Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Shallow Water Flows in Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the shallow water equations for flows through channels with arbitrary cross section. The system forms a hyperbolic set of balance laws. Exact steady-state solutions are available and are controlled by the relation between the bottom topography ... Keywords: Balance laws, Hyperbolic conservation laws, Steady-state solutions, Upwind schemes

Gerardo Hernández-Dueñas; Smadar Karni

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Discontinuous Galerkin Global Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discontinuous Galerkin shallow water model on the cubed sphere is developed, thereby extending the transport scheme developed by Nair et al. The continuous flux form nonlinear shallow water equations in curvilinear coordinates are employed. The ...

Ramachandran D. Nair; Stephen J. Thomas; Richard D. Loft

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Shallow Water in Lagrangian Coordinates LAUR 068194  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution of the shallow water equations due to Carrier and Greenspan [1]. Carrier Wu and Yeh [2] presentedShallow Water in Lagrangian Coordinates LAUR 06­8194 R. Liska 1 , B. Wendro# 2 1 Czech Technical Alamos National Laboratory, USA bbw@lanl.gov, http://math.unm.edu/~bbw 1 Introduction The shallow water

4

KP solitons in shallow water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of the paper is to provide a survey of our recent studies on soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation. The classification is based on the far-field patterns of the solutions which consist of a finite number of line-solitons. Each soliton solution is then defined by a point of the totally non-negative Grassmann variety which can be parametrized by a unique derangement of the symmetric group of permutations. Our study also includes certain numerical stability problems of those soliton solutions. Numerical simulations of the initial value problems indicate that certain class of initial waves asymptotically approach to these exact solutions of the KP equation. We then discuss an application of our theory to the Mach reflection problem in shallow water. This problem describes the resonant interaction of solitary waves appearing in the reflection of an obliquely incident wave onto a vertical wall, and it predicts an extra-ordinary four-fold amplification of the wave at the wall. There are several numerical studies confirming the prediction, but all indicate disagreements with the KP theory. Contrary to those previous numerical studies, we find that the KP theory actually provides an excellent model to describe the Mach reflection phenomena when the higher order corrections are included to the quasi-two dimensional approximation. We also present laboratory experiments of the Mach reflection recently carried out by Yeh and his colleagues, and show how precisely the KP theory predicts this wave behavior.

Yuji Kodama

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stable Shallow Water Vortices over Localized Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that a sufficient condition for stability by P. Ripa, based on the monotonicity of the flow potential vorticity (PV), can be used to prove linear stability of isolated shallow water vortices over localized topographic features. Stable ...

Roberto Iacono

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Low-Frequency Variability in Shallow-Water Models of the Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation. Part II: Time-Dependent Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent wind-driven ocean circulation is investigated for both a rectangular and a North Atlantic–shaped basin. Multiple steady states in a 2½-layer shallow-water model and their dependence on various parameters and other model ...

Eric Simonnet; Michael Ghil; Kayo Ide; Roger Temam; Shouhong Wang

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Parallel computation for shallow water flow: a domain decomposition approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: additive Schwarz preconditioning, domain decomposition, finite elements, parallelization, shallow water

L. Paglieri; D. Ambrosi; L. Formaggia; A. Quarteroni; A. L. Scheinine

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Acoustic Propagation Prediction in Shallow Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An acoustic propagation experiment was conducted on 17 May 2000 in a shallow water site off the Perth metropolitan coast with the view of obtaining reflection and refraction data to contribute to developing a geoacoustic model of the area. The site proposed has constant bathymetry, though the geological properties of the site are not well known. The experiment used two hydrophones, one situated mid-water and the other moored to the seabed to explore the possibility of receiving head waves. The acoustic sources used were a 20-cui air gun and imploding sources comprising 60W and 75W light globes and purpose built evacuated spheres.

Justin Hoffman John; John D. Penrose; Darryl R. Mcmahon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Shallow Water Investigations at Naval Underwater Systems Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of these efforts is to formulate a model suitable for sonar performance prediction in shallow water. For this purpose

Bernard Sussman; William R. Schumacher; William G. Kanabis

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work considers the flow of a fluid containing one disperse substance consisting of small particles that belong to different species differing in size and density. The flow is modelled by combining a multilayer shallow water approach with a polydisperse ... Keywords: Finite volume, Multilayer, Polydisperse, Sediment, Shallow water

E. D. FernáNdez-Nieto; E. H. Koné; T. Morales De Luna; R. BüRger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Isolated Waves and Eddies in a Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water beta-channel model was used to carry out numerical experiments with cyclonic and anticyclonic disturbances of various strengths. The model is inviscid, so fluid elements conserve potential vorticity q when unforced. Regions of ...

Michael K. Davey; Peter D. Killworth

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Spectral Viscosity for Shallow Water Equations in Spherical Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spherical spectral viscosity operator is proposed as an alternative to standard horizontal diffusion terms in global atmospheric models. Implementation in NCAR's Spectral Transform Shallow Water Model and application to a suite of standard test ...

Anne Gelb; James P. Gleeson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nonlinear Motion of a Shallow Water Barotropic Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear motions of a shallow water barotropic vortex on a ? plane differ substantially from the analogous linear motions. The nonlinear model described here, in which wavenumber 1–3 asymmetries interact with each other and the mean vortex, ...

H. E. Willoughby

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Shallow Water Model of the Winter Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow water equations are used to investigate the interaction of planetary wave-breaking with a “diabatic” forcing. The numerical integrations demonstrate the formation of a sharp gradient in potential vorticity at the edge of the polar ...

Martin Juckes

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Unconditionally Stable Scheme for the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finite-difference scheme for solving the linear shallow water equations in a bounded domain is described. Its time step is not restricted by a Courant–Friedrichs–Levy (CFL) condition. The scheme, known as Israeli–Naik–Cane (INC), is the ...

Moshe Israeli; Naomi H. Naik; Mark A. Cane

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Hybrid Second Order Scheme for Shallow Water Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We extend the well-balanced second order hybrid scheme developed in Donat and Martinez-Gavara (J. Sci. Comput., to appear) to the one-dimensional and two-dimensional shallow water system. We show that the scheme is exactly well-balanced for quiescent ... Keywords: C-property, Hyperbolic balance laws, Well-balanced schemes

A. Martinez-Gavara; R. Donat

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Shallow-Water Model of the Diurnal Dryline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores the diurnal variation in the movement and structure of the dryline using a one-dimensional shallow-water model. The model is adapted to test some common theories of dryline motion including the diurnal variation in surface ...

Jennifer A. Miller; Thomas A. Kovacs; Peter R. Bannon

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Spectral Transform Methods for Solving the Shallow-Water Equations on the Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of computed solutions to several formulations of the shallow-water equations is compared. The shallow-water equations can be written in a number of different forms that are obtained by (a) combining terms into differential ...

Paul N. Swarztrauber

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Diffusion Experiments with a Global Discontinuous Galerkin Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-order diffusion scheme is developed for the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) global shallow-water model. The shallow-water equations are discretized on the cubed sphere tiled with quadrilateral elements relying on a nonorthogonal curvilinear ...

Ramachandran D. Nair

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Equatorial Jets in Decaying Shallow-Water Turbulence on a Rotating Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble experiments of decaying shallow-water turbulence on a rotating sphere are performed to confirm the robustness of the emergence of an equatorial jet. While previous studies have reported that the equatorial jets emerging in shallow-water ...

Yuji Kitamura; Keiichi Ishioka

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Shallow water rogue wavetrains in nonlinear optical fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to deep-water rogue waves which develop from the modulation instability of an optical CW, wave propagation in optical fibers may also produce shallow water rogue waves. These extreme wave events are generated in the modulationally stable normal dispersion regime. A suitable phase or frequency modulation of a CW laser leads to chirp-free and flat-top pulses or flaticons which exhibit a stable self-similar evolution. Upon collision, flaticons at different carrier frequencies, which may also occur in wavelength division multiplexed transmission systems, merge into a single, high-intensity, temporally and spatially localized rogue pulse.

Wabnitz, Stefan; Fatome, Julien; Millot, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Numerical Treatment of the Loss of Hyperbolicity of the Two-Layer Shallow-Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is devoted to the numerical solution of the inviscid two-layer shallow water system. This system may lose the hyperbolic character when the shear between the layer is big enough. This loss of hyperbolicity is related to the appearance of ... Keywords: Complex eigenvalues, Finite volume method, Path-conservative, Two-layer shallow water

M. J. Castro-Díaz; E. D. Fernández-Nieto; J. M. González-Vida; C. Parés-Madroñal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Exploring a Multiresolution Modeling Approach within the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to solve the global shallow-water equations with a conforming, variable-resolution mesh is evaluated using standard shallow-water test cases. While the long-term motivation for this study is the creation of a global climate modeling ...

Todd D. Ringler; Doug Jacobsen; Max Gunzburger; Lili Ju; Michael Duda; William Skamarock

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Idealized Annually Averaged Macroturbulent Hadley Circulation in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of midlatitude eddies and the thermally driven Hadley circulation is studied using an idealized shallow-water model on the rotating sphere. The contributions of the annually averaged differential heating, vertical advection of ...

Ori Adam; Nili Harnik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Generalized Energy and Potential Enstrophy Conserving Finite Difference Schemes for the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such ...

Frank Abramopoulos

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Mass-Conserving Semi-Lagrangian Scheme for the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By generalizing the algorithm of Priestley for passively advected fields, a mass-conserving scheme for the coupled shallow-water equations is obtained. It is argued that the interpolation step of semi-Lagrangian schemes is the principal reason ...

Sylvie Gravel; Andrew Staniforth

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Conserving and Potential-Enstrophy Dissipating Schemes for the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease ...

Akio Arakawa; Yueh-Jiuan G. Hsu

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Potential Enstrophy and Energy Conserving Scheme for the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the simulation of nonlinear aspects of the flow over steep topography, a potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for the shallow water equations is derived. It is pointed out that a family of schemes can conserve total energy ...

Akio Arakawa; Vivian R. Lamb

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Geostrophic Adjustment and the Finite-Difference Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geostrophic adjustment in shallow water is discussed for the case of an unstaggered grid for vorticity, divergence, and mass. The dispersion equation is shown to be very well behaved and superior to that obtained with the ...

David A. Randall

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Spectral Element Solution of the Shallow-Water Equations on Multiprocessor Computers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water spectral element ocean model is implemented on multiple instruction multiple data, distributed memory parallel computers. A communications-minimizing partitioning algorithm for unstructured meshes, based on graph theory, is ...

Enrique N. Curchitser; Mohamed Iskandarani; Dale B. Haidvogel

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Shallow-Water Model that Prevents Nonlinear Steepening of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow-water model is used as a testbench for understanding many fundamental dynamical problems (e.g. certain wave–mean interaction problems). One sometimes wants to allow large-amplitude gravity waves to propagate significant distances in ...

Oliver Bühler

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Contour-Advective Semi-Lagrangian Algorithm for the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for integrating shallow water equations, the contour-advective semi-Lagrangian (CASL) algorithm, is presented. This is the first implementation of a contour method to a system of equations for which exact potential vorticity ...

David G. Dritschel; Lorenzo M. Polvani; Ali R. Mohebalhojeh

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assessing the Numerical Accuracy of Complex Spherical Shallow-Water Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of nonlinear shallow-water flows poses severe challenges for numerical modeling. The use of contour advection with contour surgery for potential vorticity (PV) within the contour-advective semi-Lagrangian (CASL) algorithm makes ...

Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; David G. Dritschel

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Diabatic Contour-Advective Semi-Lagrangian Algorithms for the Spherical Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diabatic contour-advective semi-Lagrangian (DCASL) algorithm is extended to the thermally forced shallow water equations on the sphere. DCASL rests on the partitioning of potential vorticity (PV) to adiabatic and diabatic parts solved, ...

Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; David G. Dritschel

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A PV-Based Shallow-Water Model on a Hexagonal–Icosahedral Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new global shallow-water model has been developed. It uses a hexagonal–icosahedral grid, potential vorticity as a prognostic variable, and a conservative, shape-preserving scheme for advection of mass, potential vorticity, and tracers. A semi-...

John Thuburn

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fast Spherical Harmonic Transform Routine FLTSS Applied to the Shallow Water Test Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast spherical harmonic transform algorithm proposed by Suda and Takami is evaluated in the solutions of the shallow water equation test set defined by Williamson et al. through replacing the Legendre transforms of the NCAR spectral transform ...

Reiji Suda

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Effects of a Jet-Like Current on Gravity Waves in Shallow Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of a strong current with horizontal shear on shallow water waves is studied. For jet-like currents, the existence of trapped waves and the reciprocity of scattering coefficients are pointed out. Detailed consequences of current ...

Chiang C. Mei; Edmond Lo

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Analysis of Discrete Shallow-Water Models on Geodesic Delaunay Grids with C-Type Staggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of C-grid staggered spatial discretizations of the shallow-water equations on regular Delaunay triangulations on the sphere are analyzed. Mass-conserving schemes that also conserve either energy or potential enstrophy are derived, ...

Luca Bonaventura; Todd Ringler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Global Circulation in an Axially Symmetric Shallow Water Model Forced by Equinoctial Differential Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solutions of an axially symmetric inviscid shallow-water model (SWM) on the earth forced by equinoctial differential heating are constructed using numerical integration of the time-dependent equations and analysis of their steady states. The ...

Ori Adam; Nathan Paldor

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Emergence of Jets from Turbulence in the Shallow-Water Equations on an Equatorial Beta Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent jets, such as the Jovian banded winds, are a prominent feature of rotating turbulence. Shallow-water turbulence models capture the essential mechanism of jet formation, which is systematic eddy momentum flux directed up the mean velocity ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Shallow-Water Flow past Isolated Topography. Part I: Vorticity Production and Wake Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow of a single layer of shallow water past high three-dimensional topography is studied in a nonrotating environment and in the absence of surface friction. The dimensionless parameters for this problem are the upstream Froude number, the ...

Christoph Schär; Ronald B. Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modulation of shallow water equatorial waves due to a varying equivalent height background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) is analyzed in an idealized model of the large scale atmospheric circulation. The model is composed of a linear rotating shallow water system with a variable equivalent height, or ...

Juliana Dias; Pedro L. Silva Dias; George N. Kiladis; Maria Gehne

43

POD/DEIM nonlinear model order reduction of an ADI implicit shallow water equations model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider a 2-D shallow-water equations (SWE) model on a @b-plane solved using an alternating direction fully implicit (ADI) finite-difference scheme on a rectangular domain. The scheme was shown to be unconditionally stable for ... Keywords: Discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM), Finite difference methods, Proper orthogonal decomposition, Reduced-order models (ROMs), Shallow water equations

R. ?Tefnescu; I. M. Navon

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Space-time discontinuous Galerkin discretization of rotating shallow water equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization is presented for the (rotating) shallow water equations over varying topography. We formulate the space-time DG finite element discretization in an efficient and conservative discretization. The ... Keywords: 35Q35, 65N30, 75S05, 76B15, 76M10, Bores, Discontinuous Galerkin methods, Finite element methods, Moving grid, Numerical dissipation, Potential vorticity, Shallow water equations

V. R. Ambati; O. Bokhove

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Developing the Resource Potential of a Shallow Water Table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

apply compara­ Also, soil water intake rates tend deliveryabove the water table at which plant intake and upward

Grimes, D. W; Henderson, D. W

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Conservative numerical simulation of multi-component transport in two-dimensional unsteady shallow water flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explicit finite volume model to simulate two-dimensional shallow water flow with multi-component transport is presented. The governing system of coupled conservation laws demands numerical techniques to avoid unrealistic values of the transported ... Keywords: ?-? model, 35L65, 65M06, 65M12, 76M12, 76M20, Coupled system, Multi-component transport, Reactive source terms, Shallow flow, Solute constraints, Turbulence, Variable domain, Well-balanced approach

J. Murillo; P. García-Navarro; J. Burguete

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Shallow water numerical model of the wave generated by the Vajont landslide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 9th 1963 a huge landslide fell into the Vajont artificial reservoir in Northern Italy, and displaced the water which overtopped the dam and produced a destructive wave that inundated the valley causing about 2000 casualties and complete devastation. ... Keywords: Finite volume scheme, Moving boundary condition, Numerical model, Shallow water equations, Vajont landslide

Silvia Bosa; Marco Petti

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

49

Conservative Properties of the Variational Free-Lagrange Method for Shallow Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The variational free-Lagrange (VFL) method for shallow water is a free-Lagrange method with the additional property that it preserves the variational structure of shallow water. The VFL method was first derived in this context by Augenbaum (1984) who discretised Hamilton's action principle with a free-Lagrange data structure. The primary purpose of this article is to demonstrate, through the use of geometric integrators, that the VFL method exhibits no secular drift in the energy error over long-time shallow water simulations. We additionally derive the semi-discrete divergence and potential vorticity equations in the Lagrangian frame, both of which augment the description of the discrete momentum equation by characterising the evolution of its respective irrotational and solenoidal components. Like the continuum equations, the former exhibits a $\\text{div}^2\\mathbf{U}$ term which indicates that the flow has a very strong tendency towards a purely rotational state. The latter equation provides crucial insight...

Dixon, Matthew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Simulation of a viscous fluid spreading by a bidimensional shallow water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a numerical method to solve the Cauchy problem based on the viscous shallow water equations in an horizontally moving domain. More precisely, we are interested in a flooding and drying model, used to modelize the overflow of a river or the intrusion of a tsunami on ground. We use a non conservative form of the two-dimensional shallow water equations, in eight velocity formulation and we build a numerical approximation, based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, in order to compute the solution in the moving domain.

Di Martino, Bernard; Paoli, Jean-Martin; Simonnet, Pierre; 10.1016/j.apm.2011.01.015

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying phytoplankton in water characterized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, POB 35, H-8237, Hungary Remote sensing has significantly over recent years, the application of satellite remote sensing to lake water is constrained

Tyler, Andrew N.

52

Exact solution describing a shallow water flow in an extending stripe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partially invariant solution to (2+1)D shallow water equation is constructed and investigated. The solution describes an extension of a stripe, bounded by linear source and drain of fluid. Realizations of smooth flow and of hydraulic jump are possible. Particle trajectories and sonic characteristics on the obtained solution are calculated.

Sergey V. Golovin

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Locally One-Dimensional Semi-Implicit Scheme for Global Gridpoint Shallow-Water Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A splitting method is presented for eliminating the need to directly solve for a two-dimensional Helmholtz-type difference equation in a semi-implicit scheme for a global gridpoint shallow-water model. In the proposed method, the model equations ...

Sajal K. Kar; Richard P. Turco; Carlos R. Mechoso; Akio Arakawa

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NONLINEAR EVOLUTION OF GLOBAL HYDRODYNAMIC SHALLOW-WATER INSTABILITY IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE  

SciTech Connect

We present a fully nonlinear hydrodynamic 'shallow-water' model of the solar tachocline. The model consists of a global spherical shell of differentially rotating fluid, which has a deformable top, thus allowing motions in radial directions along with latitudinal and longitudinal directions. When the system is perturbed, in the course of its nonlinear evolution it can generate unstable low-frequency shallow-water shear modes from the differential rotation, high-frequency gravity waves, and their interactions. Radiative and overshoot tachoclines are characterized in this model by high and low effective gravity values, respectively. Building a semi-implicit spectral scheme containing very low numerical diffusion, we perform nonlinear evolution of shallow-water modes. Our first results show that (1) high-latitude jets or polar spin-up occurs due to nonlinear evolution of unstable hydrodynamic shallow-water disturbances and differential rotation, (2) Reynolds stresses in the disturbances together with changing shell thickness and meridional flow are responsible for the evolution of differential rotation, (3) disturbance energy primarily remains concentrated in the lowest longitudinal wavenumbers, (4) an oscillation in energy between perturbed and unperturbed states occurs due to evolution of these modes in a nearly dissipation-free system, and (5) disturbances are geostrophic, but occasional nonadjustment in geostrophic balance can occur, particularly in the case of high effective gravity, leading to generation of gravity waves. We also find that a linearly stable differential rotation profile remains nonlinearly stable.

Dikpati, Mausumi, E-mail: dikpati@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Accurate and Efficient Finite-Element Global Model of the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Côté and Staniforth the efficiency of a semi-implicit spectral model of the shallow-water primitive equations was significantly improved by replacing the usual three-time-level Eulerian treatment of advection by a two-time-level semi-...

Jean Côté; Andrew Staniforth

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A new two-component system modelling shallow-water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For propagation of surface shallow-water waves on irrotational flows, we derive a new two-component system. The system is obtained by a variational approach in the Lagrangian formalism. The system has a non-canonical Hamiltonian formulation. We also find its exact solitary-wave solutions.

Delia Ionescu-Kruse

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Variational Data Assimilation with a Variable Resolution Finite-Element shallow-water Equations Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adjoint model of a finite-element shallow-water equations model was obtained with a view to calculate the gradient of a cost functional in the framework of using this model to carry out variational data assimilation (VDA) experiments using ...

Keyun Zhu; I. Michael Navon; Xiaolei Zou

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Comparison of Two Shallow-Water Models with Nonconforming Adaptive Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to study the applicability of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques to atmospheric models, an interpolation-based spectral element shallow-water model on a cubed-sphere grid is compared to a block-structured finite-volume method ...

Amik St-Cyr; Christiane Jablonowski; John M. Dennis; Henry M. Tufo; Stephen J. Thomas

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Number of Required Observations in Data Assimilation for a Shallow-Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors consider statistical ensemble data assimilation for a one-layer shallow-water equation in a twin experiment: data are generated by an N × N enstrophy-conserving grid integration scheme along with an Ekman vertical velocity at the ...

William G. Whartenby; John C. Quinn; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Vorticity Generation in the Shallow-Water Equations as Applied to Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors attempt to find a bridge between the vorticity dynamics of a finite cross-stream length hydraulic jump implied by the Navier-Stokes equations and that given by the shallow-water approximation (SWA) with the turbulence of the hydraulic ...

Richard Rotunno; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Global Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Shallow-Water Model on Locally Refined Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variable-resolution global shallow-water model has been developed. The scheme makes use of a two-time-level semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian discretization, and the variable-resolution grid is composed of a basic global uniform coarser grid, ...

Saulo R. M. Barros; Claudia I. Garcia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A General Method for Conserving Energy and Potential Enstrophy in Shallow-Water Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow-water equations may be posed in the form df?/dt = {F, H, Z}, where H is the energy, Z is the potential enstrophy, and the Nambu bracket {F, H, Z} is completely antisymmetric in its three arguments. This makes it very easy to construct ...

Rick Salmon

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Probabilistic Bulk Model of Coupled Mixed Layer and Convection. Part II: Shallow Convection Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probabilistic bulk convection model (PBCM) developed in a companion paper is here extended to shallow nonprecipitating convection. The PBCM unifies the clear-sky and shallow convection boundary layer regimes by obtaining mixed-layer growth, ...

Pierre Gentine; Alan K. Betts; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Fabio D’Andrea

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Elongation and Contraction of the Western Boundary Current Extension in a Shallow-Water Model: A Bifurcation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The double-gyre circulation, formulated in terms of the quasigeostrophic equations, has a symmetry about the basin midlatitude (y ? ?y, ? ? ??), which is absent in a formulation based on the shallow-water equations. As a result, the shallow-water ...

François Primeau; David Newman

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Unstructured finite volume discretisation of bed friction and convective flux in solute transport models linked to the shallow water equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The finite volume discretisation of the shallow water equations has been the subject of many previous studies, most of which deal with a well-balanced conservative discretisation of the convective flux and bathymetry. However, the bed friction discretisation ... Keywords: Bed friction, Depth averaged models, Finite volume method, High order schemes, Scalar transport, Shallow water equations, Unstructured mesh

L. Cea; M. E. Vázquez-Cendón

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 ± 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 ± 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 + 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 + 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Riemann problem for the shallow water equations with discontinuous topography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the solution of the Riemann problem for the shallow water equations with discontinuous topography. The system under consideration is non-strictly hyperbolic and does not admit a fully conservative form, and we establish the existence of two-parameter wave sets, rather than wave curves. The selection of admissible waves is particularly challenging. Our construction is fully explicit, and leads to formulas that can be implemented numerically for the approximation of the general initial-value problem.

LeFloch, Philippe G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

On the advantage of well-balanced schemes for moving-water equilibria of the shallow water equations  

SciTech Connect

This note aims at demonstrating the advantage of moving-water well-balanced schemes over still-water well-balanced schemes for the shallow water equations. We concentrate on numerical examples with solutions near a moving-water equilibrium. For such examples, still-water well-balanced methods are not capable of capturing the small perturbations of the moving-water equilibrium and may generate significant spurious oscillations, unless an extremely refined mesh is used. On the other hand, moving-water well-balanced methods perform well in these tests. The numerical examples in this note clearly demonstrate the importance of utilizing moving-water well-balanced methods for solutions near a moving-water equilibrium.

Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University; Noelle, Sebastian [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High-order nite volume WENO schemes for the shallow water equations with dry states  

SciTech Connect

The shallow water equations are used to model flows in rivers and coastal areas, and have wide applications in ocean, hydraulic engineering, and atmospheric modeling. These equations have still water steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are balanced by the source term. It is desirable to develop numerical methods which preserve exactly these steady state solutions. Another main difficulty usually arising from the simulation of dam breaks and flood waves flows is the appearance of dry areas where no water is present. If no special attention is paid, standard numerical methods may fail near dry/wet front and produce non-physical negative water height. A high-order accurate finite volume weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is proposed in this paper to address these difficulties and to provide an efficient and robust method for solving the shallow water equations. A simple, easy-to-implement positivity-preserving limiter is introduced. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples are provided to verify the positivity-preserving property, well-balanced property, high-order accuracy, and good resolution for smooth and discontinuous solutions.

Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Potential Enstrophy and Energy Conserving Numerical Scheme for Solution of the Shallow-Water Equations on a Geodesic Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the shallow water equations, a numerical framework on a spherical geodesic grid that conserves domain-integrated mass, potential vorticity, potential enstrophy, and total energy is developed. The numerical scheme is equally applicable to ...

Todd D. Ringler; David A. Randall

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Implementation of A Posteriori Methods for Enforcing Conservation of Potential Enstrophy and Mass in Discretized Shallow-Water Equations Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Sasaki variational approach is for the first time applied to enforce a posteriori conservation of potential enstrophy and total mass in long-term integrations of two ADI finite-difference approximations of the nonlinear shallow-water equations ...

I. M. Navon

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Comparison of Space and Time Errors in Spectral Numerical Solutions of the Global Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergence of spectral model numerical solutions of the global shallow-water equations is examined as a function of the time step and the spectral truncation. The contributions to the errors due to the spatial and temporal discretizations ...

Michael J. Naughton; Gerald L. Browning; William Bourke

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Voronoi, Delaunay, and Block-Structured Mesh Refinement for Solution of the Shallow-Water Equations on the Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative meshes of the sphere and adaptive mesh refinement could be immensely beneficial for weather and climate forecasts, but it is not clear how mesh refinement should be achieved. A finite-volume model that solves the shallow-water ...

Hilary Weller; Henry G. Weller; Aimé Fournier

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A New Time Stepping Method for the Solution of the Shallow Water Equations on a Rotating Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow water equations on a rotating sphere form a system of great interest in geophysical fluid dynamics, from meteorology to atmospheric physics and climate studies. Williamson and his collaborators at the National Center for Atmospheric ...

Ali Rouhi; Roy Schult; Jon Wright

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Implicit Nonlinearly Consistent Method for the Two-Dimensional Shallow-Water Equations with Coriolis Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An implicit and nonlinearly consistent (INC) solution technique is presented for the two-dimensional shallow-water equations. Since the method is implicit, and therefore unconditionally stable, time steps may be used that result in both gravity ...

V. A. Mousseau; D. A. Knoll; J. M. Reisner

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

On the Spectral Convergence of the Supercompact Finite-Difference Schemes for the f-Plane Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the f-plane shallow-water equations, the convergence properties of the supercompact finite-difference method (SCFDM) are examined during the evolution of complex, nonlinear flows spawned by an unstable jet. The second-, fourth-, sixth-, and ...

S. Ghader; A. R. Mohebalhojeh; V. Esfahanian

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Revisiting Vacillations in Shallow-Water Models of the Stratosphere Using Potential-Vorticity-Based Numerical Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar vortex vacillations are investigated using long-term simulations of potential-vorticity (PV)-based shallow-water (SW) models for the stratosphere. In the models examined, mechanical forcing is applied through a time-independent topography ...

Seyed Majid MirRokni; Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; David G. Dritschel

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Multiple Equilibria, Periodic, and Aperiodic Solutions in a Wind-Driven, Double-Gyre, Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-gravity shallow-water (SW) model is used to study the nonlinear behavior of western boundary currents (WBCs), with particular emphasis on multiple equilibria and low-frequency variations. When the meridionally symmetric wind stress is ...

Shi Jiang; Fei-fei Jin; Michael Ghil

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Risø Air–Sea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Mass-Conservative Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Limited-Area Shallow-Water Model on the Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A locally mass conservative shallow-water model using a two-time-level, semi-implicit, semi-Lagrangian integration scheme is presented. The momentum equations are solved with the traditional semi-Lagrangian gridpoint form. The explicit continuity ...

Peter H. Lauritzen; Eigil Kaas; Bennert Machenhauer

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Well-balanced bicharacteristic-based scheme for multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a new well-balanced finite volume scheme for two-dimensional multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts. The ideas, presented here for the two-layer model, can be generalized to a multilayer case in a ... Keywords: Bicharacteristics, Evolution galerkin, Finite volume method, Two-layer shallow water, Well-balance, Wet/dry front

M. Dudzinski; M. Luká?Ová-Medvid'Ová

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States ’ energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM – 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as “flowback ” within 30 days after hydrofracturing. “Produced water ” continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Symmetry analysis of a system of modified shallow-water equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revise the symmetry analysis of a modified system of one-dimensional shallow-water equations (MSWE) recently considered by Raja Sekhar and Sharma [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simulat. 20 (2012) 630-636]. Only a finite dimensional subalgebra of the maximal Lie invariance algebra of the MSWE, which in fact is infinite dimensional, was found in the aforementioned paper. The MSWE can be linearized using a hodograph transformation. An optimal list of inequivalent one-dimensional subalgebras of the maximal Lie invariance algebra is constructed and used for Lie reductions. Non-Lie solutions are found from solutions of the linearized MSWE.

Simon Szatmari; Alexander Bihlo

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

Giddings, J.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part II: Mixing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series in which life cycles of six numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The six clouds, selected from a single realization of a large-eddy simulation, grow as a series of ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Positivity-preserving high order well-balanced discontinuous Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations  

SciTech Connect

Shallow water equations with a non-flat bottom topography have been widely used to model flows in rivers and coastal areas. An important difficulty arising in these simulations is the appearance of dry areas where no water is present, as standard numerical methods may fail in the presence of these areas. These equations also have still water steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are nonzero but exactly balanced by the source term. In this paper we propose a high order discontinuous Galerkin method which can maintain the still water steady state exactly, and at the same time can preserve the non-negativity of the water height without loss of mass conservation. A simple positivity-preserving limiter, valid under suitable CFL condition, will be introduced in one dimension and then extended to two dimensions with rectangular meshes. Numerical tests are performed to verify the positivity-preserving property, well-balanced property, high order accuracy, and good resolution for smooth and discontinuous solutions.

Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Zhang, Xiangxiong [Brown University; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ordering of two small parameters in the shallow water wave problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The classical problem of irrotational long waves on the surface of a shallow layer of an ideal fluid moving under the influence of gravity as well as surface tension is considered. A systematic procedure for deriving an equation for surface elevation for a prescribed relation between the orders of the two expansion parameters, the amplitude parameter $\\alpha$ and the long wavelength (or shallowness) parameter $\\beta$, is developed. Unlike the heuristic approaches found in the literature, when modifications are made in the equation for surface elevation itself, the procedure starts from the consistently truncated asymptotic expansions for unidirectional waves, a counterpart of the Boussinesq system of equations for the surface elevation and the bottom velocity, from which the leading order and higher order equations for the surface elevation can be obtained by iterations. The relations between the orders of the two small parameters are taken in the form $\\beta=O(\\alpha^n)$ and $\\alpha=O(\\beta^m)$ with $n$ and $m$ specified to some important particular cases. The analysis shows, in particular, that some evolution equations, proposed before as model equations in other physical contexts (like the Gardner equation, the modified KdV equation, and the so-called 5th-order KdV equation), can emerge as the leading order equations in the asymptotic expansion for the unidirectional water waves, on equal footing with the KdV equation. The results related to the higher orders of approximation provide a set of consistent higher order model equations for unidirectional water waves which replace the KdV equation with higher-order corrections in the case of non-standard ordering when the parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ are not of the same order of magnitude. (See the paper for the complete abstract.)

Georgy I. Burde; Artur Sergyeyev

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data scenarios. Relative differences in SWH estimates among the four data scenarios were compared to illustrate estimation ranges.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

Parameter Sweep Experiments on Spontaneous Gravity Wave Radiation from Unsteady Rotational Flow in an f-Plane Shallow Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inertial gravity wave radiation from an unsteady rotational flow (spontaneous radiation) is investigated numerically in an f-plane shallow water system for a wide range of Rossby numbers, 1 ? Ro ? 1000, and Froude numbers, 0.1 ? Fr ? 0.8. A ...

Norihiko Sugimoto; Keiichi Ishioka; Katsuya Ishii

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Consistent Theory for Linear Waves of the Shallow-Water Equations on a Rotating Plane in Midlatitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study provides a consistent and unified theory for the three types of linear waves of the shallow-water equations (SWE) in a zonal channel on the ? plane: Kelvin, inertia–gravity (Poincaré), and planetary (Rossby). The new theory is ...

Nathan Paldor; Shira Rubin; Arthur J. Mariano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Steady-State Dynamics of a Density Current in an f-Plane Nonlinear Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the nonlinear dynamics of a density current generated by a diabatic source in a rotating and a nonrotating system, both in the presence and in the absence of frictional losses, using a steady-state hydrostatic shallow-water ...

Giovanni A. Dalu; Marina Baldi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin-Accelerated Exact Linear Part (ELP) Method for the Shallow-Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new approach is presented to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. ...

Rick Archibald; Katherine J. Evans; John Drake; James B. White III

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Multimoment Finite-Volume Shallow-Water Model on the Yin–Yang Overset Spherical Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model for shallow-water equations has been built and tested on the Yin–Yang overset spherical grid. A high-order multimoment finite-volume method is used for the spatial discretization in which two kinds of so-called moments of the ...

Xingliang Li; Dehui Chen; Xindong Peng; Keiko Takahashi; Feng Xiao

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy- and enstrophy-conserving schemes for the shallow-water equations, based on mimetic finite elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a family of spatial discretisations of the nonlinear rotating shallow-water equations that conserve both energy and potential enstrophy. These are based on two-dimensional mixed finite element methods, and hence, unlike some finite difference methods, do not require an orthogonal grid. Numerical verification of the aforementioned properties is also provided.

McRae, Andrew T T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Global Circulation in an Axially Symmetric Shallow-Water Model, Forced by Off-Equatorial Differential Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axially symmetric inviscid shallow-water model (SWM) on the rotating Earth forced by off-equatorial steady differential heating is employed to characterize the main features of the upper branch of an ideal Hadley circulation. The steady-state ...

Ori Adam; Nathan Paldor

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface Wave Propagation in Shallow Water beneath an Inhomogeneous Ice Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of flexural–gravity waves in a layer of shallow fluid beneath an ice cover with irregularities is investigated. The irregularities considered are the ice edges, cracks, areas of finely broken ice, and ice ridges. Even this ...

A. V. Marchenko; K. I. Voliak

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Poisson-Bracket Approach to the Construction of Energy- and Potential-Enstrophy-Conserving Algorithms for the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arakawa and Lamb discovered a finite-difference approximation to the shallow-water equations that exactly conserves finite-difference approximations to the energy and potential enstrophy of the fluid. The Arakawa– Lamb (AL) algorithm is a ...

Rick Salmon

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Low-Frequency Variability in Shallow-Water Models of the Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation. Part I: Steady-State Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successive bifurcations—from steady states through periodic to aperiodic solutions—are studied in a shallow-water, reduced-gravity, 2½-layer model of the midlatitude ocean circulation subject to time-independent wind stress. The bifurcation ...

Eric Simonnet; Michael Ghil; Kayo Ide; Roger Temam; Shouhong Wang

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Global Linear Stability of the Two-Dimensional Shallow-Water Equations: An Application of the Distributive Theorem of Roots for Polynomials on the Unit Circle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the numerical stability of the linearized shallow-water dynamic and thermodynamic system using centered spatial differencing and leapfrog time differencing. The nonlinear version of the equations is commonly used in both 2D ...

Jia Wang

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Cell-Integrated Semi-Lagrangian Semi-Implicit Shallow-Water Model (CSLAM-SW) with Conservative and Consistent Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cartesian semi-implicit solver using the Conservative Semi-Lagrangian Multitracer (CSLAM) transport scheme is constructed and tested for shallow-water (SW) flows. The SW equations solver (CSLAM-SW) uses a discrete semi-implicit continuity ...

May Wong; William C. Skamarock; Peter H. Lauritzen; Roland B. Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rossby Wave Frequencies and Group Velocities for Finite Element and Finite Difference Approximations to the Vorticity-Divergence and the Primitive Forms of the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper Rossby wave frequencies and group velocities are analyzed for various finite element and finite difference approximations to the vorticity-divergence form of the shallow water equations. Also included are finite difference solutions ...

Beny Neta; R. T. Williams

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Infiltration/ground water linkage in the southwest: Response of shallow ground water to interannual variations of precipitation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic gradients, residence times and the hydrochemistry of shallow ground water are linked to the episodic precipitation and recharge events characteristic of the arid southwest. In this region, the amount of precipitation, and corresponding biomass, is dependant upon altitude with greater frequency and duration in the montane highlands and less in the desert lowlands. Results from a four-year study at the Rio Calaveras research site in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico show a strong correlation between the physical and hydrochemical properties of shallow ground water and variations of seasonal precipitation and infiltration. For example, the water table shows a dramatic response to snowmelt infiltration during years of abundant snow pack (El Nifio) and diminished response during years of reduced snow pack (La Niiia). The chemical structure of shallow ground water is also affected by the precipitation regime, primarily by variations in the flux of reductants (organic carbon) and oxidants (dissolved oxygen) from the vadose zone to the water table. Generally, oxic conditions persist during spring snowmelt infiltration shifting to anoxic conditions as biotic and abiotic processes transform dissolved oxygen. Other redox-sensitive constituents (ferrous iron, manganese, sulfate, nitrate, and nitrite) show increasing and decreasing concentrations as redox fluctuates seasonally and year-to-year. The cycling of these redox sensitive solutes in the subsurface depends upon the character of the aquifer materials, the biomass at the surface, moisture and temperature regime of the vadose zone, and frequency of infiltration events.

Groffman, A. R. (Armand R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Shallow water flow is a serious drilling hazard encoun-tered across several areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

question: "How does fresh- water come to be near the seafloor in deepwater areas of the Gulf of Mexico extending from onshore to offshore. This option is not generally accepted by experienced Gulf of MexicoShallow water flow is a serious drilling hazard encoun- tered across several areas of the Gulf

Texas at Austin, University of

108

Shallow Pycnoclines and Mode Water Subduction in the Eastern North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lagrangian one-dimensional model is used to study the subduction of Subpolar Mode Water in the eastern North Atlantic and to analyze recently observed hydrological features related to this process. Considering a southward moving column of mode ...

Jérôme Paillet; Michel Arhan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Elimination of the Helmholtz Equation Associated with the Semi-Implicit Scheme in a Grid Point Model of the Shallow Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modification is introduced in a semi-implicit version of a grid point model of the shallow water equations. The new model is simpler, runs one-third, and after 5 days of integration, the forecasts differ by less than 1 m.

Monique Tanguay; André Robert

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessment of model error in limited-area simulations of shallow water test cases on the C-grid plane and sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suite of limited-area test cases for the solution of the shallow water (SW) equations on the plane and sphere are collected and evaluated using the Model for Predication Across Scales (MPAS) modeling system. Included are regional simulations of ...

Christopher A. Jeffery

111

A Dynamic hp-Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Shallow-Water Flows on the Sphere with Application to a Global Tsunami Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discontinuous Galerkin model solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere is presented. It captures the dynamically varying key aspects of the flows by having the advantageous ability to locally modify the mesh as well as the order of ...

Sébastien Blaise; Amik St-Cyr

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Solving general shallow wave equations on surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new framework for solving General Shallow Wave Equations (GSWE) in order to efficiently simulate water flows on solid surfaces under shallow wave assumptions. Within this framework, we develop implicit schemes for solving the external forces ...

Huamin Wang; Gavin Miller; Greg Turk

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Measurements of the Directional Spectra of Shallow Water Waves Using the Maximum Entropy Principle and a Single Ocean Bottom Seismometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for measurement of the directional spectra of surface gravity (water) waves is presented here. Measurements are made at a single point by orthogonally mounted seismometers buried 0.5 meters below the seabed surface and a pressure ...

Tom Nye; Tokuo Yamamoto; Mark Trevorrow

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Experiments with Non-Normal-Mode Initialization of a Shallow-Water Limited-Area Model: Impact of Relaxation, Orography, and of an Extended Linearization Including Most of the ? Terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A non-normal-mode initialization scheme, that is, an initialization scheme that does not require an explicit computation of the normal modes of the linearized equations, is considered. Such a scheme is applied to a shallow-water limited-area ...

Régis Juvanon Du Vachat

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

120

Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and ability to control units centrally during a shelter-in-place event. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be controlled under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (3) Cool roof. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all roofs scheduled for replacement in the LLNL deficiency list. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (4) Window shading. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all non-north facing windows. Although the simple payback is not a good for this measure, it should be considered for the associated benefits on thermal comfort and to alleviate some of the zoning and thermostat placement issues. (5) HVAC upgrade at normal replacement. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all HVAC units scheduled for replacement on the LLNL deficiency list. A total of 642 units (about 55% of the total) are on the replacement list, so this represents a major opportunity. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (6) Indirect/direct evaporative cooling. Savings estimates for the measure were applied to all HVAC units scheduled for replacement on the LLNL deficiency list. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. Due to the magnitude of the potential energy savings, this measure should be considered as the new generation IDEC systems become commercially available. (7) Super T-8's. Savings estimates for this measure were applied to all buildings in the study, assuming that the new generation lamps will be rotated in during normal lamp replacement operations. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (8) Occupancy sensors. Savings estimates for this measure were applied to buildings surveyed as candidates for occupancy sensors during the Level 1 audits. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building. (9) Remaining Lighting. Savings for this measure were calculated for each eligible fixture identified during the Lev

Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Global Change II Water is central to life on Earth. Energy is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear hydro-geo-solar biomass Energy Input Energy Output (100%) (100%) #12;Energy Predictions 73 SourcesGlobal Change II Energy Nasa/JPL #12;#12;Water is central to life on Earth. Energy is central to living on Earth. We are not running out of energy, we are running out of environment.1 Energy Outline

122

Deformation mechanisms beneath shallow foundations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Where sufficient capacity is available near the ground surface, projects such as low-rise buildings (up to about five storeys in height), houses, tanks and even wind turbines might adopt a shallow foundation system. 1.2 Shallow Foundations Shallow... and drying procedure is followed. Figures 1.1(b) and 1.1(c) show a wind turbine shallow foundation during the concrete pour stage, and a completed rectangular footing with column reinforcement respectively. Two issues are considered in the design of shallow...

McMahon, Brendan

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fragmentation of Freezing Drops in Shallow Maritime Frontal Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Images of frozen drops with pieces missing were collected on two days of airborne sampling in shallow supercooled stratiform frontal clouds in the coastal waters of Washington State. In those limited regions where ice appeared to be newly formed, ...

Arthur L. Rangno

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mass-Flux Budgets of Shallow Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical transport by shallow nonprecipitating cumulus clouds of conserved variables, such as the total specific humidity or the liquid water potential temperature, can be well modeled by the mass-flux approach, in which the cloud field is ...

Stephan R. de Roode; Christopher S. Bretherton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

126

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

127

Improving the Numerical Solution of Soil Moisture–Based Richards Equation for Land Models with a Deep or Shallow Water Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soil moisture–based Richards equation is widely used in land models for weather and climate studies, but its numerical solution using the mass-conservative scheme in the Community Land Model is found to be deficient when the water table is ...

Xubin Zeng; Mark Decker

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II CD-ROM Atlas of Global Monthly Aerosols, Ozone, NO2, Water, Vapor, and Relative Humitidy (1985–1993)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite have been used to create latitude-longitude maps of monthly mean aerosols, ozone, water vapor, ...

D. Rind; X. Liao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of AMIP II Global Climate Model Simulations of the Land Surface Water Budget and Its Components over the GEWEX-CEOP Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface water balance components simulated by 20 atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) participating in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II) are analyzed globally and over seven Global Energy and ...

P. Irannejad; A. Henderson-Sellers

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

131

Prevention of a nuclear excursion upon water flooding of an ocean based Tory II-C  

SciTech Connect

As TORY II-C is presently designed, a nuclear excursion would occur if the core were flooded with water. This is true even if all of the existing control rods were fully inserted. Indeed ANGIE calculations indicate that the reactor would be about 30% super-critical in such a case. There are several methods by which the core may be forced sub- critical under these extreme conditions. We will here consider only the method of introducing, directly into the core, a material which strongly absorbs neutrons. It must be possible to remove this excess `poison` prior to, or during the boost phase. Since the computer codes can be trusted to only approximately 3%, we will, for safety, insist on 40% negative reactivity to be introduced by the excess poison.

Stubbs, T.

1962-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Numerical Integration of the Shallow-Water Equations on a Twisted Icosahedral Grid. Part II. A Detailed Description of the Grid and an Analysis of Numerical Accuracy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The finite-difference scheme for the Laplace and flux-divergence operators described in the companion paper (Part I) is consistent when applied on a grid consisting of perfect hexagons. The authors describe a necessary and sufficient condition ...

Ross Heikes; David A. Randall

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Desalination discharge in shallow coastal waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the design of a desalination plant, the intake and outfall structures need to be properly addressed. From an environmental viewpoint, it is important to… (more)

Shao, Dongdong.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shallow Carbon SequeStration Shallow Carbon SequeStration DemonStration ProjeCt Background The Shallow Carbon Sequestration Pilot Demonstration Project is a cooperative effort involving City Utilities of Springfield (CU); Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR); Missouri State University (MSU); Missouri University of Science & Technology (MS&T); AmerenUE; Aquila, Inc.; Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc.; Empire District Electric Company; and Kansas City Power & Light. The purpose of this project is to assess the feasibility of carbon sequestration at Missouri power plant sites. The six electric utilities involved in the project account for approximately 90 percent of the electric generating capacity in Missouri. Description The pilot demonstration will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the Lamotte and

135

On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part II: Water Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this two-part paper examined the satellite-derived rainfall accumulation and rain potential history of Hurricanes Isidore and Lili (2002). This paper (Part II) uses analyses from the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System ...

Haiyan Jiang; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Joanne Simpson; Edward J. Zipser

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CSE Water and Energy Budgets in the NCEP–DOE Reanalysis II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) continental-scale experiments (CSEs) have started to develop regional hydroclimatological datasets and water and energy budget studies (WEBS). To provide some ...

J. Roads; M. Kanamitsu; R. Stewart

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent studies suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from the Albano crater lake. Alban Hills are presently characterized by high PCO2 in groundwaters and by several cold gas emissions usually in sites where excavations removed the

138

Evaluation of the Role of Water in the H2 Bond Formation by Ni(II)-based Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the role of water in the H-H bond formation by a family of nickel molecular catalysts that exhibit high rates for H2 production in acetonitrile solvent. A key feature leading to the high reactivity is the Lewis acidity of the Ni(II) center and pendant amines in the diphosphine ligand that function as Lewis bases, facilitating H-H bond formation or cleavage. Significant increases in the rate of H2 production have been reported in the presence of added water. Our calculations show that molecular water can displace an acetonitrile solvent molecule in the first solvation shell of the metal. One or two water molecules can also participate in shuttling a proton that can combine with a metal hydride to form the H-H bond. However the participation of the water molecules does not lower the barrier to H-H bond formation. Thus these calculations suggest that the rate increase due to water in these electrocatalysts is not associated with the elementary step of H-H bond formation or cleavage, but rather with the proton delivery steps. We attribute the higher barrier in the H-H bond formation in the presence of water to a decrease in direct interaction between the protic and hydridic hydrogen atoms forced by the water molecules. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Ho, Ming-Hsun; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Shallow, Intermediate, and Deep Overturning Components of the Global Heat Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean's overturning circulation and associated heat transport are divided into contributions based on water mass ventilation from 1) shallow overturning within the wind-driven subtropical gyres to the base of the thermocline, 2) overturning ...

Lynne D. Talley

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Inversion for subbottom sound velocity profiles in the deep and shallow ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the application of acoustic measurements in the deep and shallow ocean to infer the sound velocity profile (svp) in the seabed. For the deep water ocean, an exact method based on the Gelfand-Levitan ...

Souza, Luiz Alberto Lopes de

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

On the Representation of Reynolds Stress in Estuaries and Shallow Coastal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for the representation of the Reynolds-stress tensor in three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of shallow water flows is derived which combines the accuracy of turbulence-energy closure schemes with the computational efficiency of ...

T. J. Smith

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measurements of the Total Water Content of Cirrus Clouds. Part II: Instrument Performance and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance and in-flight validation of an instrument mounted in a pallet on the NASA WB-57 research aircraft that measures the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds. Using a heated ...

E. M. Weinstock; J. B. Smith; D. Sayres; J. V. Pittman; N. Allen; J. G. Anderson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impact Of Standing Water On Saltstone Placement II - Hydraulic Conductivity Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes was prepared and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. Report SRNL-STI-2012-00546 was issued detailing the experimental procedure, results, and conclusions related to density and leachability. In the previous report, it was concluded that: density tends to increase toward the bottom of the samples. This effect is pronounced with excess bleed water; drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Index (more leaching) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate; there is no noticeable effect on saltstone oxidation/leachability by changing the water to premix ratio (over the range studied), or by pouring into standing water (when tested up to 10 volume percent). The hydraulic conductivity data presented in this report show that samples cured exposed to the atmosphere had about three orders of magnitude higher hydraulic conductivity than any of the other samples. Considering these data, along with the results presented in the previous report, leads to the conclusion that small changes in water to premix ratio and the inclusion of up to 10 volume percent standing water should not be expected to have a detrimental effect on saltstone grout quality. The hydraulic conductivity results further demonstrate that curing in a moist environment is critical to maintaining saltstone quality.

Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. Tasks accomplished in Phase II include the complete migration of the Project Website and related databases to the ArcIMS software, which provides a better spatial query capacity. The database was enhanced by incorporating more gauge stations, limited groundwater data (well information, water levels, water quality, and pumpage) and other new data, and strengthened data sharing by implementing FGDC classic metadata. Protocols were explored for data sharing and spatial queries and opportunities for more active participation of volunteer regional data providers in the Project. The linkage of the PdNWC database with future groundwater and surface water model development was also assessed. Based on the experiences gained in the Project, the following recommendations for future Project work include: * Continued compilation of new data sources not yet included in the Project to enhance data sharing, * Installation of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in future ArcIMS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data, * Strengthening the links with the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) being advanced by the USACE. Special focus will be given to serving DEM and orthophoto data recently transferred from the USACE to NMWRRI and enhancing direct Web linkages with USACE and URGWOM project activities to improve model development capacity and enhance sharing of modeling results, * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project Website, * Development and making available online for download a Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions, * Development of an online help tutorial that would support online searches of the database, making the site easier for end users to navigate and utilize, and * Continuity in the exploration of future funding opportunities for Project activities, especially through linkages with other regional data compilation and modeling projects. Part I of this report presents major historical and technical components of the Phase II development of the Database and GIS prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon. Groundwater elements of interest, relevant to the development of the coordinated database and to the integral comprehension of the watershed’s mission and planning are also included as Part II of this report. This part, prepared by Z. Sheng and others, presents the sources of regional groundwater resources data compiled by different federal and state entities and outlines suggestions for regional groundwater data to be implemented with an ArcIMS interface so that this data can be shared and accessed by all Paso del Norte Watershed Council stakeholders. Part III, prepared by R. Srinivasan, presents the technical challenges posed to data sharing by multiple data collectors and sources and summarizes the different protocols available for an effective transfer and sharing of data through a GIS ArcIMS interface. Part IV, prepared by Z. Sheng and D. Zhang, explores the possibility to link the Database Project to a comprehensive development of regional hydrological models within the Rio Grande reach between Elephant Butte Dam, in New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. Finally, Part V, prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon, presents closing comments as well as a summary of the recommendations made throughout the document. Dr. Hanks provided assistance in summarizing preliminary user survey results

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Formation of Labrador Sea Water. Part II. Mesoscale and Smaller-Scale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a previous paper, Clarke and Gascard argued that the formation of Labrador Sea Water was taking place in a cyclonic gyre set up each winter in the western Labrador Sea.

Jean-Claude Gascard; R. Allyn Clarke

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Representation of Water Table Dynamics in a Land Surface Scheme. Part II: Subgrid Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped unconfined aquifer model has been developed and interactively coupled to a land surface scheme in a companion paper. Here, the issue of the representation of subgrid variability of water table depths (WTDs) is addressed. A statistical–...

Pat J-F. Yeh; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Structure and Function Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Barber's research aims to mimic one step in photosynthesis to produce hydrogen as a fuel. In photosynthesis, plants use sunlight to split water and combine its hydrogen with carbon dioxide to form organic matter and oxygen. Barber and colleagues from Imperial College used a technique called x-ray crystallography to illuminate the mechanism that underpins the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. By analyzing these findings, the researchers believe it may be possible to learn how to recreate the process on an industrial scale, allowing hydrogen to be manufactured as a fuel. 'Hydrogen derived from the water-splitting in plants could be one of the most promising energy sources of the future,' Barber said. 'Unlike fossil fuels, it's highly efficient, low polluting and is mobile so it can be used for power generation in remote regions where it's difficult to access electricity.'

Barber, James (Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London)

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

High-Resolution Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). Part II: Water Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) is used to simulate Hurricane Bonnie at high resolution (2-km spacing) in order to examine budgets of water vapor, cloud ...

Scott A. Braun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Sun's Shallow Meridional Circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun's global meridional circulation is evident as a slow poleward flow at its surface. This flow is observed to carry magnetic elements poleward - producing the Sun's polar magnetic fields as a key part of the 11-year sunspot cycle. Current theories for the sunspot cycle assume that this surface flow is part of a circulation which sinks inward at the poles and turns equatorward at depths below 100 Mm. Here we use the advection of the Sun's convection cells by the meridional flow to map the flow velocity in latitude and depth. Our measurements show the largest cells clearly moving equatorward at depths below 35 Mm - the base of the Sun's surface shear layer. This surprisingly shallow return flow indicates the need for substantial revisions to solar/stellar dynamo theory.

Hathaway, David H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Top hole drilling with dual gradient technology to control shallow hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently the "Pump and Dump" method employed by Exploration and Production (E&P) companies in deepwater is simply not enough to control increasingly dangerous and unpredictable shallow hazards. "Pump and Dump" requires a heavy dependence on accurate seismic data to avoid shallow gas zones; the kick detection methods are slow and unreliable, which results in a need for visual kick detection; and it does not offer dynamic well control methods of managing shallow hazards such as methane hydrates, shallow gas and shallow water flows. These negative aspects of "Pump and Dump" are in addition to the environmental impact, high drilling fluid (mud) costs and limited mud options. Dual gradient technology offers a closed system, which improves drilling simply because the mud within the system is recycled. The amount of required mud is reduced, the variety of acceptable mud types is increased and chemical additives to the mud become an option. This closed system also offers more accurate and faster kick detection methods in addition to those that are already used in the "Pump and Dump" method. This closed system has the potential to prevent the formation of hydrates by adding hydrate inhibitors to the drilling mud. And more significantly, this system successfully controls dissociating methane hydrates, over pressured shallow gas zones and shallow water flows. Dual gradient technology improves deepwater drilling operations by removing fluid constraints and offering proactive well control over dissociating hydrates, shallow water flows and over pressured shallow gas zones. There are several clear advantages for dual gradient technology: economic, technical and significantly improved safety, which is achieved through superior well control.

Elieff, Brandee Anastacia Marie

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after North Atlantic distant-water trawlers, designed for extended cruising range, versatility of exploring the world's deepest ocean, to smaller ships responsible for charting the shallow bays and inlets

152

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

Modeling the Atmospheric Response to Irrigation in the Great Plains. Part II: The Precipitation of Irrigated Water and Changes in Precipitation Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid expansion of irrigation in the Great Plains since World War II has resulted in significant water table declines, threatening the long-term sustainability of the Ogallala Aquifer. As discussed in Part I of this paper, the Weather Research ...

Keith J. Harding; Peter K. Snyder

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Executive Director for Operations CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING SYSTEMS FOR BOILING WATER REACTORS WITH MARK I AND MARK II CONTAINMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information, options, and a recommendation from the NRC staff to impose new requirements for containment venting systems for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. This paper is provided in response to the Commission’s staff requirements memorandum (SRM) for SECY-11-0137, “Prioritization of Recommended Actions To Be

R. W. Borchardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Shallow gas off the Rhone prodelta, Gulf of Lions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in press. What controls shallow gas in Western Adriatic Sea?L. , Arntsen, B. , 2003. Gas chimneys – indicating aseismic maping of shallow gas in the Belgian coastal zone.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Shallow...

158

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

159

Part II: Potential Usefullness of Antitranspirants for Increasing Water Use Efficiency in Plants: Applied Investigations with Antitranspirants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fruit (Figure 34). Water intake was not curtailed bya 50% retardation in water intake to the fruit, the actualsystems the greatest water intake was by fruit not treated

Davenport, David C; Martin, Paul E; Hagan, Robert M; Fisher, Mary Ann

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part II: Land-Characteristic Contributions to Spatial Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land water and energy balances vary around the globe because of variations in amount and temporal distribution of water and energy supplies and because of variations in land characteristics. The former control (water and energy supplies) explains ...

P. C. D. Milly; A. B. Shmakin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optical Depth Measurements of Aerosol Cloud, and Water Vapor Using Sun Photometers during FIRE Cirrus IFO II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depths in the visible to infrared spectral region were obtained from solar extinction measurements with two sun photometers during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment Phase II Cirrus Intensive Field Observation in Kansas.

Masataka Shiobara; James D. Spinhirne; Akihiro Uchiyama; Shoji Asano

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nature versus Nurture in Shallow Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracers are used in a large-eddy simulation of shallow convection to show that stochastic entrainment (and not cloud-base properties) determines the fate of convecting parcels. The tracers are used to diagnose the correlations between a parcel’s ...

David M. Romps; Zhiming Kuang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ (approximately 10/sup 5/ MBtu) annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.V.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.F.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid...

166

Shallow magma targets in the western US  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the next few years a hole will be drilled into a shallow magma body in the western US for the purpose of evaluating the engineering feasibility of magma energy. This paper examines potential drilling sites for these engineering feasibility experiments. Target sites high on the list are ones that currently exhibit good geophysical and geological data for shallow magma and also have reasonable operational requirements. Top ranked sites for the first magma energy well are Long Valley, CA, and Coso/Indian Wells, CA. Kilauea, HI, also in the top group, is an attractive site for some limited field experiments. A number of additional sites offer promise as eventual magma energy sites, but sparsity of geophysical data presently prevents these sites from being considered for the first magma energy well.

Hardee, H.C.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

South Dakota shallow gas hunt heats up  

SciTech Connect

As the search for shallow gas reserves in South Dakota intensifies, most of the exploratory drilling activity is concentrating along the Camp Crook anticline in the northwestern part of the state, where large amounts of gas could be locked in shallow, low-pressure sands. Gas production found in 1977 in the Cretaceous Shannon of the West Short Pine hills field in Harding Co. set off the current gas play. Drilling reports now list some 28 wells in that section of the state, mostly in Harding Co. Previous drilling - notably at the Ardmore gas field in southwestern South Dakota in the 1940s - failed to initiate any exploratory plays. The state remains one of the most undrilled prospective hydrocarbon regions in the US. South Dakota's Cretaceous section is similar to that in Wyoming, where the Dakota and Muddy sandstones are important producers. Numerous sites for exploratory wells lie in the Powder River, Kennedy, and Williston basins.

McCaslin, J.C.

1981-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Shallow infiltration processes in arid watersheds at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was developed for use in hydrologic flow models to characterize net infiltration (the penetration of the wetting front below the zone influenced by evapotranspiration). The model categorizes the surface of the site into four infiltration zones. These zones were identified as ridgetops, sideslopes, terraces, and active channels on the basis of water-content changes with depth and time. The maximum depth of measured water-content change at a specific site is a function of surface storage capacity, the timing and magnitude of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and the degree of saturation of surficial materials overlying fractured bedrock. Measured water-content profiles for the four zones indicated that the potential for net infiltration is higher when evapotranspiration is low (i.e winter, cloudy periods), where surface concentration of water is likely to occur (i.e. depressions, channels), where surface storage capacity is low, and where fractured bedrock is close to the surface.

Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L. Hevesi, J.A. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part II: Assessing the ECMWF Humidity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent publication (Part I), the authors introduced a data source—Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC)—for monitoring and studying upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) and analyzed 10 yr (1994–2004) of ...

Zhengzhao Luo; Dieter Kley; Richard H. Johnson; Herman Smit

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Jupiter's Great Red Spot as a Shallow Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most current models of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) are cast in terms of a two-layer model, where a thin upper weather layer, which contains the vortex, overlies a much deeper layer, which is meant to represent the neutrally stratified deep ...

Timothy E. Dowling; Andrew P. Ingersoll

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Acoustics 2000 1 Acoustic Propagation Prediction in Shallow Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experiment location. Light bulbs in particular have been the topic of interest as an implosive underwater) will be lost to an absorptive seabed. The results of the propagation measurements performed using light bulbs were a 20-cui air gun and imploding sources comprising 60W and 75W light globes and purpose built

172

Radiometric and photometric determinations of simulated shallow-water environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical remote sensing is increasingly becoming a preferred economic alternative to the traditional in situ observations and physical sampling for mapping and monitoring habitats. Submersed habitats, such as eelgrass and ...

Shachak Pe'eri, Glenn Shwaery

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Tropical Squall Line Observed during the COPT 81 Experiment in West Africa. Part II: Water Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative contributions of the different processes involved in the water budget of the 22 June 1981 tropical squall line are investigated. The kinematic and thermodynamic fields derived from Doppler radar data are used to calculate the sources ...

Michel Chong; Daniele Hauser

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

175

Droplet Growth in Warm Water Clouds Observed by the A-Train. Part II: A Multisensor View  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrometeor droplet growth processes are inferred from a combination of Aqua/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud particle size observations and CloudSat/Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) observations of warm water clouds. This ...

Takashi Y. Nakajima; Kentaroh Suzuki; Graeme L. Stephens

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part II: Airborne-to-Airborne Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dataset of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) gives the first opportunity for direct intercomparisons of airborne water vapor lidar systems and allows very important conclusions to be drawn for future field campaigns. Three airborne ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Thorsten Schaberl; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; Cyrille Flamant; Susan Kooi; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Edward V. Browell; David N. Whiteman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wagner, K.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Putative Liquid-Liquid Transition is a Liquid-Solid Transition in Atomistic Models of Water, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and arXiv:1107.0337v2]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, SW silicon and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate u...

Limmer, David T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Putative Liquid-Liquid Transition is a Liquid-Solid Transition in Atomistic Models of Water, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and arXiv:1107.0337v2]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, SW silicon and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative nonequilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

David T. Limmer; David Chandler

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...

182

PNNL offers 'virtual tour' of Shallow Underground Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNNL offers 'virtual tour' of Shallow Underground Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

183

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid...

184

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

HEAVY-WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTORS ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS. VOLUME II. ENGINEERING STUDIES AND TECHNICAL DATA  

SciTech Connect

The results of preliminary design and evaluation studies of various concepts of a power reactor that is moderated by heavy water and fueled with natural uranium are presented. Twenty-nine conceptal designs were developed for reactors ranging in capacity from 100 Mwe to 460 Mwe. Resigns were prepared for hot- and cold-moderator reac tors of the pressure vessel type, with liquid D/sub 2/O, boiling D/sub 2/O, E/sub 2/O steam, and helium as coolants. Also studied were cold-moderator pressure tube reactors cooled with liquid D/sub 2/O and boiling D/sub 2/O. The repont includes the results of engineering studies of the reactor systems, electrical generation facilities, and auxiliary equipment. (auth)

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART II. ECONOMIC POTENTIAL AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. HEAVY WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The reactor design which forms the base for the current economic status of D/sub 2/O-moderated reactors was estimated from developments in several reactor programs. However, since a heavy water-moderated reactor was not operated on natural U fuel at power reactor conditions, considerable improvement from this current status can be foreseen. A summary of improvements is presented concerning the concept which would result solely from operation of succeeding generation plants without a parallel development program, and improvements which would result from the successful completion of the development program as presented. One plant size was used in the evaluation of plant potential, with a 300 Mw/sub e/ nominal rating. The boiling D/sub 2/O-cooled, pressure tube direct cycle plant design was used. The current development program is outlined; this work includes several items leading to the long-range development of the concept. (auth)

Hutton, J.H.; Davis, S.A.; Graves, C.C.; Duffy, J.G. comps.

1960-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Author Richard Zehner Organization U.S. Department of Energy Published U.S. Department of Energy, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Citation Richard Zehner (U.S. Department of Energy). 2010. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously

188

Participation of Glutamate-354 of the CP43 Polypeptide in the Ligation of Mn and the Binding of Substrate Water in Photosystem II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current X-ray crystallographic structural models of photosystem II, Glu354 of the CP43 polypeptide is the only amino acid ligand of the oxygen-evolving Mn4Ca cluster that is not provided by the D1 polypeptide. To further explore the influence of this structurally unique residue on the properties of the Mn4Ca cluster, the CP43-E354Q mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was characterized with a variety of biophysical and spectroscopic methods, including polarography, EPR, X-ray Absorption, FTIR, and mass spectrometry. The kinetics of oxygen release in the mutant were essentially unchanged from those in wild-type. In addition, the oxygen flash-yields exhibited normal period-four oscillations having normal S state parameters, although the yields were lower, correlating with the mutant?s lower steady-state rate (approx. 20percent compared to wild-type). Experiments conducted with H218O showed that the fast and slow phases of substrate water exchange in CP43-E354Q thylakoid membranes were accelerated 8.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively, in the S3 state compared to wild-type. Purified oxygen-evolving CP43-E354Q PSII core complexes exhibited a slightly altered S1 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum, a slightly altered S2 state multiline EPR signal, a substantially altered S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum, and an unusually long lifetime for the S2 state (> 10 hours) in a substantial fraction of reaction centers. In contrast, the S2 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum was nearly indistinguishable from that of wild-type. The S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum showed alterations throughout the amide and carboxylate stretching regions. Global labeling with 15N and specific labeling with L-[1-13C]alanine revealed that the mutation perturbs both amide II and carboxylate stretching modes and shifts the symmetric carboxylate stretching modes of the ?-COO? group of D1-Ala344 (the C-terminus of the D1 polypeptide) to higher frequencies by 3 ? 4 cm-1 in both the S1 and S2 states. The EPR and FTIR data implied that 76 -82 percent of CP43-E354Q PSII centers can achieve the S2 state and that most of these can achieve the S3 state, but no evidence for advancement beyond the S3 state was observed in the FTIR data, at least not in a majority of PSII centers. Although the X-ray absorption and EPR data showed that the CP43-E354Q mutation only subtly perturbs the structure and spin state of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S2 state, the FTIR and H218O exchange data show that the mutation strongly influences other properties of the Mn4Ca cluster, altering the response of numerous carboxylate and amide groups to the increased positive charge that develops on the cluster during the S1 to S2 transition and weakening the binding of both substrate water molecules (or water derived ligands), especially the one that exchanges rapidly in the S3 state. The FTIR data provide evidence that CP43-Glu354 coordinates to the Mn4Ca cluster in the S1 state as a bridging ligand between two metal ions, but provide no compelling evidence that this residue changes its coordination mode during the S1 to S2 transition. The H218O exchange data provide evidence that CP43-Glu354 interacts with the Mn ion that ligates the substrate water molecule (or water-derived ligand) that is in rapid exchange in the S3 state.

Service, Rachel; Yano, Junko; McConnell, Iain; Hwang, Hong Jin; Niks, Dimitri; Hille, Russ; Wydrzynski, Tom; Burnap, Robert; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code  

SciTech Connect

PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe demonstrating the feasibility of measuring soil thermal diffusivity at the time the 2-m temperatures are recorded. This opens the way for operational shallow temperature surveys in areas which do not have, as at Coso, a simple set of surface conditions. It is concluded that making useful shallow temperature measurements where there is a modest amount of ground water flow need not be a hopeless task.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.; Lewellen, R.I.; O'Hara, N.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we added numerical solution along streamline subroutines to our streamline compositional simulator. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We studied the wettability of the reservoir oil and formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The effect of new relative permeability formulations on a five-spot pattern WAG recovery was evaluated. Effect of horizontal wells on pattern sweep has been initiated. A model quarter five-spot experiment is being designed. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, evaluation of complex well-architecture and design of model quarter five-spot experiment.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Abstract The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy has been working on improvements in shallow (two-meter) temperature surveys in two areas: overcoming limitations posed by difficult ground conditions with the use of a portable rock drill, and improvements in temperature measurements and interpretations Previous 2-meter temperature surveys conducted by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy have been limited to areas that were not excessively rocky. This limitation has been overcome by the use of a

195

Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mixing in Shallow Cumulus Clouds Studied by Lagrangian Particle Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing between shallow cumulus clouds and their environment is studied using large-eddy simulations. The origin of in-cloud air is studied by two distinct methods: 1) by analyzing conserved variable mixing diagrams (Paluch diagrams) and 2) by ...

Thijs Heus; Gertjan van Dijk; Harm J. J. Jonker; Harry E. A. Van den Akker

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ranging Through Shallow Semitransparent Media with Polarization Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to shallow depth measurement (< 2 m) using polarization lidar is presented. The transmitter consists of a 532 nm linearly polarized laser coupled with conditioning and polarization optics. The prototype lidar evaluates the differing ...

Steven E. Mitchell; Jeffrey P. Thayer

198

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley...

199

Entrainment in Shallow Rotating Gravity Currents: A Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of shallow gravity currents passing through a rotating channel at subcritical Froude number is investigated here with a series of idealized numerical experiments. It is found that the combined effects of friction and rotation set up a ...

Lars Umlauf; Lars Arneborg; Richard Hofmeister; Hans Burchard

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Surface energy balance and buoyancy response to shallow cumulus shading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions surrounding the coupling between surface energy balance and a boundary layer with shallow cumuli are investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s large eddy simulation code coupled to the NOAH land surface ...

Fabienne Lohou; Edward G. Patton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiation Damping of Shallow Foundations on Nonlinear Soil Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the reduction of radiation damping due to soil yielding.since the reduced radiation damping at foundation level will2007 Paper No. 1150 RADIATION DAMPING OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS

Zhang, Jian; Tang, Yuchuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of Parametric Assumptions for Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-eddy simulation (LES) model has been utilized to study nonprecipitating Shallow Convective clouds such as observed during the undisturbed BOMEX period in the trade wind areas. By choosing a realistic large-scale forcing the authors have ...

A. P. Siebesma; J. W. M. Cuijpers

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effectiveness of shallow temperature surveys to target a geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has used to delineate thermal anomalies at many sites, has already identified a shallow steam-heated thermal anomaly at McGee Mountain. The second innovative technology, the...

204

Relations between Precipitation and Shallow Groundwater in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical relationships between monthly precipitation (P) and shallow groundwater levels (GW) in 20 wells scattered across Illinois with data for 1960–84 were defined using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) modeling. A lag of ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Floyd A. Huff; Chin-Fei Hsu

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

What Controls the Vertical Extent of Continental Shallow Cumulus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what controls the vertical extent of shallow cumulus. Higher boundary-layer relative humidity is found on thick-cloud days, associated with large-scale moisture advection before...

206

An integrated architecture for shallow and deep processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an architecture for the integration of shallow and deep NLP components which is aimed at flexible combination of different language technologies for a range of practical current and future applications. In particular, we describe the integration ...

Berthold Crysmann; Anette Frank; Bernd Kiefer; Stefan Müller; Günter Neumann; Jakub Piskorski; Ulrich Schäfer; Melanie Siegel; Hans Uszkoreit; Feiyu Xu; Markus Becker; Hans-Ulrich Krieger

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Simple Parameterization for Detrainment in Shallow Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a wide range of shallow cumulus convection cases, large-eddy simulation (LES) model results have been used to investigate lateral mixing as expressed by the fractional entrainment and fractional detrainment rates. It appears that the ...

Wim C. de Rooy; A. Pier Siebesma

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Rain in Shallow Cumulus Over the Ocean: The RICO Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow, maritime cumuli are ubiquitous over much of the tropical oceans, and characterizing their properties is important to understanding weather and climate. The Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during ...

Robert M. Rauber; Harry T. Ochs III; L. Di Girolamo; S. Göke; E. Snodgrass; Bjorn Stevens; Charles Knight; J. B. Jensen; D. H. Lenschow; R. A. Rilling; D. C. Rogers; J. L. Stith; B. A. Albrecht; P. Zuidema; A. M. Blyth; C. W. Fairall; W. A. Brewer; S. Tucker; S. G. Lasher-Trapp; O. L. Mayol-Bracero; G. Vali; B. Geerts; J. R. Anderson; B. A. Baker; R. P. Lawson; A. R. Bandy; D. C. Thornton; E. Burnet; J-L. Brenguier; L. Gomes; P. R. A. Brown; P. Chuang; W. R. Cotton; H. Gerber; B. G. Heikes; J. G. Hudson; P. Kollias; S. K. Krueger; L. Nuijens; D. W. O'Sullivan; A. P. Siebesma; C. H. Twohy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NREL: Learning - Solar Hot Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water Hot Water Photo of solar collectors on a roof for a solar hot water system. For solar hot water systems, flat-plate solar collectors are typically installed facing south on a rooftop. The shallow water of a lake is usually warmer than the deep water. That's because the sunlight can heat the lake bottom in the shallow areas, which in turn, heats the water. It's nature's way of solar water heating. The sun can be used in basically the same way to heat water used in buildings and swimming pools. Most solar water heating systems for buildings have two main parts: a solar collector and a storage tank. The most common collector is called a flat-plate collector. Mounted on the roof, it consists of a thin, flat, rectangular box with a transparent cover that faces the sun. Small tubes

210

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by anDerived from In Situ Oil Shale Processing", Proceedings, 2ndWastewaters Sour Waters from Oil Shale Retorting Sour Waters

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was conducted to help understand a premature and irregular water breakthrough which resulted from a waterflooding project in the increment II region of Haradh oilfield in Saudi Arabia using different geophysical methods. Oil wells cannot sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI), walkaround vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and cross-dipole shear wave measurements were used to detect anisotropy caused by fractures near and far from the borehole. The results from all the different methods were analyzed to understand the possible causes of water fingering in the field and determine the reasons for discrepancies and similarities of results of the different methods. The study was done in wells located in the area of the irregular water encroachment in Haradh II oilfield. Waterflooding was performed, where water was injected in the water injector wells drilled at the flanks of Harahd II toward the oil producer wells. Unexpected water coning was noticed in the west flank of the field. While cross-dipole and SWI measurements of a small-scale clearly identify a fracture oriented N60E in the upper tight zone of the reservoir, the VSP measurements of a large-scale showed a dominating fracture system to the NS direction in the upper highpermeability zone of the same reservoir. These results are consistent with the directions of the three main fracture sets in the field at N130E, N80E and N20E, and the direction of the maximum horizontal stress in the field varies between N50E and N90E. Results suggested that the fracture which is detected by cross-dipole at 2 to 4 ft from the borehole is the same fracture detected by SWI 65 ft away from the borehole. This fracture was described using the SWI as being 110 ft from top to bottom, having an orientation of N60E and having an angle of dip of 12° relative to the vertical borehole axis. The detected fracture is located in the tight zone of the reservoir makes a path for water to enter the well from that zone. On the Other hand, the fractures detected by the large-scale VSP measurements in the NS direction are responsible for the high-permeability in the upper zone of the reservoir.

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Combined characteristics and finite volume methods for sediment transport and bed morphology in surface water flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: We propose a new numerical method for solving the equations of coupled sediment transport and bed morphology by free-surface water flows. The mathematical formulation of these models consists of the shallow water equations for the hydraulics, ... Keywords: Bed morphology, Finite volume scheme, Method of characteristics, Sediment transport, Shallow water equations

Fayssal Benkhaldoun; Mohammed Seaïd

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semi-annual technical report Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for

215

Localization of shallow gas deposits and uncontrolled gas flows in young and unconsolidated sediments by geophysical methods  

SciTech Connect

The great mass of Neogene sediments in the Hungarian basin, where several hydrocarbon accumulations are known, is affected by Pliocene strike-slip movements, resulting in many [open quotes]flower structures.[close quotes] The gas may migrate from the reservoirs upward to the surface along the faults. Thus, shallow gas deposits can be located in the young, unconsolidated sands. There are also several shallow gas deposits derived from uncontrolled gas flows. In Hungary, the shallow gas reservoirs, which are small but increasingly important, have not yet been explored properly. However, the depleting gas may pollute the water in the soil as well as cause explosions. Our purpose is to develop inexpensive, complete, and highly sophisticated field- and data-processing techniques and an integrated complex of geophysical methods in order to define the limits of shallow gas deposits. To avoid anomalous behavior on seismic sections of the depleting gas, we started from uncontrolled gas flows which require special velocity and amplitude vs. offset analyses. In addition, natural and controlled source electromagnetic/electric surveys with various parameters were applied. An industrial-scale seismic section over an uncontrolled gas flow, special sections over flower structures and geoelectric sections, and a magnetic map are presented. The integrated complex of geophysical methods outlined above is being developed in order to establish the conditions for the exploration of gas reservoirs which have been used close to their locality and which could be recovered inexpensively.

Csoergei, J.; Kummer, I.; Papa, A.; Sipos, J.; Solyom, I.; Takacs, E.; Timar, Z. (Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)); Keresztes, T. (MOL RT, Budapest (Hungary))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

U.S. DEP.'\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'\RTMENT OF ENERGY '\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :Freshwater Wind I. lLC PROJECT TITLE: Shallow Water Offshore Wind System Optimization for the Great Lakes Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instl"ument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA.Q000415 DE-EEOOOO5488 GFO-OOO5488-001 0 Based on my nview or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SUA),. have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathertng, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site Visits, and audits). data analysis

217

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

218

IIS5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1) enabled/disabled, (1) Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager GUI: Right Click on Server > Properties > Home Directory tab > Read, Chapter 2 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. Coreflood, quarter 5-spot study, compositional simulation, wettability, relative permeability study and streamline-based simulation were conducted in this project. 1D compositional simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the slim tube experiments. Injection of CO{sub 2}-NGL is preferable over that of PBG-NGL. MME is sensitive to pressure (in the range of 1300-1800 psi) for the injection of PBG-NGL, but not for CO{sub 2}-NGL. Three hydrocarbon phases form in this pressure range. As the mean thickness of the adsorbed organic layer on minerals increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The adsorbed organic films left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil implying that asphaltenes are responsible for the mixed-wettability in this reservoir. A new relative permeability model for a four-phase, mixed-wet system has been proposed. A streamline module is developed which can be incorporated in an existing finite-difference based compositional simulator to model water flood, gas flood and WAG flood. Horizontal wells increase well deliverability over vertical wells, but sweep efficiency can decrease. The well performance depends on the well length, position, heterogeneity, and viscosity ratio. The productivity increase due to electromagnetic heating is a function of power intensity, flow rate, and frequency etc. The productivity of a well can be doubled by electromagnetic heating. A high-pressure quarter 5-spot model has been constructed to evaluate the sweep efficiency of miscible WAG floods. WAG displacement reduces bypassing compared to gas floods and improves oil recovery in cores. As the WAG ratio decreased and slug size increased, oil recovery increased. Oil was recovered faster with increased slug size and decreased WAG ratio in the simulations for field cases studied.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mixing on a Shallow Shelf of the Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure measurements were carried out on the shallow shelf of the Black Sea, from the sea surface to the bottom, using a free-falling BAKLAN-S profiler released from an anchored ship. A northeast to southwest transect consisting of eight ...

I. D. Lozovatsky; H. J. S. Fernando

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Shallow syntax analysis in Sanskrit guided by semantic nets constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the state of the art of a computational platform for the analysis of classical Sanskrit. The platform comprises modules for phonology, morphology, segmentation and shallow syntax analysis, organized around a structured lexical database. It ... Keywords: Sanskrit parser, computational linguistic, natuaral language processing, semantic net, syntax analysis

Gérard Huet

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

What Controls the Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a 2D cloud-system-resolving model (CSRM) is used to assess the control mechanism for the transition from shallow to deep convection in the diurnal cycle over land. By comparing with a 3D CSRM under conditions taken from the Large-...

Chien-Ming Wu; Bjorn Stevens; Akio Arakawa

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Influence of Wind Speed on Shallow Marine Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of wind speed on shallow marine cumulus convection is explored using large-eddy simulations and concepts from bulk theory. Focusing on cases characteristic of the trades, the equilibrium trade wind layer is found to be deeper at stronger ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Echo Size Distribution of Precipitating Shallow Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S-band radar surveillance scans of precipitating shallow convection are analyzed. The scans are complied from 52 days of near-continuous measurements in the winter trades of the North Atlantic during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) ...

Panu Trivej; Bjorn Stevens

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Development Practices for Optimized MEOR in Shallow Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas using a combination of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and hydraulic fracturing of vertical wells.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dynamics of Rotating Shallow Gravity Currents Passing through a Channel. Part II: Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of frictional control for channelized rotating gravity currents are analyzed using an extensive dataset including hydrographic, current, and microstructure measurements from the western Baltic Sea. Rotational effects in these gravity ...

Lars Umlauf; Lars Arneborg

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ISLSCP II Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISLSCP II The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project, Initiative II (ISLSCP II) Overview ISLSCP II Logo The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology...

228

Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D8): Yeh PJ and Eltahir EAB, “Representation of Water TableYeh and Eltahir, 2005; Fan et al, 2007). Additionally, waterYeh and Eltahir (2005) addressed errors in predicted land surface fluxes especially for shallow water

Rihani, Jehan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interactions between Shallow and Deep Convection under a Finite Departure from Convective Quasi Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper presents a simple theory for the transformation of nonprecipitating, shallow convection into precipitating, deep convective clouds. To make the pertinent point a much idealized system is considered, consisting only of shallow and ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Robert Plant

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A New Bulk Shallow-Cumulus Model and Implications for Penetrative Entrainment Feedback on Updraft Buoyancy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new refinement of Albrecht et al.’s bulk model for shallow-cumulus convection is presented. It is used to illuminate fundamental aspects of oceanic shallow-cumulus boundary layer structure, including updraft buoyancy and vertical velocity ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Sungsu Park

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Closer Look at Chaotic Advection in the Stratosphere. Part II: Statistical Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical diagnostics of mixing and transport are computed for a numerical model of forced shallow-water flow on the sphere and a middle-atmosphere general circulation model. In particular, particle dispersion statistics, transport fluxes, ...

Keith Ngan; Theodore G. Shepherd

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tropical Ocean Decadal Variability and Resonance of Planetary Wave Basin Modes. Part II: Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanic response to stochastic wind forcing is studied in a tropical–extratropical basin using two shallow water models: a periodically forced model and a time-forward model. Consistent with theory, extratropical stochastic wind forces a decadal ...

Haijun Yang; Zhengyu Liu; Qiong Zhang

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

234

Shallow horizontal drilling in unconsolidated sands offshore California  

SciTech Connect

Four shallow horizontal wells were drilled from Platform C in Dos Cuadras field offshore California to recover reserves inaccessible with conventional drilling techniques. The wells had true vertical depths (TVD's) ranging from 746 to 989 ft with total horizontal displacements from 1,613 to 3,788 ft. The wells had horizontal displacement TVD ratios up to 3.95. The targets were unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. This paper details well planning, drilling, and completion.

Payne, J.D.; Bunyak, M.J. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Huston, C.W. (Smith International Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Characteristics and Distribution of Cloud Water over the Mountains of Northern Colorado during Wintertime Storms. Part II: Spatial Distribution and Microphysical Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Physical and microphysical structure of the supercooled water fields in wintertime storms over the Park Range of the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains is examined using aircraft and ground-based measurements. Cloud top, cloud base, and zones ...

Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

present gases, the shale decompose and oil, residual areupgrade oil derived from oil-shale and tar sands are similarof Economic Materials from Oil Shale Retort Water by an

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of Interior Circulation in a High-Resolution Global Ocean Model. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Intermediate, Mode, and Thermocline Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution, offline ocean general circulation model, incorporating a realistic parameterization of mixed layer convection, is used to diagnose pathways and time scales of Southern Hemisphere intermediate, mode, and lower thermocline water ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Matthew H. England

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex: Stable isotope evidence for shallow emplacement into Archean ocean crust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios indicate that unusual rocks at the upper contact of the Archean Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex at Fiskenaesset Harbor (southwest Greenland) are the products of hydrothermal alteration by seawater at the time of anorthosite intrusion. Subsequent granulite-facies metamorphism of these Ca-poor and Al- and Mg-rich rocks produced sapphirine- and kornerupine-bearing assemblages. Because large amounts of surface waters cannot penetrate to depths of 30 km during granulite-facies metamorphism, the isotopic signature of the contact rocks must have been obtained prior to regional metamorphism. The stable isotope and geochemical characteristics of the contact rocks support a model of shallow emplacement into Archean ocean crust for the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Peck, W.H.; Valley, J.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modelling the fate and transport of negatively buoyant storm-river water in small multi-basin lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of negatively buoyant river plumes in a small multi-basin kettle lake with steep bathymetry (Toolik Lake, AK) are simulated using a Cartesian hydrodynamic model based on the solution of the three-dimensional shallow water equations. To validate ... Keywords: Flow paths, Lakes, River, Shallow water models

Francisco J. Rueda; Sally MacIntyre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Flow measurement and characterization in shallow geothermal systems used for downhole heat exchanger applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the largest non-electrical application of geothermal energy presently occurring in the United States, over 400 relatively shallow wells are being used for extraction of energy with downhole heat exchangers. Despite this large amount of application, the exact nature of the flows in the wells has not before been characterized. Knowledge to date on the nature of flows in the systems is summarized, and an ongoing experimental program for making appropriate downhole measurements to determine flows is described in detail. Flow characterization was a principal object of this study. Horizontal cross-flows of geothermal fluid may occur at upper and/or lower levels in the well where perforations in the well casing are situated. In addition, natural convection may induce vertical flows within the well casing which would be influenced by the presence or absence of a heat exchanger. Three main aspects of the experimental program are reported on: (i) a review of potentially applicable methods for measuring vertical and horizontal flows in wells, (ii) the limitations and preliminary results of using a vane anemometer for measuring vertical flows, and (iii) the description of the selected hot-film probe, its associated pressurized calibration facility, and means of making well measurements.

Churchill, D.; Culver, G.G.; Reistad, G.M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Low-threshold Analysis of CDMS Shallow-site Data  

SciTech Connect

Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Akerib, D.S.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Attisha, M.J.; /Brown U.; Baudis, L.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Bolozdynya, A.I.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Brink, P.L.; /SLAC; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Caldwell, D.O.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Chang, C.L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Clarke, R.M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Cooley, J.; /Southern Methodist U.; Crisler, M.B.; /Fermilab; Cushman, P.; /Minnesota U.; DeJongh, F.; /Fermilab; Dixon, R.; /Fermilab; Driscoll, D.D.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Filippini, J.; /Caltech; Funkhouser, S.; /UC, Berkeley; Gaitskell, R.J.; /Brown U.; Golwala, S.R.; /Caltech /Fermilab /Fermilab /Colorado U., Denver /Case Western Reserve U. /Texas A-M /Minnesota U. /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Minnesota U. /Queen's U., Kingston /Minnesota U. /St. Olaf Coll. /Florida U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Texas A-M /UC, Santa Barbara /Syracuse U. /UC, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Case Western Reserve U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Fermilab /Santa Clara U.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

A low-threshold analysis of CDMS shallow-site data  

SciTech Connect

Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 keV and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 GeV/c{sup 2} and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Akerib, D.S.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Attisha, M.J.; /Brown U.; Baudis, L.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Bolozdynya, A.I.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Brink, P.L.; /SLAC; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Caldwell, D.O.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Chang, C.L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Clarke, R.M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Southern Methodist U.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

246

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Abstract N/A Author V. J. S. Grauch Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2002 Report Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Citation V. J. S. Grauch. 2002. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada. (!) : U.S. Geological Survey. Report No.: 02-384. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=High-Resolution_Aeromagnetic_Survey_to_Image_Shallow_Faults,_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field,_Nevada&oldid=682601"

247

Gap Winds in a Fjord. Part II: Hydraulic Analog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple shallow-water model of gap wind in a channel that is based upon hydraulic theory is presented and compared with observations and output from a 3D mesoscale numerical model. The model is found to be successful in simulating gap winds. The ...

Peter L. Jackson; D. G. Steyn

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Self-adaptive methods for acoustic focusing and mode extraction in a shallow ocean waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 Time-reversal in the shallow ocean . . . . . .applications versus ocean acoustic SONAR and communicationsH. Schmidt, Computational Ocean Acoustics, (AIP New York,

Walker, Shane C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Ecosystem Standards and Planning Biodiversity BranchThis page has been intentionally left blank ii Preface Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

British Columbia is recognized globally for its exceptional wildlife, diversity of ecosystems, and rich natural resources. The Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection (WLAP) works to maintain these valuable natural assets, which lie at the heart of many recreational and economic activities enjoyed by British Columbians in all regions of the province. The Ministry has responsibility for the protection and stewardship of British Columbia’s environment. To fulfil this responsibility, it develops policy and legislation, regulations, codes of practice, environmental contracts and covenants (legal agreements). It also monitors and reports on selected species and habitats, as well as acquires information on habitat and species health. It sets science- and results-based objectives and standards and provides best practices for activities that affect our environment. Together, clear goals and objectives, meaningful performance measures and science-based tools guide Ministry actions in improving environmental management. Regulatory frameworks allow headquarters and regional staff to

Instream Works

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Second technical report Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe

251

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

252

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

253

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from...

254

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Search for shallow magma accumulations at Augustine Volcano  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A search was made for shallow magma accumulations beneath Augustine Volcano using primarily three geophysical techniques: (1) temperature and heat flow measurements, (2) active and passive seismic refraction, and (3) three-dimensional modeling of aeromagnetic data. With these studies it was hoped to gain insight into the interval structure of Augustine Volcano, to delineate, if possible, the size and shape of near surface magma bodies and to assess the potential of the volcano as a natural laboratory for hot rock and magma geothermal energy research. Augustine was chosen because it is a very young and very active volcano with several historic eruptions in 1812, 1883, 1935, 1964/64. One of the main targets for the geophysical studies was a summit lava dome of about 0.05 km/sup 3/ volume, extruded in 1963/64 and suspected to still contain considerable residual heat, perhaps be still partially molten years after its intrusion. Five months after the field work in 1975 this dome was exploded in January 1976. One month later, a hot (about 650 to 800/sup 0/C) viscous dome was intruded into the January summit crater.

Kienle, J.; Lalla, D.J.; Pearson, C.F.; Barrett, S.A.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Improvement and Implementation of a Parameterization for Shallow Cumulus in the Global Climate Model ECHAM5-HAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transient shallow-convection scheme is implemented into the general circulation model ECHAM5 and the coupled aerosol model HAM, developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. The shallow-convection scheme is extended to take ...

Francesco A. Isotta; P. Spichtinger; U. Lohmann; K. von Salzen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Using Digital Cloud Photogrammetry to Characterize the Onset and Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection over Orography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated method for segmenting digital images of orographic cumulus and a simple metric for characterizing the transition from shallow to deep convection are presented. The analysis is motivated by the hypothesis that shallow convection ...

Joseph A. Zehnder; Liyan Zhang; Dianne Hansford; Anshuman Radzan; Nancy Selover; Constance M. Brown

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transport of point-source contaminant plumes across the estuarine transition zone. This paper presents at the site is impacted with dissolved-phase petroleum hydrocarbons, including the BTEX (benzene, toluene approximately 80 m from the river's edge. The plume follows an easterly flow path from the UST source

Clement, Prabhakar

260

Linear and Nonlinear Vortex Motion in an Asymmetric Balance Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work extends asymmetric balance (AB) theory to the beta plane (?-AB). The physical problem examined is the motion of a coherent vortex on a beta plane in a finite depth fluid in the absence of an environmental steering flow. A useful ...

Michael T. Montgomery; J. Dominique Möller; Christopher T. Nicklas

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Phase Space Volume Conservation under Space and Time Discretization Schemes for the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying concepts of analytical mechanics to numerical discretization techniques for geophysical flows has recently been proposed. So far, mostly the role of the conservation laws for energy- and vorticity-based quantities has been discussed, but ...

Matthias Sommer; Sebastian Reich

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Broadband Acoustic Technique for Measuring Bubble Size Distributions: Laboratory and Shallow Water Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a broadband sound velocimeter that allows the simultaneous measurement of sound speed and attenuation over a wide range of frequencies is described. The velocimeter measures the attenuation and dispersion of a broadband ...

Eric J. Terrill; W. Kendall Melville

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Physically Consistent Formulation of Lateral Friction in Shallow-Water Equation Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissipation in numerical ocean models has two purposes: to simulate processes in which the friction is physically relevant and to prevent numerical instability by suppressing accumulation of energy in the smallest resolved scales. This study ...

Alexander F. Shchepetkin; James J. O'Brien

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Tracking Nonlinear Solutions with Simulated Altimetric Data in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-frequency variability of western boundary currents (WBCs) is pervasive in both observations and numerical models of the oceans. Because advection is of the essence in WBCs, nonlinearities are thought to be important in causing their ...

Shi Jiang; Michael Ghil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Numerical Investigation of the Stability of Isolated Shallow Water Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by observational data and recent numerical simulations showing that ageostrophic effects may play an important role in the dynamics and transport of large-scale vortices in the atmosphere and the oceans, the authors examine the ...

A. Stegner; D. G. Dritschel

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Method for Assimilating Lagrangian Data into a Shallow-Water-Equation Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian measurements provide a significant portion of the data collected in the ocean. Difficulties arise in their assimilation, however, since Lagrangian data are described in a moving frame of reference that does not correspond to the fixed ...

H. Salman; L. Kuznetsov; C. K. R. T. Jones; K. Ide

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Resonant Interaction between an Atmospheric Gravity Wave and Shallow Water Wave along Florida's West Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 25 March 1995, a large solitary wave, seemingly from nowhere, washed ashore along the normally tranquil Gulf Coast of Florida from Tampa Bay to south of Naples. On this Saturday morning, many beachgoers and coastal residents saw either a large ...

Charles H. Paxton; Daniel A. Sobien

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A shallow water model for dense gas simulation in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of toxic chemicals are stored at industrial facilities and transported around the country via train and truck. In the event of an accidental release, many of these chemicals are released as heavier-than-air gases that stay low to the ground as they are transported by the wind . Breathing height concentrations can remain high due to reduced vertical mixing and hazard zone coverage area can be larger due to near-source gravitational slumping . A number of fast-response dense gas dispersion models have been developed and are routinely used to deal with heavier-than-air releases over unobstructed terrain. If a release were to occur in a built-up environment, however, the effects of buildings and other obstacles will significantly alter the initial spreading, the transport direction, and the amount of mixing of the dense gas cloud . We have developed a new fast-running dense gas dispersion model that is intended for handling releases in cities and at large industrial facilities. In this paper we describe the scheme employed and how the model has been integrated into the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system.

Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Mike D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brambilla, Sara [POLITECNICO DI MILANO; Manca, Davide [POLITECNICO DI MILANO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Triggered Convection, Gravity Waves, and the MJO: A Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of intraseasonal variability in the tropics. Despite its primary importance, a generally accepted theory that accounts for fundamental features of the MJO, including its propagation speed, ...

Da Yang; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Abstract Presented at The Marine and Estuarine Shallow Water Science and Management Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction is emphasized as a way of obtaining adequate funding for infrastructure and operating costs during, NY 10007 K. W. Jones US Department of Energy - Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY 11973 K. R Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 A unique federal project aimed at the commercialization of different

Brookhaven National Laboratory

271

Evolution of the suborder Blennioidei : phylogeny and phylogeography of a shallow water fish clade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ronquist, F. 2001. MRBAYES: Bayesian inference of phylogeny.Bollback, J. P. 2001. Bayesian inference of phylogeny andRonquist, F. 2001. MRBAYES: Bayesian inference of phylogeny.

Lin, Hsiu-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

General Spectral Computations of the Nonlinear Shallow Water Tidal Interactions within the Bight of Abaco  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iterative frequency–time domain finite element tidal circulation model is applied to the Bight of Abaco in the Bahamas to study the nonlinear interactions that occur between the various astronomical, overtide and compound-tide constituents. ...

J. J. Westerink; K. D. Stolzenbach; J. J. Connor

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is complicated by quaternary deposits (including glacial and fluvial deposits), we use DC electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential mapping to identify preferential...

274

Dynamical Properties of Error Statistics in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical ocean diagnoses and predictions rely on two types of information: model information and data information. Sequential estimation theory shows that the most probable state is a linear combination of the two, weighted according to their ...

Shi Jiang; Michael Ghil

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Observations of Shallow-Water Transport and Shear in Western Florida Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) data are used to describe depth-integrated transport and vertical shear at two study sites along the open western boundary of Florida Bay. During a 404-day study period, transport was into the bay at the northern ...

Ned P. Smith

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Spectral Deferred Correction Method Applied to the Shallow Water Equations on a Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although significant gains have been made in achieving high-order spatial accuracy in global climate modeling, less attention has been given to the impact imposed by low-order temporal discretizations. For long-time simulations, the error ...

Jun Jia; Judith C. Hill; Katherine J. Evans; George I. Fann; Mark A. Taylor

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM). Part I: Shallow-Water Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM) has been developed to extend the capabilities of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to a global model domain. OLAM adopts many features of its predecessor, including physical parameterizations, ...

Robert L. Walko; Roni Avissar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stochastic data assimilation of the random shallow water model loads with uncertain experimental measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the estimation of a parametric probabilistic model of the random displacement source field at the origin of seaquakes in a given region. The observation of the physical effects induced by statistically independent realizations ... Keywords: Data assimilation, Maximum likelihood, Parametric estimation, Polynomial chaos, Stochastic inverse method

Lionel Mathelin; Christophe Desceliers; M. Yousuff Hussaini

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hierarchical Tropical Cloud Systems in an Analog Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations have revealed an hierarchy of cloud clusters and superclusters within the Madden-Julian oscillation of the equatorial troposphere. The authors here report on the results of simulations with a model based on a simple nonlinear ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; James C. McWilliams; Mitchell W. Moncrieff; Kerry A. Emanuel

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Factors Influencing Model Skill for Hindcasting Shallow Water Currents during Hurricane Andrew  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Andrew made landfall in the Gulf of Mexico after crossing directly over several moored current meter arrays deployed on the Louisiana–Texas shelf. The resulting three-dimensional current, temperature, and salinity time series are used ...

Timothy R. Keen; Scott M. Glenn

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A spectral deferred correction method applied to the shallow water equations on a sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although significant gains have been made to achieve high-order spatial accuracy in global climate modeling, less attention has been given to the impact imposed by low-order temporal discretizations. For long-time simulations, the error ...

Jun Jia; Judith C. Hill; Katherine J. Evans; George I. Fann; Mark A. Taylor

282

The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries  

SciTech Connect

To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and ‘‘tickler chain,’’ excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

284

A strip theory approximation for wave forces on submerged vehicles in finite depth water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) are becoming of increasing use in shallow waters for oceanographic data collection, coastal mapping, and military operations such as mine surveillance along enemy coastlines. Currently ...

Rybka Jan A. (Jan Andrzej)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

286

Boils and Turbulence in a Weakly Stratified Shallow Tidal Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbulence are made in a weakly but variably stratified region of tidal straining in the eastern Irish Sea using turbulence sensors profiling vertically through the water column on the Fast Light Yo-yo (FLY) profiler and ...

S. A. Thorpe; J. A. M. Green; J. H. Simpson; T. R. Osborn; W. A. M. Nimmo Smith

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles,

288

The Influence of Whitecapping Waves on the Vertical Structure of Turbulence in a Shallow Estuarine Embayment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate was measured using an array of four acoustic Doppler velocimeters in the shallow embayment of Grizzly Bay, San Francisco Bay, California. Owing to the combination of wind ...

Nicole L. Jones; Stephen G. Monismith

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Life Cycle of an Undular Bore and Its Interaction with a Shallow, Intense Cold Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of an undular bore and its associated wind shift, spawned by the passage of a shallow surface cold front over the Southern Great Plains of the United States, is examined using surface and remote sensing observations along with ...

Daniel C. Hartung; Jason A. Otkin; Jonathan E. Martin; David D. Turner

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Frontal Analysis in the Light of Abrupt Temperature Changes in a Shallow Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine selected cases of abrupt temperature changes in a shallow valley in rural Oklahoma and examine their wider associations. All changes in the valley, whether rise or fall, are accompanied by a northerly wind shift at or shortly ...

Frederick Sanders; Edwin Kessler

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Episodic Mixing and Buoyancy-Sorting Representations of Shallow Convection: A Diagnostic Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic mixing and buoyancy-sorting (EMBS) models have been proposed as a physically more realistic alternative to entraining plume models of cumulus convection. Applying these models to shallow nonprecipitating clouds requires assumptions about ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modeling Study of Ice Formation in Warm-Based Precipitating Shallow Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of large concentrations of ice particles in the dissipating stage of warm-based precipitating shallow cumulus clouds point to the limitations of scientists’ understanding of the physics of such clouds and the possible role of cloud ...

Jiming Sun; Parisa A. Ariya; Henry G. Leighton; Man Kong Yau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Numerical Simulation of Winter Cumulus Electrification. Part I: Shallow Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of electricity in a shallow wintertime cumulus was studied using an axisymmetric cloud model containing both microphysical and electrical charge separation processes during graupel formation. The charge separation mechanisms ...

Tsutomu Takahashi

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by scuba divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with a regulated filling ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Model Impacts of Entrainment and Detrainment Rates in Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass flux parameterization scheme for shallow cumulus convection is evaluated for a case based on observations and large eddy simulation (LES) results for the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX). The mass flux scheme is ...

A. P. Siebesma; A. A. M. Holtslag

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Size Distributions and Dynamical Properties of Shallow Cumulus Clouds from Aircraft Observations and Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper aircraft observations of shallow cumulus over Florida during the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study (SCMS) are analyzed. Size distributions of cloud fraction, mass flux, and in-cloud buoyancy flux are derived. These distributions ...

Stefaan M. A. Rodts; Peter G. Duynkerke; Harm J. J. Jonker

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Influence of Shallow Cumuli on Subcloud Turbulence Fluxes Analyzed from Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to improve understanding of shallow cumuli in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by quantitatively analysing subcloud turbulence variables. Aircraft turbulence data for three flights from the 1986 Hydrologic–...

Zekai Otles; John A. Young

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by SCUBA divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with regulated filling rate to ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

299

A Shallow-Convection Parameterization for Mesoscale Models. Part I: Submodel Description and Preliminary Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-convection parameterization suitable for both marine and continental regimes is developed for use in mesoscale models. The scheme is closely associated with boundary layer turbulence processes and can transition to either a deep-...

Aijun Deng; Nelson L. Seaman; John S. Kain

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Immobilization of 99-Technetium (VII) by Fe(II)-Goethite and Limited Reoxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesized goethite was successfully used with addition of Fe(II) to sequester Tc present in both deionized water and simulated off-gas scrubber waste solutions. Pertechnetate concentration in solution decreased immediately when the pH was raised above 7 by addition of sodium hydroxide. Removal of Tc(VII) from solution occurred most likely as a result of heterogeneous surface-catalyzed reduction to Tc(IV) and subsequent co-precipitation onto the goethite. The final Tc-bearing solid was identified as goethite-dominated Fe(III)-(oxy)hydroxide based on XRD analysis, confirming the widespread observation of its characteristic acicular habit by TEM/SEM images. Analysis of the solid precipitate by XAFS showed that the dominant oxidation state of Tc was Tc(IV) and was in octahedral coordination with Tc-O, Fe-O, and Tc-Fe bond distances that are consistent with direct substitution of Tc for Fe in the goethite structure. In some experiments the final Tc-goethite product was subsequently armored with additional layers of freshly precipitated goethite. Successful incorporation of Tc(IV) within the goethite mineral lattice and subsequent goethite armoring can limit re-oxidation of Tc(IV) and its subsequent release from Tc-goethite waste forms, even when the final product is placed in oxidizing environments that typify shallow waste burial facilities.

Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Steven, Smith C.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

From Tissues to Landscapes: How Thermal Physiology, Water Use, and Climate Influence Patterns of Landscape Use in Elephants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lowest value (resting), but water intake is limited to thatbehavioral option (Table 3). Water intake via food and drinkliterature (Appendix II). Water intake via food was coupled

Dunkin, Robin Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

305

Technical report for a fluidless directional drilling system demonstrated at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 shallow buried waste sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the research was to demonstrate a fluidless directional drilling and monitoring system (FDD) specifically tailored to address environmental drilling concerns for shallow buried wasted. The major concerns are related to worker exposure, minimizing waste generation, and confining the spread of contamination. The FDD is potentially applicable to Environmental Restoration (ER) activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 (WAG 6) shallow buried waste disposed in unlined trenches. Major ER activities for directional drilling are to develop a drilling system for leachate collection directly beneath trenches, and to provide localized control over leachate release to the environment. Other ER FDD activities could include vadose zone and groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport. The operational constraints pointed the research in the direction of purchasing a steerable impact hammer, or mole, manufactured by Steer-Rite Ltd. of Racine, Wisconsin. This drill was selected due to the very low cost ($25,000) associated with procuring the drill, steering module, instrumentation and service lines. The impact hammer is a self propelled drill which penetrates the soil by compacting cut material along the sidewalls of the borehole. Essentially, it forces its way through the subsurface. Although the pneumatic hammer exhausts compressed air which must be handled at the borehole collar, it does not generate soil cuttings or liquids. This is the basis for the term fluidless. A stub casing muffler was attached to the entrance hole for controlling exhaust gas and any airborne releases. Other environmental compliance modifications made to the equipment included operating the tool without lubrication, and using water instead of hydraulic fluid to actuate the steering fins on the tool.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III  

SciTech Connect

In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ~ 8, 14 and 20 Hz.

308

A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Spectral ratios of teleseismic direct and scattered P waves observed in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, show a systematic pattern of low amplitudes at sites inside the caldera relative to sites on or outside the ring fracture. Waveforms recorded at caldera stations are considerably more complex than those recorded outside the caldera. The data used in this study were collected during a passive seismic monitoring experiment conducted in 1987. Twenty-four teleseismic events were recorded on two

309

Local Mass Conservation and Velocity Splitting in PV-Based Balanced Models. Part II: Numerical Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of enforcing local mass conservation on the accuracy of non-Hamiltonian potential-vorticity- based balanced models (PBMs) are examined numerically for a set of chaotic shallow-water f-plane vortical flows in a doubly periodic square ...

Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; Michael E. McIntyre

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A method for filtering hot spring noise from shallow temperature gradient data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for separating shallow heat source effects from temperature gradient data is presented. The technique makes use of the depth dependent information available in the wave number spectrum of the gradient data. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated on a two-dimensional numerical model of a geothermal system containing a deep geothermal reservoir which is masked by a warm, shallow aquifer and a thermal spring. This geothermal system is representative of those found throughout the Basin and Range province. The resulting filtered gradients produce an excellent prediction of the temperatures in the modeled geothermal reservoir.

Li, T.M.C.; Chandler, C.A.; Ferguson, J.F.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Flume Studies of Sediment Transportation in Shallow Flow with Simulated Rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study involves four of the twelve major river basins of the state of Texas and is essentially a proposal to divert water from the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins. When first considered, it appears to be a rather unusual plan. It proposes to take water from the Red River at Lake Texoma, which is often of poor quality and in some areas of the basin scarce, and transport this water into a portion of the state that has an apparent abundance. There are, however, numerous advantages to this plan. First, a dependable supply of water Is made available to the upper reaches of the receiving basins without the cost of reservoir construction. It also creates a potential for peak period hydroelectric power generation and supplies the lower portion of the basins with an increased water supply which can be put to beneficial use. This may involve water quality control of municipal and industrial pollution, control of salt water intrusion, or redistribution. In an age of grandiose water supply schemes, e.g., the California Water Plan 2 and the preliminary Texas Water Plan,3 the cost of this proposal is very reasonable. Some of the disadvantages of this proposal are discussed briefly in the following paragraph. The Red River is an interstate stream; consequently, division of its waters among the states included in the basin must be by compact. Compact Commissioners representing the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana, with a chairman representing the Federal Government, have been negotiating a Red River Compact. Most of the details have been worked out and the draft of this agreement is being reviewed by federal and state agencies. The Red River Compact will then need approval by the legislatures of each of the states and by the Congress before it will become effective. Until final arrangements have been made concerning the allocation of water, the proposed diversion cannot legally be made. Since the quality of the Red River water has been poor much of the time, the Corps of Engineers has begun work to alleviate the natural salt pollution. The states concerned have agreed to aid the Federal Government by close control of manmade pollutants. The quality of the Red River water is dependent upon these control programs. Finally, the development of this plan would require revision of the master plans for the specific basins because a number of existing reservoirs would be affected. If for no other reason, this study and the evolved proposal have been valuable as a training program for use of the many recently developed water resources planning techniques. In order to insure a sense of direction, it seems apropos to present a brief outline of the study procedure. Chapter II, entitled, "The Economic Development and Potential for the Red, Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins," is a general discussion of the economic factors as they are related to demand for water in each basin. In addition to a statewide outlook, a separate discussion for each basin is presented which includes future population projections. In closing this chapter, a table of the anticipated municipal and industrial water requirements is presented. Careful consideration of the information in this chapter is necessary for any type of water resources planning. The largest section in this study is Chapter III, "The Water Resources of the Neches and Red River Basins." A comprehensive investigation of the water resources of all the basins in the proposal would have been desirable; however, the work required would have approached development of a master plan for a major portion of the state of Texas Detailed examination and research of the donating basin and for a single receiving basin was considered adequate for the objectives of this study. The specific subtopics which were discussed are too numerous to list here and are available in the Table of Contents section. Chapter IV, "The Proposed Physical Plan," contains a description of the diversion facilities required to t

Nail, F.M.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

313

Effect of irrigation water salinity and sodicity and water table position on water table chemistry beneath Atriplex lentiformis and Hordeum marinum  

SciTech Connect

Coal bed methane (CBM) extraction in Montana and Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) produces large quantities of modestly saline-sodic water. This study assessed effects of irrigation water quality and water table position on water chemistry of closed columns, simulating a perched or a shallow water table. The experiment assessed the potential salt loading in areas where shallow or perched water tables prevent leaching or where artificial drainage is not possible. Water tables were established in sand filled PVC columns at 0.38, 0.76, and1.14 m below the surface, after which columns were planted to one of three species, two halophytic Atriplex spp. and Hordeum marinum Huds. (maritime barley), a glycophyte. As results for the two Atriplex ssp. did not differ much, only results from Atriplex lentiformis (Torn) S. Wats. (big saltbush) and H. marinum are presented. Irrigation water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) (electrolytic conductivity (EC) = 0.19 Sm{sup -1}, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) = 3.5) or CBM water (EC = 0.35 Sm-1, SAR = 10.5). Continuous irrigation with CBM and PR water led to salt loading over time, the extent being proportional to the salinity and sodicity of applied water. Water in columns planted to A. lentiformis with water tables maintained at 0.38 m depth had greater EC and SAR values than those with 0.76 and 1.14 m water table positions. Elevated EC and SAR values most likely reflect the shallow rooted nature of A. lentiformis, which resulted in enhanced ET with the water table close to the soil surface.

Browning, L.S.; Bauder, J.W.; Phelps, S.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly the shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation in making the necessary corrections to the 2-m temperature data were considered. The corrected data for both locations have been plotted up by computer to avoid any personal bias, and have been compared with the published 10-m contour data at Long Valley and the 30-m contour data for Coso. Close geometrical similarity has been observed. Additionally, previously located faults have been identified with the shallow temperature survey technique. Due to the relative inexpensiveness of the technique, it was concluded that shallow temperature exploration should be one of the first geophysical surveys initiated at a geothermal prospect to help guide the development and expenditure of financial resources when embarking on a detailed exploration program.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for both locations have been plotted up by computer to avoid any personal bias, and have been compared with the published 10-m contour data at Long Valley and the 30-m contour data for Coso. Close geometrical similarity has been observed. Additionally, previously located faults were identified with the shallow temperature survey technique. Due to the relative inexpensiveness of this technique, it was concluded that shallow temperature exploration should be one of the first geophysical surveys initiated at a geothermal prospect to help guide the development and expenditure of financial resources when embarking on a detailed exploration program.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Middle Ground for Nuclear Waste Management: Social and Ethical Aspects of Shallow Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 terrorist attacks in the USA and the 2011 seismic events in Japan have brought into sharp relief the vulnerabilities involved in storing nuclear waste on the land's surface. Nuclear engineers and waste managers are deciding that disposing nuclear ... Keywords: Ethics, Inter-Generational Equity, Nuclear Waste, Shallow Storage, Waste Disposal

Alan Marshall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An Integrated Turbulence Scheme for Boundary Layers with Shallow Cumulus Applied to Pollutant Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme is described that provides an integrated description of turbulent transport in free convective boundary layers with shallow cumulus. The scheme uses a mass-flux formulation, as is commonly found in cumulus schemes, and a 1.5-order ...

Wayne M. Angevine

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dummy feature placement for chemical-mechanical polishing uniformity in a shallow trench isolation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturability of a design that is processed with shallow trench isolation (STI) depends on the uniformity of the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) step in STI. The CMP step in STI is a dual-material polish, for which all previous studies on dummy ...

Ruiqi Tian; Xiaoping Tang; D. F. Wong

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part I: Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a two-part series in which the life cycles of numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The life cycle data for six clouds with a range of cloud-top heights are isolated from an ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Impacts of Shallow Convection on MJO Simulation: A Moist Static Energy and Moisture Budget Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of shallow convection in Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) simulation is examined in terms of the moist static energy (MSE) and moisture budgets. Two experiments are carried out using the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.0 (CAM3.0)...

Qiongqiong Cai; Guang J. Zhang; Tianjun Zhou

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Using a shallow linguistic kernel for drug-drug interaction extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drug-drug interaction (DDI) occurs when one drug influences the level or activity of another drug. Information Extraction (IE) techniques can provide health care professionals with an interesting way to reduce time spent reviewing the literature for ... Keywords: Biomedical information extraction, Drug-drug interactions, Machine learning, MetaMap, Patient safety, Shallow linguistic kernel, Unified medical language system

Isabel Segura-Bedmar; Paloma MartíNez; Cesar De Pablo-SáNchez

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Submarine pingoes: Indicators of shallow gas hydrates in a pockmark at Nyegga, Norwegian Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forming and disintegrating gas hydrate pingoes on the seafloor. The two most important ones are believed also manifest the whereabouts of shallow gas hydrates. The pingoes emphasise the dynamic nature and removal of plugs. Proc. Conf. on Natural Gas Hydrates. Salt Lake City. Bates, R.L., Jackson, J.A., 1987

Svensen, Henrik

323

Multicomponent seismic data registration for subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gulf of Mexico Sergey Fomel, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Paul E. Murray, Bob A. Hardage with application to subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we extend-S images. Application of this technique to data from the Gulf of Mexico reveals the structure of sediments

Texas at Austin, University of

324

Steady-State Large-Eddy Simulations to Study the Stratocumulus to Shallow Cumulus Cloud Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a series of steady-state large-eddy simulations (LESs) to study the stratocumulus to shallow cumulus cloud transition. To represent the different stages of what can be interpreted as an Eulerian view of the transition, each ...

D. Chung; G. Matheou; J. Teixeira

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad hoc trigger function used in the Kain–Fritsch cumulus ...

Larry K. Berg; William I. Gustafson Jr.; Evgueni I. Kassianov; Liping Deng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad-hoc trigger function used in the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization with a trigger function related to the distribution of temperature and humidity in the convective boundary layer via probability density functions (PDFs). An additional modification to the default version of WRF is the computation of a cumulus cloud fraction based on the time scales relevant for shallow cumuli. Results from three case studies over the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma are presented. These days were selected because of the presence of shallow cumuli over the ARM site. The modified version of WRF does a much better job predicting the cloud fraction and the downwelling shortwave irradiance thancontrol simulations utilizing the default Kain-Fritsch scheme. The modified scheme includes a number of additional free parameters, including the number and size of bins used to define the PDF, the minimum frequency of a bin within the PDF before that bin is considered for shallow clouds to form, and the critical cumulative frequency of bins required to trigger deep convection. A series of tests were undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters. Overall, the scheme was found to be relatively insensitive to each of the parameters.

Berg, Larry K.; Gustafson, William I.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Deng, Liping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

REPROCESSING OF SHALLOW SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA TO IMAGE FAULTS NEAR A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

Shallow seismic reflection data from Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstrates that spectral balancing and tomographic refraction statics can be important processing tools for shallow seismic data. At this site, reprocessing of data which had previously yielded no useable CMP stacked sections was successful after application of these processing techniques.

DOLL, W.E.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Groundwater penetrating radar and high resolution seismic for locating shallow faults in unconsolidated sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediments, particularly in coastal plain settings, are very difficult to discern during subsurface exploration yet have critical impact to groundwater flow, contaminant transport and geotechnical evaluations. This paper presents a case study using cross-over geophysical technologies in an area where shallow faulting is probable and known contamination exists. A comparison is made between Wenner and dipole-dipole resistivity data, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic data. Data from these methods were verified with a cone penetrometer investigation for subsurface lithology and compared to existing monitoring well data. Interpretations from these techniques are compared with actual and theoretical shallow faulting found in the literature. The results of this study suggests that (1) the CPT study, combined with the monitoring well data may suggest that discontinuities in correlatable zones may indicate that faulting is present (2) the addition of the Wenner and dipole-dipole data may further suggest that offset zones exist in the shallow subsurface but not allow specific fault planes or fault stranding to be mapped (3) the high resolution seismic data will image faults to within a few feet of the surface but does not have the resolution to identify the faulting on the scale of our models, however it will suggest locations for upward continuation of faulted zones (4) offset 100 MHz and 200 MHz CMP GPR will image zones and features that may be fault planes and strands similar to our models (5) 300 MHz GPR will image higher resolution features that may suggest the presence of deeper faults and strands, and (6) the combination of all of the tools in this study, particularly the GPR and seismic may allow for the mapping of small scale, shallow faulting in unconsolidated sediments.

Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.; Waddell, M.G. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.; Sexton, B.G. [Microseeps Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

330

NIST STARR II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on board, a calibrated reference reflector, called a solar diffuser, is ... efficiently coupled to a monochromator, the tunable source power in STARR II ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Accelerating Dense-Water Flow down a Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Where water is denser on a shallow shelf than in the adjacent deep ocean, it tends to flow down the slope from shelf to ocean. The flow can be in a steady bottom boundary layer for moderate combinations of upslope density gradient ??x? and bottom ...

John M. Huthnance

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Institutional Aspects of Water Resources Management," 1975 background paper produced by the Food and Agricultureq SECTION II WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of public policy and the use or misuse of the national water supply. Subsection topics in this unit are general

US Army Corps of Engineers

333

PARS II FAQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

334

Portable Automated Mesonet II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portable Automated Mesonet II (PAM II) system was developed by NCAR to provide surface mesoscale data for the research needs of the atmospheric science community. The PAM system has 60 remote stations with planned growth to 300. In such a ...

Fred V. Brock; George H. Saum; Steven R. Semmer

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The 1990 Valentine's Day Arctic Outbreak. Part I: Mesoscale and Microscale Structure and Evolution of a Colorado Front Range Shallow Upslope Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale and microscale structure and evolution of a shallow, upslope cloud is described using observations obtained during the Winter Icing and Storms Project (WISP) and model stimulations. The upslope cloud formed within a shallow arctic ...

Roy M. Rasmussen; Ben C. Bernstein; Masataka Murakami; Greg Stossmeister; Jon Reisner; Boba Stankov

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that this project will show that the application of the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates can be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. The selected site for the demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Work is nearing completion on the reservoir characterization components of the project. The near-term emphasis is to, (1) provide an accurate distribution of original oil-in-place on a waterflood pattern entity level, (2) evaluate past recovery efficiencies, (3) perform parametric simulations, and (4) forecast performance for a site specific field demonstration of the proposed technology. Macro zonation now exists throughout the study area and cross-sections are available. The Oil-Water Contact has been defined. Laboratory capillary pressure data was used to define the initial water saturations within the pay horizon. The reservoir`s porosity distribution has been enhanced with the assistance of geostatistical software. Three-Dimensional kriging created the spatial distributions of porosity at interwell locations. Artificial intelligence software was utilized to relate core permeability to core porosity, which in turn was applied to the 3-D geostatistical porosity gridding. An Equation-of-State has been developed and refined for upcoming compositional simulation exercises. Options for local grid-refinement in the model are under consideration. These tasks will be completed by mid-1995, prior to initiating the field demonstrations in the second budget period.

Wehner, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

338

Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NSLS-II Project Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Pages Project Management Team Project Schedule Integrated Project Team (IPT) Monthly Status Meetings Advisory Committees Project Reviews Documents NSLS-II...

340

DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corpus Christi Bay (TX, USA) is a shallow wind-driven bay which is designated as a National Estuary due to its impact on the economy. But this bay experiences periodic hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 mg/l) which threatens aerobic aquatic organisms. Development of the Coastal Margin Observation and Assessment System (CMOAS) through integration of real-time observations with numerical modeling helps to understand the processes causing hypoxia in this energetic bay. CMOAS also serves as a template for the implementation of observational systems in other dynamic ecosystems for characterizing and predicting other episodic events such as harmful algal blooms, accidental oil spills, sediment resuspension events, etc. State-of-the-art sensor technologies are involved in real-time monitoring of hydrodynamic, meteorological and water quality parameters in the bay. Three different platform types used for the installation of sensor systems are: 1) Fixed Robotic, 2) Mobile, and 3) Remote. An automated profiler system, installed on the fixed robotic platform, vertically moves a suite of in-situ sensors within the water column for continuous measurements. An Integrated Data Acquisition, Communication and Control system has been configured on our mobile platform (research vessel) for the synchronized measurements and real-time visualization of hydrodynamic and water quality parameters at greater spatial resolution. In addition, a high frequency (HF) radar system has been installed on remote platforms to generate surface current maps for Corpus Christi (CC) Bay and its offshore area. This data is made available to stakeholders in real-time through the development of cyberinfrastructure which includes establishment of communication network, software development, web services, database development, etc. Real-time availability of measured datasets assists in implementing an integrated sampling scheme for our monitoring systems installed at different platforms. With our integrated system, we were able to capture evidence of an hypoxic event in Summer 2007. Data collected from our monitoring systems are used to drive and validate numerical models developed in this study. The analysis of observational datasets and developed 2-D hydrodynamic model output suggests that a depth-integrated model is not able to capture the water current structure of CC Bay. Also, the development of a threedimensional mechanistic dissolved oxygen model and a particle aggregation transport model (PAT) helps to clarify the critical processes causing hypoxia in the bay. The various numerical models and monitoring systems developed in this study can serve as valuable tools for the understanding and prediction of various episodic events dominant in other dynamic ecosystems.

Islam, Mohammad S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling Studies of Geothermal Systems with a Free Water Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulators developed for geothermal reservoir engineering applications generally only consider systems which are saturated with liquid water and/or steam. However, most geothermal fields are in hydraulic communicatino with shallow ground water aquifers having free surface (water level), so that production or injection operations will cause movement of the surface, and of the air in the pore spaces above the water level. In some geothermal fields the water level is located hundreds of meters below the surface (e.g. Olkaria, Kenya; Bjornsson, 1978), so that an extensive so that an extensive unsaturated zone is present. In other the caprock may be very leaky or nonexistent [e.g., Klamath Falls, oregon (Sammel, 1976)]; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; (Grant et al., 1984) in which case ther eis good hydraulic communication between the geothermal reservoir and the shallow unconfined aquifers. Thus, there is a need to explore the effect of shallow free-surface aquifers on reservoir behavior during production or injection operations. In a free-surface aquifer the water table moves depending upon the rate of recharge or discharge. This results in a high overall storativity; typically two orders of magnitude higher than that of compressed liquid systems, but one or two orders of magnitude lower than that for liquid-steam reservoirs. As a consequence, various data analysis methods developed for compressed liquid aquifers (such as conventional well test analysis methods) are not applicable to aquifer with a free surface.

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

343

PARS II User Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document serves as a reference manual to assist DOE end-users in performing their respective functions within the PARS II web application. The document provides a description and “How To” for...

344

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

345

CX-006393: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006393: Categorical Exclusion Determination M-Area Chemical Oxidation Phase II: Shallow Water Table Direct Push Technology Borings and Monitoring...

346

CX-006394: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006394: Categorical Exclusion Determination M-Area Chemical Oxidation (MACO) Phase II: Shallow Water Table Direct Push Technology (DPT) Borings...

347

CX-006410: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006410: Categorical Exclusion Determination M-Area Chemical Oxidation Phase II: Shallow Water Table Direct Push Technology Borings and Monitoring...

348

CX-006610: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-006610: Categorical Exclusion Determination M-Area Chemical Oxidation Phase II: Shallow Water Table Direct Push Technology Borings and Monitoring...

349

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

350

STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS  

SciTech Connect

STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

Chen, K.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling studies of geothermal systems with a free water surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical simulator was developed for the modeling of air-steam-water systems. The simulator was applied to various problems involving injection into or production from a geothermal reservoir in hydraulic communication with a shallow free-surface aquifer. First, a one-dimensional column problem is considered and the water level movement during exploitation is studied using different capillary pressure functions. Second, a two-dimensional radial model is used to study and compare reservoir depletion for cases with and without a free-surface aquifer. Finally, the contamination of a shallow free-surface aquifer due to cold water injection is investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain an understanding of the response of a reservoir in hydraulic communication with a unconfined aquifer during exploitation or injection and to determine under which circumstances conventional modeling techniques (fully saturated systems) can be applied to such systems.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

O' Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

High-spatial-resolution Raman microscopy of stress in shallow-trench-isolated Si structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress in single and periodic shallow-trench-isolated Si structures was examined by 364 nm excitation confocal resonance Raman microscopy, laser penetration being restricted to the near-surface region. Using a 1.3 numerical aperture microobjective lens with a theoretical {approx}140 nm spatial resolution, the authors show that the configuration with both incident and scattered lights polarized parallel to each other and perpendicular to Si stripes is favorable for stress detection in the middle of the stripes, suppressing contributions from their edges. The stresses located in different areas of the structures were identified and analyzed.

Poborchii, Vladimir; Tada, Tetsuya; Kanayama, Toshihiko [MIRAI, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the Sundown Slaughter Unit (SSU) CO2 Huff- n- Puff (H- n- P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. Sundown Slaughter Unit is the second demonstration site associated with this project, following the unsuccessful test at Central Vacuum Unit. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other fields. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is a timely effort for near- term goals. The goal of this Sundown Slaughter Unit Project is to demonstrate the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process in a waterflooded, light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. The CO2 Huff- n- Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology for Louisiana- Texas gulf coast sandstone reservoirs. The reader is referred to three Society of Petroleum Engineer (SPE) papers, No. 15502, No. 16720 & No. 20208 for a review of the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils. Although the technology is proven in gulf coast sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. The goal of this technology demonstration is to gain an overall understanding of the reservoir qualities that influence CO2 Huff- n- Puff production responses within a heterogeneous reservoir such as the shallow shelf carbonate environment of the Sundown Slaughter Unit. A generalized reservoir model was developed and used to determine the importance of various geological and operational influences upon the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process at CVU. The findings at CVU would be applied to the demonstration site at SSU without further simulation studies being conducted at SSU.

John Prieditis; Mark Kovar; Roger Cole; Scott Wehner

1998-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

360

Program to investigate the engineering feasibility of extracting energy from shallow magma bodies  

SciTech Connect

A new program, sponsored by the Department of Energy's Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division, has begun to investigate the engineering feasibility of extracting energy from shallow magma bodies. This program follows a previous investigation of the scientific feasibility of using magma and differs from it in focus. The current program is directed toward determining whether magma energy can be extracted economically. In the first year of the program, the three most promising sites for a long term experiment will be characterized; the research and development tasks that will be required will be identified; and a program plan outlining the entire feasibility study will be compiled.

Carson, C.C.; Allen, A.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

363

A Reduced-Order Information Filter for Multilayer Shallow-Water Models: Profiling and Assimilation of Sea Surface Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-order information filter (ROIF) for the Miami Isopycnal Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) is implemented for assimilation of the TOPEX/Poseidon sea surface height (SSH) data. ROIF is an approximate Kalman filter that compactly ...

T. M. Chin; A. C. Haza; A. J. Mariano

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Observations of Quasi-Stationary and Shallow Orographic Snow Clouds: Spatial Distributions of Supercooled Liquid Water and Snow Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 25 February 1999, due to a winter monsoon after a cyclonic storm, orographic snow clouds formed under conditions of weak cold advection on the western side of the central mountain range of Japan. In this study, the Ka-band Doppler radar and ...

Kenichi Kusunoki; Masataka Murakami; Narihiro Orikasa; Mizuho Hoshimoto; Yoshinobu Tanaka; Yoshinori Yamada; Hakaru Mizuno; Kyosuke Hamazu; Hideyuki Watanabe

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Measuring the Impact of Observations on the Predictability of the Kuroshio Extension in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, sequential importance sampling is used to assess the impact of observations on an ensemble prediction for the decadal path transitions of the Kuroshio Extension. This particle-filtering approach gives access to the probability ...

Werner Kramer; Henk A. Dijkstra; Stefano Pierini; Peter Jan van Leeuwen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Variable-Resolution Semi-Lagrangian Finite-Element Global Model of the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the needs of short- and medium-range operational forecasting, the authors propose a unified strategy based on the use of a global variable-resolution model, run in two different configurations. These are as follows: (i) a variable-...

Jean Côté; Michel Roch; Andrew Staniforth; Luc Fillion

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

Newman, J. E.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A CDMA-based Medium . . . UnderWater Acoustic Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UnderWater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UW-ASNs) ... performing collaborative monitoring tasks. In this article, UW-MAC, a distributed Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol designed for UW-ASNs, is introduced. The proposed MAC protocol is a transmitter-based Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) scheme that incorporates a novel closed-loop distributed algorithm to jointly set the optimal transmit power and code length. CDMA is the most promising physical layer and multiple access technique for UW-ASNs because it is robust to frequencyselective fading, it compensates for the effect of multipath at the receiver, and it allows receivers to distinguish among signals simultaneously transmitted by multiple devices. UW-MAC aims at achieving three objectives, i.e., guarantee i) high network throughput, ii) low channel access delay, and iii) low energy consumption. It is demonstrated that UW-MAC simultaneously achieves these three objectives in deep water communications (where the ocean depth is more than 100 m), which are usually not severely affected by multipath. In shallow water communications, which may be heavily affected by multipath, it dynamically finds the optimal trade-off among these objectives according to the application requirements. UW-MAC is the first protocol that leverages CDMA properties to achieve multiple access to the scarce underwater bandwidth, while other protocols tailored for this environment have considered CDMA merely from a physical layer perspective. Experiments show that UW-MAC outperforms many existing MAC protocols tuned for the underwater environment under different architecture scenarios and simulation settings.

Dario Pompili; Tommaso Melodia; Ian F. Akyildiz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

370

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

371

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

372

PARS II Training Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 4 5 6 7 8 WEEK 3 11 12 13 14 15 WEEK 4 18 19 20 21 22 WEEK 5 25 26 27 28 PARS II Training Schedule FEBRUARY 2013 Webinar PARS 102: Session A) 10:00 - 12:00 1 Hour Break...

373

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

376

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

377

PARS II Software Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These...

378

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

379

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP...

380

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II. Purpose: On May 20, 2010, NIST hosted the first Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

382

Cabazon Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cabazon Wind Farm II Cabazon Wind Farm II Facility Cabazon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldman Sachs/Shell Developer Canon Power Corp. Energy Purchaser L.A. Department of Water Resources Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

384

Comments on "Shallow gas off the Rhone prodelta, Gulf of Lions" by Garcia-Garcia et al. (2006) Marine Geology 234 (215-231) - Reply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mastalerz, V. on “Shallow gas off the Rhône prodelta, Gulfauthor pattern in our answers: 1- Gas sampling procedure,2-Reported gas concentrations results, 3-General remarks, 4-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

386

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

387

BOAST II for the IBM 3090 and RISC 6000  

SciTech Connect

BOAST II simulates isothermal, darcy flow in three dimensions. It assumes that reservoir liquids can be described in three fluid phases (oil, gas, and water) of constant composition, with physical properties that depend on pressure, only. These reservoir fluid approximations are acceptable for a large percentage of the world's oil and gas reservoirs. Consequently, BOAST II has a wide range of applicability. BOAST II can simulate oil and/or gas recovery by fluid expansion, displacement, gravity drainage, and capillary imbibition mechanisms. Typical field production problems that BOAST II can handle include primary depletion studies, pressure maintenance by water and/or gas injection, and evaluation of secondary recovery waterflooding and displacement operations. Technically, BOAST II is a finite, implicit pressure, explicit saturation (IMPES) numerical simulator. It applies both direct and iterative solution techniques for solving systems of algebraic equations. The well model allows specification of rate or pressure constraints on well performance, and the user is free to add or to recomplete wells during the simulation. In addition, the user can define multiple rock and PVT regions and can choose from three aquifer models. BOAST II also provides flexible initialization, a bubble-point tracking scheme, automatic time-step control, and a material balance check on solution stability. The user controls output, which includes a run summary and line-printer plots of fieldwide performance.

Hebert, P.; Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Tyler, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

An Ensemble-Based Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation Scheme. Part II: Observing System Simulation Experiments with Advanced Research WRF (ARW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble-based four-dimensional variational data assimilation (En4DVAR) algorithm and its performance in a low-dimension space with a one-dimensional shallow-water model have been presented in Part I. This algorithm adopts the standard ...

Chengsi Liu; Qingnong Xiao; Bin Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Effect of Topographic Variability on Initial Condition Sensitivity of Low-Level Wind Forecasts. Part II: Experiments Using Real Terrain and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study by Bieringer et al., which is Part I of this two-part study, demonstrated analytically using the shallow-water equations and numerically in controlled experiments that the presence of terrain can result in an enhancement of sensitivities ...

Paul E. Bieringer; Peter S. Ray; Andrew J. Annunzio

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

392

Dynamics of shallow dark solitons in a trapped gas of impenetrable bosons  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of linear and nonlinear excitations in a Bose gas in the Tonks-Girardeau regime with longitudinal confinement are studied within a mean-field theory of quintic nonlinearity. A reductive perturbation method is used to demonstrate that the dynamics of shallow dark solitons, in the presence of an external potential, can effectively be described by a variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries equation. The soliton oscillation frequency is analytically obtained to be equal to the axial trap frequency, in agreement with numerical predictions obtained by Busch et al. [J. Phys. B 36, 2553 (2003)] via the Bose-Fermi mapping. We obtain analytical expressions for the evolution of both soliton and emitted radiation (sound) profiles.

Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Proukakis, N.P. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-4515 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE program for improvement practices for shallow burial of radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The practice of burying solid radioactive waste in relatively shallow pits or trenches at government nuclear sites dates back to the Manhattan Project. In some cases, where local conditions were considered unfavorable, intersite shipment of waste has been required. This general concept was later used at commercially-operated sites under Federal or state regulation. The purpose, scope, and results of a DOE program begun several years ago for improvements of burial ground disposal methods are reviewed. The program includes the re-evaluation of the original siting and of operating practices at existing burial grounds (including monitoring for migration of activity); the development of improved criteria for siting of new grounds that might be required as the defense site operations continue; and development of corrective measures such as diking and better draining for possible unsatisfactory conditions that might be detected. The possible applications of these findings to commercial burial grounds is discussed.

Dieckhoner, J.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. A selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The data file was built to provide information support to DOE researchers in the field of low-level radioactive waste disposal and management. The scope of the data base emphasizes studies which deal with the ''old'' Manhattan sites, commercial disposal sites, and the specific parameters which affect the soil and geologic migration of radionuclides. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data base to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the ''Measured Radionuclides'' field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the ''Measured Parameters'' field. The 504 references are rated indicating applicability to shallow land burial technology and whether interpretation is required. Indexes are provided for author, geographic location, title, measured parameters, measured radionuclides, keywords, subject categories, and publication description. (DLC)

Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Tappen, J. (comps.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Shallow hydraulic fracturing measurements in Korea support tectonic and seismic indicators of regional stress.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have conducted five hydraulic fracturing stress measurement campaigns in Korea, involving 13 test holes ranging in depth from 30 to 250 m, at locations from North Seoul to the southern coast of the peninsula. The measurements reveal consistent crustal stress magnitudes and directions that suggest persistence throughout western and southern Korea. The maximum horizontal stress {sigma}{sub H} is oriented between ENE-WSW and E-W, in accord with plate movement and deformation, and with directions indicated by both focal mechanism solutions from earthquakes inland and offshore as well as borehole breakouts in mainland China close to its eastern coast. With respect to magnitudes, the vertical stress is the overall minimum stress at all tested locations, suggesting a thrust faulting regime within the relatively shallow depths reached by our tests. Typically, such a stress regime becomes one favoring strike-slip at greater depths, as is also indicated by the focal mechanism solutions around Korea.

Haimson, Bezalel Cecil (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Lee, Moo Yul; Song, I. (Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

397

Tensiometer for shallow or deep measurements including vadose zone and aquifers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two cell tensiometer is described in which water level in the lower cell is maintained at a relatively constant height, and in equilibrium with the water pressure of materials that surround the tensiometer. An isolated volume of air in the lower cell changes pressure proportionately to the changing water pressure of the materials that surround the tensiometer. The air pressure is measured remotely. The tensiometer can be used in drying as well as wetting cycles above and below the water table.

Faybishenko, Boris (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Biomaterial Surfaces II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofilm produced by microbes is a structure formed on material surface containing water ... In this work, both dense and porous silica and niobium oxide coatings were ... environments and their surface and interfacial breakdown was examined.

399

Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Synthesis of CdSe Nanocrystals 4.1 Introduction Inprecursors in the synthesis of CdSe and other group II-VIof Water on the Synthesis of CdSe and CdS Nanorods 5.1

Liu, Haitao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Sun-Pointing-Error Correction for Sea Deployment of the MICROTOPS II Handheld Sun Photometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Handheld sun photometers, such as the MICROTOPS II (manufactured by Solar Light, Inc.), provide a simple and inexpensive way to measure in situ aerosol optical thickness (AOT), ozone content, and water vapor. Handheld sun photometers require that ...

Kirk D. Knobelspiesse; Christophe Pietras; Giulietta S. Fargion

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

402

Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary properties: methodology and case history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OTC 15118 Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary of multicomponent data analysis for the detection of gas hydrate prospects in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Methane and pressure conditions in the region. In many regions of North America, including the southern Gulf of Mexico

Texas at Austin, University of

403

Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

406

PADD IV PADD II lakes PADD V - PADD II - inland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Source Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V -

407

water from the CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water from the CO water from the CO 2 stream and then compresses the dry CO 2 to a supercritical phase. The compressed CO 2 then travels through a 1 mile- long pipeline to the wellhead where it is injected into the Mt. Simon Sandstone at a depth of about 7,000 feet. November 21, 2011, http:// www.netl.doe.gov/publications/press/2011/111121_co2_injection. html. Fossil Energy Techline, "Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO 2 Emissions." Injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) indicate that their region has the geologic potential to store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions primarily in deep saline formations. The MRCSP Phase II field tests included seven small-scale field validation tests: three

408

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

409

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

410

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

411

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

412

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced 1,2 . The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils 3 and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin?s daily production.4 There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO2 projects when coupled together. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology in Louisiana-Texas Gulf-coast sandstone reservoirs 5,6 . Application seems to mostly confine itself to low pressure sandstone reservoirs 7 . The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils 8,9 . A review of earlier literature 5,10,11 provides an excellent discussion on the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. Although the technology is proven in light oil sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. However, the theories associated with the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process are not lithology dependent. It was anticipated that this project would show that the application of the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates could be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project were the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential.

Mark Kovar; Scott Wehner

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

414

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

415

Marine Stratocumulus Layers. Part II: Turbulence Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the turbulence profiles and budgets for two days of radiation, dynamical and thermodynamical observations by the NCAR Electra in shallow marine stratocumulus off the California coast in June 1976.

R. A. Brost; J. C. Wyngaard; D. H. Lenschow

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

417

Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arthur L. , and Eric L.  Garner.  California Water II.  Point Arena, CA: Solano,  Managing California's Water.  Policy Institute of California,  Rule, Troy A.  "Airspace 

Fedman, Anna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

419

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

420

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Survey of Department of Energy-Sponsored Geophysical Research for Shallow Waste Site Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface contamination plagues many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and threatens groundwater supplies. This survey discusses research sponsored by the DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) for geophysical characterization of the vadose zone at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and other contaminated sites. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques are used to characterize the shallow subsurface—electromagnetic, ground-penetrating radar, electrical, seismic, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Three common themes appear in the research surveyed in this article: (1) the development of high-resolution imaging capabilities to capture important details of the heterogeneous nature of subsurface properties and processes, (2) the coupling of non-intrusive survey geophysical measurements (e.g., electrical surveys) with detailed quantitative precise point-sensor measurements (e.g., lysimeters and vapor-port systems) or borehole (e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance, neutron-based moisture, and geochemical tools) measurements to extend high-precision knowledge away from the borehole, and finally (3) the application of multiple geophysical methods to constrain the uncertainty in determining critical subsurface physical properties. Laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of the manner in which contaminants travel through the vadose zone. Applications of geophysical methods to various contaminated areas at the INEEL are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

427

Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CWA for determining the quantities of oil and of hazardousthan reportable quantities of oil or a hazardous substance,for oil discharged in harmful quantities as apply to any

Glicksman, Robert L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Phase II Nuclide Partition Laboratory Study Influence of Cellulose Degradation Products on the Transport of Nuclides from SRS Shallow Land Burial Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Degradation products of cellulosic materials (e.g., paper and wood products) can significantly influence the subsurface transport of metals and radionuclides. Codisposal of radionuclides with cellulosic materials in the E-Area slit trenches at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is, therefore, expected to influence nuclide fate and transport in the subsurface. Due to the complexities of these systems and the scarcity of site-specific data, the effects of cellulose waste loading and its subsequent influence on nuclide transport are not well established.

Serkiz, S.M.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

A New Parameterization for Shallow Cumulus Convection and Its Application to Marine Subtropical Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers. Part II: Regional Simulations of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of physical parameterizations on simulations of cloud-topped marine boundary layers is investigated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). Three-month MM5 simulations of the northeast and ...

James R. McCaa; Christopher S. Bretherton

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The chloride-rich water obtained in 1967 from the shallow (114.3 m) Coso Hot Springs well No. 1 comes from a deep aquifer with a temperature at least as high as about 240 C and possibly higher than 275 C. Similar, but slightly diluted and cooled chloride-rich water enters the 1477-meter deep CGEH No. 1 well drilled in 1977 about 3.2 km to the west of the 1967 well. From the data in hand the Coso geothermal system appears to be a hot

432

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

433

Water Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning EUEC Energy & Environment Conference 2008, EPS,1292008 2 * Water Scarcity Seen Dampening Case...

434

Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

Pelka, W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Improved water-driven lpg slug process  

SciTech Connect

The economics of oil recovery by the LPG-slug process depends upon increasing the sweep efficiency and recovering the injected LPG. There are 2 basic forms of the LPG-slug processes--the gas-driven and the water-driven. The pressure required for miscibility between dry gas and LPG prohibits the use of the gas-driven LPG process in shallow reservoirs. The water-driven LPG slug process normally exhibits good sweep efficiency. However, displacement of the LPG by water is poor. An improvement in this process appears possible by injecting a slug of carbon dioxide between the LPG slug and the water drive. Laboratory experiments were conducted in linear core systems to determine the effect of pressure on the various displacement zones. A displacement test was conducted with LPG and carbon dioxide slugs large enough to avoid interference between the oil-LPG, LPG-carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide- water displacement zones. Under these conditions, essentially complete oil and LPG recovery was obtained. However, a substantial amount of carbon dioxide was left in the core at water breakthrough.

Thompson, J.L.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

HAQ MA

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

Performance of a Triclass Parameterization for the Collision–Coalescence Process in Shallow Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focusing on the formation of precipitation in marine stratiform clouds, a two-moment bulk parameterization for three liquid water classes (cloud, drizzle, and rain) is proposed to describe the process of collision–coalescence. Based on the ...

Vivek Sant; Ulrike Lohmann; Axel Seifert

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Large-Eddy Simulations of Strongly Precipitating, Shallow, Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulations that incorporate a size-resolving representation of cloud water are used to study the effect of heavy drizzle on PBL structure. Simulated surface precipitation rates average about 1 mm day?1. Heavily drizzling simulations ...

Bjorn Stevens; William R. Cotton; Graham Feingold; Chin-Hoh Moeng

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effects of Domain Size and Numerical Resolution on the Simulation of Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present three-dimensional numerical simulations of oceanic trade cumulus clouds underlying stratocumulus clouds. The case studied is a Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) model intercomparison that is ...

David E. Stevens; Andrew S. Ackerman; Christopher S. Bretherton

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters...

442

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

443

PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation (Course 103) PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) PARS103Presentation.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II PARS II...

444

PARS II Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II Training PARS II Training PARS II training is delivered as traditional, instructor-led, hands-on classroom training, and also, as instructor-led Webinars with limited...

445

Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners II Wind Farm Power Partners II Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MDU Resources Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser L.A. Department of Water Resources Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Observation of Coherence in the Photosystem II Reaction Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photosynthesis powers life on our planet. The basic photosynthetic architecture comprises antenna complexes to harvest solar energy and reaction centers to convert the energy into a stable charge separated state. In oxygenic photosynthesis, the initial charge separation event occurs in the photosystem II reaction center; the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosynthesis are rapid and have high quantum efficiencies. Recently, nonlinear spectroscopic experiments have suggested that electronic coherence may play a role in energy transfer efficiency in antenna complexes. Here we report the observation of coherence in the photosystem II reaction center by two dimensional electronic spectroscopy. The frequencies of the observed coherences match exciton difference frequencies and/or known vibrational modes of the photosystem II reaction center. These observations raise questions about the possible role of electronic and/or vibrational coherence in the fundamental charge separation process in oxygenic photosynthesis.

Franklin D. Fuller; Jie Pan; S. Seckin Senlik; Daniel E. Wilcox; Jennifer P. Ogilvie

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Observation of Coherence in the Photosystem II Reaction Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photosynthesis powers life on our planet. The basic photosynthetic architecture comprises antenna complexes to harvest solar energy and reaction centers to convert the energy into a stable charge separated state. In oxygenic photosynthesis, the initial charge separation event occurs in the photosystem II reaction center; the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosynthesis are rapid and have high quantum efficiencies. Recently, nonlinear spectroscopic experiments have suggested that electronic coherence may play a role in energy transfer efficiency in antenna complexes. Here we report the observation of coherence in the photosystem II reaction center by two dimensional electronic spectroscopy. The frequencies of the observed coherences match exciton difference frequencies and/or known vibrational modes of the photosystem II reaction center. These observations raise questions about the possible role of electronic and/or vibrational coheren...

Fuller, Franklin D; Senlik, S Seckin; Wilcox, Daniel E; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

449

NSLS-II Design and Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Design & Performance NSLS-II CD-0 Proposal Preliminary Design Report (PDR) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) Source Properties (.pdf) Cell section Last Modified: April 2,...

450

PARS II FAQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PARS 3.0 Data Model Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

451

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

452

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Diurnal Cycle of Shallow and Deep Convection for a Tropical Land and an Ocean Environment and Its Relationship to Synoptic Wind Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of shallow and deep convection during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (TRMM/LBA) and the Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes in the Coupled Ocean–...

L. Gustavo Pereira; Steven A. Rutledge

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Shallow CISK, Deep Equilibrium Mechanism for the Interaction between Large-Scale Convection and Large-Scale Circulations in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the circulations driven by deep heating and shallow heating are investigated through analytically solving a set of linear equations and examining circulations simulated by a dry primitive equation model. Special emphasis is placed ...

Zhaohua Wu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The University of Washington Shallow Convection and Moist Turbulence Schemes and Their Impact on Climate Simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new version of the University of Washington shallow cumulus parameterization. The new version includes improved treatments of lateral mixing rates into cumulus updrafts, the evaporation of precipitation and of the ...

Sungsu Park; Christopher S. Bretherton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

MHK Technologies/Triton II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Triton II Triton II < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Triton II.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Triton II Is a patented novel on shore operating wave power converter that can be installed on low value coast lines breakwater walls piers and even near shore platforms etc The converter is of the floating type the power transmission and conversion systems being mounted above still water level on solid fundament This architecture yields increased power production due to wave reflection almost doubling the incident wave height on the breakwater frontage and high reliability and operational safety Each sea wave converter unit is composed of three main parts A The floats moving up down following the vertical movements of the waves B The mechanism which converts the vertical movements to horizontal C The mechanism which converts the horizontal movements to rotational conveyed to an electrical generator The floats the only parts moving in the water are protected during their up down motions in cages which are installed inside recesses on the breakwater Safety

457

Penascal II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penascal II Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Kenedy County TX Coordinates 27.003108°, -97.584014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.003108,"lon":-97.584014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Cimarron II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cimarron II Facility Cimarron II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Developer CPV Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Kansas City Power & Light Location Cimarron KS Coordinates 37.90154236°, -100.3934097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.90154236,"lon":-100.3934097,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Limon II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limon II Limon II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Limon CO Coordinates 39.33323523°, -103.5521507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.33323523,"lon":-103.5521507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Aegir II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates 43.098°, -86.597° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.098,"lon":-86.597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Photovoltaics II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Energy Nanomaterials: Photovoltaics II ... and Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Ziqi Sun1; Jung Ho Kim1; Yue Zhao1; ... the electron lifetime (?n) are examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

462

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Overview Macromolecular crystallography has been enormously successful in elucidating the structures of proteins and other biomolecules. These data are being combined with emerging genetic and biochemical information on pathways to suggest temporal, spatial, and functional relations controlling cellular function. However, the central question in biophysics still remains: What is the connection between the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, polysaccharides, and their complexes? Answering this question requires understanding the dynamics of macromolecular structures in their natural environment, where flexibility of the molecules and water, pH, and ion concentration play determinant roles. Examples include protein and nucleic acid folding and unfolding, polymer collapse upon change of solvent, electron transfer, and large-scale fluctuations in macromolecules.

463

Memorandum of Understanding II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate Geochemical characterization of concentrated gas hydrate deposits on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand Preliminary Geochemical Cruise Report Dr. Richard Coffin Dr. Leila Hamdan Dr. John Pohlman Marine Biogeochemistry Section Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC, USA Dr. Warren Wood Geology and Geophysics Section Naval Research Laboratory Stennis, MS, USA Dr. Ingo Pecher Dr. Stuart Henrys Dr. Jens Greinert Dr. Kevin Faure Geological and Nuclear Sciences P.O. Box 30-368, Lower Hutt, NZ Dr. Andrew Gorman University of Otago Dept. of Geology P.O.Box 56 Dunedin, 9015, NZ Dr. Alan Orpin National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Private Bag 14-901 Kilbirnie, Wellington, NZ 2 i. Table of Contents i. Table of Contents ................................................................................. 2

464

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

465

The Lotus and the Water Lilies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lotus and the Water Lilies Lotus and the Water Lilies Nature Bulletin No. 196-A June 12, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LOTUS AND THE WATER LILIES In midsummer, when the weather is hot and sultry, Mother Nature puts on an extravagant flower show. She uses just one kind of blossom. Completely covering hundreds of acres of water in shallow lakes or sluggish streams, are dense almost impenetrable beds of plants with huge green leaves like elephant ears and stately creamy-yellow flowers as fragrant as they are beautiful. This is the American Lotus, closely akin to the Egyptian lotus and the sacred lotus of the Hindus. The American lotus grows in quiet water from 2 to 5 feet deep, where its big leaves and flowers usually stand a foot or two above the surface on thick stiff stems rising from fleshy rootstalks buried in the mud. It has several leathery dark green leaves, almost circular and from one to two or more feet in diameter, each balanced at its center, like a platter, on the stem. The great flower buds open into blossoms, from 6 to 10 inches across, with broad petals and sepals. These are followed by conical seed capsules, often the size of a man's fist. From one to two dozen seeds are set in pits in the fist top of the capsule, which breaks off and floats about, scattering the seeds.

466

Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. (CIBA-GEIGY Corp., Summit, NJ (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The abundance of cetaceans in California waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abundance of cetaceans in California waters. Part II: Aerial surveys in winter and spring abundance estimates were calculated aftercompletionofthefirst aerial survey in 1991 (Forney and Barlow, 1993 aerial surveys. Survey methods The methods used during the 1991- 92 aerial surveys are described

469

Carbon Nanomaterials II & Computational Studies on Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2014 Functional Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties and Applications: Carbon Nanomaterials II & Computational Studies on Nanomaterials Sponsored by: ...

470

STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 AQUEOUS TRANSPORT CODE TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS  

SciTech Connect

STREAM II is an aqueous transport model developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) emergency response program. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) is used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. A recent version of the code (STREAM II-V4) predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM IIV4. STREAM II-V5 is an upgraded version which accounts for the effects of a storm event. The revised model finds the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 then adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations. This paper will discuss the required modifications to STREAM II and a comparison of results between the older and newer versions for an example involving a rainfall event.

Chen, K.

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Lue Houjun; Gao He [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yi Shuangxi, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [College of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Nanning University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Summary of accomplishments and research on forward-in-time differencing for shallow fluid flows on the sphere. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This past year the authors have continued the development of their 3D grid point model. The general model is nonhydrostatic, is written in nonorthogonal terrain following coordinates, and consistently incorporates either Eulerian or semi-Lagrangian differencing. The non-hydrostatic formulation will be particularly useful when the grid size is small enough to resolve nonhydrostatic processes--for example: convective instabilities, and internal gravity wave dynamics in deep sheared atmospheres. However, the authors have also found that the nonhydrostatic formulation has numerical advantages on coarser grids, such as a better conditioning of the Laplacian matrix that must be inverted. In addition, use of the nonhydrostatic equations allows consistency as the mesh is refined, or when using nested grids. The authors have used this model as a vehicle to compare the advantages of Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian methods. They have incorporated more options into different versions of the basic model. They have implemented a fairly sophisticated subgrid scale turbulence parameterization in the basic model and performed a number of LES studies of planetary boundary layers to calibrate the model. In order to further improve the efficiency of the model, they have developed a new method for treating systems with a variety of time scales. Traditional strategies, including split explicit methods, semi-implicit methods, and mode splitting, all have some inaccuracies and/or stability problems. The new method, which they have named the method of averages (MOA), is based on three steps. To validate the method, they built a 2D shallow water model of an ocean basin.

Smolarkiewicz, P. [NCAR/MMM (United States); Margolin, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

Previous modeling studies have shown a high sensitivity of simulated properties of mixed-phase clouds to ice number concentration, Ni, with many models losing their ability to maintain the liquid phase as Ni increases. Although models differ widely at what Ni the mixed-phase cloud becomes unstable, the transition from a mixed-phase to an ice only cloud in many cases occurs over a narrow range of ice concentration. To gain better understanding of this non-linear model behavior, in this study, we analyze simulations of a mixed-phase stratiform Artic cloud observed on 26 April 2008 during recent Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). The BASE simulation, in which Ni is constrained to match the measured value, produces a long-lived cloud in a quasi steady state similar to that observed. The simulation without the ice (NO_ICE) produces a comparable but slightly thicker cloud because more moisture is kept in the mixed layer due to lack of precipitation. When Ni is quadrupled relative to BASE (HI_ICE), the cloud starts loosing liquid water almost immediately and the liquid water path is reduced by half in less than two hours. The changes in liquid water are accompanied by corresponding reduction in the radiative cooling of the layer and a slow down in the vertical mixing, confirming the important role of interactions among microphysics, radiation and dynamics in this type of clouds. Deviations of BASE and HI_ICE from NO_ICE are used to explore the linearity of the model response to variation in Ni. It is shown that at early stages, changes in liquid and ice water as well as in radiative cooling/heating rates are proportional to the Ni change, while changes in the vertical buoyancy flux are qualitatively different in HI_ICE compared to BASE. Thus, while the positive feedback between the liquid water path and radiative cooling of the cloud layer is essential for glaciation of the cloud at higher Ni, the non-linear (with respect to Ni) reduction in positive buoyancy flux within and below the liquid cloud layer emerges as the process that influences the initial response of the mixed layer dynamics to the appearance of ice and subsequently determines the sustainability of liquid water in the cloud in this case.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Alexei; Fan, Jiwen

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

476

Superspace Type II 4D Supergravity from Type II Superstring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the equations of motion of type II 4D supergravity in superspace. This is achieved by coupling the Type II Berkovits' hybrid superstring to an N=2 curved background and requiring that the sigma-model has N=(2,2) superconformal invariance at one loop. We show that there are no anomalies in the fermionic OPE's and the complete set of compensator's equations is derived from the energy-momentum tensor. The equations of motion describe a hypertensorial and vectorial multiplet coupled to a U(1)\\times U(1) N=2 Poincar\\`e Supergravity.

Daniel L. Nedel

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report  

SciTech Connect

The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for the study because the aerial survey indicates that a channel mapped on the United States Geological Survey topographic map of the area traverses the south end of the area of surface contamination; this channel lies south of the point marked number 3 in Figure 1, and anecdotal information indicates that sediment has been deposited on the road bordering the southeast boundary of the CAU from an adjacent channel (Traynor, J, personal communication, 2011). Because contamination is particularly close to the boundary of CAU 550, Smoky CA, it is important to know if contaminants are moving, what meteorological conditions result in movement of contaminated soils, and what particle size fractions associated with contamination are involved. Closure plans are being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS. The closure plans may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of contaminated soils under ambient climatic conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

Julianne J. Miller, Steve A. Mizell, Greg McCurdy, and Scott A. Campbell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Water Boatman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

480

CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)  

SciTech Connect

A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii shallow water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Musselshell II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Musselshell II Musselshell II Facility Musselshell II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.26733°, -109.499175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.26733,"lon":-109.499175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Glacier II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Near Ethridge MT Coordinates 48.555639°, -112.120992° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"co