Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Study by thermogravimetry of the evolution of ettringite phase during type II Portland cement hydration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) have been used by the authors as very effective tools to study hydration steps of cements used for solidification/stabilization of tanning wastes. The p...

J. Dweck; P. F. Ferreira da Silva…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effect of alkalis and sulfates on Portland cement systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of the sulfates and alkalis on the durability of Portland cement systems was investigated through a series of cube and prism mixes. Durability… (more)

Halaweh, Mahmoud

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012 Revised: May 8 for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described on the Drawings and in this Special as required; 5. Constructing the composite pavement on a prepared subgrade, or subbase, without forms. 6

6

Sisal fiber-reinforced cement composite with Portland cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the partial replacement of Portland cement (PC) by combination of metakaolin (MK) and nanoclay (NC) in sisal fiber-reinforced cement composites by studying the microstructure, mechanical behavi...

Jianqiang Wei; Christian Meyer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - african portland cement Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex... materials produced in rotary kilns are portland cement, quicklime and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate... is discussed later in this report as a concern when using...

8

Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture  

SciTech Connect

Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous portland cements Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability of Concrete Construction Tarun R. Naik, F.ASCE1 Summary: , a greenhouse gas GHG ; production of one ton of portland cement produces about one ton of CO2 and other...

10

Portland cement mortar modified with latex and fiber glass for thin shell construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with latex and fiber glass as a covering material for thin shell structures. Tests were conducted on various formulations to determine certain physical properties of the modified portland cement. Application techniques were investigated to determine...

Raymond, Jewell Duane

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obtain Si02.33a0, In his conclusions Hebuffat does not consider it of importance whether alit consists of pure Si02.3CaO or a crystalline compound of Si02.2CaO with 3a0 and an aluminate. He says the aluminate in Portland dement can­ not be Al 203.30a..., Erd- meyer, Nev/berry's, Zulkowski, Rebuff at, Meyers, Richardson, Michaelis and Meade• d. Work of the Carbegie Institute of Washington on CaO #Si0 2 series and binary compounds of Al 2°3> Si0 2, MgO, CaO. On the presence of free lime in cement...

Wright, Claude W.

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of Phase 2 are to determine the feasibility of using cements with controlled particle size distributions (CPSD cements) in practical concrete applications, and to refine our estimates of the potential energy savings that may ensue from such use. The work in Phase 2 is divided into two main tasks, some parts of which will be carried out simultaneously: Task 1 will continue cement paste studies to optimize cement performance similar to those of Phase 1, but with particular emphasis on gypsum requirements, blended cements, and water-reducing admixtures. This task will also include preparation of sufficient CPSD cements for use in all Phase 2 work. Task 2 will be a comprehensive examination of the properties of concretes made with CPSD cements. This will include optimization of concrete mix designs to obtain the best possible performance for practical applications of both portland and blended cements. The effects of chemical admixtures and curing temperature variations will also be determined.

Helmuth, R.A; Whiting, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sulfate impurities from deicing salt and durability of Portland cement mortar  

SciTech Connect

This thesis reports research on the effects of calcium sulfate in halite on Portland cement durability. Much has been published about sulfate ions causing expansion reactions in Portland cement concrete, on scaling caused by sodium chloride, and the participation of magnesium sulfate in seawater attack. However, little work has been done on the influence of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate solutions as they are found combined in natural halite. Durability studies were conducted using brines containing different amounts of gypsum as an impurity. Damage mechanisms, reaction products and pore structure changes were evaluated. 16 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

Schluter, M.C.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The physical and chemical aspects of the leaching behavior of metals from portland cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solvent (such as groundwater) passes through the system. In this work, Cr(NO3)S and Pb(NO3)Z at varying concentrations are mixed with Type I Portland cement to produce simulated waste forms. These samples are then leached by three methods... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Chemistry THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF METALS FROM PORTLAND CEMENT A Thesis by RICARDO CORYE DAVIS Approved as to style and content by: David L. Cocke (Co...

Davis, Ricardo Corye

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by blending demonstration of PLC concrete in the late-fall construction of a parking lot at a ready mixed concrete plant near Gatineau, QC, Canada. The performance of the plastic and hardened concretes produced with PLC

18

Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Carbon nanotube and nanofiber reinforcement for improving the flexural strength and fracture toughness of portland cement paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of the proposed research will be on exploring the use of nanotechnology-based nano-filaments, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement in improving the mechanical properties of portland cement paste as a...

Tyson, Bryan Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Coupled Nanoindentation/SEM-EDS Study on Low Water/Cement Ratio Portland Cement Paste: Evidence for C-S-H/Ca(OH)[subscript 2] Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low water/cement ratio (w/c=0.20) hydrated Portland cement paste was analyzed by grid-indentation coupled with ex situ scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (SEM-EDS) analysis at each indentation ...

Chen, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Formation of ettringite in Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates at lower temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To explore the formation of ettringite at lower temperatures in the Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates, the effect of calcium sulfate variety on the setting time of the ternary system and the strength development of its mortars at 0, 5, 10 and 20 °C were investigated. The formation of ettringite was further analyzed using XRD and ESEM. The results show that, as temperature increases, both initial and final setting time are shortened and that compressive and flexural strength are enhanced. In particular, mortars with anhydrite develop higher strength between 0 and 10 °C but lower strength at 20 °C than those with hemihydrate. Further, pastes with anhydrite set faster than those with hemihydrate. It is also found that both the formation rate and amount of ettringite are sensitive to temperature and calcium sulfate variety.

Linglin Xu; Peiming Wang; Guofang Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Identification and characterization of agent for reductive dechlorination in mixtures of ferrous iron and Portland cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(II)/Fe(III) hydroxide with anionic interlayer. This XRD analysis result strongly supports the hypothesis that the active agent in Fe(II)/PCX was also formed in Fe(II)/Cement slurry system. The elemental analysis showed that the solids produced by Fe(II)/PCX consisted...

Ko, Sae Bom

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transient Model for Behavior of Mercury in Portland Cement Kilns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Bituminous coals (median value of 0.1 ?g/g) typically contain more mercury than petcoke (0.05 ?g/g median) or tires (0.04 ?g/g median), although the range of fuel mercury content is broad. ... Figure 2. Cumulative distribution of mercury in bituminous coal, petcoke, and tires fired at coal-fired power plants(2) and limestone input to cement kilns. ... The kiln used coal and petcoke as primary fuels, while tires were burned in the precalciner. ...

Constance Senior; Christopher J. Montgomery; Adel Sarofim

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

Walker, B.W.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5 wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad, Zainal Arifin [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zainal@eng.usm.my; Sakai, Etsuo [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, 2-12-1 Meguro-ku, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Immittance spectra for Portland cement/fly ash-based binders during early hydration  

SciTech Connect

A range of immittance formalisms is exploited to understand the nature of conduction and polarization within Portland cement-based binders over the frequency range 1 Hz to 1 MHz. Data are presented for binders with and without aggregate additions; of particular interest was the electrical response of a binary combination of ordinary Portland cement and fly ash. Regarding the latter, when presented on a Nyquist diagram, a characteristic plateau region emerged between the electrode spur and the bulk arc. When presented in the form of dielectric constant and conductivity as a function of frequency, a region of dispersion was evident for all systems. Furthermore, it was shown that by undertaking a dielectric frequency-domain analysis of the data, the experimental results could be synthesized across the frequency range 1 kHz to 1 MHz. Rather than ascribing separate processes to each impedance zone, the observed response could be attributed to a single bulk polarization process. When transformed into the complex impedance plane, there was also good agreement between synthesized and measured response. It is postulated that polarization is as a result of double-layer effects on the grain with a relaxation frequency in the low kilohertz region.

McCarter, W.J.; Starrs, G.; Chrisp, T.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil and Offshore Engineering] [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil and Offshore Engineering

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Special Cements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the production of expansive cements ettringite formation is used and the most popular ... ’s complex is added to Portland cement. Ettringite structure is discussed.

Wieslaw Kurdowski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) are known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the gray rock of Portland, Eng...

O. V. Roussak; H. D. Gesser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) is known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the grey rock of Portland, Engl...

H. D. Gesser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Investigation of the formation of a Portland Cement plant detached plume  

SciTech Connect

A gaseous and particulate-source emissions sampling program was conducted at a Portland Cement production plant in Rapid City, South Dakota. The study was conducted to determine the cause of the formation of an opaque detached plume from the plants' dry process kiln. The instack opacity of the emissions was less than 10% while the opacity of the plume five to ten stack diameters from the mouth of the stack was in excess of 40%, thus giving an appearance of a detached plume. The sampling and analysis program included particulate emissions measurements, particle sizing and composition, and measurements of gaseous and particle ammonia, chloride, fluoride, and sulfur dioxide. Extensive process materials sampling and analysis were also conducted. Based on the resulting data, one conclusion is that the opaque detached plume is the result of ammonium chloride particles formed by the reaction of gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid. It was also found that the ammonia in the cement plant was generated from the shale portion of the raw products when the raw product was passed through the heat exchanger.

Cheney, J.L.; Knapp, K.T.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermal stability of certain hydrated phases in systems made using portland cement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As part of the study of hydraulic-cement system for use in possible underground isolation of nuclear wastes, this study was made to determine the temperature stability of ettringite and chloroaluminate. Either or both of these phases may be expected in a hydraulic cement system depending on the presence of salt (NaCl). The study of ettringite was made using 15 mixtures that contained portland cement, plaster, 2 levels of water, and in some mixtures, 1 of 6 pozzolans (3 fly ashes, 1 slag, a silica fume, a natural pozzolan), plus a 16th mixture with anhydrous sodium sulfate replacing plaster (CaSO4 . 1/2H20). Specimens were made and stored at 23, 50, and 75 C or 23, 75, and 100 C (all four temperatures in one case) for periodic examination by x-ray diffraction for phase compositiion and ettringite stability, and testing for compressive strength and restrained expansion. A more limited study of the stability of chloroaluminate was made along the same lines using fewer mixtures, salt instead of plaster, and higher temperatures plus some pressure. It was found that while some ettringette was decomposed at 75 C, depending on the composition of the mixture, all ettringite was undetectable by x-ray diffraction at 100 C, usually within a few days. The evidence indicates that the ettringite became amorphous and no significant test phases formed in its place. Since there was no corresponding loss in strength or reduction in volume, this loss of ettringite crystallinity was considered to be damaging. Based on much more limited data, chloroaluminate was found to decompose between 130 C at 25 psi and 170 C at 100 psi; no significant phases replaced it.

Buck, A.D.; Burkes, J.P.; Poole, T.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the microstructure of C3S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C3S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C3S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C3S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small ‘hollowed-out’ hydration shells were observed in the C3S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

K.O. Kjellsen; B. Lagerblad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

SciTech Connect

The development of the microstructure of C{sub 3}S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C{sub 3}S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C{sub 3}S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C{sub 3}S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small 'hollowed-out' hydration shells were observed in the C{sub 3}S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

Kjellsen, K.O. [Norcem A.S, Heidelberg Cement Group, N-3950 Brevik (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.kjellsen@norcem.no; Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

EFFECT OF NaF AND SnO{sub 2} ON PORTLAND CEMENT CLINKER FABRICATION  

SciTech Connect

The paper aimed at studying the effect of NaF and SnO{sub 2} employed as mineralisers on Portland cement clinker fabrication. In order to do this, the raw mix included in turn 0.5% NaF, 0.5% SnO{sub 2}, and a combination of 0.5% NaF and 0.5% SnO{sub 2}, all expressed as weight percentages of the raw mix. The effects of the presence of NaF and SnO{sub 2} mineralisers on the raw mix were studied by investigations of the loss on ignition at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C with calculating the corresponding decarbonation ratio of the raw mix, determination of free lime and XRD analysis. NaF was found to have a positive effect both during the decarbonation of the raw mix and during the formation of minerals in clinker. On the other hand, SnO{sub 2} has but a little effect on the decarbonation process. Finally, the combined use of NaF and SnO{sub 2} modifies the kinetics of binding the free lime to the effect of accelerating the process as compared to the separate use of each mineraliser.

Paceagiu, Jenica; Amzica, Florin; Chendrean, Teofil; Paraschiv, Tatiana [CEPROCIM SA, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes  

SciTech Connect

Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of {sup 1}H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The 'Solid-liquid' separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C-S-H gel. {sup 1}H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C-S-H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

Bortolotti, Villiam, E-mail: villiam.bortolotti@unibo.it [Department DICAM, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, 40131, Bologna (Italy); Fantazzini, Paola [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Mongiorgi, Romano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Sauro, Salvatore [Department of Dental Biomaterials Science Kings College, London Dental Institute at Guy's, King's College and St Thomas' Hospitals, Floor 17 Guy's Tower, Guys Hospital, London Bridge, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, University of Granada, Colegio Maximo, Campus de Cartuja, Granada (Spain); Zanna, Silvano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System  

SciTech Connect

Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

Canonico, J.S.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fly ash production. Researchers have subsequently had the opportunity to develop a full body of knowledge concerning bitum1nous ash and its applications. The first s1gn1ficant use of b1tuminous fly ash probably occurred 20 in the 1940's when...THE VARIABILITY OF FLY ASH AND ITS EFFECTS ON SELECTED PROPERTIES OF FRESH PORTLAND CEi'1ENT/FLY ASH MORTARS A Thesis by WILLIAM CARLTON MCKERALL Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of Texas A&M Uni ver s i ty in partia1 fu1fi11ment...

McKerall, William Carlton

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate cements hydration Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements... Transportation & Development and Louisiana State University incorporating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

42

History and some potentials of oil shale cement  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements J, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK Abstract The heat of hydration of a number of composite cement systems has of composite cements based on the partial replacement of Portland cement by waste materials has become

Sheffield, University of

44

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

45

Solar Policy Environment: Portland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

City of Portland’s Solar Now! Program will pursue solar market transformation for Portland residents, businesses, and city operations. The program will work with other City bureaus to ease the regulatory process by streamlining city-level regulations for contractors, homeowners and businesses. The City will use its influence as a regulator, educator and motivator to reach the larger regional community.

46

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermal and mechanical properties of hemp fabric-reinforced nanoclay–cement nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of nanoclay on thermal and mechanical properties of hemp ... these properties are improved as a result of nanoclay addition. An optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement with 1 wt% nanoclay is...

A. Hakamy; F. U. A. Shaikh; I. M. Low

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

10 - Assessing the environmental impact of conventional and ‘green’ cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: With the current focus on sustainability, it is necessary to evaluate cement’s environmental impact properly, especially when developing new ‘green’ concrete types. Therefore, this chapter investigates the available literature on every process involved during the production of cement and its alternatives. A detailed study of ordinary Portland cement’s environmental impacts is followed by an assessment of improvement potentials which can be achieved with the use of supplementary cementitious materials. Finally, the environmental impacts of alternative binders such as sulfoaluminate or magnesia cements as well as alkali activated binders are studied.

G. Habert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

'The Overriding Demand for Energy Conservation in the Cement Industry' An Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and argillaceous materials such as limestone and clay or shale into an intermediate fused material called clinker, which is subse quently ground together with a small amount of gypsum. Portland cement is the principal material produced by the U. S. cement..., energy con sumption pe r ton of cement produced dropped overall by 10 percent, despite considerably higher electric power requirements for pollution control and coal-handling facilities. It is significant that the industry has rapidly con verted its...

Spellman, L. U.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cementation Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contributions vary in quality, but any...solid bed-rock by cementation...sedimentary rocks covered include...strata ofthe rock record...petroleum reservoir in which...microenvironmental permeability alone. Large...cements in sandstones, kinds ofsilicifica-tion...fabrics, porosity development...

GERALD M. FRIEDMAN

1988-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Re-use of drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) sludge: Characterization and technological behaviour of cement mortars with atomized sludge additions  

SciTech Connect

This paper aims to characterize spray-dried DWTP sludge and evaluate its possible use as an addition for the cement industry. It describes the physical, chemical and micro-structural characterization of the sludge as well as the effect of its addition to Portland cements on the hydration, water demand, setting and mechanical strength of standardized mortars. Spray drying DWTP sludge generates a readily handled powdery material whose particle size is similar to those of Portland cement. The atomized sludge contains 12-14% organic matter (mainly fatty acids), while its main mineral constituents are muscovite, quartz, calcite, dolomite and seraphinite (or clinoclor). Its amorphous material content is 35%. The mortars were made with type CEM I Portland cement mixed with 10 to 30% atomized sludge exhibited lower mechanical strength than the control cement and a decline in slump. Setting was also altered in the blended cements with respect to the control.

Husillos Rodriguez, N., E-mail: nuriah@ietcc.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja (CSIC), Serrano Galvache 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Martinez Ramirez, S.; Blanco Varela, M.T. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja (CSIC), Serrano Galvache 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Guillem, M.; Puig, J. [Cementos Molins S.A., Crta. N-340, 2 al 38, E-08620 Sant Vicenc dels Horts, Barcelona (Spain); Larrotcha, E.; Flores, J. [Aguas de Barcelona S.A., Avenida Diagonal 211, 08018 Barcelona (Spain)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollutant hydrogen fluoride Integrated Pollution Prevention and Controland control technology requirements for toxic air pollutants.control technologies for gaseous pollutants from Portland cement manufacturing (Greer 2003) Potential control technologies Mixing air

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Category:Portland, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OR OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Portland, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Portland OR... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Portland ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Portland... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Portlan... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Por... 72 KB SVOutPatient Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Portland ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

56

Theory of Sorption Hysteresis in Nanoporous Solids: II. Molecular condensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynami...

Bazant, Martin Z

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Category:Portland, ME | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ME ME Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Portland, ME" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 58 KB SVHospital Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVHospital Portland ME... 61 KB SVLargeHotel Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Portland ... 56 KB SVLargeOffice Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Portland... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Portlan... 59 KB SVMidriseApartment Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Por... 58 KB SVOutPatient Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVOutPatient Portland ...

58

[Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system  

SciTech Connect

Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel...

60

Portland Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Data Dashboard Portland Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Portland, Oregon, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003565pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Portland Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Summary of Reported Data Portland Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Portland, Oregon. Portland Summary of Reported...

62

Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

Kinoshita, Hajime, E-mail: h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Carro-Mateo, Beatriz [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain)] [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain); Marchand, Geraldine [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)] [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Collier, Nick [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Milestone, Neil [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)] [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sp surface pressure 0P maximum Hertz pressure r radial coordinate for axisymmetry R tip radius RH relative humidity t time lt loading time ht load holding time ut unloading time ? dimensionless parameter... show the ability of the self-consistent solution to capture both repulsive and adhesive effects. Also plotted are the Hertzian pressure profiles for the same indentation depths. Notice that because the Hertz solution neglects the adhesion outside...

Jones, Christopher

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Investigation of benefit of using coal wastes in cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste disposal in coal preparation plants leads to serious environmental problems. These wastes usually contain about 20% carbon, and the composition of the remaining ash is similar to clay. Addition of these wastes to cement clinker raw material utilises carbon as a source of energy. In this investigation, the effect of addition of these waste materials to the raw materials used in cement manufacture is studied. Ordinary type II cement and sulphoaluminate cement may be produced from the wastes. Mechanical strength, chemical and phase analysis, setting time and particle size distribution of the cement were studied. The results of the experiments show that an addition of about 3% of the coal wastes to the raw materials used in cement manufacture produces cements with good quality. Further, energy consumption may be reduced by up to 15%.

A. Sarrafi; M.R. Izadpanah; A. Ebrahimi; A.I. Mansouri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

Chen, Ying-Liang [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Ko, Ming-Sheng [Institute of Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chunghsiao E. Rd., Taipei City 10608, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yi-Chieh [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Chung-Pei Rd., Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Chang, Juu-En, E-mail: juuen@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Theory of Sorption Hysteresis in Nanoporous Solids: II. Molecular condensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynamics simulations, where the interfacial energy (or gradient penalty) at nanopore junctions acts as a free energy barrier for snap-through instabilities. The model helps to quantitatively understand recent experimental data for concrete or cement paste wetting and drying cycles and suggests new experiments at different temperatures and humidity sweep rates.

Martin Z. Bazant; Zdenek P. Bazant

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry CalPortland New Westminster C4I Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Westminster Cement Terminal CalPortland Company 20 Capilano Way New Westminster, British Columbia V3L 5H2 The CalPortland Company New Westminster Cement Terminal opened for business in 1999. The terminal is located in New Westminster, BC and serves the surrounding markets including Vancouver. The terminal consists of two 600 ton storage silos, both pneumatic and mechanical conveying, and one truck loadout scale. The facility has space for 9 railcars, 6 gravity and 3 pneumatic railcars. The standard operating procedures were reviewed and new processes were put into place to minimize run time and maximize operating efficiencies. Additionally, the railcar fleet was rearranged to include more gravity than pneumatic railcars. Through excellent energy management practices the New

69

Problems in squeeze cementing  

SciTech Connect

For the past half century, work has been carried out to improve squeeze cementing. During the course of time, new techniques, equipment, cement and cement additives were introduced. Work is still underway to improve squeeze cementing. Basic concept of squeeze cementing, understanding the problems, planning for a squeeze job and then later testing of the job help in achieving the goal. Solutions were offered to some common problems, whereas many regional problems need time to time study and effort. Squeezing long perforations in highly permeable sand has always been a problem, for which some techniques were presented.

Toor, I.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Characteristics of hemp fabric reinforced nanoclay–cement nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement eco-nanocomposites reinforced with hemp fabric (HF) and nanoclay platelets (Cloisite 30B) are fabricated and investigated in terms of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, physical and mechanical properties. Results indicated that the mechanical properties generally increased as a result of the addition of nanoclay into the cement matrix with HF. An optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement with 1 wt% nanoclay decreased the porosity and also significantly increased the density, flexural strength and fracture toughness of HF-reinforced nanocomposite. The microstructural results indicate that the nanoclay behaves not only as a filler to improve the microstructure, but also as an activator to promote the pozzolanic reaction and thus improved the adhesion with hemp fabric. The failure micromechanisms and energy dissipative processes in HF-reinforced cement composite and HF-reinforced nanocomposite are discussed in terms of microstructural observations. These cement eco-nanocomposites can provide new insights for the development of new ‘environmental-friendly nanomaterials’ for building applications such as the construction of sandwich panels, ceilings and roofs.

A. Hakamy; F.U.A. Shaikh; I.M. Low

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

QER Public Meeting in Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West QER Public Meeting in Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West Meeting Date...

72

Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors...

73

NREL: Technology Deployment - Portland, Oregon Grassroots Solarize...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30% News Watch a video on the Solarize movement Pallets of PV: Communities Purchase Solar and Drive Down Costs Together Solarize Portland Solarize New York Solarize...

74

Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement  

SciTech Connect

This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.

Walker, B.W.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cement (2010 MECS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement Sector (NAICS 327310) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

76

Portland Public School Children Move with Propane  

SciTech Connect

This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

78

Leaching induced concentration profiles in the solid phase of cement  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the solid phase of portland cement specimens by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry before and after leaching provided elemental profiles within the cement. Releases of potassium were calculated from the solid phase profiles and were compared to releases determined from leachate analyses of potassium and cesium-137. The fraction of potassium released in the leachate was found to correlate closely to that of cesium-137 under varying time and temperature conditions, despite the different manner in which each was originally contained in the cement. Agreement was obtained among potassium releases as determined from the solid, potassium in the leachate and cesium-137 in the leachate. These correlations allowed the use of potassium as an analog for cesium-137 in cement. Profiles of potassium in the solid showed varying degrees of depletion. A specimen, sectioned immediately after leaching for 471 days, showed complete removal of potassium to 9 mm depth from the specimens surface. From 9 mm to the center of the specimen, an apparently linear increase in concentration was observed. Specimens that had been air dried prior to sectioning had profiles that were produced by evaporative transport of dissolved species toward the surface. Carbonation of the surface appears to have retarded migration of the dissolved material. This prevented it from reaching the outer edge and resulted in increased potassium concentrations several mm inside the surface. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

National Electric Transmission Congestion Study- Portland Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On December 13, 2011, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Portland, OR to receive input and suggestions concerning the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The workshop flyer, agenda, presentations, and full transcript are available below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Portland General Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since the late 1990s, Portland General Electric (PGE) has offered plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging for its employees. With the advent of the modern Level 2 and DC Quick-Charging standards,...

82

Promoting High-Performance Homes to Portland Real Estate Pros  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two Portland, Oregon-based Better Buildings Residential Network members—the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability and Clean Energy Works (CEW)—are supporting Earth Advantage’s...

83

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

Fred Sabins

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Imperial Valley College Portland State University Imperial Valley College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imperial Valley College Portland State University Imperial Valley College Transfer Worksheet If you) at Imperial Valley College (IVC), you can rest assured that those credits will also transfer to Portland State. Degree Requirements (BA, BS) #12;Imperial Valley College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Caughman, John

85

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diversifying Weatherization Workforce Diversifying Weatherization Workforce Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce May 6, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE As Recovery Act funds started flowing towards businesses in Oregon last year, stakeholders in Portland wanted to make sure some of the money landed in the hands of women, minorities and other underrepresented groups. A diverse group in itself, the stakeholders-made up of city officials, labor unions, civil rights organizations, nonprofits, faith-based organizations and contractors-signed the agreement as the Clean Energy Works Portland program got underway. The agreement ensures that those in disadvantaged communities have access to some of the weatherization jobs stemming from the pilot phase, which has almost 500 homes receiving

87

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluation of cement production using a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

There are several primary conclusions which can be reached and used to define research required in establishing the feasibility of using PFBC-derived materials as cement feedstock. 1. With appropriate blending almost any material containing the required cement-making materials can be utilized to manufacture cement. However, extensive blending with multiple materials or the use of ash in relatively small quantities would compromise the worth of this concept. 2. The composition of a potential feedstock must be considered not only with respect to the presence of required materials, but just as significantly, with respect to the presence and concentration of known deleterious materials. 3. The processing costs for rendering the feedstock into an acceptable composition and the energy costs associated with both processing and burning must be considered. It should be noted that the cost of energy to produce cement, expressed as a percentage of the price of the product is higher than for any other major industrial product. Energy consumption is, therefore, a major issue. 4. The need for conformance to environmental regulations has a profound effect on the cement industry since waste materials can neither be discharged to the atmosphere or be shipped to a landfill. 5. Fifth, the need for achieving uniformity in the composition of the cement is critical to controlling its quality. Unfortunately, certain materials in very small concentrations have the capability to affect the rate and extent to which the cementitious compound in portland cement are able to form. Particularly critical are variations in the ash, the sulfur content of the coal or the amount and composition of the stack dust returned to the kiln.

DeLallo, M.; Eshbach, R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Institute of Transportation Studies Portland State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Transportation Studies Portland State University November 2007 Transit's Dirty Little Director, UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies #12;Institute of Transportation Studies Transit of Transportation Studies Fewer than 40 trips per capita since 1965 Trend in Transit Ridership Per Capita 1900

Bertini, Robert L.

90

Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Proceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis, Seaside Oregon, GIS, flood hazard maps, shoreline change, digital elevation model INTRODUCTION, 2006). The flood maps and GIS data are briefly described here. 100- AND 500-YEAR FLOOD MAPSProceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon July 22 to 26, 2007 Coastal Zone 07: Wong 1 GIS

92

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

97-D Portland General Electric Company Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company Application from PGE to export electric energy...

94

MECS 2006 - Cement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Cement More Documents & Publications Cement (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Glass Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)...

95

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get...

96

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

MHK Projects/Portland | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland Portland < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.3063,"lon":144.755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Portland, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Portland, OR) (Redirected from Portland, OR) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5234515°, -122.6762071° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5234515,"lon":-122.6762071,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Portland, ME) (Redirected from Portland, ME) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.661471°, -70.2553259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.661471,"lon":-70.2553259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

Portland General Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland General Electric Co Portland General Electric Co Place Oregon Service Territory Oregon Website www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Landing Page www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Reference Page energy.gov/articles/green Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15248 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in mortars of white cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study white cement CEM I-52.5 and white limestone cement CEM II-LL, A and B, with 15% and 25% limestone substitution, were studied. The way delayed ettringite forms, due to exposure to high temperatures (50 °C) and external sulphate attacks, was examined in the mortar samples. The mortars were immersed at 50 °C for 180 days in: (a) a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and (b) a 5% Na2SO4 solution. During the experiment’s duration, the mortar samples were being observed visually on a regular basis while their expansion was estimated on a weekly basis by measuring the change of length with a micrometer. At the end of the experiment, the mortar samples’ compressive strength was determined and the deterioration products were identified through means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDAX), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Concluding it is evident that the amount of ettringite is proportional to the C3A content of cement. Sulphates amount in cement is the controlling factor for heat induced ettringite formation since when they are consumed the reaction stops. On the other hand in the case of external sulphate attack another important controlling factor is the compressive strength of the cement; the higher compressive strength the lower the risk of expansion. Finally, in the case of external sulphate attack, limestone, when added to cement, was proved to enhance the durability against sulphates attack when compared to a cement of the same class.

M. Katsioti; N. Patsikas; P. Pipilikaki; N. Katsiotis; K. Mikedi; M. Chaniotakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

103

West Valley College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Valley College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet If you are taking classes that are part of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at West Valley College (WVC) #12;West Valley College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority of majors at PSU

Caughman, John

104

Portland State University Confidentiality and Information Management Policy and Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland State University Confidentiality and Information Management Policy and Procedures I:\\Staff\\DEV\\Office\\KATRINA\\WEB\\Policies Page\\Info Mgmt Policy & Procedures.doc 8/15/2008 PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CONFIDENTIALITY and INFORMATION MANAGEMENT POLICY and PROCEDURES Confidentiality and Information Management Policy Information

Bertini, Robert L.

105

Full-scale tests of sulfur polymer cement and non-radioactive waste in heated and unheated prototypical containers  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur polymer cement has been demonstrated to be superior to portland cement in the stabilization of numerous troublesome low- level radioactive wastes, notably mixed waste fly ash, which contains heavy metals. EG G Idaho, Inc. conducted full-scale, waste-stabilization tests with a mixture of sulfur polymer cement and nonradioactive incinerator ash poured over simulated steel and ash wastes. The container used to contain the simulated waste for the pour was a thin-walled, rectangular, steel container with no appendages. The variable in the tests was that one container and its contents were at 65{degree}F (18{degree}C) at the beginning of the pour, while the other was preheated to 275{degree}F (135{degree}C) and was insulated before the pour. The primary goal was to determine the procedures and equipment deemed operationally acceptable and capable of providing the best probability of passing the only remaining governmental test for sulfur polymer cement, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's full-scale test. The secondary goal was to analyze the ability of the molten cement and ash mixture to fill different size pipes and thus eliminate voids in the resultant 24 ft{sup 3} monolith.

Darnell, G.R.; Aldrich, W.C.; Logan, J.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Full-scale tests of sulfur polymer cement and non-radioactive waste in heated and unheated prototypical containers  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur polymer cement has been demonstrated to be superior to portland cement in the stabilization of numerous troublesome low- level radioactive wastes, notably mixed waste fly ash, which contains heavy metals. EG&G Idaho, Inc. conducted full-scale, waste-stabilization tests with a mixture of sulfur polymer cement and nonradioactive incinerator ash poured over simulated steel and ash wastes. The container used to contain the simulated waste for the pour was a thin-walled, rectangular, steel container with no appendages. The variable in the tests was that one container and its contents were at 65{degree}F (18{degree}C) at the beginning of the pour, while the other was preheated to 275{degree}F (135{degree}C) and was insulated before the pour. The primary goal was to determine the procedures and equipment deemed operationally acceptable and capable of providing the best probability of passing the only remaining governmental test for sulfur polymer cement, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s full-scale test. The secondary goal was to analyze the ability of the molten cement and ash mixture to fill different size pipes and thus eliminate voids in the resultant 24 ft{sup 3} monolith.

Darnell, G.R.; Aldrich, W.C.; Logan, J.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

China's Cement Production:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

108

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System October 3, 2011 - 4:43pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system will help Portland Community College save on its energy bills and help achieve its energy efficiency and sustainability goals. Students at the College will also learn about the fuel cell technology used in the project as part of a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum offered by the school. "The benefits of a combined heat and power fuel cell system, coupled with

109

Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $200 Provider Portland General Electric Portland General Electric's (PGE) Heat Pump Rebate Program offers residential customers a $200 rebate for an energy-efficient heat pump installed to PGE's standards by a PGE-approved contractor. The rebate is also available for replacing older, inefficient heat pump units. See the program web site or contact the utility for additional information on program incentives and guidelines. Other Information Heat pumps: 7.7 HSPF and 13 SEER minimum

110

2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Portland Workshop 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop On December 13, 2011, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Portland, OR to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The workshop flyer, agenda, presentations, and full transcript are available below. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2012 Western Workshops.pdf 12-13-11 CONGESTION WORKSHOP AGENDA - PORTLAND (final).pdf Introduction by David Meyer, DOE .pdf Presentation by Steve Oxley, WY PSC.pdf Presentation by Rich Bayless, NTTG.pdf Presentation by Susan Henderson, Xcel Energy.pdf Presentation by Marv Landauer, ColumbiaGrid.pdf Presentation by Steve Metague, PGE.pdf Presentation by Bradley Nickell, WECC.pdf

111

Design of High Viscosity Cement Gun for Vertebroplasty:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure for treating spine. Cement leakage is problem occurring from usage of low viscosity bone cements. High viscosity bone cements… (more)

Gupta, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

113

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

115

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING at PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITYMECHANICAL ENGINEERING at PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY The Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department at Portland State University offers a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Services Office: 503.725.4631; advisor@cecs.pdx.edu) Page 1 #12;TransfertoPSU:MaseehCollegeofEngineeringMECHANICAL ENGINEERING at PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITYMECHANICAL ENGINEERING at PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY The Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department at Portland State University offers a Bachelor

Bertini, Robert L.

116

Effects of variations in rate of temperature rise, curing temperature and size of specimen on selected physical properties of concrete made with type III cement and steam cured at atmospheric pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thesis Weldon Wayne Aldridge p 44 Subaitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1958 Ma)or Sub]ect: Civil Engineering...- ment of the requirements for a Master of . ":cience degree in Civil Engineering. Mr. Burleson used Type I Portland cement and siliceous sand and gravel in his conorete mixes which he held at a constant water/cement ratio throughout his testing...

Aldridge, Weldon Wayne

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM...

Ko, Sae Bom

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

[ ]May 2014 Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success in many locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility (PRF) site in Port Allen, Louisiana. The overall objective of this research study is to evaluate overlay sections using the ATLaS30 device available at the PRF; assess the fatigue, thermal, and

Harms, Kyle E.

119

Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as heat generation, strength development and shrinkage are the results of interrelated chemical, physical and mechanical processes. A thorough understanding of theses processes is a critical prerequisite for modeling

Meyer, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

122

Characterization using thermomechanical and differential thermal analysis of the sinterization of Portland clinker doped with CaF{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the sintering process of Portland cement was studied by combining thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), together with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal analysis results employing both techniques indicted that phase transformations appeared at lower temperatures when CaF{sub 2} was incorporated in the raw materials. Besides, it was observed at high temperature that in some phase transformations TMA conducts to better resolution compared with the DTA measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns corroborate the TMA and DTA results, corroborating that the final amount of alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) is higher when a certain amount of CaF{sub 2} was present during the clinkerization process.

Dominguez, O., E-mail: nanoquimica@yahoo.com [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres-Castillo, A. [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Flores-Velez, L.M. [Instituto de Metalurgia-UASLP, Sierra Leona 550, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres, R. [Mexichem Fluor S.A., Eje 106 s/n CP 78395, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

Veazey, G.W. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Ames, R.L. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specimens (58-60). The crystalline cement mineral tobermorite...has developed a cement waste form in which a slurry ofcement...additives is mixed with a waste solution. The "grout...Scintific Basr for Nuclear Waste Mangement VIII, vol...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 October 1970 research-article Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products A. J. Majumdar Glass fibre reinforced cements and gypsum plaster...discontinuous and irregular. The dispersion of glass fibre in the matrix is not easy. When chopped...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503  

SciTech Connect

During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Exergy analysis of cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, cement production in Greece has been examined using the exergy analysis methodology. The major goal of the modern cement and concrete production industry is the minimisation of energy costs and environmental effects. The rational management of raw materials and energy requires analytical decision making tools that will provide the necessary information for the identification of possible improvements in the life cycle of a product. The second law of Thermodynamics allows for the evaluation of the irreversibility and the exergetic performance of a process. The analysis involves assessment of energy and exergy input at each stage of the cement production process. The chemical exergy of the reaction is also calculated and taken into consideration. It is found that 50% of the exergy is being lost even though a big amount of waste heat is being recovered.

C. Koroneos; G. Roumbas; N. Moussiopoulos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

129

City of Portland- Green Building Policy and LEED Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2001, the City of Portland adopted a Green Building Policy requiring new construction and major renovations of all city facilities to meet the Certified level of LEED. This policy was amended on...

130

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Portland, Oregon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland, Oregon Portland, Oregon FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Portland, Oregon October 7, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of Mount Hood. The logo reads On the Trail to Peak Energy Efficiency; FUPWG April 20-21, 2010; Portland, Oregon. April 19-21, 2011 Hosted by Bonneville Power Administration Tuesday, April 19, 2011 (Pre-Meeting) 8:30 am Welcome and Overview Curt Nichols, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) 9:00 am FEMP Introduction David McAndrew, Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 9:00 am Overview of Available BPA Services Your Steps to Energy Savings Partners and Resources Curt Nichols, BPA 10:15 am Break 10:30 am General Services Administration (GSA) Assisted Acquisition Services Bob Campbell, GSA 11:00 am

131

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

132

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Portland General Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from PGE) (Redirected from PGE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Portland General Electric Co Place Oregon Service Territory Oregon Website www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Landing Page www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Reference Page energy.gov/articles/green Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15248 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

134

Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

97-D Portland General Electric Company: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 103 - May 29, 2014 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland General...

135

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Magnetic resonance studies of cement based materials in inhomogeneous magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

Single-sided magnets give hope that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) might in future be used for in situ characterisation of hydration and water transport in the surface layers of concrete slabs. Towards that end, a portable NMR-MOUSE (MObile Universal Surface Explorer) has been used to follow the hydration of gypsum based plaster, a Portland cement paste and concrete mortar. The results compare favourably to those obtained using a standard laboratory bench-top spectrometer. Further, stray field imaging (STRAFI) based methods have been used with embedded NMR detector coils to study water transport across a mortar/topping interface. The measured signal amplitudes are found to correlate with varying sample conditions.

Boguszynska, Joanna [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Brown, Marc C.A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); McDonald, Peter J. [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk; Mitchell, Jonathan [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Mulheron, Mike [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Verganelakis, Dimitris A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

138

Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

Kruger, A.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

140

The Portland Hills Fault: uncovering a hidden fault in Portland, Oregon using high-resolution geophysical methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Portland metropolitan area historically is the most seismically active region in Oregon. At least three potentially active faults are located in the immediate vicinity of downtown Portland, with the Portland Hills Fault (PHF) extending directly beneath downtown Portland. The faults are poorly understood, and the surface geologic record does not provide the information required to assess the seismic hazards associated with them. The limited geologic information stems from a surface topography that has not maintained a cumulative geologic record of faulting, in part, due to rapid erosion and deposition from late Pleistocene catastrophic flood events and a possible strike-slip component of the faults. We integrated multiple high-resolution geophysical techniques, including seismic reflection, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and magnetic methods, with regional geological and geophysical surveys to determine that the Portland Hills Fault is presently active with a zone of deformation that extends at least 400 m. The style of deformation is consistent with at least two major earthquakes in the last 12–15 ka, as confirmed by a sidehill excavation trench. High-resolution geophysical methods provide detailed images of the upper 100 m across the active fault zone. The geophysical images are critical to characterizing the structural style within the zone of deformation, and when integrated with a paleoseismic trench, can accurately record the seismic history of a region with little surface geologic exposure.

Lee M. Liberty; Mark A. Hemphill-Haley; Ian P. Madin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

City of Portland, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland Portland Place Michigan Utility Id 15246 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial Large General Service "LGS" Industrial Residential Service Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh Industrial: $0.0853/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Portland,_Michigan_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410130"

143

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

144

Portland Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home Portland Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home June 9, 2010 - 2:07pm Addthis Insulation is blown into the home of Roy and Kim Fox in Portland, Ore. EcoTech modified its equipment to avoid damaging the home, which was built in 1884. | Photo courtesy of Roy Fox | Insulation is blown into the home of Roy and Kim Fox in Portland, Ore. EcoTech modified its equipment to avoid damaging the home, which was built in 1884. | Photo courtesy of Roy Fox | Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy "Lots of people come to see our house but these people were here to see weatherization." Roy Fox, historic homeowner On most days, visitors traipsing up the doorsteps of Roy and Kim Fox's

145

Relationship Between Engineering Properties, Mineralogy, and Microstructure in Cement-Based Hydroceramic Materials Cured at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. I. Introduction CEMENT is universally used in the construction of oil and geothermal wells. Cement

Bentz, Dale P.

146

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects June 4, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in the Portland area by this fall. A program developed by the city of Portland, Ore., is proving to be a model of public and private collaboration for large-scale home retrofit projects throughout the country. Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in

148

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Abstract: About 1800...

149

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstrationAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement PlantsCement Ltd. also installed waste heat recovery equipment on

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fracture model for cemented aggregates  

A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation Conditioned spaces when a space is not being occupied and be selected with energy efficiency and safety as top priorities scheduling team to consolidate activities into energy efficient buildings on campus. Purchasing When

Caughman, John

152

March 15, 2006Portland State University Electronic Communications from Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Practice · Institutional and Technical Barriers to Implementation · Feasibility Assessment/Security Power failure Number of Responses [N=49] #12;March 15, 2006Portland State University Technical Barriers & Motor Vehicle Services Division: A Feasibility Assessment Christopher M. Monsere, Principal Investigator

Bertini, Robert L.

153

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab Bret Comnes & A. La Rosa 1. Introduction Arduino Libraries Writing our own PID control loop isn't that hard, but there are a lot of details to take to start with an Arduino library is the libraries documentation. (Beauregard, PIDLibrary, 2013). This page

154

Geologic Mapping and Database for Portland Area Fault Studies Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This collection of digital geologic data derives from geologic and interpretive maps prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) over the last 15 years. Most of the data was collected in the course of preparing digital earthquake hazards maps for all or part of the greater Portland (METRO) urban growth

Ian P. Madin

155

Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY HDOBPvvIi va vGI ge(iD(vI oannItI au NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT 9(evP(n uDnuPnnBIrv au vGI eI0DPeIBIrvR uae vGI i...IteII au LEHNFA -M Ho2FYoF EDtDRv 3456 L(7ae HDO7I8v? oP1Pn FrtPrIIePrt ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY E99ea1Ii (R va RvTnI (ri 8arvIrv OT? LP...

Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The following information is intended to complement and support existing policies and procedures in place at Portland State University ("PSU") and the Portland State University Foundation ("PSU Foundation")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in place at Portland State University ("PSU") and the Portland State University Foundation ("PSU Foundation Foundation and the Executive Director for Financial Services and Controller will sign on behalf of PSU consider the value of the gift to the University or the PSU Foundation. Please consider the following

Caughman, John

157

Hydrogeology and Water Resource Potential of Neogene Sediments in the Tualatin Basin and Comparison with the Neighboring Portland Basin, Northwest Oregon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Network:: unpublished data, Weather Office, Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR. Wilson, D. C., 1997...Network: unpublished data, Weather Office, Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR. WILSON, D. C., 1997...

DOYLE C. WILSON

158

Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. (TNO Inst. of Applied Geoscience (NL)); Breunese, J.N. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands (NL)); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. (Ministry of Oil and Mineral Resources (YE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microsoft Word - 11-20973.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characteristics than normal Type II Portland Cement and the aggregates may need to be a shale, clay or slate material containing a lower percentage of quartz. For the FOAK...

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport portland oregon Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- ENRON), 1998-1999 Rogue River Channel... -6, 1981 Portland, Conference, Megawatts for Small Hydro, ... Source: Cox, Dan - O.H. Hinsdale Wave Laboratory, Oregon State University...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

162

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plantsquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinkerthere is significant effect of waste heat recovery on dioxin

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Welcome to Portland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Welcome to Portland Mike Weedall Vice President for Energy Efficiency Bonneville Power Administration FUPWG Spring Meeting Portland, Oregon April 20-21, 2011 Slide 2 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Bonneville Power Slide 3 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BPA's Service Area Slide 4 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Energy Efficiency Pays * BPA helps our customers encourage energy

165

Better Buildings- Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings.

166

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. Attached you

167

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC -1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC - 1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation Lifeguard Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation Type of work ­ position requires mostly sitting experience. Application can be found here: http://www.pdx.edu/recreation/employment-opportunities-0 o See

Bertini, Robert L.

168

BEST IN THE WEST Portland State University is one of the best colleges and universi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a "Green Rating" of 90 out of 99 for its environmentally related policies, practices, and course offeringsBEST IN THE WEST Portland State University is one of the best colleges and universi- ties in its "Best in the West" review. In the profile on Portland State, The Princeton Review gives PSU

Bertini, Robert L.

169

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities...

Jang, Se Hoon

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissionsand energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop a novel, zeolite-containing lightweight, high temperature, high pressure geothermal cement, which will provide operators with an easy to use, flexible cementing system that saves time and simplifies logistics.

174

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

175

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

176

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Portland Cement Pyroprocessing Operations. Skokie, IL,for Portland Cement Pyroprocessing Operations Firing Tire-Fuels Preparation Pyroprocessing Clinker Cooling Emissions

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts Background Sandvik in cemented carbide, high-speed steel and other hard materials such as diamond, cubic boron nitride in cemented carbide inserts will be performed using the FEM software Ansys and AdvantEdge. The work

Haviland, David

178

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also probe the texture and extent of anisotropic structures within cement paste at micrometer length...nanocomposites: Concrete, bone, and shale . J Am Ceram Soc 90 : 2677 – 2692 . 19...elasticity of an isotropic aggregate of anisotropic cubic crystals . J Appl Mech 21 : 135...

Roland J.-M. Pellenq; Akihiro Kushima; Rouzbeh Shahsavari; Krystyn J. Van Vliet; Markus J. Buehler; Sidney Yip; Franz-Josef Ulm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 January 1980 research-article Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion...Ubbelohde G. Manfre The development of glass fibre compositions having sufficient alkali...resistance were used in an initial evaluation of glass compositions, which were then further...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013 Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013 at 5:00 PM PDT Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs LShapton's picture Submitted by LShapton(9) Member 28 August, 2013 - 15:09 Portland General Electric has issued an RFP for marketing and supply for its voluntary renewable energy program. Bidders may bid on the marketing or supply portions of the RFP or both. Intent to bid is due September 3, 2013. Date: Wednesday, 28 August, 2013 - 00:00 - Tuesday, 3 September, 2013 - 17:00 Groups: Renewable Energy RFPs Login to post comments Latest event comments No comments have been made yet Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Past group events Aug 27 2013 Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013

183

Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies September 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu today awarded more than $1.3 million to Ocean Renewable Power Company in Portland, Maine to improve the efficiency, flexibility, and environmental performance of hydroelectric energy. The investment will further the nation's supply of domestic clean hydroelectricity through technological innovation and will advance research to maximize the nation's largest renewable energy source. "Hydropower is our largest source of renewable energy and it can play an even bigger role in the further. These investments will create jobs, cut

184

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BTu/tonne cement) Baseline Portland Cement produced at wet kiln long dry kiln Coal Electricity Distillate (diesel)

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

186

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Silica fume 0.2 2.89 3.3 Slag 8 14.2 Sand 150-1180 28.5 55.7 Steel 710-2000...28); 83-01 is made with basaltic sand. tSee (27). tSee (40). (pH 12...cement and 30% 28 days 38 15 11,000 30 21 sand Natura weathering (U.K.) for 36 13...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

188

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

189

An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage characteristics of solid cement mortar cylinders. Two var1a- tions 1nvolving mechanically induced porosity were also investigated. Rocks, a commonly used sensible heat storage material, were tested to prov1de a reference for the cement... mortar. A numer1cal model, analogous to program available for rock bed storage systems, simulating the cement mortar cylinder storage section was developed. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for use in the model...

Davis, Glenn Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

191

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Power Generation by Waste Heat of the Kiln in NingguoPure Low Temperature & Waste Heat in Beijing Cement Ltd. ;flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstration

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry incement and using alternative fuels in the cement kiln. There

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Understanding the Link Between Bicyclists and Light Rail Survey Results from Bicycle Riders on MAX in Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the Link Between Bicyclists and Light Rail Survey Results from Bicycle Riders on MAX Introduction 1 Portland Bicycle Master Plan, Section V 2 History of Bicycles on MAX 3 Benefits of the Bicycle is a bicycle friendly city. In 1995 and 1998, Bicycling Magazine named Portland the best city for bicycling

Bertini, Robert L.

196

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung Abstract Electric polarization induced an increase of the measured electrical resistivity of carbon fiber of the cement paste through the use of carbon fibers that were more crystalline, the increase of the fiber

Chung, Deborah D.L.

198

Two-dimensional computational simulation of eccentric annular cementing displacements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1 etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...in the far field. The narrow...Etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...can expect a cumulative error of size...design in a field setting. Thus...certain heavy oils in porous media......

S. Pelipenko; I. A. Frigaard

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Cement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The geopolymer concrete is a more durable and green material with less CO2 emission and less energy consuming as compared with the widely used Portland… (more)

Fan, Fenghong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Portland General Electric Company Renewable Energy RFP , Deadline Sept 28, 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portland General Electric Company Portland General Electric Company REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Issued: August 22, 2001 INTRODUCTION Portland General Electric Company (PGE) is requesting bid proposals for retail marketing services and renewable power or tradable renewable credits (TRCs) sufficient to meet the needs of PGE customer enrollments for the period from March 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003. Proposals are due by 5:00 p.m. on September 28, 2001. Pursuant to the Oregon Public Utility Commission (OPUC) adoption of Portfolio Options contained in ORS 757.603(2), OAR 860-038-0220 (refer to OPUC Order 01-337 at http://www.puc.state.or.us/orders/2001ords/01-337.pdf.) PGE is seeking to purchase Marketing Services and Renewable Energy or TRCs in support of the Company's portfolio option offers of

204

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257­271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum of the cement formed, the maturation of petroleum in the interbedded shales likely postdates cementation. q 1998 of partially cemented petroleum reservoirs may help in constraining the physical character of a reservoir

205

Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

Columbia University

206

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

208

Klondike II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Klondike II Facility Klondike II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Wasco OR Coordinates 45.592556°, -120.590322° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.592556,"lon":-120.590322,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC -1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC - 1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation Outdoor recreation. This is accomplished by offering adventure trips, non-credit instruction, team-building programs resource to the PSU community regarding outdoor recreation. DESCRIPTION The Climbing Center Student

Veerman, J. J. P.

210

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC -1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus Rec | 210 ASRC - 1800 SW Sixth Avenue | Portland, OR 97201 www.pdx.edu/recreation Outdoor and environmentally conscious outdoor recreation. This is accomplished by offering adventure trips, non as the informational resource to the PSU community regarding outdoor recreation. This position is open to all currently

Daescu, Dacian N.

211

Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portland State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portland State University Oct 14, 2009 #12;Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money James Whiteneck #12;Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portal archives a large amount of data Over

Bertini, Robert L.

212

Department of Energy Announces Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting in Portland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC – The Energy Department’s Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis will host a public meeting in Portland, OR, on Friday, July 11, to receive stakeholder input to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), an administration-wide effort to make recommendations regarding key infrastructure needed for transmission, storage and distribution of energy.

213

Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

214

This was printed from Portland Business Journal Oregon State diploma yields top  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to send the kids to the Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls. The typical 30-year returnScale grouped the results for 137 schools in 13 western states, OSU ranked 31st. The University of Portland ranked 91 out of 691 schools. However, PayScale added a cautionary note about OIT: Its rank falls

Tullos, Desiree

215

n a recent TEDx talk she gave before a Portland audience, microbiologist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Brown is an expert in sustainable buildings. His involvement ensures that the discoveries made test sites like the UO's sustainably built Lundquist College of Business and a Portland hospital other, with humans, and with their environment. "Buildings are complex ecosystems that are an important

Oregon, University of

216

Energy Department Recognizes Cities of Beaverton and Hillsboro, Oregon, Portland Public Schools in Better Buildings Challenge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a part of the Administration’s effort to support greater energy efficiency through the Better Buildings Challenge, the Energy Department today recognized the cities of Beaverton and Hillsboro, as well as the Portland Public School District for their leadership in reducing energy use.

217

Watch a Live Stream of the Portland Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review- Today!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On Friday, July 11, the Department of Energy will host a public meeting in Portland, Oregon, to gather public comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review. This meeting will focus specifically on issues associated with electricity transmission, storage and distribution in the western United States.

218

An Exploration of Bicycle-Motor Vehicle Crash Types and Causes in Portland-Metro, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Exploration of Bicycle-Motor Vehicle Crash Types and Causes in Portland-Metro, Oregon by Kouros. This research project investigates ways to improve traffic safety, focusing specifically on bicycle- motor of BMV crashes resulted in fatal injury and 127 of resulted in incapacitating injury. Each bicycle crash

Bertini, Robert L.

219

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

220

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

222

Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase II Wind Farm Phase II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (1–5 km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~ 50 km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125–150 m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (19–13 ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (11–8 ka) buried at 70–30 m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5 cm year? 1 during 11–9 ka and 0.3 cm year? 1 during 9–0 ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

Curt D. Peterson; Rick Minor; Gary L. Peterson; Edward B. Gates

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to provide an assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 400 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 ..mu..m in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling. Particulate transport mechanisms which appear to be of greatest importance include laminar and turbulent mass transfer, thermophoresis, electrophoresis, and inertial impaction. Chemical reaction mechanisms of particular importance include the deposition of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, spurrite, calcium carbonate, and calcium sulfate. At sufficiently low temperatures, sulfuric acid and water can condense on heat exchanger surfaces which can cause corrosion and also attract particulates in the flow. The deleterious effects of gas-side fouling in cement plants are due to: (1) increased capital costs; (2) increased maintenance costs; (3) loss of production; and (4) energy losses. A conservative order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the cost of gas-side fouling in US cement plants is $0.24 billion annually.

Marner, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Expansion-contraction cycles for cement optimized as a function of additives  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was carried out to investigate the addition of specific additives to cement in order to eliminate the micro-fractures and micro-annuli that cause gas migration. The experiments performed monitored the change in the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction were observed. This is due to the individual contributions of each part of the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized for the best final cement results. By utilizing the correct amount of Anchorage Clay, XC-Polymer, Ironite Scavenger, Ultrafine cement and Synthetic Rubber powder in a class G mixture at a given temperature and confining pressure, an impermeable cement mixture can be obtained. The correct amount of Synthetic Rubber used for cyclic pressure reduction is a function of cement setting temperature and pressure as well as the elastic properties of the rubber. By using laboratory testing at different pressure and temperature with different rubber concentrations and elastic properties, it is estimated that the entire annulus can have an impermeable cement from surface to total depth. The difference in temperature and pressure with depth dictates the concentration and elastic properties of the rubber as the required expansion and contraction changes with depth.

Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Resource Saving Technologies in Cement Industry.1:87–94. Blue World Crete. 2012. Technology. Available atOakey. 2009. CO 2 Capture Technologies for Cement Industry.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of completed page authorized Printed on recycled paper #12;ii SI* (MODERN METRIC) CONVERSION FACTORS Notes 16. Abstract In 2001, Oregon's governor responded to a perceived future energy shortage illumination reductions on Oregon interstate highways as part of their energy saving strategy. The illumination

Bertini, Robert L.

230

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production instantly reaches the current world best practice energyworld best practice and implement aggressive energy efficiency and carbon reduction measures in all cement productionenergy intensity of China’s cement production would reach current world

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effectiveness of the top-down nanotechnology in the production of ultrafine cement (~220?nm)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present investigation is dealing with the communition of the cement particle to the ultrafine level (?220 nm) utilizing the bead milling process, which is considered as a top-down nanotechnology. During the grinding of the cement particle, ...

Byung-Wan Jo, Sumit Chakraborty, Ki Heon Kim, Yun Sung Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2008 is used as the fuel price in the fuel conservationprices and average fuel prices for Shandong’s cementCurve (FCSC) with average fuel price for the studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Monitoring the ettringite formation in cement paste using low field T2-NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work we study the transverse relaxation time evolution of water molecules confined inside cement paste during the hydration process. The cement paste under study was manufactured with different water-to-cement ratios and using two types of cement: gray cement (CEM I 52.5 R) having a high content of magnetic impurities and white cement (CEM I 52.5 N) with lower amount of magnetic impurities. The two cement types were chosen in order to better distinguish the surface contribution to the relaxation process. On this basis a relationship between porosity evolution ettringite formation and the transverse relaxation time evolution was established. It was also observed that the increase in the water-to-cement ratio better reveals the ettringite formation.

Alexandra Pop; Codruta Badea; Ioan Ardelean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted an inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon. The purpose of their inspection was to determine if a covert video surveillance operation conducted at Bonneville Power Administration was consistent with Department of Energy policies and procedures and other applicable regulations and procedures, and to determine if administrative leave policies and procedures used at Bonneville Power Administration in a specific instance were consistent with Department of Energy requirements and the Code of Federal Regulations. This inspection focused on a specific incident that occurred in 1989 on the 5th floor of the BPA Headquarters Building located in Portland, Oregon. The incident involved the soiling of an employee`s personal property with what appeared to be urine.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

High-volume natural volcanic pozzolan and limestone powder as partial replacements for portland cement in self-compacting and sustainable concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the resulting self-compacting concrete (SCC). Petrographicity, which satisfy self-compacting concrete criteria withoutcement in self-compacting and sustainable concrete K. Celik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

240

Sulfur dioxide oxidation and plume formation at cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

Results of source sampling at the Glens Falls cement kiln in Glens Falls, N.Y., are reported for sulfur oxides, ammonia, hydrochloric acid, oxygen, and moisture content. The origin of a detached, high-opacity, persistent plume originating from the cement kiln stack is investigated. It is proposed that this plume is due to ammonium salts of SOx and sulfuric acid that have been formed in condensed water droplets in the plume by the pseudocatalytic action of ammonia. (1 diagram, 1 graph, 22 references, 7 tables)

Dellinger, B.; Grotecloss, G.; Fortune, C.R.; Cheney, J.L.; Homolya, J.B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Long-term monitoring of microleakage of dental cements by radiochemical diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive /sup 14/C sucrose was found to be an ideal marker for microleakage because it did not penetrate tooth tissue, dental cement, or mounting resin. The main finding is that the adhesive cements--the glass-ionomer and polycarboxylate--are significantly more effective at preventing microleakage than are the traditional phosphate cements--silicate and zinc phosphate. The differences can be as high as two orders of magnitude. The adhesive cements provide almost perfect and reliable seals. By contrast, the nonadhesive cements are erratic sealants with most of the restorations leaking.

Powis, D.R.; Prosser, H.J.; Wilson, A.D.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions  

SciTech Connect

Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

244

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

245

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Extension and replacement of aspalt cement with sulphur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation were performed on selected combinations of aggregate, asphalt and sulphur. Three different methods of incorpora- ting the mixture ingredients were studied. Based upon results of the screening and characterization tests, relationships between... Selection of Analysis Methods . Selection of Materials Characterization Tests CHAPTER IV. TASK B: DEVELOPMENT OF SULPHUR EXTENDED ASPHALT SYSTEMS Selection of Mixture Composition and Experimental Design Variables . Sulphur Selection Asphalt Cement...

Pickett, Daniel Ernest

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

BUTLER,L.G.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microsoft Word - DOE Congestion Workshop Portland 12-13-11 Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 4 5 6 NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY 7 WORKSHOP 8 9 10 Portland, Oregon 11 Tuesday, December 13, 2011 12 13 14 2 PARTICIPANTS: 1 Welcome and Presentation: 2 DAVID MEYER 3 U.S. Department of Energy 4 5 Panel 1 Regulators: 6 7 PHILIP B. JONES 8 Washington Utilities & Transportation 9 Commission 10 11 STEVE OXLEY 12 Wyoming Public Service Commission 13 14 JOHN SAVAGE 15 Oregon Public Utilities Commission 16 17 MARSHA SMITH 18 Idaho Public Utilities Commission 19 20 Panel 2 Industry: 21 22 RICH BAYLESS 23 TEPPC Representative, Pacificorp/Northern 24

250

DOE and Northwest Partners Host Three-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Portland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

More than 270 attendees gathered in Portland, OR to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 9-11, 2008. The workshop, hosted by DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and Puget Sound Energy, was the third DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

251

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

252

The impact of cement parameters on Delayed Ettringite Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) in concrete is likely to lead to swelling and cracking in structures which have undergone early age heating to a temperature of over 65 °C. Application of a method that accelerates this process has made it possible to study the impact of cement properties on DEF. For two temperatures reached by the concrete (75 °C or 85 °C), the study considers a domain defined by the sulphate content [2.6–3.6%], the alkali content [0.5–1%] and the Blaine specific area [3330–4635 cm2/g] of the cement. The impact of these parameters and the interactions between them on swelling are discussed. Monitoring of the dynamic elastic modulus of the concretes shows that this property may be reduced by DEF, but that it may increase again once the swelling process has ceased, probably due to the gradual filling of voids by ettringite formed under conditions of limited supersaturation.

A. Pavoine; X. Brunetaud; L. Divet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

SciTech Connect

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hard x-ray nanotomography of amorphous aluminosilicate cements.  

SciTech Connect

Nanotomographic reconstruction of a sample of low-CO{sub 2} 'geopolymer' cement provides the first three-dimensional view of the pore structure of the aluminosilicate geopolymer gel, as well as evidence for direct binding of geopolymer gel onto unreacted fly ash precursor particles. This is central to understanding and optimizing the durability of concretes made using this new class of binder, and demonstrates the value of nanotomography in providing a three-dimensional view of nanoporous inorganic materials.

Provis, J. L.; Rose, V.; Winarski, R. P.; van Deventer, J. S. J. (Advanced Photon Source); ( CNM)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Exponential coefficient plots for identifying cement channels from temperature logs  

SciTech Connect

One technique for identifying a cement channel in such a well is to inject cold water or diesel fuel for a period of time, followed by recording shut-in temperature profiles after the injection ceases. Qualitative judgements are made from the appearance of these profiles in order to confirm the existence of a channel. Alternatively, by processing the temperature logs mathematically, an exponential coefficient may be calculated and plotted against depth. This exponential coefficient plot is very responsive to the presence of cold fluid in a cement channel, and confirms a channel's existence quantitatively and conclusively. This paper discusses use of such a mathematical relationship in a predictive fashion for identifying injection zones. Methods are given for deriving and plotting the exponential coefficients from temperature logs of a well placed on cold fluid injection. Three examples are presented on the application of exponential coefficient plots to actual field logs for confirmation of suspected channels and for assessment of the uniformity of cement bonding.

Barnette, J.C.; Lanuke, E.W.; Carlson, N.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

In Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. A NEW H2O ICE HUGONIOT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Collisions on icy planetary bodies produce impact melt water, redistribute ground ice, and deposit thermalIn Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. 1 A NEW H2O ICE the onset of phase transformations on the ice Hugoniot, and consequently, the criteria for shock melting

Stewart, Sarah T.

259

Developing a Strategy for Reducing the Impact of Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants in Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more familiar with national best practices to reduce impaired driving. Objective The purpose-related crashes in Portland. The research intent was also to highlight best practices as found in the literature international and national best practices · Interview stakeholders in current Multnomah County and City

Bertini, Robert L.

260

Economic feasibility and optimisation of an energy storage system for Portland Wind Farm (Victoria, Australia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of a theoretical study of the economic advantages of using large-scale energy storage to complement a wind farm in a base-load dominated electricity grid. A computer model is developed which simulates the operation of several energy storage systems when used with the 190-MW Portland Wind Farm (PWF) located in Portland, Victoria, Australia. A variety of operating strategies are compared with the results of a dynamic programming model which finds the maximum possible revenue which a given system can generate for a set of input conditions. Three energy storage systems are modelled and costed: Pumped Seawater Hydro Storage (PSHS), Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES), and Thermal Energy Storage (TES). It is found that CAES is the most profitable storage medium, requiring a capital expenditure of A$140 M and generating a rate of return (ROR) of 15.4%. The ROR for PSHS was 9.6%, and for TES was 8.0%. Therefore, a significant investment opportunity exists for the installation of an energy storage system in this wind farm. It is therefore highly recommended that CAES is investigated further with the aim of introducing large-scale energy storage to PWF and other similar wind turbine installations.

Mir-Akbar Hessami; David R. Bowly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mg/Al Ordering in Layered Double Hydroxides Revealed by Multinuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental remediation, Portland cements, anionic conductors, drug candidates, proteins. Clare Grey and collaborators performed multinuclear quadrupolar NMR spectroscopy...

262

Study of cementing practices applied to the shallow casing in offshore wells  

SciTech Connect

Survey information shows annular gas flow associated with cementing defects to be a major problem in shallow casing strings offshore as well as in other cemented strings in oil and gas wells. The gas flow hazard to safety, environment, and economics could be reduced by an aggressive program keyed to prevent gas migration. The program components are: (1) historical data base; (2) training; (3) research of cement hydration in a long, thin column; and (4) development of logging-surveillance devices.

Martinez, J.; McDonald, W.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells "DeepTrek"  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to formulate a 'Supercement' designed for improving the long-term sealing integrity in HPHT wells. Phase I concentrated on chemistry studies and screening tests to design and evaluate Portland-based, hybrid Portland, and non-Portland-based cement systems suitable for further scale-up testing. Phase II work concentrated on additional lab and field testing to reduce the candidate materials list to two systems, as well as scaleup activities aimed at verifying performance at the field scale. Phase II was extended thorough a proposal to develop additional testing capabilities aimed at quantifying cementing material properties and performance that were previously not possible. Phase III focused on bringing the material(s) developed in previous Phases to commercialization, through Field Trials, Cost/Benefit Analysis, and Technology Transfer. Extensive development and testing work throughout the project led to Phase III commercialization of two very different materials: (1) Highly-expansive cement (Portland-based), patent pending as 'PRESTRESSED CEMENT'; and (2) Epoxy Resin (non-Portland-based), patent pending. Trade name is Ultra Seal-R. In Phase III, work concentrated on application of the Supercement materials in various increasingly-challenging wells. Previous testing revealed that PRESTRESSED CEMENT, when applied in weak or unconsolidated formations, tends to expand away from the central pipe, restricting the applicability of this material to competent formations. Tests were devised to quantify this effect so the material could be applied in appropriate wells. Additionally, the testing was needed because of industry resistance to expansive cements, due to previous marketing attempts with other materials that were less than successful. Field trials with the Epoxy Resin currently numbers in the hundreds of jobs at up to 295 deg F, with a large percentage being completely successful. Both the PRESTRESSED CEMENT as well as the Ultra Seal-R represent materials fulfilling the objectives of the DeepTrek project.

CSI Technologies

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect cement penetration Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of carbonation of cement-based products. The process of carbonation and the rate of carbonation penetration... were very important factors that affect rate of...

265

Identifying demand market participation opportunities available in cement plants / Izak Daniël Krüger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??South African cement manufacturers are under financial pressure. Sales have declined due to the 2008 recession and electricity costs have tripled from 2005 to 2012.… (more)

Krüger, Izak Daniël

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash blended cement Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLSM mixture utilized... . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... investigation. Two additional ash ......

268

Characterization of cement from a well at Teapot Dome Oil Field: Implications for geological sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wellbores represent the weakest link in terms of CO2 storage permanence. As a result, special attention to the numerous existing wells that perforate storage formations is needed. The pre-injection condition of the cement can influence the rate (and type) of alteration by the injected CO2 plume. The condition of the existing well cement depends on a variety of factors including wellbore/formation and wellbore/brine interactions as well as the composition and type of cement placed in the well (i.e. type of admixtures used, water/solids ratio, sulfate resistant mixes, etc.). In this paper, the details of recovering wellbore cement from an older well to determine pre-injection seal integrity are described. Petrographical and chemical analyses are presented for samples of cement that were retrieved from a 19-year-old well at Teapot Dome in Wyoming. Examination revealed that the retrieved cement had altered as a result of original slurry composition and with respect to the local downhole wellbore environment. Although samples were obtained from a single well, significant differences were observed in their alteration and condition. Sulfate attack resulted in abundant ettringite formation in a cement sample taken adjacent to the Wall Creek sandstone (3060 ft), while cement taken adjacent to the Tensleep formation (5478 ft) was decalcified and enriched in magnesium, owing to reaction of calcium hydroxide in the cement with the dolomitic formation.

George W. Scherer; Barbara Kutchko; Niels Thaulow; Andrew Duguid; Bryant Mook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azure. Alternative Fuel Use in the Cement Sector in ShandongAlternative fuels ..6 Resource potential for alternative fuel use in Shandong

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Development waste heat recovery World Wide FundTaishan Cement Works Waste Heat Recovery and Utilisation forPlant’s Low Temperature Waste Heat Power Generation Project.

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report of cement industry waste heat power generation. ChinaWorrell et al. , 2001). Waste heat recovery (WHR) poweradoption and utilization of waste heat recovery (WHR) power

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the coal-dominated energy mix. We note that China’sof final energy consumption and fuel mix of China’s cement

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

*Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA Department of Molecular Biosciences, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA Department of Molecular Biosciences, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California, USA à Davis, California, USA §Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science

Hammock, Bruce D.

276

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. , 1990. “Utilisation of Waste Heat from the Cement RotaryAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”a roller mill. Utilizing waste heat from the kiln exhaust,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Commerical-Scale CO2 Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

On June 8, 2009, DOE issued Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number DE-FOA-000015 seeking proposals to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources. This FOA called for what was essentially a two-tier selection process. A number of projects would receive awards to conduct front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies as Phase I. Those project sponsors selected would be required to apply for Phase II, which would be the full design, construction, and operation of their proposed technology. Over forty proposals were received, and ten were awarded Phase I Cooperative Agreements. One of those proposers was CEMEX. CEMEX proposed to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from one of their existing cement plants and either sequester the CO2 in a geologic formation or use it for enhanced oil recovery. The project consisted of evaluating their plants to identify the plant best suited for the demonstration, identify the best available capture technology, and prepare a design basis. The project also included evaluation of the storage or sequestration options in the vicinity of the selected plant.

Adolfo Garza

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Incorporation of V, Zn and Pb into the crystalline phases of Portland clinker  

SciTech Connect

Burning of industrial wastes in cement kilns has an increasing environmental importance, brought about by the incorporation of potentially hazardous elements into clinker crystalline phases and partial substitution of primary fuel and raw materials. In this study, experimental clinkers were synthesized, with the addition of V, Zn and Pb to a standard raw meal, from which a control clinker was obtained for comparison. The three metals were chosen as they are present in the alternative fuel petcoke (V) and in industrial wastes (Zn, Pb) commonly burned in cement kilns. Electron microprobe and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the preferential partition of these metals among the clinker crystalline phases. It was observed that V has shown a preferential partition towards C{sub 2}S. Zn appears in higher amounts in periclase, and C{sub 3}S has higher Zn contents than C{sub 2}S. Pb concentrates in minute spherules and partitions toward C{sub 3}S in small amounts.

Andrade, F.R.D.; Maringolo, V.; Kihara, Y

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227­256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum-feldspars recovered at various depths from a deep well drilled through a carbonate-cemented sandstone petroleum of a sandstone petroleum xreservoir, Elk Hills, California. Part 2: In situ oxygen and carbon isotopic results

280

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone, UK North Sea A. M (Received 15 June 1998; revised 11 February 1999) ABSTRACT: In the Miller Field, diagenetic quartz abundance: quartz cementation, Miller deep water sandstone, North Sea, diagenetic quartz. The Miller Field

Haszeldine, Stuart

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbon 39 (2001) 19952001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon 39 (2001) 1995­2001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement *Yunsheng Xu, D-treated carbon fibers and silane-treated silica fume, relative to the values for cement paste with as-received carbon fibers and as-received silica fume. Silane treatment of fibers and silica fume contributed about

Chung, Deborah D.L.

282

Corrosion of Metals in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi*, J. Hill and N. B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes (ILW) in the UK. Cements are used because they are economic, durable and have long-term stability and assess whether the corrosion has any effects on cement durability over extended storage. Background Steel by carbonation. However, in waste encapsulation processes this is not the case as the grouts are enclosed

Sheffield, University of

283

Sr radionuclide in cement: An atomistic modeling study Mostafa Youssef a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Available online xxxx Keywords: Molecular simulation Cement Nuclear waste storage Mechanical properties a b the interaction of each radionuclide with the cement matrix. Understanding on a fundamental level the long-term s t r a c t Cementitious materials are considered to be a waste form for the ultimate disposal

Yildiz, Bilge

284

Improved cement quality and grinding efficiency by means of closed mill circuit modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grinding of clinker is the last and most energy-consuming stage of the cement manufacturing process, drawing on average 40% of the total energy required to produce one ton of cement. During this stage, the clinker particles are substantially reduced...

Mejeoumov, Gleb Gennadievich

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Indian Country Energy & Infrastructure Working Group, Sept. 10-11, 2013, Portland, Maine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 10-11, 2013 September 10-11, 2013 DOUBLETREE HOTEL 363 Maine Mall Road Portland, Maine 207-775 6161 AGENDA TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013 CONFERENCE ROOM: WHALEBACK 9:00 - 9:30 a.m. REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST (Hot breakfast will be provided onsite.) 9:30 - 10:00 a.m. WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS Opening Prayer by ICEIWG Tribal Leader Pilar Thomas, Acting Director, U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy (IE) & DOE ICEIWG co-chair Chief Joseph Socobasin, Passamaquoddy Tribe at Indian Township, ICEIWG member and meeting co-host  Attendee Introductions  Overview of Agenda and Meeting Goals  Review of Past Meeting Summary and ICEIWG Accomplishments to Date 10:00 - 10:30 a.m. ICEIWG UPDATES AND GENERAL DISCUSSION  Individual ICEIWG Member Updates and Report-Out

287

Assessment and risk analysis of casing and cement impairment in oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, 2000–2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and/or casing impairment. Remedial action is often attempted once...contamination/gas migration investigations, but these types of inspections...annular vent" 20 Cement Squeeze Remedial cementing operation performed...patch", "perf" 34 Top Job Remedial cementing operation used to...

Anthony R. Ingraffea; Martin T. Wells; Renee L. Santoro; Seth B. C. Shonkoff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

289

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

290

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

Kacimi, Larbi [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: kacimi20002000@yahoo.fr; Simon-Masseron, Angelique [Laboratoire des Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, CNRS UMR 7016, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 3, rue Alfred-Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)], E-mail: A.Simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Salem, Souria [Departement d'Architecture, Faculte de Genie Civile, USTO-Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: zinaisalem@yahoo.fr; Ghomari, Abdelhamid [Departement de Chimie, U.A.I.B., Route de Belahcel, Mostaganem (Algeria)], E-mail: belkey@hotmail.com; Derriche, Zoubir [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Acceptable approaches for beneficial use of cement kiln dust  

SciTech Connect

One beneficial use of cement kiln dust (CKD) is application of CKD to cropland as agricultural lime or fertilizer. However, the EPA has expressed a concern over land application of CKD when the metals constituents in the CKD are above the industry-wide median levels presented in EPA`s Report to Congress on Cement Kiln Dust. Under the Clean Water Act, EPA has established limits for metals concentrations in sewage sludge that is applied to the land for beneficial use of the nitrogen in the sludge. The limits for land application of sewage sludge were established based on the results of exposure risk assessments. A comparison of the median industry-wide metals concentrations in CKD to the metals concentration limits for land application of sewage sludge indicates that all trace metal concentrations IN CKD are below the corresponding sewage sludge land application limit, with the exception of the median level of arsenic from one data set. EPA has determined that land application of CKD with metals concentration limits at or below the industry-wide median concentrations does not pose a significant human cancer or non-cancer health risk. Therefore, with appropriate limits, CKD can be beneficially reused for land application on agricultural land in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.

Schreiber, R.J.; Smeenk, S.D. [Schreiber, Yonley and Associates, St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

295

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass  

SciTech Connect

About 1800 years ago a Roman Corbita sunk off the coast of Italy carrying a barrel of glass cullet to the floor of the Adriatic Sea. Samples of glass cullet and the cemented surrounding sediment have been characterized and the reaction between the glass and the sea water saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite has been modeled. Results from characterization and modeling show that the cement phase surrounding the sediment grains is a high-Mg calcite. The origin of the cement phase is likely the reaction between the glass and the sea water to from a Mg-silicate, here modeled as sepiolite.

Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Silvestri, Alberta

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

298

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sorption of Selenite and Selenate to Cement Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption of selenite and selenate to ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), “monosulfate” (3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·12H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (C?S?H) was investigated in order to understand Se immobilization by cement in hazardous wastes. ... Selenite is suggested to sorb by surface reactions, and for ettringite, a sorption maximum of 0.03 mol kg-1 was determined. ... Distribution ratios (Rd) for selenite were 0.18, 0.38, and 0.21 m3 kg-1 for ettringite, monosulfate, and C?S?H, respectively. ...

Isabel Baur; C. Annette Johnson

2003-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Patch microstructure in cement-based materials: Fact or artefact?  

SciTech Connect

The appearance of patch microstructure, i.e. broad dense and porous regions separated by sharp and distinct boundaries and occurring randomly in bulk and interfacial transition zones, has been reported previously in various site- and laboratory-mixed concretes and mortars. In this paper, evidence is presented to show that patch microstructure is an artefact of sample preparation and does not reflect the true nature of the hydrated cement paste. The appearance of dense patches comes from paste areas that have been ground and polished beyond the epoxy resin intrusion depth. In a backscattered electron image, pores not filled with epoxy are not visible because the signal is generated from the base or side walls of the pores. A modified method for epoxy impregnation, which can achieve a much deeper epoxy penetration than conventional vacuum impregnation, is presented.

Wong, H.S. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: hong.wong@imperial.ac.uk; Buenfeld, N.R. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

302

Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......these radionuclides in large amounts of waste products used in the cement manufacturing, like phosphogypsum, coal fly ash, shale ash, some rare minerals and so on. Fly ash is obtained from coal-fired power plants and certainly contains......

S. A. Mujahid; A. Rahim; S. Hussain; M. Farooq

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Technology roadmapping for mature industries: 2010â??2050 global cement product roadmap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of a technology roadmap to create a holistic picture of the movement in a mature industry. Not only does it also help the cement manufacturers in mature and emerging markets, but also balances between market pull and technology push at a commercialised scale. The roadmap concept can assist any organisation to address three key strategic questions: where the company aims to go, where the status quo of the company and how the company will achieve its strategic intent goals. Thus, in this research, we illustrate the evolution of cement product from present to 2050 through the existing industrial literature, analysing forces, trends, impacts and developing a global cement product roadmap. The roadmap covers a wide range of cement products.

Tugrul U. Daim; Nuttavut Intarode

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures  

SciTech Connect

The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sources of high temperature degradation of cement-based materials : nanoindentation and microporoelastic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of high temperature exposure on cement-based materials have been under investigation for quite some time, but a fundamental understanding of the sources of high temperature degradation has been limited by ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Biochemical response of Cupressus sempervirens to cement dust: Yields and chemical composition of its essential oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of cement dust on the yield and chemical composition of the essential oil were investigated in Cupressus sempervirens. Exposure to cement dust resulted in significant increase in the essential oil yields. Significant factory distance-related changes in qualitative and quantitative composition of the essential oil were observed. Increasing pollution with dust increased the content of monoterpene hydrocarbons concomitant to increase of ?-pinene, suggesting a redirection of the secondary metabolism of C. sempervirens towards biosynthesis of monoterpenes. By contrast, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were strongly reduced. These results provide an overall picture of the different response of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to air pollution caused by cement dust. They also reveal the suitability of using C. sempervirens in the creation of green areas around cement factories and encourage the use of dusted plants as potential source of valuable natural products.

Karim Hosni; Imed Hassen; Yacine M’Rabet; Hervé Casabianca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of halloysite nanoclay on mechanical properties, thermal behavior and microstructure of cement mortars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have targeted the application of clay in cement composites and declared some enhancement on the properties of concrete. However there is little knowledge on nanoclays and their effect on the mechanical properties and durability of cement composites. Halloysite nanoclay is one of the subcategories of nanoclay that has been undeservedly ignored in the production of cement composites. Chemically, the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes has properties similar to SiO2 while the inner cylinder core is related to Al2O3 which together may improve the cement matrix. In this study the mechanical properties, flowability, thermal behavior and durability of mortars containing 1, 2, 3% halloysite nanoclay were studied. Compressive strength and gas permeability of samples with 3% and 2% nanoclay were improved up to 24% and 56%, respectively. SEM, XRD, DSC tests were carried out to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition change in samples with halloysite nanoclay.

Nima Farzadnia; Abang Abdullah Abang Ali; Ramazan Demirboga; Mohammed Parvez Anwar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report...

311

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 abatement using the calcium looping cycle. Energy Environ.the CO 2 captured by the calcium looping system, use of the16. Flow diagram of calcium-looping CO 2 capture and cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling with an average diffusion coefficient and with determined viscoelastic parameters from creep tests agreed well compared to the shrinkage data from experiments, indicating that drying shrinkage of cement paste may be considered as a poroviscoelastic...

Leung, Chin K.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic-loaded cement spacers Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in this study. Sealed Reference Sample Sample Cement Paste 10 mm 10 mm 11.5mm 8mm Plastic Spacers 5 mm... based on Stokes equation actually suggests that some of the...

314

Ettringite and calcium sulfoaluminate cement: investigation of water content by near-infrared spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement is a sulfate-based binder whose high-performance hydraulic behavior depends on the rapid formation of ettringite, when grinded clinker is hydrated in presence of gypsum. Ettringite

Daniela Gastaldi; Fulvio Canonico; Enrico Boccaleri

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

An overview of air emission intensities and environmental performance of grey cement manufacturing in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Air emissions generated in grey cement manufacturing originate primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels required to heat the kiln and the chemical reaction of raw materials in the pyroprocessing phase. Gi...

Darren Brown; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type of high-heat or pyroprocessing kiln used today is theis decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing (e.g. , ,in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technological, economic and financial prospects of carbon dioxide capture in the cement industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement is the second largest anthropogenic emission source, contributing approximately 7% of global CO2 emissions. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology is considered by the International Energy Agency (IEA) as an essential technology capable of reducing CO2 emissions in the cement sector by 56% by 2050. The study compares CO2 capture technologies for the cement manufacturing process and analyses the economic and financial issues in deploying CO2 capture in the cement industry. Post-combustion capture with chemical absorption is regarded as a proven technology to capture CO2 from the calcination process. Oxyfuel is less mature but Oxyfuel partial capture—which only recycles O2/CO2 gas in the precalciner—is estimated to be more economic than post-combustion capture. Carbonate looping technologies are not yet commercial, but they have theoretical advantages in terms of energy consumption. In contrast with coal-fired power plants, CO2 capture in the cement industry benefits from a higher concentration of CO2 in the flue gas, but the benefit is offset by higher \\{SOx\\} and \\{NOx\\} levels and the smaller scale of emissions from each plant. Concerning the prospects for financing cement plant CO2 capture, large cement manufacturers on average have a higher ROE (return on equity) and lower debt ratio, thus a higher discount rate should be considered for the cost analysis than in power plants. IEA estimates that the incremental cost for deploying CCS to decarbonise the global cement sector is in the range US$350–840 billion. The cost estimates for deploying state-of-the art post-combustion CO2 capture technologies in cement plants are above $60 to avoid each tonne of CO2 emissions. However, the expectation is that the current market can only provide a minority of financial support for CO2 capture in cement plants. Public financial support and/or CO2 utilisation will be essential to trigger large-scale CCS demonstration projects in the cement industry.

Jia Li; Pradeep Tharakan; Douglas Macdonald; Xi Liang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Submicron carbon filament cement-matrix composites for electromagnetic interference shielding  

SciTech Connect

Carbon filaments of diameter 0.1 mm were found to be a much more effective additive than conventional carbon fibers of diameter 10 mm in providing cement pastes capable of electromagnetic interference shielding. With 0.54 vol. % filaments and a shield thickness of 4 mm, a shielding effectiveness of 30 dB was attained at 1--2 GHz. However, the filaments were less effective than the fibers for reinforcing and for providing strain sensing cement-matrix composites.

Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Results of Laboratory Scale Fracture Tests on Rock/Cement Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

A number of pure cement and cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to a range of compressive loads to form internal fractures. X-ray microtomography was used to visualize the formation and growth of internal fractures in three dimensions as a function of compressive loads. This laboratory data will be incorporated into a geomechanics model to predict the risk of CO2 leakage through wellbores during geologic carbon storage.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Use of Finite-element Analysis to Improve Well Cementing in HTHP Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................. 124 Figure 5.10 Photos of uniaxial and tensile strength tests for 15.6-ppg FlexStone cements ..................................................................................................... 125 Figure 5.11 BoxPlot of tensile strength of Baker... .............................................................................. 124 Figure 5.10 Photos of uniaxial and tensile strength tests for 15.6-ppg FlexStone cements ..................................................................................................... 125 Figure 5.11 BoxPlot of tensile strength of Baker...

Arias, Henry

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tensile creep of soil-cement and its relationship to fatigue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanics to cement and concrete. He reported from the literature review that the presence of water appeared to enhance subcritical crack growth and confirmed it experimentally [34]. In addition, it was noted that the fracture surface energy (estimated...&t , due to the large elastic compliance. The creep data were then used to predict the fatigue life of soil-cement utilizing Schapery's crack growth theory in linear viscoelastic media. Paris' law was adopted to express both the predicteo (from...

Kim, Youngsoo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

The relationship between petroleum, exotic cements and reservoir quality in carbonates – A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exotic minerals, i.e. those that do not have an obvious source of components within the host rocks, can be major porosity occluding cement and replacement phases in subsurface carbonate reservoirs. Here we present and discuss petrographic and fluid inclusion data from a number of petroleum systems. These have had different geological histories but a common factor is the presence of exotic mineral cements and late stage dissolution. The effect of these cements and late stage dissolution on reservoir quality is also considered. Petroleum filling does not appear to inhibit the precipitation of exotic cements in the way that it appears to inhibit the precipitation of calcite. Burial dolomite and anhydrite are the most important of these volumetrically but they are often accompanied by other late stage cements such as fluorite, kaolin, quartz, barite, celestite, sphalerite and galena, generally in much smaller quantities. In accounting for the concentration of the material contained in these cements compared with the host rocks, stylolitisation is a possible mechanism in some cases, but, in many others, import from sources external to the reservoir is required.

J.E. Neilson; N.H. Oxtoby

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry inis very little use of alternative fuels (defined as waste

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speedquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinker

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:and water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing ( e.g. , in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy efficiency for greenhouse gas emission reduction in China: The case of the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

A project at LBNL has combined two different approaches to investigate changes in efficiency in China`s cement industry, which currently accounts for over 6% of China`s total commercial energy use and over 1% of global carbon emissions. Cement output has doubled over the past five years, and will double again within 15 years. Addressing cement industry carbon emissions will be a key element of any program to control China`s carbon emissions. Macro-level analysis was used to investigate industry-wide trends, and detailed case studies of individual plants illuminated key issues in technology choice that fundamentally affect efficiency. In general, enterprises adopted technologies that increased output and improved quality, and had little regard for energy efficiency, though most new technologies and practices did improve efficiency. Changes in energy prices were a surprisingly weak factor in adoption of efficient technologies. Unexpectedly, many enterprises developed a strong preference for the least fuel-efficient technology, which allows power generation with kiln waste heat. This preference was motivated in a large part by the desire to achieve security in electricity supply, and by some reforms. This alternative has become increasingly popular, and threatens to reverse some progress made in reducing the carbon-intensiveness of China`s cement industry. Foreign technical assistance and more importantly, greater participation in China`s cement industry of foreign cement companies would speed the adoption of large scale very efficient precalciner plants. Paradoxically, improving energy efficiency in China`s cement industry is also a supply-side issue, improved reliability in China`s power network will make the more fuel-efficient alternative more attractive.

Sinton, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Porosity and cementation in upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, central Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Cyclically arranged chalky marl, marl, limestone, and sand facies comprise the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, the lower two formation in the Selma Group, inner Coastal Plain of Alabama. In the central Alabama study area (Dallas, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties), the Mooreville-Demopolis section is 305 m thick and the two main facies are chalky marl and marl. Chalky marl consists of 50-70% carbonate (nannofossil component plus isopachous cement) and is relatively impermeable (average permeability is 0.9 md). The marl has 30-50% carbonate (mainly nannofossil component) and has an average permeability of 0.13 md. Helium-calibrated porosity values range from 31 to 35% in chalky marl and 36 to 41% in the marl. Scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) of chalky marl and marl shows a relatively poor alignment of phyllosilicate grains in both facies. Under SEM, the calcareous nannofossil component, mainly coccoliths and rhabdoliths, shows pristine to cement-coated exterior surfaces. The cement coating is most common in the chalky marl. Sampling throughout the Mooreville-Demopolis section shows no apparent vertical (stratigraphic) trends in facies-specific petrologic characteristics such as permeability, helium-calibrated porosity, phyllosilicate grain alignment, nannofossil content, and extent of cementation. The most parsimonious explanation of the development and evolution of porosity and cementation in the study area is as follows. First, simple mechanical compaction from burial under a few hundred meters of sediment can readily explain the reduction in porosity to less than 40% in most samples from the Mooreville-Demopolis section. Secondary (facies-selective) cementation is a further cause for porosity reduction in chalky marl. Cementation is likely the result of calcareous nannofossil dissolution during compaction and carbonate solution-transfer via groundwater movement.

Holston, I.; King, D.T. Jr.; Bittner, E. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

329

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation project: Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges (typically based on water use), reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals because the recycled water has already been treated with soaps and conditioners. A recovery system saves water by recycling wash water that would normally be dumped into the city sewage system. Recycling the wash water produces considerable energy savings because the recycled water has a higher temperature than fresh water. As a result, a hot water heater consumes less energy to heat the recycled water. The demonstration project discussed in this report was based in a large commercial laundry in Portland, Oregon. The laundry serves a large hotel/motel chain and processes an average of 25,000 pounds of laundry per day. A wastewater recovery system using a membrane microfiltration unit (MFU) was installed in the laundry in September 1995. Time series data of the water and energy consumption of the laundry were taken before and after installation of the MFU. Energy savings were measured by performing a thermal energy balance around the washing machines. Water savings were calculated by metering volumetric flow rates. After a period of approximately five months, the MFU has achieved final results of 52 percent savings in water consumption and 44 percent savings in energy to heat water. This five-month period represents a learning curve during which several small technical improvements were made to the MFU and laundry staff adjusted laundry operations to maximize the benefits of the MFU. An economic analysis discusses the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: The purpose Reporting, Project #2009-002-00 In 2008-2009, the Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps document outlining the review process for the Accords, the Council recognizes Bonneville's commitment

331

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: The purpose Reservation of Oregon, Project #2008-311-00 In 2008-2009, the Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army document outlining the review process for the Accords, the Council recognizes Bonneville's commitment

332

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the committee and Council for a decision at the February meeting. BACKGROUND The Bonneville Power Administration Review. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) will consider any public comments received by January 16, 2008, before

333

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Wildlife Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: Re and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Project Funding Recommendations to the Bonneville Power Administration's recommendations to the Bonneville Power Administration for the fish and wildlife projects Bonneville should fund

334

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: The purpose in the tributaries below Bonneville Dam, Project #2008-710-00 On March 11, 2009 the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) submitted a 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) project

335

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Wildlife Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: Re for Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) funding of projects solicited by the Council and Bonneville to Bonneville the Council's final decision document concluding the fish and wildlife project review process

336

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there is participation from people and firms that specialize in creating public messages and branding. It was clear Bill Gaines, Tacoma Public Utilities Margie Harris, Energy Trust of Oregon Erin Holland, Edelman Public Skeahan, Cowlitz County Public Utility District Cal Shirley, Puget Sound Energy Phil Welker, Portland

337

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of Demand- Side Management, Distributed Generation and Energy Efficiency resources. There was also and Conservation Council February 11, 2014 - Portland, OR Keegan Moyer Manager, Transmission Expansion Planning Expansion Planning and Policy Committee Purpose Oversee and maintain public planning database and models

338

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Publicly-Owned Utilities Ed Brost ­ Franklin County PUD (General Manager) Gregg Carrington ­ Chelan County Utilities Scott Bolton ­ PacifiCorp (Vice President, Government Affairs) Stefan Brown ­ Portland General Public Utility Commission (Utility Program Director) Travis Kavulla ­ Montana Public Service Commission

339

Determining the slag fraction, water/binder ratio and degree of hydration in hardened cement pastes  

SciTech Connect

A method for determining the original mix composition of hardened slag-blended cement-based materials based on analysis of backscattered electron images combined with loss on ignition measurements is presented. The method does not require comparison to reference standards or prior knowledge of the composition of the binders used. Therefore, it is well-suited for application to real structures. The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. Results obtained from an experimental study involving sixty samples with a wide range of water/binder (w/b) ratios (0.30 to 0.50), slag/binder ratios (0 to 0.6) and curing ages (3 days to 1 year) show that the method is very promising. The mean absolute errors for the estimated slag, water and cement contents (kg/m{sup 3}), w/b and s/b ratios were 9.1%, 1.5%, 2.5%, 4.7% and 8.7%, respectively. 91% of the estimated w/b ratios were within 0.036 of the actual values. -- Highlights: •A new method for estimating w/b ratio and slag content in cement pastes is proposed. •The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. •Reference standards or prior knowledge of the binder composition are not required. •The method was tested on samples with varying w/b ratios and slag content.

Yio, M.H.N., E-mail: marcus.yio11@imperial.ac.uk; Phelan, J.C.; Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microbiological evaluation of the condition of cement compounds with radioactive wastes after long-term storage in near-surface repositories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of the core material taken by check drilling of a monolith of cemented radioactive waste in near-surface repositories operated for 15–45 years revealed the presence of damaged areas in the cement matr...

O. A. Gorbunova; A. S. Barinov

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Influence of poly(acrylic acid) molar mass on the fracture properties of glass polyalkenoate cements based on waste gasifier slags  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The failure behaviour of glass polyalkenoate cements was investigated using a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach. Cements were based on Drayton gasifier slag and four poly(acrylic acid)s...3 to 6.4...

A. Sullivan; R. Hill

343

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

Adam Buttress; Aled Jones; Sam Kingman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars  

SciTech Connect

The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J. [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton] [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

CSER 00-001 Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for Cementation Operations at the PFP  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox HA-20MB is located in Room 235B of the 234-5Z Building at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. This enclosure contains mixers, mixer bowls, a crusher unit, an isolated inoperable conveyor unit, plutonium residue feed cans, cemented cans, and a feedwater container. Plutonium residue, not conducive to other forms of stabilization, is prepared for storage and ultimate disposal by cementation. The feed residue material cans can have plutonium contents of only a few grams or up to 200 grams. This evaluation accommodates this wide range of container fissile concentrations.

DOBBIN, K.D.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods 1 June 2012 Financing and Incentives Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Key Takeaways ■■ Use performance-based incentives to nudge customers toward greater energy savings ■■ Promote recurring, limited- time bonus rebates to grab customers' attention, even when reducing incentive levels ■■ Approve financing early and make it an integral part of the program to reduce barriers to customer participation C i i r p l e m B t o i t f m c The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is a U.S. Energy Department program that is improving lives and communities across the country through energy efficiency. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood

350

Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

one-and-a-half-story, two-bedroom home with a half-basement one-and-a-half-story, two-bedroom home with a half-basement is typical of 100-year-old homes in Portland, Oregon. The home had no insulation, an unfinished basement, old appliances and air leaks everywhere when purchased by its current owner in 2010. The owners performed a full deep energy retrofit, including air sealing and insulating exterior walls and attic and installing new, efficient appliances. Building America researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory audited the home after the retrofits had occurred and used Energy Gauge USA simulation software to predict energy savings. They also partnered with local home performance contractor Imagine Energy to meter the circuit-level electricity use and the natural gas use of the tankless hot water heater and 95% condensing gas furnace. Based on

351

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures · Exam info (A Hoffman) ...

352

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation they are economic, durable and have long-term stability. However, there may be issues regarding the corrosion it is exposed to air, an oxide layer is formed. This layer generally provides protection to further corrosion

Sheffield, University of

353

Effect of metallic aggregate and cement content on abrasion resistance behaviour of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

objects during service. The abrasive resistance of con- struction materials, including mortar and concreteEffect of metallic aggregate and cement content on abrasion resistance behaviour of concrete O abrasion resistance, such as dams, canals, roads and floors. The abrasion resistance of concrete may

North Texas, University of

354

Influence of hydroxypropylguars on rheological behaviour of cement-based mortars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavior of cementitious materials [7]. Concrete, mortar and cement grout with high fluidity (e.g. self-compacting concrete or self- leveling underlayment) have been developed in order to facilitate placement. However and Concrete Research 58 (2014) 161-168" DOI : 10.1016/j.cemconres.2014.01.020 #12;2 ABSTRACT

Boyer, Edmond

355

CSER 96-027: storage of cemented plutonium residue containers in 55 gallon drums  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed for the storage of residual plutonium cementation containers, produced at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, in 55 gallon drums. This CSER increases the limit of total plutonium stored in each 55 gallon drum from 100 to 200 grams.

Watson, W.T.

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Pore water evolution in oilfield sandstones: constraints from oxygen isotope microanalyses of quartz cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of quartz cement Ann M.E. Marchanda,*, Calum I. Macaulayb , R. Stuart Haszeldinea , Anthony E. Fallickc--direct measurements were not possible) precipitated in the sandstones at temperatures jC; (2) the second zone B in the sandstones most likely between 70 and 90 jC; (3) the third zone C (homogeneous CL pattern and directly

Haszeldine, Stuart

357

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung; Silica fume; Shielding 1. Introduction Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding [1­4] is in critical, NY 14260-4400, USA Received 9 January 2002; accepted 14 August 2003 Abstract An electromagnetic

Chung, Deborah D.L.

358

Modeling of the Aging Viscoelastic Properties of Cement Paste Using Computational Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from the Dissolution-Formation Viscoelastic Program, the NISTIR ELAS3D Program and the Abaqus Program ............................................................................................................ 38 Figure 14 Comparison... with an existent aging viscoelastic model which has some limitations in predicting the behavior of cement paste. Overview of the three dimensional linear elastic model ELAS3D is also included in this chapter. Chapter 3 develops the dissolution...

Li, Xiaodan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

CAPACITY INVESTMENT UNDER DEMAND UNCERTAINTY: THE ROLE OF IMPORTS IN THE U.S. CEMENT INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

varies across markets. In the presence of uncertain demand, capacity choices are shown theoreticallyCAPACITY INVESTMENT UNDER DEMAND UNCERTAINTY: THE ROLE OF IMPORTS IN THE U.S. CEMENT INDUSTRY Guy://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu #12;Capacity Investment under Demand Uncertainty: The Role

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Speciation of heavy metals in cement-stabilized waste forms: A micro-spectroscopic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuring safe disposal and long-term storage of haz- ardous and radioactive wastes represents a primary en- vironmental task of industrial societies. The long-term disposal of the hazardous wastes is associatedSpeciation of heavy metals in cement-stabilized waste forms: A micro-spectroscopic study M. Vespa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Synchronous Oil Migration and Cementation in Sandstone Reservoirs Demonstrated by Quantitative Description of Diagenesis [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...July 1993 research-article Synchronous Oil Migration and Cementation in Sandstone Reservoirs...of sandstone burial diagenesis in certain oil reservoirs, in which petroleum migration...at, and in a series of zones below, the oil-water contact which descends as oil fills...

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Detecting and modeling cement failure in high pressure/ high temperature wells using finite-element method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the event that high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) conditions are encountered, we must attempt to achieve permeability in the set cement to prevent gas migration and to prevent any other fluid passing through to collapse the entire structure. Therefore...

Shahri, Mehdi Abbaszadeh

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Mechanical properties of WC10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion processed powders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of WC±10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion as the spray conversion process [2]. The WC particle sizes in powders fabricated by the spray conversion: microstructural parameters such as WC grain size, Co mean free path and WC/WC contiguity; chemical factors

Hong, Soon Hyung

364

Characterizations of WC-10Co nanocomposite powders and subsequently sinterhip sintered cemented carbide  

SciTech Connect

Ultrafine WC-Co cemented carbides, combining high hardness and high toughness, are expected to find broad applications. In this study, WC-10Co-0.4VC-0.4Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} (wt.%) nanocomposite powders, whose average grain size was about 30 nm, were fabricated by spray pyrolysis-continuous reduction and carbonization technology. The as-prepared nanocomposite powders were characterized and analyzed by chemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BET analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, 'sinterhip' was used in the sintering process, by which ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbides with an average grain size of 240 nm were prepared. The material exhibited high Rockwell A hardness of HRA 92.8, Vickers hardness HV{sub 1} 1918, and transverse rapture strength (TRS) of 3780 MPa. The homogeneously dispersed grain growth inhibitors such as VC, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} in nanocomposite powder and the special nonmetal-metal nanocomposite structure of WC-10Co nanocomposite powder played very important roles in obtaining ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide with the desired properties and microstructure. There was an abundance of triple junctions in the ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide; these triple junctions endowed the sintered specimen with high mechanical properties.

Shi, X.L. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)]. E-mail: sxl071932@126.com; Shao, G.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Duan, X.L. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiong, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yang, H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

366

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

SciTech Connect

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

368

Development of ternary blended Concrete;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Manufacturing of Portland cement is an energy intensive process newlineand releases very large amount of green house gases into the atmosphere newlinewhich affect the earth… (more)

Murthi P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pollutant Formation and Emissions from Cement Kiln Stack Using a Solid Recovered Fuel from Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Figure S2 it can be observed that a great majority of PCDD/Fs congeners correlate with the % of PetCoke fed to the cement kiln. ...

Juan A. Conesa; Lorena Rey; Silvia Egea; Maria D. Rey

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cobalt-cement catalysts for the synthesis of motor fuel components from synthesis gas obtained from oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly effective cobalt-cement catalysts for the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H2, which are formed upon the thermolysis or gasification of oil shale or coals, are considered. The formation of t...

A. L. Lapidus; E. Z. Golosman; Yu. A. Strizhakova

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Multi-Scale Studies of Transport and Adsorption Phenomena of Cement-based Materials in Aqueous and Saline Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monosulfoaluminate, and ettringite, and coordination figurePalmer, Solubility of ettringite (Ca 6 [Al(OH) 6 ] 2 (SO 4 )K.L. Scrivener, Delayed ettringite formation, Cement and

Yoon, Se Yoon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reduction of Multi-pollutant Emissions from Industrial Sectors: The U.S. Cement Industry – A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from cement kilns result from the sulfur in the fuel and the sulfur in the feed materials. Sulfur in the fuel will oxidize to SO2during pyroprocessing and a significant amount is li...

Ravi K. Srivastava; Samudra Vijay…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effect of WC/TiC grain size ratio on microstructure and mechanical properties of WCTiCCo cemented carbides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of TiC powder as 1 lm. The microstructures of sintered WC­TiC­10 wt%Co cemented carbides were than that expected by modified Hall­Petch type equation. Transverse rupture strength of WC­20TiC­10 wt for decades [1]. Generally, cemented carbides are based on the WC­Co and some cubic carbide such as TiC, Ta

Hong, Soon Hyung

374

Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

Han, Jiabin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Abstracts ii Schedule....................................................................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................................88 Dark Matter & Dark Energy ...............................................................................................3 HAD II Special: Neptune after One Orbit: Reflections on the Discovery of a Planet

Ciotti, Luca

376

Modeling of Damage in Cement-Based Materials Subjected to External Sulfate Attack. II: Comparison with Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydration products such as ettringite can lead to internal stresses. Using the volumetric information. The general format of the equation is based on the formation of ettringite from an aluminate phase

Mobasher, Barzin

377

Image-based characterization of cement pore structure using Wood`s metal intrusion  

SciTech Connect

Mercury intrusion porosimetry is a widely used technique for characterization of the pore size distribution of cement-based materials. However, the technique has several limitations, among which are the ink bottle effect and a cylindrical pore geometry assumption that lead to inaccurate pore size distribution curves. By substituting Wood`s metal for mercury as the intruding liquid, scanning electron microscopy and imaging techniques can be applied to the sample after intrusion. The molten Wood`s metal solidifies within the pore structure of the sample, which allows it to be sectioned and observed in the scanning electron microscopy. From here, the sample can be analyzed both qualitatively, by observing the changes in the appearance of the sample as the intrusion process progresses, and quantitatively, by applying image analysis techniques. This study provides insight for better interpretation of mercury intrusion porosimetry results and the possibility for quantitative characterization of the spatial geometry of pores in cement-based materials.

Willis, K.L.; Abell, A.B.; Lange, D.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of Gel Permeation Chromatography as an analytical tool for aspect cement testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V ? ANALYSIS OF TEST RESULTS Introduction Hot Mixed Asphaltic Concrete Binder Aging Versus GPC . Identification by GPC . GPC and Chemical Analysis CHAPTER VI ? CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Conclusions Recommendations ~Pa e iv vii ix 7...EVALUATION OF GEL PERMEATION CHROMATOGRAPHY AS AN ANALYTICAL TOOL FOR ASPHALT CEMENT TESTING A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN HOLMGREEN, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Holmgreen, Richard J

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 23 (1988) 1976-1980 Drying shrinkage of expansive cements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of strength-contributing substances, and formation of potentially deleterious products such as ettringite-type expansive cement is ettringite (C6AS3H32)t. C4A3Sin Type K, CA and C12A7in Type M, and C3A in Type S, are the sources of reactive alumina required for the formation of ettringite. Type K is the most widely used

Mobasher, Barzin

380

Durability and microstructure characteristics of alkali activated coal bottom ash geopolymer cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have focused on the production of mortar and concrete without cement. This is referred to as geopolymer mortar or concrete. This paper discusses the effect of alkali oxides (Na2O = 8, 12, 16 wt.% and SiO2 = 0, 4, 8, 12 wt.%) on compressive strength, microstructure and durability of circulating fluidized bed combustion coal bottom ash (CBA) geopolymer cements (GC). Durability and morphology tests were carried out through heating and freezing tests. The highest compressive strength (25.83 MPa) was achieved at Na2O wt.% = 12, SiO2 wt.% = 8. The optimum atomic ratios for a compact microstructure were obtained for Si/Al between 3.5 and 4 and Si/Na close to 0.5. Following the sintering, the main reaction products (N-A-S-H gel) became more amorphous at 800 °C, attaining Si/Al and Si/Na atomic ratios of 4.54 and 0.98. Sodium carbonate formation was observed at 800 °C. Also, the strength loss of GC was only 6.77% after 30 freeze-thaw cycles. The results show that durable geopolymer concrete without cement can be produced by using waste bottom coal ash. Therefore, the production of geopolymer concrete has a high environmental impact, decreasing waste material in addition to global warming.

?lker Bekir Topçu; Mehmet U?ur Toprak; Tayfun Uyguno?lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques  

SciTech Connect

In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi, E-mail: kurumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nawa, Toyoharu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Owada, Hitoshi [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shibata, Masahito [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)] [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dynamics of cementation in response to oil charge: Evidence from a Cretaceous carbonate field, U.A.E.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil charge is thought to inhibit the growth of cements within subsurface pore systems. We explore this phenomenon in a giant Cretaceous carbonate field from U.A.E., where the oil-filled crest porosity ranges from 10 to 50% and permeability from 0.08 to 830 mD but coeval water leg porosity is reduced to 10 to 23% and permeability to 0.1 to 4 mD. Only 5% of primary interparticle pores (> 30 ?m diameter) in the crest are fully cemented, compared to 99% of pores in the water leg. Syntaxial calcite burial cements (> 10 ?m diameter) in the oil leg show 12 cathodoluminescence zones with oil inclusions (n = 27) occurring in four of the five final zones. Mean in-situ ion microprobe ?18OVPDB data from the oil leg cements range from ?1.2‰ in the oldest zone decreasing to ?10.3‰ in zone 11, returning to ?7.7‰ in the final zone. The oldest distinguishable cement zone in the water leg shows highly variable ?18O from ?3.6‰ to ?9.3‰ with a mean of ?7.3‰, and with subsequent zones decreasing to a mean value of ?9.4‰ for the youngest cement zone. Decreasing ?18O values are interpreted as indicating increasing temperature reflecting burial and the evolution of pore water composition: broadly similar trends in the oil and water legs suggest precipitation under the same general conditions. Unlike the oil leg cements, the final zone in the water leg occludes nearly all remaining pore space. The ?18OVPDB of bulk micrite from the water leg shows an average of ?7.4‰ (n = 9) compared to ?6.2‰ (n = 10) from the oil leg, suggesting the precipitation of further micrite cement at greater burial depths. We infer that burial cementation slowed in the presence of oil due to a reduction of potential nucleation sites as well as porewater and solute movement within weakly oil-wet pores, whereas continued flow and solute movement through all pores including the micropores (< 10 ?m diameter) enabled extensive cementation in the water leg.

P.A. Cox; R.A. Wood; J.A.D. Dickson; H.B. Al Rougha; H. Shebl; P.W.M. Corbett

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

342 .BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. up nom and a fern hatching-troughs with iSalnto levenensis ova in, but  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of concrete and the mills built up with granite and Portland cement (threeof sand and one part cement the oars to push the vessels apart, and they have seines from 011e to another; with a sudden change of wind

384

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

386

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.S. 2008. “Complete alternative fuel solution for cementKolyfetis, E. 2007. “Alternative Fuels & Raw Materials inof the workshop on Alternative Fuels & Alternative Raw

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

388

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

389

PARS II FAQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

390

Appearance of the first cemental annulation of permanent incisor teeth of the domestic cat (Felis catus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19S3 Major Subject: Veterinary Anatomy APPEARANCE OF THE FIRST CEMENTAL ANNULATION OF THE FFRMANENT INCISOR TEETH OF THE DOMEST'C CAT (EEL IS CATL'S) A Thesis by IN-BACK CHOI Approved as to styie and content by: is, D. V.... the Domestic Cat (Felis catus). (August 1983) In-Back Choi, D. V. M. , Seoul National University Cnairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. F. Sis O. V. M. , Ph. D. Fourteen incisors from three female and four male cats (2. 5 to 15. 5 months of age) were...

Choi, In-Back

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

393

An evaluation of the carbonate cements and their diagenesis on selected banks, outer Continental Shelf: northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved as to style and content by: Ric ar Reza Co-chairman of Committee Wayne M. hr, Co-chai man of Committee William R. Bryan Member Robert 0. Reid Head of Department May 198Z ABSTRACT An Evaluation of the Carbonate Cements... Approved as to style and content by: Ric ar Reza Co-chairman of Committee Wayne M. hr, Co-chai man of Committee William R. Bryan Member Robert 0. Reid Head of Department May 198Z ABSTRACT An Evaluation of the Carbonate Cements...

Stafford, John Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Telephone: 503-222-5161 Fax: 503-820-2370 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Toll free: 800-452-5161 Web site: www.nwcouncil.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administrator and Chief Executive Officer Bonneville Power Administration PO Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208 Dear Mr for the Future Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in Power Supply. These recommendations were developed Danielson Chair #12;#12;Recommendations on the Future Role of the Bonneville Power Administration

395

Health Hazard Evaluation determination report HHE 81-000-113, Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the United Cement, Lime, Gypsum and Allied Workers Union Local 421, an investigation was made of possible health hazards occurring from the burning of high sulfur coal which exposed workers to sulfur-dioxide, carbon-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide at Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mail questionnaires were sent to employees prior to a hazard survey, and were followed up with medical interviews focusing on neurological symptoms, syncope, strokes, chest pain, and mucous membrane irritation. Environmental samples were collected for sulfur-dioxide, sulfates, sulfites, carbon-monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide, and measured predominately in work areas near the back end of the kiln. Eighteen of 29 questionnaire respondents and 20 of 21 interviewed workers reported mucous membrane irritation compatible with sulfur-dioxide exposure. The NIOSH recommended limit for sulfur-dioxide was 0.5ppm as a time weighted average. The authors conclude that a health hazard did exist at the time of the survey, and recommend that controls be implemented to minimize sulfur-dioxide exposure in the facility.

Sanderson, W.; Hodgson, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Suspension process for cement synthesis. Final report, November 1986-March 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Research Institute has initiated a program to develop an advanced gas-fired cement synthesis process which will markedly reduce product processing time, lower maintenance and initial capital costs, minimize alkali sulfate formation, and mitigate greenhouse gaseous emissions compared to conventional cement pyroprocessing technology. In the advanced process, pellets of agglomerated batch enter at the top of a vertical shaft and fall in counterflow with the combustion gases. During this time, which is of order a few seconds and an order of magnitude less than the state-of-the-art kiln process, the pellets heat-up, dry, calcine and are partially clinkered. They land on a fixed bed where clinkering is completed and heat is recovered from the pellets to the counter-flowing combustion air. Energy input to the process is through the direct combustion of natural gas in the clinkering and calcining zones of the shaft. This report describes the work performed in the first phase of the development program. Flow stability, batch agglomeration, and clinkering tests were performed to validate the process concept. An interim economic analysis comparing likely commercial installation options to the state-of-the-art process was made.

Zappa, O.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

398

Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 per system per year. Algae biomass fuels are predicted toalgae oils suitable for manufacture of high-grade plastics, transport fuel,algae are grown at a facility next to the cement plant to be harvested, dried, and then used as fuel

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Cementation Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kinds of sedimentary rocks. The BOOK REVIEWS...The sedimentary rocks covered include...carbonate strata ofthe rock record, this may...large petroleum reservoir in which the migration...microenvironmental permeability alone. Large pores...ofsilicifica-tion fabrics, porosity development in sand-stones...

GERALD M. FRIEDMAN

1988-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Observation of dynamic crossover and dynamic heterogeneity in hydration water confined in aged cement paste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502101 502101 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/20/50/502101 FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Observation of dynamic crossover and dynamic heterogeneity in hydration water confined in aged cement paste Y Zhang 1 , M Lagi 1,2 , F Ridi 2 , E Fratini 2 , P Baglioni 2 , E Mamontov 3 and S H Chen 1,4 1 Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, I-50019, Italy 3 Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA E-mail: sowhsin@mit.edu Received 24 September 2008, in final form 23 October 2008 Published 12 November 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysCM/20/502101 Abstract High resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering is used to investigate the slow dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium silicate hydrate

402

INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

67006 67006 INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS FINAL REPORT FY 1999 M.L. Allan and A.J. Philippacopoulos November 1999 Prepared for: Office of Geothermal Technologies United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Materials and Chemical Sciences Division DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agenc:y of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makers any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

403

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Research Needs Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

404

Microsoft Word - CSC for Indian Cement Final_2013-8-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Industry William R. Morrow III, Ali Hasanbeigi, Jayant Sathaye, Tengfang Xu Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA USA February 2013 This study is sponsored by Climate Economics Branch, Climate Change Division of U.S. Environmental Protecstion Agency, under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6337E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

405

A wireless sensor network deployment to detect the degeneration of cement used in construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During last few years, the high environmental humidity and salinity in areas close to the sea have caused degeneration of the construction materials. Due to this, several building have collapsed. Several studies demonstrated that it is very difficult to predict these cases. For this reason, we propose a non-invasive technique which takes into account the appropriate placement of the wireless sensors to detect the degeneration of the cement used in construction. Our proposal is based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) which is able to sense the temperature, humidity, micro-vibrations and structural movements. We show the sensor deployment and its appropriate location to take the most suitable measurements and ensure the reliability of the data. We show the energy consumption of each node and the web interface used to show the data. From the structural movements, our WSN can know whether a building is in danger of collapse or not.

S. Sendra; A.T. Lloret; J. Lloret; J.J.P.C. Rodrigues

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

407

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

409

Surface hardening of Fe-based alloy powders by Nd:YAG laser cladding followed by electrospark deposition with WC-Co cemented carbide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study concerned with the surface hardening of Fe-based alloys and WC-8Co cemented carbide by integrating laser cladding and the electrospark deposition processes. Specimens of...

Jiansheng Wang; Huimin Meng; Hongying Yu; Zishuan Fan; Dongbai Sun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December. Busato, L.C. n.d. Dioxins and Furans in Brazil:release and control of dioxins in cement kilns - A review.and Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases. Geneva,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The synthesis and characterization of an expansive admixture for M-type cements I. The influence of free CaO to the formation of ettringite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydration process of expansive admixtures for M-type of expansive or shrinkage compensation cements was studied by thermal analysis supplemented by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The main attent...

TomᚠOpravil; Petr Ptá?ek; František Šoukal…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

413

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

414

APPENDIX II WESTFLISCHE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - APPENDIX II WESTF�LISCHE WILHELMS-UNIVERSIT�T M�NSTER Instructions for the experiment ,,Stock information about how the experiment works. Please keep general questions until the end of the introduction either 100 or 0 monetary units (MU). Due to the fact that the outcome of the event is uncertain during

Greer, Julia R.

415

Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

request dated September 15, 2008. In that request you asked for copies of all IG referral documents, memoranda andor letters, and DOE program management responses that...

417

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dear Customers and Stakeholders: It has been a busy year since we kicked-off the Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review with you last November. This public process has been invaluable...

418

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is designing its Integrated Program Review (IPR) process for the Fiscal Year 2014-2015 rate period. The IPR is a consolidated...

419

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) proposed schedule for the 2007 Supplemental Wholesale Power (WP-07) Rate Case that will revise its power rates for Fiscal Year 2009 in...

420

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dangerous to fish. The list of ideas we are working on is found in the attached statement distributed at the meeting. (See pages 4 - 5.) Participants suggested even more ideas, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Spokane Seattle Portland Y  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

habitat with several different species. 6. Greasewood Dominated Area Just Before Powerhouse and Springs a. Native habitat still, not been too impacted by fires but is heavily...

422

Portland HQ Letterhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA and BEF (including its lawyers) regarding the contract prior to Administrator Wright signing the agreement on January 30, 2009. "Communications" are to include all...

423

Energetic valorization of SRF in dedicated plants and cement kilns and guidelines for application in Greece and Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A debate is still open on issues of waste to energy methodologies aiming to answer to questions of particular relevance, such as whether the concept of SRF/RDF production can be applied directly to MSW through the Mechanical–Biological Treatment (MBT) process, when selective collection acts as a virtual pre-treatment of the same, or if the use of SRF/RDF as alternative fuel in cement kilns is the most sustainable solution. In this study, two scenarios were analyzed and compared: (a) the use of SRF in a new dedicated thermal plant for electricity production and (b) the use of SRF as an alternative fuel in an existing cement plant. The comparative assessment was based on principles of Sustainable Waste Management embracing technical and cost issues, environmental protection, industrial ecology and symbiosis. The application of SWOT analysis showed that the use of SRF in cement kilns is more sustainable compared to its use in a new dedicated plant for electricity production.

M.C. Samolada; A.A. Zabaniotou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

425

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

426

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

427

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives Objectives Measure the hydraulic conductivities of LAW cementitious waste forms (in this case, Saltstone) as a function of curing temperature Use the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA) centrifuge method to measure permeabilities and compare results with those obtained using a conventional permeameter (MACTEC) Correlate dynamic Young's moduli values with the hydraulic conductivities for these mixes Monitor changes in the microstructure with curing temperature using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Experimental Material Category Vendor Premix wt % Portland Cement Type II Holcim 10 Blast Furnace Slag Grade I Holcim 45 Fly Ash Class F SEFA 45 UFA EFFLUENT COLLECTION CHAMBER SAMPLE HOLDER SAMPLE BUCKET CENTER FLUID FLOWPATH ANNULAR FLUID FLOWPATH SAMPLE BUCKET SAMPLE CUP (Titanium)

428

Formulation verification study results for 241-AN-106 waste grout  

SciTech Connect

Tests were conducted to determine whether the reference formulation and variations around the formulation are adequate for solidifying 241-AN-106 (106-AN) waste into a grout waste form. The reference formulation consists of 21 wt% type I/II Portland cement, 68 wt% fly ash, and 11 wt% attapulgite clay. The mix ratio is 8.4 lb/gal. Variations in dry blend component ratios, mix ratio, and waste concentration were assessed by using a statistically designed experimental matrix consisting of 44 grout compositions. Based on the results of the statistically designed variability study, the 106-AN grout formulations tested met all the formulation criteria except for the heat of hydration.

Lokken, R.O.; Martin, P.F.C.; Morrison, L.C.; Palmer, S.E.; Anderson, C.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

430

No. 3-2007 (Volume 60) ZKG INTERNATIONAL Material Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dämme, wichtig ist. Die Produktion von Port- landzement erfordert eine beachtliche Menge an Energie (0Wh/kg cement). Advances in technology have reduced the energy consumption associ- ated with cement production, roads and dams. The production of Portland cement requires considerable energy (0.2 to 0.35 k

Vandenbossche, Julie M.

431

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

432

Mod II Stirling engine overviews  

SciTech Connect

The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given. 12 references.

Farrell, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Environmental Advantages. Available at http://www.ceratechinc.com/environmental- advantages.asp Cross, D., J. Stephens, J. Vollmer. 2005. Structural Applications of 100 Percent Fly Ash Concrete. 2005 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), Lexington, Kentucky, USAApril...://recocement.com/ Roskos, C., D. Cross, M. Berry, J. Stephens. 2011. Identification and Verification of Self-Cementing Fly Ash Binders for ?Green? Concrete. 2011 World of Coal Ash (WOCA) Conference ? May 9-12, 2011 in Denver CO, USA. Available at www.flyash.info/2011...

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

439

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

440

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mod II engine performance  

SciTech Connect

The Automotive Stirling Engine Program (ASE) is directed at the development of a kinematic Stirling engine for automotive use. This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA-Lewis Research Center (NASA-LeRC). Following proof-of-concept testing and development of promising performance values with early versions of the Stirling engine, a production-type automotive design, the Mod II engine, was developed. The design of this engine and its systems has been previously presented. Based on this design, the first engine has been built and development testing has started. Projections for this first engine build are presented in this paper. Results of initial tests are also given including identification of development items and formulation of plans for resolution of existing deficiencies.

Richey, A.E.; Huang, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

Kinematic Viscosity of Helium II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By observing the time of formation of the meniscus in a cylindrical vessel suddenly given a rotation, it has been found possible to determine, directly, the kinematic viscosity of both He I and He II. At the angular velocities used (?15 rev/sec) it appears that, for He II, all the liquid rotates rather than the normal component alone.

R. J. Donnelly; G. V. Chester; R. H. Walmsley; C. T. Lane

1956-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solid-phase synthesis of high-alumina cements by high-temperature treatment on the surface of molten cast iron  

SciTech Connect

The use of block and monolithic concreting technology in the construction of thermal power plants together with the technical and economic advantages arising from the use of high-alumina cements in the production of refractory concretes have made the development of new methods for the production of high-alumina cement clinkers mandatory. To this end the authors of this paper study the kinetics of synthesis of such clinkers obtained by their firing on the surface of molten cast iron as the heat transfer agent. Among the results presented are a structural and quantitative analysis of the clinker along with phase and activation energy studies.

Fedorov, N.F.; Gavrilov, A.P.; Ivanov, N.I.; Khalina, O.M.

1986-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the blight encountered the previous year. Forage sorghum (DeKalb SX-11) was planted 5/1/73, 4/26/74 and, 6/9/75) . Yield of corn grain, corn forage, and sorghum forage were determined for the three growing seasons. Leaf samples were also taken... by rate and source of lime, de th, and time. Treatment k /ha 0 mo. 3 mo. 8 mo. 11 mo. 17 mo. 0 to 15 cm depth 8000 flue dust 2000 5QQ II II S. 6 a s. s a 5. 6 a 6. 9 c 6. 1 ab 5. 7 a 7. 2 c 6. 5 bc 5. 9 ab 6. 5 bc 7. 0 c 6. 0 abc 6. 4 b 5. 6 a...

Poole, Warren David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modelling and simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cement-based materials: Interactions between damage and leaching  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of the durability of cement-based materials, which could be employed in underground structures for nuclear waste disposal, requires accounting for deterioration factors, such as chemical attacks and damage, and for the interactions between these phenomena. The objective of the present paper consists in investigating the long-term behaviour of cementitious materials by simulating their response to chemical and mechanical solicitations. In a companion paper (Stora et al., submitted to Cem. Concr. Res. 2008), the implementation of a multi-scale homogenization model into an integration platform has allowed for evaluating the evolution of the mineral composition, diffusive and elastic properties inside a concrete material subjected to leaching. To complete this previous work, an orthotropic micromechanical damage model is presently developed and incorporated in this numerical platform to estimate the mechanical and diffusive properties of damaged cement-based materials. Simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cementitious materials are performed with the tool thus obtained and compared with available experiments. The numerical results are insightful about the interactions between damage and chemical deteriorations.

Stora, E., E-mail: stora@univ-mlv.f [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Bary, B. [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); He, Q.-C. [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Deville, E.; Montarnal, P. [CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DM2S/SFME/MTMS, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technical justifications for the tests and criteria in the waste form technical position appendix on cement stabilization  

SciTech Connect

As part of its technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a background document for the cement stabilization appendix, Appendix A, to Rev. 1 of the Technical Position on Waste Form (TP). Here we present an overview of this background document, which provides technical justification for the stability tests to be performed on cement-stabilized waste forms and for the criteria posed in each test, especially for those tests which have been changed from their counterparts in the May 1983 Rev. 0 TP. We address guidelines for procedures from Appendix A which are considered in less detail or not at all in the Rev. 0 of the TP, namely, qualification specimen preparation (mixing, curing, storage), statistical sampling and analysis, process control program specimen preparation and examination, and surveillance specimens. For each waste form qualification test, criterion or procedural guidelines, we consider the reason for its inclusion in Appendix A, the changes from Rev. 0 of the TP (if applicable), and a discussion of the justification or rationale for these changes.

Siskind, B.; Cowgill, M.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Technical justifications for the tests and criteria in the waste form technical position appendix on cement stabilization  

SciTech Connect

As part of its technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a background document for the cement stabilization appendix, Appendix A, to Rev. 1 of the Technical Position on Waste Form (TP). Here we present an overview of this background document, which provides technical justification for the stability tests to be performed on cement-stabilized waste forms and for the criteria posed in each test, especially for those tests which have been changed from their counterparts in the May 1983 Rev. 0 TP. We address guidelines for procedures from Appendix A which are considered in less detail or not at all in the Rev. 0 of the TP, namely, qualification specimen preparation (mixing, curing, storage), statistical sampling and analysis, process control program specimen preparation and examination, and surveillance specimens. For each waste form qualification test, criterion or procedural guidelines, we consider the reason for its inclusion in Appendix A, the changes from Rev. 0 of the TP (if applicable), and a discussion of the justification or rationale for these changes.

Siskind, B.; Cowgill, M.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Behavior of cement mortars containing an industrial waste from aluminium refining: Stability in Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical interaction between a solid industrial waste from aluminium refining and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution, as well as the effects of substituting siliceous sand for the waste on the physical and mechanical properties of mortars were studied. The waste is a solid that contains reactive alumina capable of combining with the calcium hydroxide. These reactions result in stable and insoluble compounds. This alumina, together with the halite (also present in the waste composition), chemically react with a saturated solution of Ca(OH){sub 2}, giving as a main reaction product the so-called Friedel's salt (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}O{sub 6} {center{underscore}dot} 10 H{sub 2}O). Straetlingite and Si-hydrogarnets were among other products detected. The waste has a high specific surface area. The cement/waste mixtures therefore require a higher quantity of mixing water than cement/sand mixtures. The result is a decrease of the mechanical strengths and an increase of the total porosity. However, a decrease of the average size of the pores occurs, which can have a positive effect on the durability of the final material.

Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Vazquez, T.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Growth of sheets in 3D confinements - a model for the C-S-H meso 2 structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.20 2.0 0 02 5 6 8 P0 rog resVaVNeoml i eet al. di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eRWwWDml di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eWi RWwWDml rhVaal TWi f ehI TRl en h p022ei ewt Al Tl Figure 6: Example scattering curves obtained for structure (h) in Figure 3 together with small... ] H. M. Jennings, Refinements to colloid model of C-S-H in cement: CM-II, Cem. Conc. Res 38 (3) (2008) 275–289.293 [7] R. F. Feldman, P. J. Sereda, New model for hydrated portland cement and its practical implications, Eng.J.-Canada294 53 (8/9) (1970...

Etzold, Merlin A.; McDonald, Peter J.; Routh, Alexander F.

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

452

Sílabo del curso de Redes II.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??El curso de Redes II, es de naturaleza Teórico–Práctica, pertenece al área de infraestructura de tecnologías de información Redes II es un curso que aporta… (more)

[No author

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

454

Cement and Concrete Research 29 (1999) 961965 0008-8846/99/$see front matter 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Type I) from La- farge Corp. (Southfield, MI, USA). The silica fume (Elkem Materials, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA, EMS 965) was used in the amount of 15% by mass of cement. The methylcellulose, used University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-4400, USA Manuscript received 19 January 1999; accepted

Chung, Deborah D.L.

455

Penascal II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penascal II Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Kenedy County TX Coordinates 27.003108°, -97.584014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.003108,"lon":-97.584014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Cimarron II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cimarron II Facility Cimarron II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Developer CPV Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Kansas City Power & Light Location Cimarron KS Coordinates 37.90154236°, -100.3934097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.90154236,"lon":-100.3934097,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Limon II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limon II Limon II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Limon CO Coordinates 39.33323523°, -103.5521507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.33323523,"lon":-103.5521507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Category II Dixon Recreation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Category II Dixon Recreation Center BB or VB court $30 RB/Squash court $23 Multipurpose Room $30 for any rental that is cancelled with less than seven days notice Department of Recreational Sports

Escher, Christine

459

Super KEKB / Belle II Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the status of the KEKB collider and the Belle detector upgrade, along with several examples of physics measurements to be performed with Belle II at Super KEKB.

B. Golob

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Aegir II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates 43.098°, -86.597° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.098,"lon":-86.597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

462

Aspect Ratio Effect of Functionalized/Non-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to investigate the use of functionalized/non-functionalized multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements for the Portland cement paste. The unique geometrical characteristics of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs...

Ashour, Ahmad

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Utilizing New Binder Materials for Green Building has Zero Waste by Recycling Slag and Sewage Sludge Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

binding material to save energy and to produce new innovative zero materials waste . The current research aims to investigate new binder materials as alternative of Portland cement. Alkali activated slag (AAS) blended with sewage sludge ash (SSA...

Zeedan, S. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Rock alteration in alkaline cement waters over 15 years and its relevance to the geological disposal of nuclear waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The interaction of groundwater with cement in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for intermediate level radioactive waste will produce a high pH leachate plume. Such a plume may alter the physical and chemical properties of the GDF host rock. However, the geochemical and mineralogical processes which may occur in such systems over timescales relevant for geological disposal remain unclear. This study has extended the timescale for laboratory experiments and shown that, after 15 years two distinct phases of reaction may occur during alteration of a dolomite-rich rock at high pH. In these experiments the dissolution of primary silicate minerals and the formation of secondary calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) phases containing varying amounts of aluminium and potassium (C–(A)–(K)–S–H) during the early stages of reaction (up to 15 months) have been superseded as the systems have evolved. After 15 years significant dedolomitisation (MgCa(CO3)2 + 2OH? ? Mg(OH)2 + CaCO3 + CO32?(aq)) has led to the formation of magnesium silicates, such as saponite and talc, containing variable amounts of aluminium and potassium (Mg–(Al)–(K)–silicates), and calcite at the expense of the early-formed C–(A)–(K)–S–H phases. This occured in high pH solutions representative of two different periods of cement leachate evolution with little difference in the alteration processes in either a KOH and NaOH or a Ca(OH)2 dominated solution but a greater extent of alteration in the higher pH KOH/NaOH leachate. The high pH alteration of the rock over 15 years also increased the rock’s sorption capacity for U(VI). The results of this study provide a detailed insight into the longer term reactions occurring during the interaction of cement leachate and dolomite-rich rock in the geosphere. These processes have the potential to impact on radionuclide transport from a geodisposal facility and are therefore important in underpinning any safety case for geological disposal.

Elizabeth B.A. Moyce; Christopher Rochelle; Katherine Morris; Antoni E. Milodowski; Xiaohui Chen; Steve Thornton; Joe S. Small; Samuel Shaw

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy WIAT Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II #12;2 | Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II working with Forestry Commission Scotland on Woods In and Around Towns #12;Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II | 3 What is this about? The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides

466

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

addition for mortars and concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed on self-compacting concrete mixtures (1-6). MATERIALS Portland Cement A commercial portland AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2005-09 REP-580 August

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

467

Partial replacement of fossil fuel in a cement plant: Risk assessment for the population living in the neighborhood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In cement plants, the substitution of traditional fossil fuels not only allows a reduction of CO2, but it also means to check-out residual materials, such as sewage sludge or municipal solid wastes (MSW), which should otherwise be disposed somehow/somewhere. In recent months, a cement plant placed in Alcanar (Catalonia, Spain) has been conducting tests to replace fossil fuel by refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW. In July 2009, an operational test was progressively initiated by reaching a maximum of partial substitution of 20% of the required energy. In order to study the influence of the new process, environmental monitoring surveys were performed before and after the RDF implementation. Metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were analyzed in soil, herbage, and air samples collected around the facility. In soils, significant decreases of PCDD/F levels, as well as in some metal concentrations were found, while no significant increases in the concentrations of these pollutants were observed. In turn, PM10 levels remained constant, with a value of 16 ?g m? 3. In both surveys, the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks derived from exposure to metals and PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of the facility were within the ranges considered as acceptable according to national and international standards. This means that RDF may be a successful choice in front of classical fossil fuels, being in accordance with the new EU environmental policies, which entail the reduction of CO2 emissions and the energetic valorization of MSW. However, further long-term environmental studies are necessary to corroborate the harmlessness of RDF, in terms of human health risks.

Joaquim Rovira; Montse Mari; Martí Nadal; Marta Schuhmacher; José L. Domingo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Musselshell II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Musselshell II Musselshell II Facility Musselshell II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.26733°, -109.499175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.26733,"lon":-109.499175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Glacier II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Near Ethridge MT Coordinates 48.555639°, -112.120992° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.555639,"lon":-112.120992,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Majestic II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Majestic II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser SWEPCO Location Amarillo TX Coordinates 35.3672156°, -101.5474892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.3672156,"lon":-101.5474892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

471

Harvest II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harvest II Harvest II Facility Harvest II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Pigeon MI Coordinates 43.83861292°, -83.2171011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83861292,"lon":-83.2171011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

472

Luz II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Luz II Luz II Jump to: navigation, search Name Luz II Place Jerusalem, Israel Zip 91450 Sector Solar Product Jerusalem-based utility-scale solar power plant developer. Coordinates 31.7736°, 35.224998° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.7736,"lon":35.224998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

473

Chemomechanics of calcium leaching of cement-based materials at different scales : the role of CH-dissolution and C-S-H degradation on strength and durability performance of materials and structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calcium leaching is a durability threat for cement-based materials employed in critical infrastructures, such as Nuclear Waste Storage Systems. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of the material and structural ...

Heukamp, Franz H. (Franz Hoyte), 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

475

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Sun -II Alexei Gilchrist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun - II Alexei Gilchrist #12;Some resources · http://www.nineplanets.org/sol.html · "The Universe: Secrets of the Sun" video ­ Search on youtube (references are to clips here http in these slides Secrets of the Sun #12;Why does the sun shine? Long and fascinating history involving - geology

Wardle, Mark

477

Advanced Toroidal Facility II studies  

SciTech Connect

Design studies for a low-aspect-ratio, large next-generation stellarator, Advanced Toroidal Facility II (ATF-II), with high-current-density, high-field, stable NbTi/Cu helical windings are described. The design parameters are an average plasma radius of 0.52 m, a major radius of 2 m, and a field on axis of 4 to 5 T, with 10 to 15 MW of heating power. Such a device would be comparable in cope to other next-generation stellarators but would have roughly the same aspect ratio as the tokamaks without, however, the need for current drive to sustain steady-state operation. A number of low-aspect-ratio physics issues need to be addressed in the design of ATF-II, primarily compromises between high-beta capability and good confinement properties. A six-field-period compact torsatron is chosen as a reference design for ATF-II, and its main features and performance predictions are discussed. An integrated (beta capability and confinement) optimization approach and optimization of superconducting windings are also discussed.

Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.; Dresner, L.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hirshman, S.P.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Painter, S.L.; Rome, J.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Morris, R.N.; van Rij, W.I. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Computing and Telecommunications Div., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing.pdf More Documents & Publications Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Slide 1 PARS II Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)...

480

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

PARS II - Integrated Project Team Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Meeting PARS II - Integrated Project Team Meeting More Documents & Publications PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Slide 1...

482

Cement distribution in a carbonate reservoir: recognition of a palaeo oil–water contact and its relationship to reservoir quality in the Humbly Grove field, onshore, UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of mineral cements, total porosity, microporosity and permeability have been determined for the Humbly Grove oolitic carbonate reservoir (Middle Jurassic Great Oolite Formation, Weald Basin, onshore UK) using a combination of optical petrography, electron microscopy, fluid inclusion analysis, quantitative XRD, wireline data analysis and core analysis data. Grainstone reservoir facies have porosities ranging between 5 and 24%, but are mostly between 11 and 24%. Permeabilities vary from Jurassic reservoirs of the Weald Basin.

Emma C Heasley; Richard H Worden; James P Hendry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Very early age detection of ettringite from pozzolan origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The mineralogical composition of special purpose Portland cements must conform to certain requirements. Sulphate-resistant Portland cements, for instance, the tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and tetracalcium aluminoferrite (C4AF) phase’s contents must be very low to minimize the consequences of the hydration of large amounts of sulphates and the wide fluctuations in volume that would entail. At the same time, for economic, technical and environmental reasons, primarily pozzolanic additions, some of which are aluminic in chemical character, are included in Portland cements. When thermally activated clays such as metakaolin (aluminic pozzolan) are added to Portland cements with low (to nil) C3A content, an \\{AFt\\} phase of pozzolan origin may also form. The present study corroborated previous reports of the formation, but at very early ages (48 h), of such an \\{AFt\\} phase of pozzolan origin, mainly, in a Portland cement blend containing minimal C3A content, an aluminic pozzolan in chemical character (metakaolin, M pozzolan) and excess gypsum, 15.05% (=7.0% SO3); and if C3A content in OPC is high, the \\{AFt\\} phase originated is of pozzolan origin as well, and in addition, of such C3A content, generating so greater or lesser Expansive Synergic Effect, ESE, according to the greater or lesser pozzolanic activity amount originated previously by M pozzolan in this case, and for this reason, being the ettringite from M pozzolan its chief direct and indirect cause. On the other hand, it also proved that such excess gypsum acted as a setting regulator in blended cements with metakaolin and a retarder in all the other cements tested, whether they were pure Portland cements or blends containing a crystalline mineral addition, Q, and also some blended cements with metakaolin can be regarded as being “hydraulic expansive cements” according to ASTM C 845-90 Standard.

V. Rahhal; R. Talero

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

PARS II Training | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Training PARS II Training PARS II training is delivered as traditional, instructor-led, hands-on classroom training, and also, as instructor-led Webinars with limited hands-on. In...

485

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

486

PARS II Training Schedule | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

will certify that user to receive a PARS II user account. PARSIITrainingSchedule03-06-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Slide 1 PARS II Course Registration Form...

487

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

488

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.

Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N.; Olson, G.K.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from cement kiln/calciner through the use of the NO{sub x}OUT process  

SciTech Connect

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. This process, a selective non-catalytic reduction process known as NO{sub x}OUT, has been successfully demonstrated in a cement kiln/calciner operated by Ash Grove Cement. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 pounds per hour (3.5--6.0 lb/ton of clinker) to less than 100 pounds per hour (1.0 lb/ton of clinker). This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of > 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. Based on this demonstration, cement kiln/calciners have been identified as an ideal application for the NO{sub x}OUT Process. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech., Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States); Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Class H Oil Well Cement Hydration at Elevated Temperatures in the Presence of Retarding Agents: An In Situ High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect

In situ powder X-ray diffraction was used to examine the hydration of API Class H cement slurries, with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.394, at 66, 93, 121, and 177 C under autogenous pressure in the presence of varying amounts of the additives tartaric acid, modified lignosulfonate, and AMPS (2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) copolymer. All of these retarding agents inhibited the hydration of crystalline C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), but other modes of action were also apparent. The formation of ettringite was suppressed when tartaric acid was used by itself or in combination with other additives. Changes in the hydration of C{sub 3}S vs time could not be correlated in a simple way with the observed pumping times for the cement slurries. The largest changes in pumping time as a function of temperature occurred in a temperature interval where ettringite/monosulfate decomposes and crystalline hydrogarnet starts to be formed.

Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P. (Halliburton); (GIT)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

491

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells DE-FC26-03NT41836 Goal: The goal of the project is to develop a supercement capable of sealing the annuli of and providing long-term integrity in deep, hot wells. Performers CSI Technologies, LLC , Houston, TX Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Results Phase I work involved a literature search on cements and evaluation of Portland and non-Portland cement systems and various formulations within these systems. Laboratory work involved more than 1,100 tests on 169 different formulations. Baseline testing established a foundation for comparison. Conventional and unconventional mechanical tests were conducted, and many systems were tested at high temperatures. From this work six candidate systems comprising some 10 formulas were recommended for further analysis in Phase II: reduced water systems, magnesium oxide, molybdenum trioxide, fibers, epoxy (resins), and graded particle systems.

492

Algebraic L-theory II Tibor Macko  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tibor Macko (Uni-Bonn) Algebraic L-theory II GKSS THDM 2013 1 / 29 #12;The surgery obstruction? Recall on simply-connected manifolds. Tibor Macko (Uni-Bonn) Algebraic L-theory II GKSS THDM 2013 2 / 29 #12;The GKSS THDM 2013 3 / 29 #12;The suspension maps II Recall the 1-chain W %(I) alias : I W %(I) from

Ferrari, Patrik L.

493

I I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy I II I I I II I I I II I I I I I CONTENTS 4 Introduction 6 Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Related to Power Production 16 Energy and Environment in Developing Countries 16 UNEP Support Activities

494

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as costs associated with completing environmental compliance which will include environmental impact this project to proceed with step 2 and 3 (i.e., preliminary and final design) activities. II on the spawning grounds. BUDGETARY/ECONOMIC IMPACTS Program costs associated with this project, to date, total

495

RHIC II Science Working Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshops Workshops The series of RHIC II Science Workshops began in November 2004, at which time seven Working Groups were initiated. These groups met in workshops through 2005, with the purpose of providing an organized forum for the community to address and describe quantitatively the most important science issues for the proposed RHIC II luminosity upgrade, and corresponding detector upgrades. Each Working Group was led by three convenors representing theory and experiment, and each has produced a detailed report (except for the "New Directions" group, which provided a sounding board and input to the other groups). The Working Group reports are linked below. The summary "white paper" document, "Future Science at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider" (PDF), is based on these reports, and was prepared by a Writing Committee that included at least one convenor from each of the Working Groups.

496

NSLS-II Project Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Schedule NSLS-II Project Schedule Major Milestone Event Major Milestone Event Preliminary Schedule CD-0 (approve Mission Need) 4th quarter, FY2005 CD-1 (approve Alternative Selection and Cost Range) 4th quarter, FY2007 CD-2 (approve Performance Baseline) 1st quarter, FY2008 CD-3 (approve Start of Construction) 2nd quarter, FY2009 CD-4 (approve Start of Operations) FY2015 Critical Decisions The five Critical Decisions are major milestones approved by the Secretarial Acquisition Executive or Acquisition Executive that establish the mission need, recommended alternative, Acquisition Strategy, the Performance Baseline, and other essential elements required to ensure that the project meets applicable mission, design, security, and safety requirements. Each Critical Decision marks an increase in commitment of

497

Oak Ridge Associated Universities II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Prepared by Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities II Prepared for Division of Fuel - Cycle and Material Safety II U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission L RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W. R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY P. W. FRAME Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT January 1983 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W.R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY Prepared for Division of Fuel Cycle and Material Safety U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission P. W. Frame Project Staff J. D. Berger A. J. Liu R. D. Condra A. M. Pitt G. R. Foltz T. J. Sowell J. R. Frazier C. F. Weaver R. C. Gentry T. S. Yoo Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities

498

Tevatron Run II Physics Projections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Document for the P5 Committee (version 8, September 30, 2005) Electroweak Precision Measurements and Standard Model Higgs Searches W Mass Measurement: 20 - 30 MeV Projections versus Integrated Luminosity (made by CDF): eps, gif, gif (log) Extrapolated from Run Ib measurement Uncertainties assumed to scale with luminosity: Statiscal uncertainties Systematic uncertainties such as Energy and momentum scale, Hadron Recoil against W Uncertainties assumed not to scale with luminosity: W production and decay: PDFs, d(sigma_W)/d(Pt), higher order QCD/QED effects Assumed to be beween 20 MeV (dashed lines) and 30 MeV (solid lines) Top Mass Measurement: ~1.5 GeV Assumptions Channel: only lepton+jets channle considered. Uncertainties that scale with luminosity - 1 / sqrt(lum)

499

PEP-II Operations Report  

SciTech Connect

PEP-II is a two-ring asymmetric B factory operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. It was constructed by a SLAC-LBNL-LLNL collaboration. The collider comprises two rings, a High-Energy Ring (HER) storing 9 GeV electrons, and a Low-Energy Ring (LER) storing 3.1 GeV positrons. Commissioning of the HER began in mid-1997 and commissioning of the LER began in mid-1998. First evidence for collisions was obtained on July 23, 1998. The BaBar detector was installed in early 1999, and commissioning with the detector commenced in May 1999. By September 1999, PEP-II had reached a peak luminosity of 1.35 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. In the present run, which began in October 1999, the peak luminosity has reached 3.1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and the integrated luminosity delivered is 25 fb{sup {minus}1}. At present, PEP-II is the world's highest luminosity collider. In this paper we describe the startup experience and summarize the operational experience during fiscal year 2000 (from October 1999 through September 2000). Plan s for luminosity upgrades are briefly described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 7, 2011 (V1.3) July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload 2 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Course Objectives * Upon completion of this course, users will be able to: - Navigate in the PARS II application - Select a Project to update - Update Project data by performing * An Upload of the latest monthly project performance data extracted from the contractor's local Earned Value Management System (EVMS) * Replace the current or a prior monthly upload in response to feedback or to correct data - Verify the success of the upload - View and interpret the import log generated by the upload process 3 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Overview PARS II 4 July 7, 2011 (V1.3) PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload PARS II Overview * Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) product