-D geostatistical porosity gridding. An Equation-of-State has been developed and refined for upcoming compositional simulation exercises. Options for local grid-refinement in the model are under consideration. These tasks will be completed by mid-1995, prior to initiating the field demonstrations in the second budget period.

Wehner, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Agricultural aspects of monitoring and stabilization of shallow land-burial sites. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The year FY 1979 was a transition year between start up of work at the low level waste burial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky and completion of previous work involving laboratory studies with radionuclides. All of our studies are designed to solve problems or verify situations that exist in the field. The thrust at Maxey Flats by this group involves soil moisture and radionuclide movement at that burial site in a humid region. Vegetation cover is being manipulated, rooting depth is being studied, water penetration and flow are being measured, radionuclide uptake by plants and concentration in components of soil moisture are being measured. Goals are to determine how water is penetrating trenches and how to minimize such penetration. Laboratory studies involve fission and transuranic radionuclides with a future focus placed primarily upon field problems related to low level waste burial problems and soils. Some past studies being completed involved transuranic elements and a cross-section of USA soils. Different sized containers have been involved in the studies so that results can be extrapolated to field conditions. Analytical work is almost completed and the data are being synthesized. Some preliminary organization of the data is included in this annual report. Concentration ratios, plant part discrimination ratios and radionuclide ratios are included in the initial evaluation. The laboratory phase of this study is to be completed in the next fiscal year with more effort being redirected toward field studies at the shallow land waste burial site. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 9 items in this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Wallace, A.; Schulz, R.K.; Romney, E.M.; Nishita, H.; Herman, D.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preprocessing issues associated with multiple attenuation in water depths of less than 150 meters: ISMA and predictive deconvolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In order to study these challenges associated with acquisition and processing of shallow-water data, synthetic seismic data for 150, 75 and 25 m water depths were generated using a fully elastic, finite difference algorithm. The direct wave was removed...

Walsh, Jeffrey Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.

Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bowers, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

FACTORS AFFECTING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF MECHA WOREDA, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are used: shallow dug wells, spring and deep wells. A survey was carried out with 160 household in 16 waterFACTORS AFFECTING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF MECHA WOREDA, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA A Project Paper Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell

Walter, M.Todd

291

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

292

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

293

Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Study of cementing practices applied to the shallow casing in offshore wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Survey information shows annular gas flow associated with cementing defects to be a major problem in shallow casing strings offshore as well as in other cemented strings in oil and gas wells. The gas flow hazard to safety, environment, and economics could be reduced by an aggressive program keyed to prevent gas migration. The program components are: (1) historical data base; (2) training; (3) research of cement hydration in a long, thin column; and (4) development of logging-surveillance devices.

Martinez, J.; McDonald, W.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

High-k shallow traps observed by charge pumping with varying discharging times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the influence of falling time and base level time on high-k bulk shallow traps measured by charge pumping technique in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with HfO{sub 2}/metal gate stacks. N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different duty ratios indicate that the electron detrapping time dominates the value of N{sub T} for extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps. N{sub T} is the number of traps, and I{sub cp} is charge pumping current. By fitting discharge formula at different temperatures, the results show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps at high voltage are in fact high-k bulk shallow traps. This is also verified through a comparison of different interlayer thicknesses and different Ti{sub x}N{sub 1?x} metal gate concentrations. Next, N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different falling times (t{sub falling} {sub time}) and base level times (t{sub base} {sub level}) show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps decrease with an increase in t{sub falling} {sub time}. By fitting discharge formula for different t{sub falling} {sub time}, the results show that electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps first discharge to the channel and then to source and drain during t{sub falling} {sub time}. This current cannot be measured by the charge pumping technique. Subsequent measurements of N{sub T} by charge pumping technique at t{sub base} {sub level} reveal a remainder of electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps.

Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wang, Bin-Wei; Cao, Xi-Xin [Department of Embedded System Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, P.R.China (China); Chen, Hua-Mao [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Chen, Tsai-Fu [Device Department, United Microelectronics Corporation, Tainan Science Park, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Impacts of Shallow Geothermal Energy Production on Redox Processes and Microbial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impacts of Shallow Geothermal Energy Production on Redox Processes and Microbial Communities ... Thermophilic sulfate reduction, however, had a higher activation energy (100–160 kJ mol–1) than mesophilic sulfate reduction (30–60 kJ mol–1), which might be due to a trade-off between enzyme stability and activity with thermostable enzymes being less efficient catalysts that require higher activation energies. ...

Matthijs Bonte; Wilfred F. M. Röling; Egija Zaura; Paul W. J. J. van der Wielen; Pieter J. Stuyfzand; Boris M. van Breukelen

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling of hydroecological feedbacks predicts distinct classes of landscape pattern, process, and restoration potential in shallow aquatic ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that interactions between vegetation and flow cause the emergence of channel patterns that are distinct from the standard Schumm classification of river channels. Although landscape pattern is known to be linked to ecosystem services such as habitat provision, pollutant removal, and sustaining biodiversity, the mechanisms responsible for the development and stability of different landscape patterns in shallow, vegetated flows have remained poorly understood. Fortunately, recent advances have made possible large-scale models of flow through vegetated environments that can be run over a range of environmental variables and over timescales of millennia. We describe a new, quasi-3D cellular automata model that couples simulations of shallow-water flow, bed shear stresses, sediment transport, and vegetation dynamics in an efficient manner. That efficiency allowed us to apply the model widely in order to determine how different hydroecological feedbacks control landscape pattern and process in various types of wetlands and floodplains. Distinct classes of landscape pattern were uniquely associated with specific types of allogenic and autogenic drivers in wetland flows. Regular, anisotropically patterned wetlands were dominated by allogenic processes (i.e., processes driven by periodic high water levels and flow velocities that redistribute sediment), relative to autogenic processes (e.g., vegetation production, peat accretion, and gravitational erosion). These anistropically patterned wetlands are therefore particularly prone to hydrologic disturbance. Other classes of wetlands that emerged from simulated interactions included maze-patterned, amorphous, and topographically noisy marshes, open marsh with islands, banded string-pool sequences perpendicular to flow, parallel deep and narrow channels flanked by marsh, and ridge-and-slough patterned marsh oriented parallel to flow. Because vegetation both affects and responds to the balance between the transport capacity of the flow and sediment supply, these vegetated systems exhibit a feedback that is not dominant in most rivers. Consequently, unlike in most rivers, it is not possible to predict the “channel pattern” of a vegetated landscape based only on discharge characteristics and sediment supply; the antecedent vegetation pattern and vegetation dynamics must also be known. In general, the stability of different wetland pattern types is most strongly related to factors controlling the erosion and deposition of sediment at vegetation patch edges, the magnitude of sediment redistribution by flow, patch elevation relative to water level, and the variability of erosion rates in vegetation patches with low flow-resistance. As we exemplify in our case-study of the Everglades ridge and slough landscape, feedback between flow and vegetation also causes hysteresis in landscape evolution trajectories that will affect the potential for landscape restoration. Namely, even if the hydrologic conditions that historically produced higher flows are restored, degraded portions of the ridge and slough landscape are unlikely to revert to their former patterning. As wetlands and floodplains worldwide become increasingly threatened by climate change and urbanization, the greater mechanistic understanding of landscape pattern and process that our analysis provides will improve our ability to forecast and manage the behavior of these ecosystems.

Laurel G. Larsen; Judson W. Harvey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, water electrolysis technology and its applications for nuclear hydrogen ... of the chapter, a general classification of water electrolysis systems is given, the fundamentals of water electrolysis

Greg F. Naterer; Ibrahim Dincer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PARS II FAQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

302

Wind-induced sediment resuspension as a potential factor sustaining eutrophication in large and shallow Lake Peipsi  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using sediment traps, we aimed to elucidate the temporal and spatial variations in sediment fluxes in large and shallow Lake Peipsi, over the May to October 2011 period, and analyze the factors behind those varia...

Olga Tammeorg; Juha Niemistö; Tõnu Möls; Reet Laugaste; Kristel Panksep…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Investigation of active faulting at the Emigrant Peak fault in Nevada using shallow seismic reflection and ground penetrating radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to assess fault displacement, off-fault deformation, and alluvial fan stratigraphy at the Emigrant Peak fault zone (EPFZ) in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada utilizing shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground penetrating...

Christie, Michael Wayne

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Shallow seismic investigation of hydrogeologic problems in the Brazos River alluvium, Texas A&M Plantation, Burleson County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHALLOW SEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC PROBLEMS IN THE BRAZOS RIVER ALLUVIUM, TEXAS A&M PLANTATION, BURLESON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis Michael Albert McBrayer Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in Partial... fulfullment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Geology SHALLOW SEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC PROBLEMS IN THE BRAZOS RIVER ALLUVIUM, TEXAS DAM PLANTATION, BURLESON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis...

McBrayer, Michael Albert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

306

Be Water Smart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that rain gardens are made from a shallow depression in the landscape at least 10 feet from a building. The sod is removed and excavated to create a shallow, bowl-like area. Compost and sharp sand is added to the soil and planted with a mixture...

Swyden, Courtney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tritium in a deciduous forest adjacent to a commercial shallow land burial site: implications for monitoring to detect radionuclide migration. [Maxey Flats, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium as tritiated water was measured in the sap taken from the trunks of 26 maple trees growing in the vicinity of the shallow-land, low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. Tritium values ranged between 10,000 and 290,000 pCi/l with the highest levels measured in sap from trees growing downslope from the burial site's western boundary. Levels of tritium of less than 1000 pCi/l were measured at a distance of 20 kilometers from the site: The source of elevated tritium levels in the vicinity of the disposal site is the evaporator facility which has released tritiated water vapor into the air more or less continuously for 10 years. Another possible source of at least some of the tritium is subterranean leakage from the trenches located near the western boundary. The evaporator facility has been shut down since December 1982. With the shutdown of the evaporator the levels of tritium in tree sap in future years is expected to show a marked decline as the tritiated soil water in the root zone becomes increasingly diluted with fresh rainwater and the residual tritium is dissipated to the air by evaporation and plant transpiration processes. 11 references.

Rickard, W.H.; Kirby, L.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

Chen, K.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissemination, and technology/knowledge transfer programs at the state, national, and international levels technology support staff. The Advisory Board includes representatives from major state and federal water, and (ii) other national and international funding agencies and organizations supporting research in water

311

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The aerodynamics of a slender body moving very close to a water wave surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......wing-in-ground effect. J. Ship Res., 51, 182186...equation for interaction effects on a moored containership...passing Tanker. J. Ship Res., 50, 278287...three-dimensional wings in ground effect. J. Fluid Mech...and interactions of ships in shallow water......

Q. X. Wang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow processes of storm and wave reworking influence the seabed through submarine erosion and sediment

Purkis, Sam

315

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1 Received 13 March 2008 of heat as a tracer of shallow groundwater movement and describes current temperature-based approaches relying on traditional observation wells, and remote sensing and other large-scale advanced temperature

316

Characteristics of sound propagation in shallow water over an elastic seabed with a thin cap-rock layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-rock layer Alec J. Duncan,a) Alexander N. Gavrilov, Robert D. McCauley, and Iain M. Parnum Centre for Marine M. Collis Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, Colorado 80401 (Received 31 August.1121/1.4809723] PACS number(s): 43.30.Ma, 43.30.Bp [NPC] Pages: 207­215 I. INTRODUCTION Substantial areas

317

Sediment resuspension and light attenuation in Peoria Lake: can macrophytes improve water quality in this shallow system?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examined sediment resuspension and light attenuation in relation to the ... and clay resulted in frequent periods of sediment resuspension. As calculated (wave theory) shear stress ... measured experimentally)...

William F. James; Elly P. Best; John W. Barko

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Larval Fish Diets in Shallow Coastal Waters off San Onofre, William Watson and Raymond L. Davis, Jr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92009; present address: South- west Fisheries Center LaJolla Laboratory, National Systems. Inc., 2433 Impala Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92009; present address: Sea World, Aquarium Department

319

The precipitation of aragonite from shallow-water hydrothermal fluids in a coral reef, Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a hot, mineralized hydrothermal fluid. There, aragonite and ferrihydrite, a hydrous ferric oxide- hexagonal) crystals up to 2 cm long and (b) micro-crystals similar in appearance to ``feather dendrite found along volcanically active portions of the mid-ocean ridges or in deep back- arc basins. There is

Pichler, Thomas

320

Three new species of shallow water, yellow zoanthids (Hexacorallia: Zoanthidea: Epizoanthidae) from southern California, USA, and southern Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In southern California and southern Australia, several species of hexacorals that are common at diving depths have been referred to as “Yellow Zoanthids.” We describe three new species of them in the genus Epizoanthus because all have a macrocnemic...

Phillipp, Nicholas A.; Fautin, Daphne G.

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Adaptive observations using HSV and TESV in a 4D-Var framework with a finite volume shallow-water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Additional metrics such as similarity indices between HSV and TESV also point to the same conclusion. #12 the uncertainty in forecasts of weather events that have large societal or economic impact. Initial efforts were

Aluffi, Paolo

322

Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

Newman, J. E.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Point vibration measurements for the detection of shallow-buried objects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major UK initiative, entitled ‘Mapping the Underworld’, is seeking to address the serious social, environmental and economic consequences arising from an inability to locate accurately and comprehensively the buried utility service infrastructure without resorting to extensive excavations. Mapping the Underworld aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics, and application of this technique for detecting buried infrastructure is currently being investigated. Here, the potential for making a number of simple point vibration measurements in order to detect shallow-buried objects, in particular plastic pipes, is explored. Point measurements can be made relatively quickly without the need for arrays of surface sensors, which can be expensive, time-consuming to deploy, and sometimes impractical in congested areas. At low frequencies, the ground behaves as a simple single-degree-of-freedom (mass–spring) system with a well-defined resonance, the frequency of which will depend on the density and elastic properties of the soil locally. This resonance will be altered by the presence of a buried object whose properties differ from the surrounding soil. It is this behavior which can be exploited in order to detect the presence of a buried object, provided it is buried at a sufficiently shallow depth. The theoretical background is described and preliminary measurements are made both on a dedicated buried pipe rig and on the ground over a domestic waste pipe. Preliminary findings suggest that, for shallow-buried pipes, a measurement of this kind could be a quick and useful adjunct to more conventional methods of buried pipe detection.

J.M. Muggleton; M.J. Brennan; C.D.F. Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

325

Dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a horizontally vibrating shallow optical lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a solitonic solution of the self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensate in a one-dimensional external potential of a shallow optical lattice with large periodicity when the lattice is horizontally shaken. We investigate the dynamics of the bright soliton through the properties of the fixed points. The special type of bifurcation results in a simple criterion for the stability of the fixed points depending only on the amplitude of the shaking lattice. Because of the similarity of the equations with those of an ac-driven Josephson junction, some results may find applications in other branches of physics.

Valizadeh, A.; Jahanbani, Kh.; Kolahchi, M. R. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Sundown Slaughter Unit (SSU) CO2 Huff- n- Puff (H- n- P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. Sundown Slaughter Unit is the second demonstration site associated with this project, following the unsuccessful test at Central Vacuum Unit. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other fields. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is a timely effort for near- term goals. The goal of this Sundown Slaughter Unit Project is to demonstrate the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process in a waterflooded, light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. The CO2 Huff- n- Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology for Louisiana- Texas gulf coast sandstone reservoirs. The reader is referred to three Society of Petroleum Engineer (SPE) papers, No. 15502, No. 16720 & No. 20208 for a review of the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils. Although the technology is proven in gulf coast sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. The goal of this technology demonstration is to gain an overall understanding of the reservoir qualities that influence CO2 Huff- n- Puff production responses within a heterogeneous reservoir such as the shallow shelf carbonate environment of the Sundown Slaughter Unit. A generalized reservoir model was developed and used to determine the importance of various geological and operational influences upon the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process at CVU. The findings at CVU would be applied to the demonstration site at SSU without further simulation studies being conducted at SSU.

John Prieditis; Mark Kovar; Roger Cole; Scott Wehner

1998-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

329

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

O'Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Note: this is a web-based PDF publication revised on 10/8/12 that is regularly updated. Consult http://extension.psu.edu/water to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities including coal mining, gas well drilling, pipeline leaks and from landfills. Methane http://extension.psu.edu/water to download the most recent version. Methane gas is the main component in natural gas. It occurs naturally in some shallow rock layers that are penetrated by water wells. Methane

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

332

CHANGES IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATER QUALITY BENEATH RECENTLY URBANIZED AREAS IN THE MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE AREA1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Association (JAWRA). Received March 17, 2011; accepted October 7, 2011. ª 2011 American Water

333

Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

2011-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

Preliminary report on shallow research drilling in the Salton Sea region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09/degree/C/m) to extreme (0.83/degree/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

1988-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

water from the CO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water from the CO water from the CO 2 stream and then compresses the dry CO 2 to a supercritical phase. The compressed CO 2 then travels through a 1 mile- long pipeline to the wellhead where it is injected into the Mt. Simon Sandstone at a depth of about 7,000 feet. November 21, 2011, http:// www.netl.doe.gov/publications/press/2011/111121_co2_injection. html. Fossil Energy Techline, "Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO 2 Emissions." Injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) indicate that their region has the geologic potential to store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions primarily in deep saline formations. The MRCSP Phase II field tests included seven small-scale field validation tests: three

336

Supercooled water and the kinetic glass transition F. Sciortino,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dynamics study of the self-dynamics of water molecules in deeply supercooled liquid states. We find the superheated, stretched, and supercooled states of liquid water 4­6 ; ii the existence of a meta- stable, lowSupercooled water and the kinetic glass transition F. Sciortino,1 P. Gallo,2 P. Tartaglia,1 and S

Sciortino, Francesco

337

Evaluating Water Recycling in California Sachi De Souza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Evaluating Water Recycling in California By Sachi De Souza B.Sc.Hon (Queen's University) 2005 Recycling in California ii ABSTRACT This document describes how to complete an economic analysis, financial analysis, and cost allocation for a water recycling project. Water recycling is gaining importance

Lund, Jay R.

338

PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS By HUI JIN Bachelor of Science validation of the water-to-air heat pump model. It's hard to find any words to express the thanks to my BASED MODELS OF WATER SLOURCE HEAT PUMPS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser Dean of the Graduate College ii

339

Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

Vellekoop, Michel

340

Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a groundwater ''mound'' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. 45 refs., 23 figs., 21 tabs.

Spruill, T.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Temporary Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temporary waters are lakes, ponds, streams, seeps, microhabitats, and other areas that hold water periodically and then dry. They occur across the globe, at all latitudes, and in all biomes, wherever water can collect long enough for aquatic life to develop. These waters are numerous, mostly small, and easily studied. Their biological communities are diverse, have much among-site variation, often include endemic species, and differ from those in permanent waters, contributing to regional biodiversity. Organisms survive through species-specific behavioral, physiological, and life-history adaptations. Community composition and structure change in response to environmental variations. Temporary waters are highly productive and their food webs are relatively simple. For all of these reasons, temporary waters lend themselves to surveys and experimental manipulations designed to test hypotheses about biological adaptation, population regulation, evolutionary processes, community composition and structure, and ecosystem functioning. In many parts of the world, most temporary waters have been lost. The conservation and restoration of vulnerable temporary waters is a major thrust of applied ecology. Also important are applications of ecological understanding to the control of disease vectors, especially pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes, from temporary water habitats. This article describes temporary waters, examines their biota and adaptations, and summarizes key questions about their ecology.

E.A. Colburn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water Bugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

343

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSIDE UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKAíS WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH with a vision, thereís an untapped market using resources right under our feet,î the University of Nebraska outdoors in India, Bangladesh, China and Viet- nam. Thousands of them have been grown to harvest

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

345

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

346

water pipeline gallery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

water pipeline gallery, water pipeline drift; water pipeline tunnel (US) ? Wasserleitungsrohrstollen m

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

348

Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The chloride-rich water obtained in 1967 from the shallow (114.3 m) Coso Hot Springs well No. 1 comes from a deep aquifer with a temperature at least as high as about 240 C and possibly higher than 275 C. Similar, but slightly diluted and cooled chloride-rich water enters the 1477-meter deep CGEH No. 1 well drilled in 1977 about 3.2 km to the west of the 1967 well. From the data in hand the Coso geothermal system appears to be a hot

349

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

350

Alligator Ridge District, East-Central Nevada: Carlin-Type Gold Mineralization at Shallow Depths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...i´34Svalues could have been produced by thermochemical reduction...such as localground water. View larger version...sulfur isotope shifts produced by closed-system...sulfideminerals by meteoric water. Thus, the sulfate...the dilatant Mooney Basin fault system into theadjacent...forcirculation of meteoric water to the brittle-ductile...

Constance J. Nutt; Albert H. Hofstra

351

Cabazon Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cabazon Wind Farm II Cabazon Wind Farm II Facility Cabazon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldman Sachs/Shell Developer Canon Power Corp. Energy Purchaser L.A. Department of Water Resources Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

353

Reusing Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

354

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

355

The analysis of rib-stiffened shallow shells by means of the compliance method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface to the middle surface displacements can be expressed as: 1 9U 6 1 R hot (2. . 32) Figure 2. Cylindrical Shallow Shell. 20 ? ( ? + w) 1 av aa (2. 33) (2. 34) 1 B w 2 R 'ok 2 2 1 ~w 2 R 0P 1 b w 2 2 S~b)3 (2. 35) (2. 36) (2. 37...) and considering (3. 1? 3. 3), the following is obtained: 1 ~iP ll 'h w 12 66 'b w R ad, 2 ' R 2 2d, 4 R 2 ~d, 2 bP2 + =RZ 22 hw 2 R (3. 13) 32 Thus, after certain transformations from the equilibrium equa- tions (2. 38-Z. 42), a single equation with two...

Trainer, Lloyd Douglass

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Shallow hydraulic fracturing measurements in Korea support tectonic and seismic indicators of regional stress.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted five hydraulic fracturing stress measurement campaigns in Korea, involving 13 test holes ranging in depth from 30 to 250 m, at locations from North Seoul to the southern coast of the peninsula. The measurements reveal consistent crustal stress magnitudes and directions that suggest persistence throughout western and southern Korea. The maximum horizontal stress {sigma}{sub H} is oriented between ENE-WSW and E-W, in accord with plate movement and deformation, and with directions indicated by both focal mechanism solutions from earthquakes inland and offshore as well as borehole breakouts in mainland China close to its eastern coast. With respect to magnitudes, the vertical stress is the overall minimum stress at all tested locations, suggesting a thrust faulting regime within the relatively shallow depths reached by our tests. Typically, such a stress regime becomes one favoring strike-slip at greater depths, as is also indicated by the focal mechanism solutions around Korea.

Haimson, Bezalel Cecil (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Lee, Moo Yul; Song, I. (Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of barrels of oil exist in the Bartlesville formation throughout Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri. In an attempt to demonstrate that these shallow heavy oil deposits can be recovered, a field project was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of enhanced oil recovery techniques (EOR) employing horizontal wells. Process screening results suggested that thermal EOR processes were best suited for the recovery of this heavy oil. Screening criteria suggested that in situ combustion was a viable technique for the production of these reserves. Laboratory combustion tube tests confirmed that sufficient amounts of fuel could be deposited. The results of the in situ combustion field pilot were disappointing. A total overall recovery efficiency of only 16.0 percent was achieved. Results suggest that the combustion front might have moved past the horizontal well, however elevated temperatures or crude upgrading were not observed. Factors contributing to the lack of production are also discussed.

Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States); Trent, R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Interim Report: CHEMICAL SPECIES OF MIGRATING RADIONUCLIDES AT COMMERCIAL SHALLOW LAND BURIAL SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report for .the project "Chemical Species of Migrating Radionuclides at Commercial Shallow Land Burial Site" under the new reporting schedule requested by the sponsor. Future reports will be issued following each fiscal quarter, with the next report scheduled in October, 1982. The primary purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for radionuclide migration at low-level waste burial sites. Chemical measurements of waste trench leachate and identification of chemical changes in leachate during migration will provide a basis for geochemical waste transport models. This project will produce for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information to support guidance for implementation of 10 CFR 61, particularly in the development of criteria for low level waste disposal site selection, management, permanent closure and monitoring. Topics covered include: Experimental Trench and Well Study; Chemical Species Characterization; Specific Radionuclide Mapping; Organic Complexing Compounds,

Kirby,, L. J.; Rickard,, W. H.; Toste,, A. P.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

362

APPENDIX II WESTFLISCHE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - APPENDIX II WESTF�LISCHE WILHELMS-UNIVERSIT�T M�NSTER Instructions for the experiment ,,Stock information about how the experiment works. Please keep general questions until the end of the introduction either 100 or 0 monetary units (MU). Due to the fact that the outcome of the event is uncertain during

Greer, Julia R.

363

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

364

Probing the role of chloride in Photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus by exchanging chloride for iodide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama Ehime, 790­8577, Japan, and PRESTO, Japan Science 2012 Keywords: Photosystem II Chloride Oxygen evolution The active site for water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) goes through five sequential oxidation states (S0 to S4) before O2 is evolved

365

Copper (I) and (II) complexes of melamine Austin B. Wiles a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)2 in methanol provided melamine complex 3, and AgClO4 reacted with melamine in water/ methanol produced 4 September 2005 Abstract Coordination of copper (I) and (II) salts to melamine (Mel) produces [CuX(Mel)] [X. The dimer units that comprise the Cu(II) complex 3 contain internal hydrogen bonds between methanol

Pike, Robert D.

366

Reconstruction of Early Paleogene North Pacific Deep-Water Circulation using the Neodymium Isotopic Composition of Fossil Fish Debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the timing of the cessation of major, deep convection in the North Pacific occurred much earlier, ~52 Ma than the timing obtained from shallower Shatsky Rise sites, ~45 Ma. Convection in the North Pacific likely produced a dense water mass that influenced...

Hague, Ashley Melissa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of utilities headed by the Eugene Water and Electric Board initiated the Re- gional Solar Radiation Monitoring2 II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar Monitoring Laboratory has operated a solar radiation monitoring network in the Pacific Northwest. The number of stations participat

Oregon, University of

368

Analytical Shape Computation of Macromolecules: II. Inaccessible Cavities in Proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cavities in proteins could contain disordered water molecules not apparent in the X-ray structural data.9Analytical Shape Computation of Macromolecules: II. Inaccessible Cavities in Proteins Jie Liang,1-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois ABSTRACT The structures of proteins are well-packed, yet they contain numerous cavi

Dai, Yang

369

Pourret Olivier, Gruau Grard, Dia Aline, Davranche Mlanie, and Molnat Jrome. (2010) Colloidal control on the distribution of rare earth elements in shallow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control on the distribution of rare earth elements in shallow groundwaters. Aquatic Geochemistry 16 (1 OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATERS Olivier Pourret1, 2, § , Gérard Gruau1,* , Aline Dia1;3 Abstract A 7-year monitoring period of rare earth element (REE) concentrations and REE pattern shapes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Int. Symp. on Shallow Flows, Iowa City, USA, June 4 -6, 2012 A Hamiltonian Boussinesq model with horizontally sheared currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3rd Int. Symp. on Shallow Flows, Iowa City, USA, June 4 - 6, 2012 A Hamiltonian Boussinesq model, and these waves tend to break too early in comparison with the real phenomena. Boussinesq models include internal to be prevented in these models. The variational Boussinesq model proposed by Klopman et al. (2010) may

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

371

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Sites at McGee Mountain, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of two innovative technologies in early-stage geothermal exploration:a) shallow (2m) survey; b) hydroprobe; and Identify a geothermal resource at the project site.

372

Seepage pathway assessment for natural gas to shallow groundwater during well stimulation, in production, and after abandonment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the shallow-zone aquifers shown at the top of...reservoir needed to lift the fracking fluid 1500 meters...shale to near-surface aquifers through natural pathways...systems or deep saline aquifers (de Pater and Dong...surface by a fleet of fracking trucks is unavailable...

Maurice Dusseault; Richard Jackson

373

Three-dimensional deformation caused by the Bam, Iran, earthquake and the origin of shallow slip deficit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional deformation caused by the Bam, Iran, earthquake and the origin of shallow slip (Iran) earth- quake using radar data from the Envisat satellite of the European Space Agency. Analysis. In this paper we report on deformation associated with the Mw6.5 Bam (Iran) earthquake determined using

Fialko, Yuri

374

Equivalent CPT Method for Calculating Shallow Foundation Settlements in the Piedmont Residual Soils Based on the DMT Constrained Modulus Approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalent CPT Method for Calculating Shallow Foundation Settlements in the Piedmont Residual Soils the Piedmont physiographic province, an equivalent method has been developed for the CPT to obtain constrained to the measured cone tip resistance (qc), particularly in fine sandy soils (e.g., M' = 2 qc). This too utililized

Mayne, Paul W.

375

RHIC II Science Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

376

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

377

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

378

Water Uptake and Distribution in Germinating Tobacco Seeds Investigated in Vivo by Nuclear Magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Uptake and Distribution in Germinating Tobacco Seeds Investigated in Vivo by Nuclear Magnetic-Ludwigs-Universita¨t Freiburg, D­79104 Freiburg i. Br., Germany (K.M., B.K., G.L.-M.) The regulation of water uptake state-of-the-art methods showed that water distribution in the water uptake phases II and III

Leubner, Gerhard

379

Assessing nutrient and pharmaceutical removal efficiency from wastewater using shallow wetland treatment mesocosms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wastewaters from rural sewage lagoons in Manitoba contain pharmaceuticals that are potentially harmful to non-target organisms and reduce overall water quality when released. An option… (more)

Cardinal, Pascal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Lotus and the Water Lilies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lotus and the Water Lilies Lotus and the Water Lilies Nature Bulletin No. 196-A June 12, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LOTUS AND THE WATER LILIES In midsummer, when the weather is hot and sultry, Mother Nature puts on an extravagant flower show. She uses just one kind of blossom. Completely covering hundreds of acres of water in shallow lakes or sluggish streams, are dense almost impenetrable beds of plants with huge green leaves like elephant ears and stately creamy-yellow flowers as fragrant as they are beautiful. This is the American Lotus, closely akin to the Egyptian lotus and the sacred lotus of the Hindus. The American lotus grows in quiet water from 2 to 5 feet deep, where its big leaves and flowers usually stand a foot or two above the surface on thick stiff stems rising from fleshy rootstalks buried in the mud. It has several leathery dark green leaves, almost circular and from one to two or more feet in diameter, each balanced at its center, like a platter, on the stem. The great flower buds open into blossoms, from 6 to 10 inches across, with broad petals and sepals. These are followed by conical seed capsules, often the size of a man's fist. From one to two dozen seeds are set in pits in the fist top of the capsule, which breaks off and floats about, scattering the seeds.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................... 193 Lesson 11 Water and Pollution........................................................................................................................ 195 Activity 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere...! ............................................................................. 205 Record Sheet 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere! ..................................................................... 207 Activity 11.2, Pollution at Its Source...

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water Privatisation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

Zölls, Elisa

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Computerized Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with WRAP. TWRI Technical Report 283, April 2005. This report serves as an introductory tutorial to help new users apply the model quickly for basic water availability modeling applications. ? Comparative Evaluation of Generalized Reservoir...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) gas recovery techniques are unique compared to other production methods. Formation water must be removed, or “dewatered” as it holds the methane gas in the coal seam by hydrostatic pressure...

Alireza Bahadori; Malcolm Clark; Bill Boyd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next slide: So what are the operating costs of loops? You've got pumps. You've got heat loss in the loop. You've got maintenance. And it turns out that 90 percent of the...

386

Arsenic redistribution after solid phase epitaxial regrowth of shallow pre-amorphized silicon layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of ultra shallow ion implants of arsenic in Si following solid phase epitaxial re-growth process is reported. A 16 nm amorphous layer was created by ion implantation of Si{sup +} at energy 5 keV and a dose 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} at/cm{sup 2}. As ion were implanted at 2 keV using 3 different doses: 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14}, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} at/cm{sup 2}. The resulting As distributions, confined in the amorphous layer, were thermally treated at 550 Degree-Sign C for 5-300 s in order to electrically activate dopant atoms. Crystal re-growth and As redistribution was investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry and medium energy ion scattering. A growth rate depending on the As concentration was observed, the rate being slower for higher As content. Arsenic re-distribution to the surface and at the end-of-range defects was observed and a segregation model was developed. Finally, the substitutional fraction of As atoms was related to sheet resistance measurements revealing a higher fraction of electrically active dopant atoms in pre-amorphized samples compared to not pre-amorphized.

Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Gennaro, S.; Bersani, M.; Hourdakis, E.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.; Reading, M. A.; Berg, J. A. van den [CMM, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18. 38123 Povo - Trento (Italy); NCSR Demokritos, IMEL, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Centre for Materials and Physics, University of Salford (United Kingdom)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reservoir characterization of thinly laminated heterolithic facies within shallow-marine sand bodies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow marine sandstones typically form high quality reservoirs but they can contain a significant proportion of extremely heterogeneous facies. Particularly significant are heterolithic (mixed interlaminated sand-mud) deposits which are common in estuarine/incised valley-fill reservoirs and other tidally-influenced depositional environments. The complex mm/cm-scale interfingering of sands and clays in these reservoirs is below the resolution of most logging tools, which poses major problems for the petrophysical evaluation, quantitative reservoir modelling and reservoir performance prediction. This study outlines an integrated geological/petrophysical framework for the reservoir characterization of heterolithic facies from the Jurassic of the North Sea Basin which utilizes well logs, cores, minipermeameter and analog outcrop data. The calibration of wireline logs (GR, LDT/CNL, EPT and dipmeter) with cores helps in establishing the relationship between the architecture of sand-shale laminations and their wireline log response/electrofacies. The routine sampling procedure for porosity/permeability measurement from cores will not accurately determine the average reservoir properties for these heterolithic intervals. The selection of measurement points is of vital importance for determining average reservoir properties. The minipermeameter measurements are especially useful for these thin bedded reservoirs and serve as a useful guide for reservoir zonation and evaluation of petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The incorporation of analog outcrop data helps further in establishing vertical and lateral communication relationships at field scale.

Gupta, R.; Johnson, H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Myking, B.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Exploration model for shallow Silurian (Kankakee) carbonate reservoirs in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoirs in shallow (600-650 ft deep) basal Silurian Kankakee carbonates at Buckhorn consolidated, Siloam, and Kellerville oil fields in western Illinois have produced nearly 2 million bbl of oil, but were developed essentially by random drilling. A new exploration model that combines lithologic studies and isopach mapping has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Isopach mapping of Silurian and Devonian rocks between an organic facies in the Mississippian-Devonian New Albany Shale and the top of the Ordovician Maquoketa Shale reveals thickened sequences that coincide with most of the oil fields. These thickened intervals apparently reflect subtle paleovalleys eroded into the Maquoketa shale during the Ordovician-Silurian hiatus. During the initial Silurian marine transgression, these paleovalleys at the base of the Kankakee were filled with carbonates to form the thickened sequences. Differential erosion at the top of the Kankakee does not satisfactorily explain the locally thickened sequences in the Kankakee. Lithologic studies suggest that subsurface fluid flows concentrated along these paleovalleys contributed to subsequent diagenesis of valleyfill carbonates. Diagenetic alteration of these carbonates resulted in development of basal Kankakee reservoirs within the paleovalleys. This concept of Kankakee reservoirs occurring within paleovalleys at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity is a new exploration model that can aid in the search for similar traps in western Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Seyler, B.J.; Whitaker, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mapping benthic faunal communities in the shallow and deep sediments of Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Las Perlas Archipelago (LPA) is located off the Pacific Coast of Panama and was designated as a marine protected area (MPA) in 2007. This baseline study of the shallow and deeper sedimentary habitats of the islands partly informed the MPA designation. Ninety-two grab stations and twenty trawl stations were sampled. Sediment grab sample results were interpolated to produce a map that showed the area to be dominated by mud (1246 km2, 40%) and sand/shell sediments (780 km2, 25%). A total of 201 taxa were recorded and over 5800 individual specimens were processed, revealing that the sediments hold varying community compositions, with annelids being the dominant group (73%) followed by crustaceans (14%). Relationships were evident between community, feeding guilds, and sediment types, which give an indication of communities that can be expected in similar sediments in other areas of the Tropical Eastern Pacific. A study of this scale and level of detail is rare for this biogeographic region and provides a valuable, comprehensive appreciation of the LPA’s benthos.

James M. Mair; Sarah L. Cunningham; Jeffrey A. Sibaja-Cordero; Hector M. Guzman; Maria Fernanda Arroyo; Daisi Merino; Rita Vargas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Boundary elements method for microfluidic two-phase flows in shallow channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the following work we apply the boundary element method to two-phase flows in shallow microchannels, where one phase is dispersed and does not wet the channel walls. These kinds of flows are often encountered in microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip devices and characterized by low Reynolds and low capillary numbers. Assuming that these channels are homogeneous in height and have a large aspect ratio, we use depth-averaged equations to describe these two-phase flows using the Brinkman equation, which constitutes a refinement of Darcy's law. These partial differential equations are discretized and solved numerically using the boundary element method, where a stabilization scheme is applied to the surface tension terms, allowing for a less restrictive time step at low capillary numbers. The convergence of the numerical algorithm is checked against a static analytical solution and on a dynamic test case. Finally the algorithm is applied to the non-linear development of the Saffman-Taylor instability and compared to expe...

Nagel, Mathias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Rosedale Ranch oil field, new shallow pay in an old field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rosedale Ranch oil field, located on Sec. 1,2, T29S, R26E, in Kern County, California, was discovered by Chevron in 1959. The main pay zone was the Miocene Lerdo sandstone at 4,400 ft depth. Sixty-four wells have been drilled to date by Chevron to develop the lower zone. Five wells were completed in the shallower Pliocene Etchegoin Formation. Nahama and Weagant Energy Company in 1985 drilled 3,800 ft well based on a prospect by consultant Ernie Rennie to test the Etchegoin, resulting in a discovery. a total of 13 wells have been drilled to date producing approximately 500 BOPD from the Etchegoin with additional development potential present. The completion technique proved to be critical to good initial production. Nahama and Weagant Energy Company tried slotted lines against the formation with poor results. Subsequent recompletions with undereaming, gravelpacking, and larger slotted lines have resulted in commercial rates out of the Etchegoin. The Rosedale Ranch oil field is located on a faulted anticlinal structure. The main fault is north-trending down to the basin normal fault. Oil produced from the Etchegoin is 13{degree} gravity.

Nahama, R.; Sterling, R. (Nahama and Weagant Energy Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

393

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section II. Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.A Biological Processes II.A.1 Biological Water Gas Shift Development Gary R. Vanzin, Sharon Smolinski, Karen the overall water-gas shift (WGS) pathway by serving as an inducer, a substrate, and an inhibitor. · Elucidate the specific CO shift kinetics of the photosynthetic bacterium Rubrivivax (Rx.) gelatinosus CBS. Approach

395

Source terms of radionuclides in shallow-land-burial sites. [Maxey Flats, West Valley, Barnwell, Sheffield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program is under way to provide source term data on the chemical and radionuclide contents of trench waters at low level radioactive waste disposal sites and to provide information on the geochemical behavior of radionuclides under simulated field conditions. Trench waters were sampled at four commercial waste burial sites and analyzed for chemical and radionuclide constituents. The sorption, diffusion and precipitation behavior of radionuclides were studied using site specific sediments and trench waters. Radionuclide leach rates from solidified waste, under simulated trench conditions, were also determined.

Pietrzak, R.F.; Dayal, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chemical species of migrating radionuclides at commercial shallow land burial sites. Quarterly progress report, May-July, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purposes of this project are to develop an understanding of chemical processes that significantly influence the migration of radionuclides at commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial sites and to evaluate ecological field sampling procedures for monitoring the performance of these sites. This project will produce information to support guidance for implementation of 10 CFR 61, particularly in the development of criteria for LLW disposal site selection, management, permanent closure, and monitoring. It will also produce information needed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky as they finalize plans to stabilize, close, and monitor the Maxey Flats site. Significant current research results are reported for the following tasks: inorganic and organic radionuclide species chemical forms; subsurface migration and infiltration studies; specific radionuclide mapping at Maxey Flats and commercial shallow land burial sites; ecological monitoring at commercial shallow land burial sites; and technical program coordination for LLW research. 13 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Kirby, L.J.; Rickard, W.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Crop Water Requirement and Water Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water use efficiency is defined as ratio of yield to irrigation water requirement (De Pascale and Maggio 2005) WUE=yield/irrigation water requirement (kg crop/m3 irrigation water) ...

Christian von Zabeltitz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

Kane, Andrew S.

399

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

400

PNE WIND USA II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mod II Stirling engine overviews  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given. 12 references.

Farrell, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Water Boatman  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

403

Optical absorption of pure water in the blue and ultraviolet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Patel.53 ...............81 FIGURE V-11 The fundamental vibrational modes of the water molecule. ..................82 xiv Page FIGURE V-12 The ICAM VERSION-II results for the absorption of pure water. A large arrow with a boldface interger n indicates...

Lu, Zheng

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District by Andrew K. Doi B. A may not be produced in whole or in part by photocopy or other means, without permission of the author. #12;ii APPROVAL #12;iii ABSTRACT Instances of water scarcity are recurring with greater frequency

405

Permeability estimation from transient vadose zone pumping tests in shallow coastal-plain sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysis techniques used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of saturated sediments can...tests were conducted using a portable, trailer-mounted SVE unit (SVEU) equipped...water well pumping tests to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of semiconfined aquifers...

K. L. Dixon; R. L. Nichols

406

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...opportunities . Environ Sci Technol 44 : 5679 – 5684 . 3 Howarth RW Ingraffea A Engelder T ( 2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 : 271 – 275 . 4 Osborn SG Vengosh A Warner NR Jackson RB ( 2011 ) Methane contamination of drinking water...

Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert B. Jackson; Thomas H. Darrah; Stephen G. Osborn; Adrian Down; Kaiguang Zhao; Alissa White; Avner Vengosh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Low-level waste management in the South. Task 4. 2 - long-term care requirements. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an analysis of the long-term care requirements of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Among the topics considered are the technical requirements for long-term care, the experiences of the three inactive and three active commercial disposal facilities concerning perpetual care and maintenance, and the financial management of a perpetual care fund. In addition, certain recommendations for the establishment of a perpetual care fund are provided. The predominant method of disposing of low-level radioactive wastes is shallow land burial. After studying alternative methods of disposal, the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded that there are no compelling reasons for abandoning this disposal method. Of the 22 shallow land burial facilities in the U.S., the federal government maintains 14 active and two inactive disposal sites. There are three active (Barnwell, South Carolina; Hanford, Washington; and Beatty, Nevada) and three inactive commercial disposal facilities (Maxey Flats, Kentucky; Sheffield, Illinois; and West Valley, New York). The life of a typical facility can be broken into five phases: preoperational, operational, closure, postclosure observation and maintenance, and institutional control. Long-term care of a shallow land burial facility will begin with the disposal site closure phase and continue through the postclosure observation and maintenance and institutional control phases. Since the postclosure observation and maintenance phase will last about five years and the institutional control phase 100 years, the importance of a well planned long-term care program is apparent. 26 references, 1 table.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed from 1 April 2003 to 30 September 2003 and recommends the tasks to be performed during Phase II (Pilot Evaluation). During this period discussions were held with various water agencies regarding use of the treated produced water either directly or indirectly through a water trading arrangement. In particular, several discussions were held with Monterey County Water Resources Agency, that has been charged with the long-term management and preservation of water resources in Monterey County. The Agency is very supportive of the program. However, they would like to see water quality/cost estimate data for the treated produced water from the pilot study prior to evaluating water use/water trade options. The agency sent a letter encouraging the project team to perform the pilot study to evaluate feasibility of the project. In addition, the regulations related to use of the treated water for various applications were updated during this period. Finally, the work plan, health and safety plan and sample analyses plan for performing pilot study to treat the oilfield produced water were developed during this period.

Robert A. Liske

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Phase II Nuclide Partition Laboratory Study Influence of Cellulose Degradation Products on the Transport of Nuclides from SRS Shallow Land Burial Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Degradation products of cellulosic materials (e.g., paper and wood products) can significantly influence the subsurface transport of metals and radionuclides. Codisposal of radionuclides with cellulosic materials in the E-Area slit trenches at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is, therefore, expected to influence nuclide fate and transport in the subsurface. Due to the complexities of these systems and the scarcity of site-specific data, the effects of cellulose waste loading and its subsequent influence on nuclide transport are not well established.

Serkiz, S.M.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

Geochemical investigations at Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the NRC efforts to develop a data base on source term characteristics for low level wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has produced and analyzed a large amount of data on trench leachate chemistry at existing shallow land burial sites. In this report, we present the results of our investigations at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky disposal site. In particular, data on trench leachate chemistry are reviewed and discussed in terms of mechanisms and processes controlling the composition of trench solutes. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying both intra- and extra-trench factors and processes contributing to source term characteristics, modifications, and uncertainties. BNL research on the Maxey Flats disposal site has provided important information not only on the source term characteristics and the factors contributing to uncertainties in the source term but also some generic insights into such geochemical processes and controls as the mechanics of leachate formation, microbial degradation and development of anoxia, organic complexation and radionuclide mobility, redox inversion and modification of the source term, solubility constraints on solute chemistry, mineral authigenesis, corrosion products and radionuclide scavenging, and the role of organic complexants in geochemical partitioning of radionuclides. A knowledge of such processes and controls affecting the geochemical cycling of radionuclides as well as an understanding of the important factors that contribute to variability and uncertainties in the source term is essential for evaluating the performance of waste package and the site, making valid predictions of release for dose calculations, and for planning site performance monitoring as well as remedial actions. 43 references, 47 figures, 30 tables.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Water Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explains the su-percooling behavior. The important issue...Hydrophobic Interactions The behavior of water toward non-polar...structures ofthe clath-rate hydrates for many ofthese nonpolar...underlying the anomalous behavior of supercooled wa-ter...Schuster, G. Zundel, C. Sand-SCIENCE, VOL. 209...

Frank H. Stillinger

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Whither water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... proposal for the future seems to have been ruled out for some time to come. Desalination has been widely mooted as a practical system of obtaining pure water in Britain, ... addition, the environment lobby, which by and large seems to favour the idea of desalination, has not, perhaps, taken full account of the impact on the coastal environment ...

John Gribbin

1974-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

416

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

417

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

418

Mod II engine performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automotive Stirling Engine Program (ASE) is directed at the development of a kinematic Stirling engine for automotive use. This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA-Lewis Research Center (NASA-LeRC). Following proof-of-concept testing and development of promising performance values with early versions of the Stirling engine, a production-type automotive design, the Mod II engine, was developed. The design of this engine and its systems has been previously presented. Based on this design, the first engine has been built and development testing has started. Projections for this first engine build are presented in this paper. Results of initial tests are also given including identification of development items and formulation of plans for resolution of existing deficiencies.

Richey, A.E.; Huang, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Kinematic Viscosity of Helium II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By observing the time of formation of the meniscus in a cylindrical vessel suddenly given a rotation, it has been found possible to determine, directly, the kinematic viscosity of both He I and He II. At the angular velocities used (?15 rev/sec) it appears that, for He II, all the liquid rotates rather than the normal component alone.

R. J. Donnelly; G. V. Chester; R. H. Walmsley; C. T. Lane

1956-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners II Wind Farm Power Partners II Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MDU Resources Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser L.A. Department of Water Resources Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Uses of chloride/bromide ratios in studies of potable water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In natural ground water systems, both chlorine and bromine occur primarily as monovalent anions, chloride and bromide. Although dissolution or precipitation of halite, biological activity in the root zone, anion sorption, and exchange can affect chloride/bromide ratios in some settings, movement of the ions in potable ground water is most often conservative. Atmospheric precipitation will generally have mass ratios between 50 and 150; shallow ground water, between 100 and 200; domestic sewage, between 300 and 600; water affected by dissolution of halite, between 1,000 and 10,000; and summer runoff from urban streets, between 10 and 100. These, and other distinctive elemental ratios, are useful in the reconstruction of the origin and movement of ground water, as illustrated by case studies investigating sources of salinity in ground water from Alberta, Kansas, and Arizona, and infiltration rates and pathways at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Davis, S.N. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Whittemore, D.O. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey; Fabryka-Martin, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Flume studies of sediment transportation in shallow flow with simulated rainfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

force exerted on a particle by flowing water, which according to Newton, was equal to Trr V 2 where s is a shape factor (0. 79 for spheres), g is the specific weight s of the particle, r is its radius, and V is the critical bottom velocity. cr... water pipe flow . Turbulent flow can be visualized as being divided into sheets of fluid having one velocity. These sheets are traversed by eddies, and in this manner the flow tends to establish a condition of equilibrium by a mixing process...

Nail, Frank Mitchell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

MHK Technologies/Triton II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Triton II Triton II < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Triton II.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Triton II Is a patented novel on shore operating wave power converter that can be installed on low value coast lines breakwater walls piers and even near shore platforms etc The converter is of the floating type the power transmission and conversion systems being mounted above still water level on solid fundament This architecture yields increased power production due to wave reflection almost doubling the incident wave height on the breakwater frontage and high reliability and operational safety Each sea wave converter unit is composed of three main parts A The floats moving up down following the vertical movements of the waves B The mechanism which converts the vertical movements to horizontal C The mechanism which converts the horizontal movements to rotational conveyed to an electrical generator The floats the only parts moving in the water are protected during their up down motions in cages which are installed inside recesses on the breakwater Safety

426

DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sub 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several very important results were achieved this period for subtask 1.2. In particular, we successfully developed a robust Windows-based code to calculate MMP and MME for fluid characterizations that consist of any number of pseudocomponents. We also were successful in developing a new technique to quantify the displacement mechanism of a gas flood--that is, to determine the fraction of a displacement that is vaporizing or condensing. These new technologies will be very important to develop new correlations and to determine important parameters for the design of gas injection floods. Regarding Task 2, several results were achieved: (1) A detailed study of the accuracy of foam simulation validates the model with fits to analytical fractional-flow solutions. It shows that there is no way to represent surfactant-concentration effects on foam without some numerical artifacts. (2) New results on capillary crossflow with foam show that this is much less detrimental than earlier studies had argued. (3) It was shown that the extremely useful model of Stone for gravity segregation with foam is rigorously true as long as the standard assumptions of fractional-flow theory apply. Without this proof, it was always possible that this powerful model would break down in some important application.

William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water|Energy Energy|Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water|Energy Energy|Water ... This issue of Environmental Science & Technology features articles addressing the concept of the “water–energy nexus”. ... Perrone et al. invoke the concept in their title, in creating a tool to account for the “energy [used] for water and water [used] for energy” (Environ. ...

Darcy J. Gentleman

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

429

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy are inextricably bound. Energy is consumed and sometimes produced by every form of water resourcesWATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, water resources professionals squarely faced the fact that water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

430

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

431

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

432

Stable isotope and water quality analysis of coal bed methane production waters and gases from the Bowen Basin, Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) is a significant growing industry in Queensland's energy sector. It is, however, a relatively new industry with little local water quality data and stable isotope compositions of production waters and gases available in the public domain. This study aims to determine whether water quality and stable isotope data can be correlated with gas and groundwater production and flow pathways, and identify zones of recharge and water mixing. Stable isotope analysis and accessory water quality tests were conducted on CBM production gas and water samples collected from two CBM producing bituminous coal seams within a single field in the Bowen Basin. In the production field, the reservoir seams are gently folded with eastwardly dipping fold axes, and compartmentalised by an ENE normal fault on the flank of a broad central anticline that contains minor faults. For one seam, splitting and a change in coal quality parallels the fault and fold axes. Although virgin reservoir conditions were similar, differing production performance north and south of the main fault suggests it acts as a barrier to water and gas flow along strike. The stable isotope analysis on the production water showed that waters with more positive ?D and ?18O compositions were associated with areas of higher water production and shallower depths, whereas more negative ?D and ?18O compositions were associated with lower water production and high gas production. The gas isotope analysis showed that production gases had both biogenic and thermogenic origins and that secondary biogenic gas generated through CO2 reduction comprises a significant portion of the CBM produced from this field. More negative CH4 ?13C values characterize the zones of meteoric recharge in shallow, up-dip areas. Gas production data and CO2 ?13C values suggest that this may result from 13CH4 stripping by the recharge waters and/or increased biogenic activity in this area. Smaller CO2–CH4 carbon isotopic fractionation values characterized zones of meteoric recharge, whereas higher isotopic fractionation values characterized the high gas production domain.

E.C.P. Kinnon; S.D. Golding; C.J. Boreham; K.A. Baublys; J.S. Esterle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Session II: Gas pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session of the EPA Workshop 2, Technical Basis for EPA HLW Disposal Criteria, focused on the significance of gaseous transport of radionuclide releases. The basis of the cumulative curie release limit set for carbon-14, the principle nuclide of concern with respect to gaseous transport, is not inconsistent with the limits set for the nuclides. It was pointed out that radionuclides released through gaseous wastes affect the world-wide population while radionuclides released to the water supply affect only localized populations. This argument was used to justify a modification to the carbon-14 release limit.

Ramspott, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Microbial activity of trench leachates from shallow-land, low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples collected from disposal sites at Maxey Flats, Ky., and West...trenches at the disposal sites of Maxey Flats, Ky., West Valley...trench water at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site, p. 747-761...

A J Francis; S Dobbs; B J Nine

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

436

Sílabo del curso de Redes II.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??El curso de Redes II, es de naturaleza Teórico–Práctica, pertenece al área de infraestructura de tecnologías de información Redes II es un curso que aporta… (more)

[No author

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

438

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

439

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

440

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Photosynthetic water oxidation versus photovoltaic water electrolysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Media about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Photosynthetic water oxidation versus photovoltaic water electrolysis 13 May 2011 Professor Tom Moore, a...

442

Penascal II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penascal II Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Kenedy County TX Coordinates 27.003108°, -97.584014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.003108,"lon":-97.584014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Cimarron II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cimarron II Facility Cimarron II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Developer CPV Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Kansas City Power & Light Location Cimarron KS Coordinates 37.90154236°, -100.3934097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.90154236,"lon":-100.3934097,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Limon II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limon II Limon II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Limon CO Coordinates 39.33323523°, -103.5521507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.33323523,"lon":-103.5521507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Category II Dixon Recreation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Category II Dixon Recreation Center BB or VB court $30 RB/Squash court $23 Multipurpose Room $30 for any rental that is cancelled with less than seven days notice Department of Recreational Sports

Escher, Christine

446

Super KEKB / Belle II Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the status of the KEKB collider and the Belle detector upgrade, along with several examples of physics measurements to be performed with Belle II at Super KEKB.

B. Golob

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Aegir II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates 43.098°, -86.597° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.098,"lon":-86.597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Overview Macromolecular crystallography has been enormously successful in elucidating the structures of proteins and other biomolecules. These data are being combined with emerging genetic and biochemical information on pathways to suggest temporal, spatial, and functional relations controlling cellular function. However, the central question in biophysics still remains: What is the connection between the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, polysaccharides, and their complexes? Answering this question requires understanding the dynamics of macromolecular structures in their natural environment, where flexibility of the molecules and water, pH, and ion concentration play determinant roles. Examples include protein and nucleic acid folding and unfolding, polymer collapse upon change of solvent, electron transfer, and large-scale fluctuations in macromolecules.

449

Memorandum of Understanding II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate deposits on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand Preliminary Geochemical Cruise Report Dr. Richard Coffin Dr. Leila Hamdan Dr. John Pohlman Marine Biogeochemistry Section Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC, USA Dr. Warren Wood Geology and Geophysics Section Naval Research Laboratory Stennis, MS, USA Dr. Ingo Pecher Dr. Stuart Henrys Dr. Jens Greinert Dr. Kevin Faure Geological and Nuclear Sciences P.O. Box 30-368, Lower Hutt, NZ Dr. Andrew Gorman University of Otago Dept. of Geology P.O.Box 56 Dunedin, 9015, NZ Dr. Alan Orpin National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Private Bag 14-901 Kilbirnie, Wellington, NZ 2 i. Table of Contents i. Table of Contents ................................................................................. 2

450

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

451

Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sup 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sup 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several results related to subtask 1.1 are given. In this period, most of our research centered on how to estimate the dispersivity at the field scale. Simulation studies (Solano et al. 2001) show that oil recovery for enriched gas drives depends on the amount of dispersion in reservoir media. But the true value of dispersion, expressed as dispersivity, at the field scale, is unknown. This research investigates three types of dispersion in permeable media to obtain realistic estimates of dispersive mixing at the field scale. The dispersivity from single-well tracer tests (SWTT), also known as echo dispersivity, is the dispersivity that is unaffected by fluid flow direction. Layering in permeable media tends to increase the observed dispersivity in well-to-well tracer tests, also known as transmission dispersivity, but leaves the echo dispersivity unaffected. A collection of SWTT data is analyzed to estimate echo dispersivity at the SWTT scale. The estimated echo dispersivities closely match a published trend with length scale in dispersivities obtained from groundwater tracer tests. This unexpected result--it was thought that transmission dispersivity should be greater than echo dispersivity--is analyzed with numerical simulation. A third type of dispersive mixing is local dispersivity, or the mixing observed at a point as tracer flows past it. Numerical simulation results show that the local dispersivity is always less than the transmission dispersivity and greater than the echo dispersivity limits. It is closer to one limit or the other depending on the amount and type of heterogeneity, the autocorrelation structure of the medium's permeability, and the lateral (vertical) permeability. The agreement between the SWTT echo dispersivities and the field trend suggests that the field data are measuring local dispersivities. All dispersivities appear to grow with length. Regarding Task 2, two results are described: (1) An experimental study of N{sup 2} foam finds the two steady-state foam-flow regimes at elevated temperature and with acid, adding evidence that the two regimes occur widely, if not universally, in foam in porous media. (2) A simulation finds that the optimal injection strategy for overcoming gravity override in homogeneous reservoirs is injection of large alternating slugs of surfactant and gas at fixed, maximum attainable injection rates. A simple model for the process explains why the this strategy works so well. Before conducting simulations of SAG displacements, however, it is important to analyze the given foam model using fractional-flow theory. Fractional-flow theory predicts that some foam processes will give foam collapse immediately behind the gas front. In simulations, numerical dispersion leads to a false impression of good sweep efficiency. In this case simply grid refinement may not warn of the inaccuracy of the simulation.

William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Water from six hot springs/seeps (out of some 20 seasonal discharges identified, with hot spring temperatures ranging from 39.1-81.6°C and cold seep temperatures between 5-7°C) and playa groundwaters were sampled and

454

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal water samples at Mount St. Helens collected between 1985 and 1989 and in 1994 are used to identify water types and describe their evolution through time. Two types of low temperature hydrothermal systems are associated with the 1980 eruptions and were initiated soon after emplacement of shallow magma and pyroclastic flows. The Loowit hot spring system is located in the breach zone and is associated with the magma conduit and nearby avalanche deposits, whereas the Pumice Plain (PP)

455

Global Water Sustainability:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ground Water and Drinking Water EPA 816-R-04-003...oil and gas produced water treatment. Journal of Hazardous...92-99 Jurenka B (2007) Electrodialysis (ED) and Electrodialysis...usbr.gov/pmts/water/publications/reportpdfs...

Kelvin B. Gregory; Radisav D. Vidic; David A. Dzombak

456

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Water Beetles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

458

Water watch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

460

Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy WIAT Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II #12;2 | Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II working with Forestry Commission Scotland on Woods In and Around Towns #12;Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II | 3 What is this about? The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Chemical species of migrating radionuclides at commercial shallow land burial sites. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of chemical processes that significantly influence the migration of radionuclides at commercial low-level waste burial sites. Chemical measurements of waste trench leachate and identification of chemical changes in leachate during migration will provide a basis for geochemical waste transport models. This project will produce for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) information to support guidance for implementation of 10 CFR 61, particularly in the development of criteria for low level waste disposal site selection, management, permanent closure and monitoring. This project will also produce information needed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky as they finalize plans to stabilize, close and monitor the Maxey Flats site. Current research results are presented for the following tasks: (1) chemical forms inorganic and organic radionuclide species; (2) subsurface migration and infiltration studies; (3) specific radionuclide mapping at Maxey Flats and other commercial shallow land burial sites; (4) ecological monitoring at commercial shallow land burial sites; and (5) technical program coordination for low-level waste research. 17 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

Kirby, L.J.; Rickard, W.H.; Toste, A.P.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Water quantity and quality model for the evaluation of water-management strategies in the Netherlands: application to the province of Friesland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Netherlands have a rather complex water-management system consisting of a number of major rivers, canals, lakes and ditches. Water-quantity management on a regional scale is necessary for an effective water-quality policy. To support water management, a computer model was developed that includes both water quality and water quantity, based on three submodels: ABOPOL for the water movement, DELWAQ for the calculation of water quality variables and BLOOM-II for the phytoplankton growth. The northern province of Friesland was chosen as a test case for the integrated model to be developed, where water quality is highly related to the water distribution and the main trade-off is minimizing the intake of (eutrophicated) alien water in order to minimize external nutrient load and maximizing the intake in order to flush channels and lakes. The results of the application of these models to this and to a number of hypothetical future situations are described.

Brinkman, J.J.; Griffioen, P.S.; Groot, S.; Los, F.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

464

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

465

Design and Implementation of a CO{sub 2} Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work reported in this document covers tasks in Budget Phase II. The principle task in Budget Phase II is Field Demonstration.

Durrent, E.G.; Harpole, K.J.; Owen, Rex; Robertson, C.R.

1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Structural basis of photosynthetic water-splitting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photosynthetic water-splitting takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a membrane protein complex consisting of 20 subunits with an overall molecular mass of 350 kDa. The light-induced water-splitting reaction catalyzed by PSII not only converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy, but also provides us with oxygen indispensible for sustaining oxygenic life on the earth. We have solved the structure of PSII at a 1.9 Å resolution, from which, the detailed structure of the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5}-cluster, the catalytic center for water-splitting, became clear. Based on the structure of PSII at the atomic resolution, possible mechanism of light-induced water-splitting was discussed.

Shen, Jian-Ren [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology/Faculty of Science, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Umena, Yasufumi [The OCU Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan and PRESTO, JST (Japan); Kawakami, Keisuke [The OCU Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Kamiya, Nobuo [The OCU Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan and Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

A study of the future water requirements of the state of Texas and the projected plan to meet them as presented by the United States Study Commission - Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that my education could be continued. G. W. August, 1963 111 CONTENTS Page List of Tables List of Plates Chapter vi I. Introduction II. Water Resources I II. Water Requirements IV. The Water Development Plan 15 31 34 V. Views and Comments... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sanuary, 1964 Major Subject Business Adzninistration A STUDY OF THE FUTURE WATER REQUIREMENTS. OF THE STATE OF TEXAS AND THE PROJECTED PLAN TO MEET...

Wortham, Gene Rye

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Saver Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs....

470

Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

471

Surface characterization of polymethylmetacrylate bombarded by charged water droplets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrospray droplet impact (EDI), in which the charged electrospray water droplets are introduced in vacuum, accelerated, and allowed to impact the sample, is applied to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). The secondary ions generated were measured by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In EDI mass spectra for PMMA, fragment ions originating from PMMA could not be detected. This is due to the fact that the proton affinities of fragments formed from PMMA are smaller than those from acetic acid contained in the charged droplet. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of PMMA irradiated by water droplets did not change with prolonged cluster irradiation, i.e., EDI is capable of shallow surface etching for PMMA with a little damage of the sample underneath the surface.

Hiraoka, Kenzo; Takaishi, Riou; Asakawa, Daiki; Sakai, Yuji; Iijima, Yoshitoki [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda-4, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Electron Optics Sales Division, JEOL Ltd., 2-8-3 Akebono, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15 °C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5 ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of organic materials etched by charged water droplet impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray droplet impact (EDI) has been developed for matrix-free secondary ion mass spectrometry for surface analysis. When a target is etched by EDI, the physical etching on the target is suppressed to minimal, i.e., the occurrence of shallow surface etching. A novel approach to shallow surface etching of polystyrene (PS) by EDI was investigated. The charged water droplets were irradiated to a bulk and a spin coated PS. After irradiation, these samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy. It was found that XPS spectra for PS were independent on the irradiation time by EDI. This indicates that EDI is a unique technique for the surface etching of the organic materials without leaving any damage on the etched surface.

Sakai, Yuji; Iijima, Yoshitoki; Takaishi, Riou; Asakawa, Daiki; Hiraoka, Kenzo [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency Innovation Satellite, Shizuoka, 3-5-1 Johoku, Nakaku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Electron Optics Sales Division, JEOL Ltd., 2-8-3 Akebono, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan); Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Surface Water and Energy Budgets for the Mississippi River Basin in Three NCEP Reanalyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface water and energy budgets from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Global Reanalysis II (GR2), the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR)...

Rongqian Yang; Michael Ek; Jesse Meng

475

Civil Engineering: Soil and Water Resource Engineering Concentration Flowchart Colorado State University Effective Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Civil Engineering: Soil and Water Resource Engineering Concentration Flowchart Colorado State University Effective Spring 2014 Prerequisites and (co-requisites) are shown above the class. Technical) Spring CIVE 103 - 3 S Eng Graphics & Comp MATH 161 - 4 Calculus II PH 142 - 5 Physics II Science Tech

476

Partnering to Save Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

477

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Perspective Speaker(s): Steven Kenway Date: May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon This presentation covers the content of recent journal papers and reports focused on the water-energy nexus and the related theory of urban metabolism. This includes (i) a review of the water-energy nexus focused on cities (ii) quantifying water-related energy in cities (iii) modeling household water-related energy use including key factors, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and (iv) relevance and implications of the urban metabolism theoretical framework. Steven's work focuses on understanding the indirect connections between urban water management, energy use and

478

Musselshell II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Musselshell II Musselshell II Facility Musselshell II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.26733°, -109.499175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.26733,"lon":-109.499175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

479

Glacier II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Near Ethridge MT Coordinates 48.555639°, -112.120992° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.555639,"lon":-112.120992,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

480

Majestic II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Majestic II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser SWEPCO Location Amarillo TX Coordinates 35.3672156°, -101.5474892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.3672156,"lon":-101.5474892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Harvest II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harvest II Harvest II Facility Harvest II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Pigeon MI Coordinates 43.83861292°, -83.2171011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83861292,"lon":-83.2171011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Luz II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Luz II Luz II Jump to: navigation, search Name Luz II Place Jerusalem, Israel Zip 91450 Sector Solar Product Jerusalem-based utility-scale solar power plant developer. Coordinates 31.7736°, 35.224998° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.7736,"lon":35.224998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

483

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

486

Radionuclides in shallow groundwater at Solid Waste Storage Area 5 North, Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a compilation of groundwater monitoring data from Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) between November 1989 and September 1993. Monitoring data were collected as part of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program that was implemented in 1989 in response to DOE Order 5820.2A. SWSA 5 North was established for the retrievable storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in 1970. Four types of storage have been used within SWSA 5 North: bunkers, vaults, wells, and trenches. The fenced portion of SWSA 5 North covers about 3.7 ha (9 acres) in the White Oak Creek watershed south of ORNL. The area is bounded by White Oak Creek and two ephemeral tributaries of White Oak Creek. Since 1989, groundwater has been monitored in wells around SWSA 5 North. During that time, elevated gross alpha contamination (reaching as high as 210 Bq/L) has consistently been detected in well 516. This well is adjacent to burial trenches in the southwest corner of the area. Water level measurements in wells 516 and 518 suggest that water periodically inundates the bottom of some of those trenches. Virtually all of the gross alpha contamination is generated by Curium 244 and Americium 241. A special geochemical investigation of well 516 suggests that nearly all of the Curium 44 and Americium 241 is dissolved or associated with dissolved organic matter. These are being transported at the rate of about 2 m/year from the burial trenches, through well 516, to White Oak Creek, where Curium 244 has been detected in a few bank seeps. Concentrations at these seeps are near detection levels (<1 Bq/L).

Ashwood, T.L.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Capture of hot holes by shallow acceptors in p-type GaAs studied by picosecond infrared spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Picosecond recombination of free holes with shallow acceptors in p-doped GaAs is directly monitored via spectrally and temporally resolved infrared studies. Neutral Zn impurities are photoionized by picosecond excitation in the wavelength range around 5 ?m. The recombination dynamics of the free carriers with ionized acceptors is measured via transient changes of the acceptor deionization band at photon energies close to the band gap. Hole capture is observed on a time scale of up to 100 ps following nonexponential kinetics. The data are analyzed with the help of model calculations considering single-step as well as multiple-step trapping mechanisms. Emission of single longitudinal-optical phonons is found to be the main mechanism of picosecond recombination.

M. Woerner; A. Lohner; T. Elsaesser; W. Kaiser

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

In situ gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of radionuclide distributions at a commercial shallow land burial site. [Maxey Flats, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis conducted at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky (USA) shallow land burial site confirmed that the waste radionuclides have been retained largely within the restricted area of the burial site. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co were comparable with those originating from global fallout and lower than concentrations measured in several other areas having similar rainfall. In-situ spectrometric analyses, corroborated by soil sample and vegetation analyses, indicate that the site has influenced /sup 60/Co levels slightly in the west drainage channel, but /sup 137/Cs did not originate from the site. Concentrations of /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs determined in subsurface soils by well logging techniques confirmed that subsurface migration of waste-derived radionuclides to points outside the restricted area has not been a significant source of contamination of the environs adjacent to the site. 8 references, 8 figures.

Kirby, L.J.; Campbell, R.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Multi-point injection demonstration for solidification of shallow buried waste at Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-point injection (MPI) technology is a precision, high-velocity jetting process for the in situ delivery of various agents to treat radiological and/or chemical wastes. A wide variety of waste forms can be treated, varying from heterogeneous waste dumped into shallow burial trenches to contaminated soils consisting of sands/gravels, silts/clays and soft rock. The robustness of the MPI system is linked to its broad range of applications which vary from in situ waste treatment to creation of both vertical and horizontal barriers. The only major constraint on the type of in situ treatment which can be delivered by the NTI system is that agents must be in a slurry form.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

492

Grains, Water Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

493

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed chemical and isotopic studies not only help quantify the discharge, but also may provide additional insight to subsurface conditions. For example, CO2-rich groundwaters that are cold and dilute may be a general indicator that a volcano contains a pressurized gas cap. Shallow depths. References William C. Evans, Michael L. Sorey, Andrea C. Cook, B. Mack Kennedy, David L. Shuster, Elizabeth M. Colvard, Lloyd D. White, Mark A. Huebner

494

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Energy Efficiency Standards .. 4 Multi-Family Water Heating.. 4 Pipe HeatBuilding Energy Efficiency Standards The scope of this task included the following subtasks; Multi-Family Water Heating, Pipe Heat

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Comparison of Trihalomethanes in Tap Water and Blood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corpus Christi, TX, tap water exhibited lower THM concentrations with significant proportions of brominated THMs. ... Trihalomethanes (THMs) are a class of disinfection byproducts formed when chlorine reacts with natural organic matter and bromide found in drinking water. ... The THMs were extracted using high-purity pentane (Burdick & Jackson, Muskegon, MI) and were analyzed on a Hewlett-Packard (Avondale, PA) 5890 series II gas chromatograph using electron capture detection based on Standard Method 6232 (21). ...

Amy M. Miles; Philip C. Singer; David L. Ashley; Michele C. Lynberg; Pauline Mendola; Peter H. Langlois; J. R. Nuckols

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

496

The Sun -II Alexei Gilchrist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sun - II Alexei Gilchrist #12;Some resources · http://www.nineplanets.org/sol.html · "The Universe: Secrets of the Sun" video ­ Search on youtube (references are to clips here http in these slides Secrets of the Sun #12;Why does the sun shine? Long and fascinating history involving - geology

Wardle, Mark

497

Advanced Toroidal Facility II studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design studies for a low-aspect-ratio, large next-generation stellarator, Advanced Toroidal Facility II (ATF-II), with high-current-density, high-field, stable NbTi/Cu helical windings are described. The design parameters are an average plasma radius of 0.52 m, a major radius of 2 m, and a field on axis of 4 to 5 T, with 10 to 15 MW of heating power. Such a device would be comparable in cope to other next-generation stellarators but would have roughly the same aspect ratio as the tokamaks without, however, the need for current drive to sustain steady-state operation. A number of low-aspect-ratio physics issues need to be addressed in the design of ATF-II, primarily compromises between high-beta capability and good confinement properties. A six-field-period compact torsatron is chosen as a reference design for ATF-II, and its main features and performance predictions are discussed. An integrated (beta capability and confinement) optimization approach and optimization of superconducting windings are also discussed.

Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.; Dresner, L.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hirshman, S.P.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Painter, S.L.; Rome, J.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Morris, R.N.; van Rij, W.I. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Computing and Telecommunications Div., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Gravity currents with tailwaters in Boussinesq and non-Boussinesq systems: two-layer shallow-water dam-break solutions and Navier–Stokes simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the dam-break initial stage of propagation of a gravity current of density $$\\rho _{c}$$ ...

M. Ungarish; Z. Borden; E. Meiburg

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabricatio