Sample records for ii performance evaluation

  1. Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final ReportPhase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical FlushingU. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 SupportJanuary 2004

  2. Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolid/water and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999.

  3. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  4. Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

  5. Building Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, A.; Harris, J.; Mbentin, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Performance Evaluation Anne King and Jo Harris, MBEKTN and BSRIA Agenda ? Background to funding and programme ? The Building Performance Evaluation Programme in the UK ? Requirements ? Results ? Impact ? Discussion ? Do you/ How do... you do Building Performance Evaluation? ? What gaps are there and what could research do to fill them? Background ? The Technology Strategy Board ? the funders ? Low Impact Building programme ? BSRIA and others ? evaluators ? Soft Landings...

  6. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

  7. Evaluating Steam Trap Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, N. Y.

    EVALUATING STEAM TRAP PERFORMANCE Noel Y Fuller, P.E. Holston Defense Corporation Kingsport, Tennessee ABSTRACT Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data... that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost. INTRODUCTION Steam traps used on distribution line drip...

  8. HARMONIC CAVITY PERFORMANCE FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLEDNYKH, A.; KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; ROSE, J.; TOWNE, N.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    NSLS-II is a 3 GeV ultra-high brightness storage ring planned to succeed the present NSLS rings at BNL. Ultralow emittance combined with short bunch length means that it is critical to minimize the effects of Touschek scattering and coherent instabilities. Improved lifetime and stability can be achieved by including a third-harmonic RF cavity in the baseline design. This paper describes the required harmonic RF parameters and the expected system performance.

  9. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TURBO CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajaji, Fady

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TURBO CODES by Guangchong Zhu A project submitted to the Department named ``Turbo codes'' which claims an extraordinary performance with reasonable decoding complexity. In this project, we begin with a study on the structure and principle of Turbo codes. We then investigate

  10. PERFORMANCE OF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Pressurized Superfluid Helium", EX5 40 11th InternationalOF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II R. Althaus, S. Cacpi, W.S.OF DIMLE NMMETS IN HELIUM II* R. Althaus, S. Caspl, W.S.

  11. NNSA Strategic Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) FOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    each Performance Objective. This PEP evaluates Contractor performance and promotes a new Governance and Oversight framework based on prudent management of risk, accountability,...

  12. Performance Evaluation and Analysis Consortium End Station |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    highlighting the "bucket" algorithm from UIUC. Credit: Leonid Oliker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Performance Evaluation and Analysis Consortium End Station PI Name:...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: performance metric evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metric evaluation PV Plant Performance Technical Briefing Published in PV Power Tech On March 4, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

  14. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  15. CLINICAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Physical Therapy Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    CLINICAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Physical Therapy Program University of Wisconsin-Madison Student. Areas needing improvement: This evaluation has been discussed with the students Yes No Clinical Instructor Student Date Please Note: The focus of this 2-week clinical experience is to provide students

  16. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles will build and deploy 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  17. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  18. Collaborative Virtual Environment Standards: A Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottawa, University of

    for each standard varies from graphics and rendering to simulation and network communication. Standards categories: Rendering and Graphics and Communications Middleware. 2.1 Rendering and Graphics These standards1 Collaborative Virtual Environment Standards: A Performance Evaluation Jauvane C. de Oliveira

  19. A Methodology Database System Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    A Methodology for Database System Performance Evaluation Haran Boral Computer Science Department Technion - Israel Institute of Technology David J. DeWitt Computer Sciences Department University82-01870 and the Department of Energy under contract #DE-AC02-81ER10920. #12;ABSTRACT This paper

  20. Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of...

  1. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  2. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  3. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Phasor Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kasztenny, Bogdan; Madani, Vahid; Martin, Kenneth E.; Meliopoulos, Sakis; Novosel, Damir; Stenbakken, Jerry

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After two decades of phasor network deployment, phasor measurements are now available at many major substations and power plants. The North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI), supported by both the US Department of Energy and the North American Electricity Reliability Council (NERC), provides a forum to facilitate the efforts in phasor technology in North America. Phasor applications have been explored and some are in today’s utility practice. IEEE C37.118 Standard is a milestone in standardizing phasor measurements and defining performance requirements. To comply with IEEE C37.118 and to better understand the impact of phasor quality on applications, the NASPI Performance and Standards Task Team (PSTT) initiated and accomplished the development of two important documents to address characterization of PMUs and instrumentation channels, which leverage prior work (esp. in WECC) and international experience. This paper summarizes the accomplished PSTT work and presents the methods for phasor measurement evaluation.

  5. Performance evaluation of bound diamond ring tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL is collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) and the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA) to optimize bound diamond ring tools for the spherical generation of high quality optical surfaces. An important element of this work is establishing an experimentally-verified link between tooling properties and workpiece quality indicators such as roughness, subsurface damage and removal rate. In this paper, we report on a standardized methodology for assessing ring tool performance and its preliminary application to a set of commercially-available wheels. Our goals are to (1) assist optics manufacturers (users of the ring tools) in evaluating tools and in assessing their applicability for a given operation, and (2) provide performance feedback to wheel manufacturers to help optimize tooling for the optics industry. Our paper includes measurements of wheel performance for three 2-4 micron diamond bronze-bond wheels that were supplied by different manufacturers to nominally- identical specifications. Preliminary data suggests that the difference in performance levels among the wheels were small.

  6. Step 8: Evaluate Program Performance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    performance and processes. It is important to design programs with evaluation in mind at the very beginning. Indeed, evaluation and program design activities are...

  7. Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

  8. Performance Test Protocol for Evaluating Inverters Used in Grid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance Test Protocol for Evaluating Inverters Used in Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems. Re-direct Destination: Abstract not provided....

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training Part II Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training Part II, presented in February 2015.

  10. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation is the Introduction to the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, held on August 13, 2014.

  11. Cyber Security Evaluation of II&C Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, which is conducted in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Within the LWRS Program, the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. The II&C Pathway is conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Cyber security is a common concern among nuclear utilities and other nuclear industry stakeholders regarding the digital technologies that are being developed under this program. This concern extends to the point of calling into question whether these types of technologies could ever be deployed in nuclear plants given the possibility that the information in them can be compromised and the technologies themselves can potentially be exploited to serve as attack vectors for adversaries. To this end, a cyber security evaluation has been conducted of these technologies to determine whether they constitute a threat beyond what the nuclear plants already manage within their regulatory-required cyber security programs. Specifically, the evaluation is based on NEI 08-09, which is the industry’s template for cyber security programs and evaluations, accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as responsive to the requirements of the nuclear power plant cyber security regulation found in 10 CFR 73.54. The evaluation was conducted by a cyber security team with expertise in nuclear utility cyber security programs and experience in conducting these evaluations. The evaluation has determined that, for the most part, cyber security will not be a limiting factor in the application of these technologies to nuclear power plant applications.

  12. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  13. Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

  15. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  16. Cross Section Evaluation Group shielding benchmark compilation. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the release of ENDF/B-IV in 1974, the Shielding Subcommittee had identified a series of 12 shielding data testing benchmarks (the SDT series). Most were used in the ENDF/B-IV data testing effort. A new concept and series was begun in the interim, the so-called Shielding Benchmark (SB) series. An effort was made to upgrade the SDT series as far as possible and to add new SB benchmarks. In order to be designated in the SB class, both an experiment and analysis must have been performed. The current recommended benchmark for Shielding Data Testing are listed. Until recently, the philosophy has been to include only citations to published references for shielding benchmarks. It is now our intention to provide adequate information in this volume for proper analysis of any new benchmarks added to the collection. These compilations appear in Section II, with the SB5 Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark as the first entry.

  17. Performance evaluation of scalable parallel computing networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Robert Todd

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    II THE SERVERNETrsr TECHNOLOGY III SIMULATION MODEL A. Device Models 1. Port Nodes 2. Router Nodes . 3. CPU Nodes . 4. I/O Nodes B. Topologies 1. Pitt '2. Small Chelsea. 3. Large Chelsea C. Traffic Model 9 11 13 15 17 19 19 20 23... block diagram . Router node block diagram 14 CPU interface node block diagram I/O interface node block diagram 16 Pitt topology 21 10 Small Chelsea topology Large Chelsea topology Interval and moving averages 22 24 30 12 13 Two...

  18. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dynamics & Propulsion Innovation Center Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions 8 th Diesel Engine Emission...

  19. Using Microbenchmarks to Evaluate System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Foundation (OSF). Bershad was partially sup­ ported by a National Science Foundation Presidential memory can distort the performance of a microbench­ mark. Caches permit rapid access to memory locations

  20. Toward Accurate Performance Evaluation using Hardware Counters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    -architecture (with- out rest of the system), the system level details (such as interfaces to buses, interrupt Intel's VTune software for Intel proces- sors [5], IBM's Performance Monitor API [14], Compaq's Digital

  1. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

  2. Evaluation of Performance of Cooperative Web Caching with Web Polygraph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhlok, Jaspal

    Evaluation of Performance of Cooperative Web Caching with Web Polygraph Ping Du Jaspal Subhlok This paper presents a framework for evaluating the performance of cooperative Web cache hierarchies. Web Poly cache hierarchies built with Squid proxy cache servers. 1 Introduction Multiple Web caches can cooperate

  3. An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldini, Alessandro

    An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation: Trading QoS with Covert Channel@sti.uniurb.it Abstract. Security analysis and performance evaluation are two funda- mental activities in the system. This is accomplished by proposing a tool-supported methodology that combines noninterference-based security analysis

  4. SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology, and client interface is undergoing. The design and implementation adopted a new EPICS implementation, namely epics-pvdata [9], which is under active development. The implementation of this project under Java is close to stable, and binding to other language such as C++ and/or Python is undergoing. In this paper, we focus on the performance benchmarking and comparison for pvAccess and Channel Access, the performance evaluation for 2 services, gather and item finder respectively.

  5. Evaluating Retrieval Performance using Clickthrough Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    for the user. Taking an approach from experiment design, the paper proposes an experiment setup that generates feedback can provide powerful information for analyzing and optimizing the performance of information retrieval systems. Unfortunately, experience shows that users are only rarely willing to give explicit

  6. Design for, and Evaluation of Life Cycle Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.; Hall, E. W.

    ?. DESIGN FOR, AND EVALUATION OF LIFE CYCLE PERFORMANCE David J. Ahner Eldon W. Hall GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT EQUIPMENT DEGRADATION Project evaluation necessarily requires performance estimates over... the project life cycle. In contrast to new and clean condi tions, extended 1 ife performance inherently introduces additional complexity and vari ability in developing such estimates, due to changing operating environment, mainte nance policies...

  7. Diagnostics and performance evaluation of multikilohertz capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDuff, G.; Nunnally, W.C.; Rust, K.; Sarjeant, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed performance of nanofarad polypropylene-silicone oil, mica paper, and polytetrafluoroethylene-silicone oil capacitors discharged in a 100-ns, 1-kA pulse with a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz is presented. The test facility circuit, diagnostic parameters, and the preliminary test schedule are outlined as a basis for discussion of the observed failure locations and proposed failure mechanisms. Most of the test data and discussion presented involves the polypropylene-silicone oil units.

  8. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

  9. TEMPORAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CONTROL ARCHITECTURE IN AUTOMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TEMPORAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CONTROL ARCHITECTURE IN AUTOMATION SYSTEMS Pascal Meunier, Bruno, France pascal.meunier@lurpa.ens-cachan.fr (Pascal Meunier) Abstract The performances of automation performances of networked automation system and which guides the engineer throughout the control architecture

  10. Evaluating Parameter Sweep Workflows in High Performance Computing*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evaluating Parameter Sweep Workflows in High Performance Computing* Fernando Chirigati1,# , Vítor a large amount of tasks that are submitted to High Performance Computing (HPC) environments. Different, Parameter Sweep, High Performance Computing (HPC) 1. INTRODUCTION1 # Many scientific experiments are based

  11. Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 Federalof EnergyThorium,8,2011Barriers and

  12. Evaluating separator performance for hydrocarbon streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, W.F.

    1982-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal for ideal separator selection and design is to separate the hydrocarbon stream into liquid-free gas and gasfree liquid. Separators are mechanical devices for removing and collecting liquids from natural gas. Verticle, horizontal, and spherical separators and their respective capabilities are described. Coalescing gas separators are designed specifically for the removal of mists, oil fogs, rust, and dust from the gas stream. A table lists estimated fabrication and installation cost, performance rating, and time requirements for each filter-coalescer liquid separator based on gas pressure (psig) and gas volumes (MMcfd).

  13. Performance Evaluations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity ofPerformance

  14. Performance evaluation of the Balcomb solar house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Perry, J.E. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional instrumentation was added to the Balcomb solar house for a six-week period and up to 85 channels were recorded hourly. Some new findings based on an evaluation of these data are presented. (1) The thermal comfort characteristics of four rooms are documented. (2) Relative humidity in the living room varies from 30 to 50%; these data are used to infer an evaporation rate in the house of about 25 kg of water/day. The evaporation rate correlates reasonably well with greenhouse temperature. (3) Heat storage in the greenhouse floor is estimated at about 0.30 kWh/day-m/sup 2/ based on temperatures measured at four depths. (4) Several thermal characteristics of the rock bed are deduced but it is evident that the heat flow is not yet completely understood.

  15. The FY 1998 Battelle performance evaluation and incentive fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1998-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 1998 represents the second full year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based contract. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractors performance for the period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998, as required by Articles entitled Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation and Critical Outcomes Review of the Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830. In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office has defined six critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractors performance evaluation. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory. The Critical Outcome system focuses all of the customer desires into specific objectives and performance indicators, with supporting measures to track and foster continued improvement in meeting the needs (outcomes) of the Laboratory`s customers. Section 1 provides information on how the overall performance rating for the Contractor will be determined. Section 2 provides the detailed information concerning critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators and expectations of performance. Section 3 describes the commitments for documenting and reporting the Laboratory`s self-evaluation.

  16. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory.

  17. EVALUATION OF THE FINAL REPORT: WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EVALUATION OF THE FINAL REPORT: WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL B00000000-01717-5700-00005 REV 00 August 2002 This document is not an official copy and is for...

  18. USING PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS TO EVALUATE AND STRENGTHEN INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS TO EVALUATE AND STRENGTHEN INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute about the security of information systems for the decision makers of organizations. When organizations

  19. ZERH WEBINAR: HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME SALES TRAINING PART II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  20. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

  1. Performance Evaluation for Global Computation Linda Brodo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Stephen

    nets formalism into the stochastic -calculus [2]. The objec- tive of performance evaluation is to analyse the dynamic behaviour of a system and predict performance indices or measures such as throughput certain aspects of the behaviour of the model must be quantified. For example, in classical process

  2. IS-95 forward link performance evaluation on multipath fading channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezeq, Sameh S

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    has been taken as a reference to compare the performance of the CDMA system with BPSK system. The simulation has been carried out to find the performance in a multipath fading environment. A different number of users is added to evaluate...

  3. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SECURE MAC PROTOCOL FOR VEHICULAR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1/6 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SECURE MAC PROTOCOL FOR VEHICULAR NETWORKS Yi Qian 1 , Kejie Lu 2 on a priority based secure MAC protocol for vehicular networks and present detailed security and performance and simulations that the MAC protocol can achieve both security and QoS requirements for vehicular network safety

  4. Hanford performance evaluation program for Hanford site analytical services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, L.P.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, states that it is the responsibility of DOE contractors to ensure that ``quality is achieved and maintained by those who have been assigned the responsibility for performing the work.`` Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) is designed to meet the needs of the Richland Operations Office (RL) for maintaining a consistent level of quality for the analytical chemistry services provided by contractor and commmercial analytical laboratory operations. Therefore, services supporting Hanford environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, and waste management analytical services shall meet appropriate quality standards. This performance evaluation program will monitor the quality standards of all analytical laboratories supporting the Hanforad Site including on-site and off-site laboratories. The monitoring and evaluation of laboratory performance can be completed by the use of several tools. This program will discuss the tools that will be utilized for laboratory performance evaluations. Revision 0 will primarily focus on presently available programs using readily available performance evaluation materials provided by DOE, EPA or commercial sources. Discussion of project specific PE materials and evaluations will be described in section 9.0 and Appendix A.

  5. FRANTIC 5 (a version of FRANTIC II) : a computer code for evaluating system aging effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrijevic, Vesna B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRANTIC 5 code is a modification of the FRANTIC II code for time dependent unavailability analysis. FRANTIC 5 is specially adapted for modeling the aging effects on system and component performance. The FRANTIC 5 code ...

  6. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 3rd Quarter 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles will build and deploy 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  7. Applied grinding wheel performance evaluation for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We are collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (Rochester NY) to develop fine diamond grinding wheels for spherical grinding of glass optics. A standardized method for evaluating wheel performance includes in-process acoustic emission (AE). This paper includes recent AE measurements taken during the evaluation of several fine diamond grinding wheels and discusses how this new information might relate to the physical performance of the wheels. An interesting observation is also reported on the surface topography of worn bronze wheels using an interferometric profiler.

  8. Performance Evaluation of BPM System in SSRF Using PCA Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhichu; Yan, Yingbing; Yuan, Renxian; Lai, Longwei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam position monitor (BPM) system is of most importance in a light source. The capability of the BPM depends on the resolution of the system. The traditional standard deviation on the raw data method merely gives the upper limit of the resolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) had been introduced in the accelerator physics and it could be used to get rid of the actual signals. Beam related informations were extracted before the evaluation of the BPM performance. A series of studies had been made in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and PCA was proved as an effective and robust method in the performance evaluations of our BPM system.

  9. Performance Evaluation of BPM System in SSRF Using PCA Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhichu Chen; Yongbin Leng; Yingbing Yan; Renxian Yuan; Longwei Lai

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam position monitor (BPM) system is of most importance in a light source. The capability of the BPM depends on the resolution of the system. The traditional standard deviation on the raw data method merely gives the upper limit of the resolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) had been introduced in the accelerator physics and it could be used to get rid of the actual signals. Beam related informations were extracted before the evaluation of the BPM performance. A series of studies had been made in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and PCA was proved as an effective and robust method in the performance evaluations of our BPM system.

  10. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 1st Quarter 2014 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  11. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Gen2 - 2013 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  12. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Gen 2 - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  13. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  14. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO{sub x} control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities.

  15. Evaluating the performance of passive-solar-heated buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of evaluating the thermal performance of passive-solar buildings are reviewed. Instrumentation and data logging requirements are outlined. Various methodologies that have been used to develop an energy balance for the building and various performance measures are discussed. Methods for quantifying comfort are described. Subsystem and other special-purpose monitoring are briefly reviewed. Summary results are given for 38 buildings that have been monitored.

  16. Design Optimization of Robot Manipulators over Global Stiffness Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    objective is to fulfill the industrial demands in the preliminary design of the robots manipulatorsDesign Optimization of Robot Manipulators over Global Stiffness Performance Evaluation Eric for the design optimization of robot manipulators with respect to multiple global stiffness objectives

  17. Evaluation of Compass Ambiguity Resolution Performance Using Geometric-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Evaluation of Compass Ambiguity Resolution Performance Using Geometric-Based Techniques Satellite Division. ABSTRACT The Chinese GNSS system, Compass, is expected to be operational in the near application areas involving Compass will be carrier-phase based precise positioning. However, the associated

  18. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addendum A Addendum A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Performance Evaluation Fiscal Year 2005 The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act nuclear fuel and defense high-level radioactive waste. The Act also estab lished the U.S. Nuclear Waste

  19. Performance evaluation of centralized maintenance workshop by using Queuing Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    maintenance types: Preventive maintenance: different actions are programmed in cycle periods; CorrectivePerformance evaluation of centralized maintenance workshop by using Queuing Networks Zineb Simeu: Maintenance workshop integrated in the job-shop system is required in order to maintain the production

  20. Performance Evaluation on Open Source Native XML DBMSs 92 10400,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runapongsa, Kanda

    @biotec.or.th*** , nuwee.w@pcd.go.th**** Abstract Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS) is designed storage manager and query engines. Choosing an appropriate Native XML DBMS to manage a large and complex DBMS, Performance Evaluation, Benchmark Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS

  1. Techno-economic Performance Evaluation of Compressed Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-22235 Techno-economic Performance Evaluation of Compressed Air Energy Storage in the Pacific of Compressed Air Energy Storage in the Pacific Northwest BP McGrail JE Cabe CL Davidson FS Knudsen DH Bacon MD air energy storage (CAES) in the unique geologic setting of inland Washington and Oregon. The basic

  2. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Birsen Donmez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    , Standardization, Theory. Keywords Metric Quality, Human Supervisory Control, Validity, Statistics, Experiments. 1Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics Birsen Donmez MIT Dept. of Aero(617)252-1512 missyc@mit.edu ABSTRACT Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human- automation

  3. Analysis of Photovoltaic System Energy Performance Evaluation Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Newmiller, J.; Kimber, A.; Flottemesch, R.; Riley, E.; Dierauf, T.; McKee, J.; Krishnani, P.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Documentation of the energy yield of a large photovoltaic (PV) system over a substantial period can be useful to measure a performance guarantee, as an assessment of the health of the system, for verification of a performance model to then be applied to a new system, or for a variety of other purposes. Although the measurement of this performance metric might appear to be straight forward, there are a number of subtleties associated with variations in weather and imperfect data collection that complicate the determination and data analysis. A performance assessment is most valuable when it is completed with a very low uncertainty and when the subtleties are systematically addressed, yet currently no standard exists to guide this process. This report summarizes a draft methodology for an Energy Performance Evaluation Method, the philosophy behind the draft method, and the lessons that were learned by implementing the method.

  4. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

  5. Evaluation of selection and performance of students in the professional curriculum in College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, James David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Member) ictor Willson I (M er o~fas Palmer (H a5 $ Department) May 2001 Major Subject: Educational Psychology ABSTRACT Evaluation of Selection and Performance of Students in the Professional Curriculum at College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A... with average SAT II scores of 1000 or less performed at a lower level than students from programs with higher SAT II scores. DEDICATION This work is dedicated to my wife, Carmen, and children, Forrest, Campbell, and Witt. I am grateful...

  6. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  7. Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume II. Systems evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. The parabolic trough concept (BDM) was found to provide a low temperature technology alternative to the central receiver concept with promising performance and cost potential. Its continued development is recommended, with special emphasis on lower temperature (< 700/sup 0/F) applications. Finally, a variety of new promising line focus power system configurations were identified for a range of utility and industrial applications and recommendations were made on their implementation. This volume contains the detailed report. (WHK)

  8. Low-temperature spray ponds: performance evaluation and prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerig, Philip Dwan

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pond. These figures were used along with the dry-bulb temperatures measured at the pond to estimate the wet-bulb temperature at the spray pond. A second problem encountered during very cold weather was that the manometer lines would often freeze...LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May...

  9. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  10. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - January 2003 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  11. IUPAC Critical Evaluation of the Rotational-Vibrational Spectra of Water Vapor. Part II.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , transition wavenumbers, atmospheric physics, energy levels, MARVEL, information system, database, WIUPAC Critical Evaluation of the Rotational-Vibrational Spectra of Water Vapor. Part II. Energy Kingdom c Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, U.S.A. d Universit

  12. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor. Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Atmospheric physics Energy levels MARVEL Information system Database W@DIS Infrared spectra Microwave spectraIUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor. Part II Energy, York, UK c Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA d

  13. Fiscal year 1998 Battelle performance evaluation agreement revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Year 1998 represents the second full year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based contract. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractors performance for the period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998, as required by Articles entitled Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation and Critical Outcomes Review of the Contract DE-AC08-76RLO1830. In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office has defined six critical outcomes that same as the core for the Contractors performance evaluation. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory. As stated above six critical outcomes have been established for FY 1998. These outcomes are based on the following needs identified by DOE-HQ, RL and other customers of the Laboratory. Our Energy Research customer desires relevant, quality and cost effective science. Our Environmental Management customer wants technology developed, demonstrated, and deployed to solve environmental cleanup issues. To ensure the diversification and viability of the Laboratory as a National asset, RL and HQ alike want to increase the Science and Technical contributions of PNNL related to its core capabilities. RL wants improved leadership/management, cost-effective operations, and maintenance of a work environment, which fosters innovative thinking and high morale. RL and HQ alike desire compliance with environment, safety and health (ES and H) standards and disciplined conduct of operations for protection of the worker, environment, and the public, As with all of Hanford, DOE expects contribution of the Laboratory to the economic development of the Tri-Cities community, and the region, to build a new local economy that is less reliant on the Hanford mission, as well as enhancing the status of the Laboratory as a valued corporate citizen of the Northwest Region. The Critical Outcome system focuses all of these customer desires into specific objectives and performance indicators, with supporting measures to track and foster continued improvement in meeting the needs (outcomes) of the Laboratory's customers.

  14. Laboratory Performance Evaluation Report of SEL 421 Phasor Measurement Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; faris, Anthony J.; Martin, Kenneth E.; Hauer, John F.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Shaw, James M.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL and BPA have been in close collaboration on laboratory performance evaluation of phasor measurement units for over ten years. A series of evaluation tests are designed to confirm accuracy and determine measurement performance under a variety of conditions that may be encountered in actual use. Ultimately the testing conducted should provide parameters that can be used to adjust all measurements to a standardized basis. These tests are performed with a standard relay test set using recorded files of precisely generated test signals. The test set provides test signals at a level and in a format suitable for input to a PMU that accurately reproduces the signals in both signal amplitude and timing. Test set outputs are checked to confirm the accuracy of the output signal. The recorded signals include both current and voltage waveforms and a digital timing track used to relate the PMU measured value with the test signal. Test signals include steady-state waveforms to test amplitude, phase, and frequency accuracy, modulated signals to determine measurement and rejection bands, and step tests to determine timing and response accuracy. Additional tests are included as necessary to fully describe the PMU operation. Testing is done with a BPA phasor data concentrator (PDC) which provides communication support and monitors data input for dropouts and data errors.

  15. Nitrogen-Doped 9-Cell Cavity Performance in a Test Cryomodule for LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnella, Dan; Furuta, Fumio; Ge, Mingqi; Hall, Daniel; Ho, Vivian; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Liepe, Matthias; O'Connell, Tim; Posen, Sam; Quigley, Peter; Sears, James; Veshcherevich, Vadim; Grassellino, Anna; Romanenko, Alexander; Sergatskov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting RF linac for LCLS-II calls for 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities with an average intrinsic quality factor Q0 of 2.7x10^10 at 2 K and 16 MV/m accelerating gradient. Two niobium 9-cell cavities, prepared with nitrogen-doping at Fermilab, were assembled into the Cornell Horizontal Test Cryomodule (HTC) to test cavity performance in a cryomodule that is very similar to a full LCLS-II cryomodule. The cavities met LCLS-II specifications with an average quench field of 17 MV/m and an average Q0 of 3x10^10. The sensitivity of the cavities' residual resistance to ambient magnetic field was determined to be 0.5 nOhm/mG during fast cool down. In two cool downs, a heater attached to one of the cavity beam tubes was used to induce large horizontal temperature gradients. Here we report on the results of these first tests of nitrogen-doped cavities in cryomodule, which provide critical information for the LCLS-II project.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  17. The Performance of Multileaf Collimators Evaluated by the Stripe Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastre-Padro, Maria [Department of Medical Physics, Division of Cancer Medicine and Radiotherapy, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: Maria.Sastre@radiumhospitalet.no; Lervag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik [Department of Medical Physics, Division of Cancer Medicine and Radiotherapy, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of 3 multileaf collimator (MLC) systems (Varian Medical Systems, Elekta, and Siemens Medical Solutions) mounted on 7 different radiotherapy linear accelerators was investigated by a stripe test. The stripe test consisted of 8 adjacent multileaf segments of 2.5 x 40 cm{sup 2}, enclosed by all leaf pairs. With 6-MV photons, the segments were used to irradiate Agfa CR films. The optical density profile of the irradiated film in the travel direction of the MLC was used to estimate the short- and long-term leaf positioning reproducibility. The short-term reproducibility was found by analyzing 6 consecutive stripe tests. The long-term reproducibility was obtained by performing 3 to 5 stripe tests over 2 months. The short-term reproducibility was mainly within 0.3 mm for all systems. For the long-term reproducibility, the Varian and Elekta MLCs were within 0.4 to 0.5 mm, while the Siemens MLC showed a wider distribution, with values up to 1 mm for some leaf pairs. The inferior long-term reproducibility of the Siemens MLCs was mainly due to a decrease of the segment size with time. In conclusion, the stripe test is a useful method for evaluating MLC performance. Furthermore, the long-term reproducibility varied among the MLC systems investigated.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF THE LEAD/LIQUID ARGON SHOWER COUNTER SYSTEM OF THE MARK II DETECTOR AT SPEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, G.S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of California. PERFORMANCE OF THE LEAD/LIQUID ARGON SHOWERMark II detector is a large lead/liquid argon system of theof-flight information, lead/liquid argon shower counters,

  19. An evaluation of EIA system performance in eight EU countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, A. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Wood, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). EIA Centre] [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). EIA Centre

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the quality of environmental impact assessment (EIA) reports, modifications to projects as a result of EIA, and the influence of changes to EIA procedures in the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Ireland, and Portugal is reported. The overall proportion of satisfactory EIA reports sampled increased from 50% to 71% between 1990--1991 and 1994--1996. Several modifications to projects occurred as a result of the EIA process, but there was no apparent trend over time relating to the number or significance of modifications. All the eight Member States had taken major or minor measures to modify EIA procedures and these either have already improved the quality of EIA practice or are expected to do so. A series of recommendations to improve the performance of the EIA process is presented.

  20. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it; Sepe, Raffaele, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples, via Roma, 29 - 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers’ safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  1. Liquid Cooling v. Air Cooling Evaluation in the Maui High-Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Liquid Cooling v. Air Cooling Evaluation in the Maui High-Performance Computing Center Liquid Cooling v. Air Cooling Evaluation in the Maui High-Performance Computing Center Study...

  2. High-temperature superconducting transformer performance, cost, and market evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, J.A.; Dagle, J.E.; DeSteese, J.G.; Huber, H.D.; Smith, S.A.; Currie, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Merrick, S.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent laboratory breakthroughs in high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials have stimulated both the scientific community and general public with questions regarding how these materials can be used in practical applications. While there are obvious benefits from using HTS materials (most notably the potential for reduced energy losses in the conductors), a number of issues (such as overall system energy losses, cost, and reliability) may limit applications of HTS equipment, even if the well known materials problems are solved. This study examined the future application potential of HTS materials to power transformers. This study effort was part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) research program, Superconductivity Technology for Electric Power Systems (STEPS). The study took a systems perspective to gain insights to help guide DOE in managing research designed to realize the vision of HTS applications. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to develop an understanding of the fundamental HTS transformer design issues that can provide guidance for developing practical devices of interest to the electric utility industry; to identify electric utility requirements for HTS transformers and to evaluate the potential for developing a commercial market; to evaluate the market potential and national benefits for HTS transformers that could be achieved by a successful HTS development program; to develop an integrated systems analysis framework, which can be used to support R&D planning by DOE, by identifying how various HTS materials characteristics impact the performance, cost, and national benefits of the HTS application.

  3. Statistical Performance Evaluation Of Soft Seat Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Stephen P.; Gross, Robert E.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk-based inspection methods enable estimation of the probability of failure on demand for spring-operated pressure relief valves at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This paper presents a statistical performance evaluation of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves. These pressure relief valves are typically smaller and of lower cost than hard seat (metal to metal) pressure relief valves and can provide substantial cost savings in fluid service applications (air, gas, liquid, and steam) providing that probability of failure on demand (the probability that the pressure relief valve fails to perform its intended safety function during a potentially dangerous over pressurization) is at least as good as that for hard seat valves. The research in this paper shows that the proportion of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves failing is the same or less than that of hard seat valves, and that for failed valves, soft seat valves typically have failure ratios of proof test pressure to set pressure less than that of hard seat valves.

  4. Performance Test Protocol for Evaluating Inverters Used in Grid-Connected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance Test Protocol for Evaluating Inverters Used in Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems....................................................................................... 6 4.1 Inverter Size

  5. Study on a two-piston type Stirling engine MELSE II -- Analysis of engine performance --

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azotsu, A.; Tanaka, A.; Yamada, Y.; Yamashita, I.; Yanagihara, S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of performance test data of the two-piston type laboratory research Stirling engine MELSE II. On the basis of the experimental data, the effects of the working gas species and the phase difference between the two pistons on engine performance are discussed and made clear. As working gases, helium, neon and argon were used. Phase difference was changed from 60 to 150 degrees. These effects appear mainly as the distinctions of the pressure drop loss and the mean working gas temperature in the expansion cylinder, and depend significantly on the engine speed. In addition, the pressure difference between the two cylinders and the temperature distribution of the expansion cylinder wall have been measured, and their behaviors are clarified in relation to the effects mentioned just above.

  6. An evaluation of the Fort Polk energy savings performance contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4,003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the Army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M and V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHP systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

  7. An Evaluation of the Fort Polk Energy Savings Performance Contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Shonder, John A [ORNL

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M&V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHPS systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from<5percent to roughly 100percent) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

  9. CPOL: High-Performance Policy Evaluation Kevin Borders, Xin Zhao, Atul Prakash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Atul

    ). To evaluate CPOL, we ran a simulated workload of users making privacy queries in a location, Performance, Design, Security. Keywords Policy evaluation, performance, privacy policy. 1. INTRODUCTION Design of policy evaluation systems has been a focus of the security community [1, 4, 2]. However, performance

  10. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  11. Performance of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Light Source; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron laser facilities requires x-ray optical systems with extremely high performance, generally of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of such optics requires adequate, highly accurate metrology and dedicated instrumentation. Previously, we suggested ways to improve the performance of the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a slope measuring instrument widely used to characterize x-ray optics at long spatial wavelengths. The main way is use of a CCD detector and corresponding technique for calibration of photo-response non-uniformity [J. L. Kirschman, et al., Proceedings of SPIE 6704, 67040J (2007)]. The present work focuses on the performance and characteristics of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. This includes a review of the overall aspects of the design, control system, the movement and measurement regimes for the stage, and analysis of the performance by a slope measurement of a highly curved super-quality substrate with less than 0.3 microradian (rms)slope variation.

  12. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  13. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  14. II*

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon, a 1 II

  15. Origins of Analysis Methods Used to Design High Performance Commercial Buildings: Part II, Solar Energy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, S.; Haberl, J.S.

    PV, solar thermal, passive solar analysis programs are reivewed using a new comprehensive genealogy chart. In companion papers, the origins of the analysis methods of whole-building energy and daylighting simulation programs are reviewed (Oh... analysis programs evaluate the performance of solar systems that are designed to collect and use solar radiation for thermal or electricity conversion. These programs are used for simulations and design methods: Computer simulations estimate the time...

  16. NREL Evaluates Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.

  17. PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT 1508-1F PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE UT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT 1508-1F PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE UT AUTOMATED ROAD MAINTENANCE MACHINE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE UT AUTOMATED ROAD MAINTENANCE MACHINE 5. Report Date October 1997 6. Performing MAINTENANCE MACHINE Carl Haas Al Traver Young-Suk Kim Richard Greer Research Report 1508-1F Research Project 9

  18. SEISMIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR STEEL MOMENT FRAMES By Seung-Yul Yun1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    SEISMIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR STEEL MOMENT FRAMES By Seung-Yul Yun1 , Ronald O. Hamburger2 , C than existing buildings designed and built with older technologies. Key words: seismic behavior; seismic performance evaluation; performance-based design; earthquake engineering; steel moment frame

  19. Fast Instruction Cache Performance Evaluation Using CompileTime Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalley, David

    of a program's execution [BKW90]. Cache performance mea­ surements obtained when unrealistic input data is used

  20. Performance confirmation of the Belle II imaging Time Of Propogation (iTOP) prototype counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Alan; Liu, Yang; Belhorn, Matt; /Cincinnati U.; Browder, Thomas; Varner, Gary; Andrew, Matt; Rosen, Marc; Barrett, Matthew; Nishimura, Kurtis; Anderson, Eric /Hawaii U.; Iijima, Toru; /Nagoya U. /PNL, Richland

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bell Detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider performed extremely well, logging an integrated luminosity an order of magnitude higher than the design baseline. With this inverse attobarn of integrated luminosity, time-dependent CP-violation inn the 3rd generation beauty quarks was firmly established, and is now a precision measurement. Going beyond this to explore if the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism is the only contributor to quark-mixing, and to interrogate the flavor sector for non-standard model enhancements, requires a detector and accelerator capable of topping this world-record luminosity by more than an order of magnitude. The Belle II detector at the upgraded Super-KEKB accelerator has been designed to meet this highly ambitious goal of operating at a luminosity approaching 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Such higher event rates and backgrounds require upgrade of essentially all detector subsystems, as well as their readout. Comparing the Belle composite (threshold Aerogel + Time of Flight) particle identification (PID) system with the DIRC employed by BaBar, quartz radiator internal Cherenkov photon detection proved to have higher kaon efficiency and lower pion fake rates. However, because the detector structure and CsI calorimeter will be retained, an improved barrel PID must fit within a very narrow envelope, as indicated in Figure 1. To effectively utilize this space, a more compact detector concept based on the same quartz radiators, but primarily using photon arrival time was proposed. This Time Of Propagation (TOP) counter was studied in a number of earlier prototype tests. Key to the necessary 10's of picosecond single-photon timing has been the development of the so-called SL-10 Micro-Channel Plate Photo-Multiplier Tube (MCP-PMT), which has demonstrated sub-40 ps single photon Transit Time Spread TTS. Further simulation study of this detector concept indicated that a focusing mirror in the forward direction, as well as a modest image expansion volume and more highly pixelated image plane improve the theoretical detector performance, since timing alone is limited by chromatic dispersion of the Cherenkov photons. This imaging-TOP (or iTOP) counter is the basis of Belle II barrel PID upgrade. However, a number of critical performance parameters must be demonstrated prior to releasing this prototype design for production manufacture.

  1. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  2. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  3. Evaluating the Performance of Virtual Teams in a Highly Distributed Information Technology Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeonov, Svetoslav (Svet)

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the performance of virtual teams in large corporations is especially challenging when there is a lack of understanding of the common factors that influence it and the existence of a framework for evaluation. The ...

  4. Experimental performance evaluation of line-focus sun trackers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, R.C.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two sun trackers have been tested for tracking accuracy on an sun tracker. Both performed well during the entire test period. Their tracking performance as a function of insolation level was established, and their overall tracking accuracy (rms tracking error) was calculated. Both the flux-line and the shadowband tracker were found to have an effective rms error of about 1 milliradian. This information was used to determine the impact that the two trackers have on the annual energy performance of typical parabolic trough concentrating collectors. One milliradian rms tracking errors were found to result in negligibly small annual performance losses.

  5. analytical performance evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meta- analysis of the empirical evidence on the impact of CSP on firm financial performance. However, since this last meta-analytic review, dozens of studies examining the...

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefied   natural  gas  (LNG)  from  Pacific  Rim  potential   impacts  of  using  LNG  with  the  existing  performance  impacts  of  LNG  use  in  California.  

  7. Comparative evaluation of cooling tower drift eliminator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Joseph Kwok-Kwong

    The performance of standard industrial evaporative cooling tower drift eliminators is analyzed using experiments and numerical simulations. The experiments measure the

  8. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

  9. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aug 28 - Sept 2, Coronado, California, USA VTT PROCESSES Kimmo Erkkil 20 CITY BUS EMISSION EVALUATION RESULTS NOx and CO2 emissions over the Braunschweig city bus -cycle 0...

  10. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  11. Simulation of the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector performance: Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veronica Cocco; Francesco Longo; Marco Tavani

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper (Paper II) we complete our discussion on the results of a comprehensive GEANT simulation of the scientific performance of the AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID), operating in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV energy range in an equatorial orbit of height near 550 km. Here we focus on the on-board Level-2 data processing and discuss possible alternative strategies for event selection and their optimization. We find that the dominant particle background components after our Level-2 processing are electrons and positrons of kinetic energies between 10 and 100 MeV penetrating the GRID instrument from directions almost parallel to the Tracker planes (incidence angles > 90 degrees) or from below. The analog (charge) information available on-board in the GRID Tracker is crucial for a reduction by almost three orders of magnitude of protons (and heavier ions) with kinetic energies near 100 MeV. We also present in this paper the telemetry structure of the GRID photon and particle events, and obtain the on-board effective area for photon detection in the energy range ~30 MeV - 50 GeV.

  12. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pina, Patricia Elena

    Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human-automation performance to facilitate metric selection, as well as understanding and comparison of research results. However, there is still lack of an objective ...

  13. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Finland 2004deererkkila.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD...

  14. Performance evaluation for conflict resolution transaction management approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henschen, L.J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of EECS

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors continue their previous study on the conflict resolution approach to transaction management. They compare both time and space performance of their approach with those of other transaction management models. They use mathematical abstraction and calculation for the comparison.

  15. Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and performance assessment of chiller (turbo type) after installation of new facility (industrial plant applica- tions) was completed. 3.1 Need for Finding the Actual Performance Recently built facilities include many en- ergy-saving devices such as high...-efficiency chiller [4]. These were incorporated at the planning design stage as an investment giving priority to effects on the equipment life cycle. The correct type of opera- tion and sophisticated management is needed to make this type of equipment exhibit its...

  16. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses how a significant opportunity for energy savings is domestic hot water heating, where an emerging technology has recently arrived in the U.S. market: the residential integrated heat pump water heater. A laboratory evaluation is presented of the five integrated HPWHs available in the U.S. today.

  17. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in certain climate zones when compared to typical electric resistance water heaters. Results show that this technology is a viable option in most climates, but differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the units tested. Tests were conducted to map heat pump performance across the operating range and to determine the logic used to control the heat pump and the backup electric heaters. Other tests performed include two unique draw profile tests, reduced air flow performance tests and the standard DOE rating tests. The results from all these tests are presented here for all five units tested. The results of these tests will be used to improve the EnergyPlus heat pump water heater for use in BEopt(tm) whole-house building simulations.

  18. A Framework for Performance Evaluation and Optimization of an Emerging Multimedia DS-CDMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Framework for Performance Evaluation and Optimization of an Emerging Multimedia DS-CDMA Network for performance evaluation and optimization of an emerging multimedia, packet Direct-Sequence Code Division tolerant traffic. Accounting for these aspects becomes essential for emerging multimedia DS-CDMA networks

  19. Evaluation of the VIIRS ocean color monitoring performance in coastal regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This paper addresses the preliminary evaluations of the VIIRS sensor's performance for retrieving OC dataEvaluation of the VIIRS ocean color monitoring performance in coastal regions Soe Hlaing sensing has entered a new phase with the successful deployment of the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer

  20. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

    2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

  1. Performance-Based Evaluation of an Improved Robust Optimization Formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    of risk, and ability to adapt. Formulating a tool to meet the information needs of a decision management; Benefit-cost analysis; Decision-making under uncertainty; Regional planning. Introduction), and (4) risk of performance deterioration (sustainability). In addition, a decision-maker may want

  2. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A CONTROLLED FLOW-SHOP SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    --philippe.le-parc--frank.singhoff--lionel.marce}@univ-brest.fr Keywords: Assembly lines, flow-shop, control presents an original performance analysis applied to a flow-shop system driven by a set of local command-shop system whose control is jointly ensured by a set of local command units (pro- grammable logic controllers

  3. Author's personal copy Performance Evaluation 65 (2008) 319344

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Ray

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Region-based key management; Secure group communication; Wireless networks 1. Introduction A mobile ad.elsevier.com/locate/peva Performance optimization of region-based group key management in mobile ad hoc networks Jin-Hee Choa, Ing and analyse a scalable and efficient region-based group key management protocol for secure group

  4. Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

  5. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Innovative Metal Building Roof Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Daniel James [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the coming energy codes, multiple layers of various insulation types will be required. The demand for greater efficiency has pushed insulation levels beyond the cavity depth. These experiments show the potential for improving metal building roof thermal performance. Additional work is currently being done by several stakeholders, so the data is expanding. These experiments are for research and development purposes, and may not be viable for immediate use.

  6. Building performance evaluation and certification in the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Scott; Pollitt, Michael G.; Crawford Brown, Doug

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Certificates EST Energy Saving Trust EU European Union FES Fuel and Energy Survey FIT Feed In Tariff GDP Gross Domestic Product PV Photovoltaic RdSAP Reduced Data Standard Assessment Procedure RHI Renewable Heat Incentive SAP Standard... ). This is only exacerbated by the forecasted increase to energy prices (DECC 2011b). Without detailed information about the performance of buildings classified as being in fuel poverty, it is difficult to determine what strategies may alleviate these pressures...

  7. Development of advanced blanket performance under irradiation and system integration through JUPITER-II project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, Katsunori; Kohyama, Akira; Tanaka, Satoru; Namba, C.; Terai, T.; Kunugi, T.; Muroga, Takeo; Hasegawa, Akira; Sagara, A.; Berk, S.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Sze, Dai Kai; Petti, D. A.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Morley, Neil B.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an outline of the activities of the JUPITER-II collaboration (japan-USA program of Irradiation/Integration test for Fusion Research-II), Which has bee carried out through six years (2001-2006) under Phase 4 of the collabroation implemented by Amendment 4 of Annex 1 to the DOE (United States Department of Energy)-MEXT (Ministry of Education ,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology) Cooperation. This program followed the RTNS-II Program (Phase1:1982-4986), the FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase2:1987-1994) and the JUPITER Program (Phase 3: 1995-2000) [1].

  8. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    1 A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing Victor Basili1 the development time for programs written for high performance computers (HPC). To attack this relatively novel students in a graduate level High Performance Computing class at the University of Maryland. We collected

  9. Evaluation of the performance of polypropylene fibers on soil stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangineni, Srinivas Meherji

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Chattanooga, TN 37416. Its product name is "Fibergrids". These are one inch long 1000 denier fibers having a specific gravity of 0. 91. Sand (SM) was stabilized with type I portland cement and clay (CL) was stabilized with lime. Moisture-Density tests... and triaxial testing at a low confining pressure of 5 psi was performed for non-fibrous and fiber-filled soil cement and soil lime mixtures and the virgin soils. Stress-strain plots from the triaxial testing were used to compare the mixture properties. A...

  10. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic Trough ParabolicPerformance Audit of theUranium

  11. Evaluation of PMU Dynamic Performance in Both Lab Environments and under Field Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Hauer, John F.; Martin, Kenneth E.

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Capturing system dynamics is one important feature of phasor measurements. To ensure PMU accurately reflect system dynamic behavior, one must evaluate the dynamic performance of a PMU. PMU dynamic performance evaluation includes three aspects: PMU modeling studies, laboratory testing and field evaluation. This paper briefly reviews the general PMU model structure, and then continues on PMU dynamic performance evaluation from actual field measurements. Reasons for field evaluation include: 1) inappropriate field settings of a PMU would generate unexpected phasor measurements; and 2) many conditions can not be easily produced in a lab environment. PMU field evaluation includes aspects like time synchronization, timing inconsistency due to filtering, frequency calculation issues, parasitic oscillations/processing artifacts, etc. Actual WECC measurement examples will be presented. Dynamic PMU testing in a lab environment is explored with a special focus on PMU filtering characteristics. How the phasor quality would impact derived system dynamic characteristics is addressed in the later part of this paper.

  12. Primary plant performance evaluation and plant signals validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anikanov, S. S. [Westinghouse LLC, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Stolyetniy, I. V.; Semenovski, Y. P. [Westron, 1, Academic Proskura str., Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses results of the implementation of NPP signal validation and data reconciliation algorithms applied to VVER-1000 reactor as part of the Core Monitoring System (CMS) project at South Ukrainian NPP. The proposed method is compared with the G2TM tool (Gensym) application of neural network algorithms to the same plant data. The proposed algorithms yield practically identical results for situations with a significant amount of erroneous data, even though it runs in on-line mode as oppose to the off-line mode of the G2TM tool. The method described in this paper includes preliminary signal processing, data fusion, and data reconciliation algorithms. All major primary and secondary sides measurements, used for plant thermal power evaluation based on different methods, were undergone the proposed processing algorithm. Some plant life data is presented to illustrate quality of input signals used to obtain calculation results. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of Long Term Performance of Continuously Running Atomic Fountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peil, Steven; Swanson, Thomas B; Taylor, Jennifer; Ekstrom, Christopher R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ensemble of rubidium atomic fountain clocks has been put into operation at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO). These fountains are used as continuous clocks in the manner of commercial cesium beams and hydrogen masers for the purpose of improved timing applications. Four fountains have been in operation for more than two years and are included in the ensemble used to generate the USNO master clock. Individual fountain performance is characterized by a white-frequency noise level below $2\\times 10^{-13}$ and fractional-frequency stability routinely reaching the low $10^{-16}$s. The highest performing pair of fountains exhibits stability consistent with each fountain integrating as white frequency noise, with Allan deviation surpassing $6\\times 10^{-17}$ at $10^7$~s, and with no relative drift between the fountains at the level of $7.5 \\times 10^{-19}$/day. As an ensemble, the fountains generate a timescale with white-frequency noise level of $1\\times 10^{-13}$ and long-term frequency stability consistent wit...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  15. Evaluating Performance, Power, and Cooling in High Performance Computing (HPC) Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Jeffrey; Sandeep, Gupta; Karavanic, Karen; Marquez, Andres; Varsamopoulos, Girogios

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter explores current research focused on developing our understanding of the interrelationships involved with HPC performance and energy management. The first section explores data center instrumentation, measurement, and performance analysis techniques, followed by a section focusing on work in data center thermal management and resource allocation. This is followed by an exploration of emerging techniques to identify application behavioral attributes that can provide clues and advice to HPC resource and energy management systems for the purpose of balancing HPC performance and energy efficiency.

  16. Resolution studies and performance evaluation of the LHCb VELO upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynds, Daniel Peter McFarlane; Soler, Paul; Parkes, Christopher

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb detector at CERN is scheduled to undergo an upgrade during the second long shutdown of the LHC. As part of this upgrade, the vertex detector (VELO) will be replaced with a new hybrid pixel detector, based on an evolution of the Timepix ASIC. The performance of this detector should improve upon that achieved by the current VELO, in addition to facilitating the complete detector readout at 40 MHz. As part of the preparation for this upgrade, this thesis presents the results of studies carried out on the single hit resolution of silicon hybrid pixel detectors. The development of a particle beam telescope has been carried out to allow these studies, shown to operate with track rates in excess of 45 kHz and with a pointing resolution at the device under test of less than 2 ?m. A wide range of sensor types, thicknesses and resistivities have then been tested under different operating conditions and the results presented, with single hit resolutions varying between 4 ?m and 12 ?m depending on the conditi...

  17. FY 1996 performance evaluation and incentive fee agreement for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, specific detail on incentive fee, and agreements concerning the evaluation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s FY 1996 Self-Assessment. This information will be the basis for the evaluation of the Laboratory`s performance as required by Articles H-24 and H-25 of the Contract. For the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996, the Parties have agreed to measure and evaluate the individual areas of Laboratory activities identified herein. This reflects the fact that the Contractor will be evaluated on two dimensions, namely (1) accomplishment of critical outcomes and (2) the effectiveness of the Contractor`s self-assessment program. Each area will receive its own evaluation rating and they will be combined to determined an overall rating with the first area weighted at 75% and the second area weighted at 25%.

  18. Lightweight ventilated facade prototype: acoustic performance evaluation when the ventilation surface of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lightweight ventilated facade prototype: acoustic performance evaluation when the ventilation Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3801 #12;1. INTRODUCTION Lightweight ventilated facades cavity is almost totally open, fully ventilated and not very wide. Therefore, its contribution

  19. Experimental Evaluation of Performance Improvements in Abductive Network Classifiers with Problem Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    1 Experimental Evaluation of Performance Improvements in Abductive Network Classifiers with Problem by problem decomposition for abductive network classifiers that classify four noisy waveform patterns having decomposition method and significantly superior to an abductive network committee approach. Index Terms

  20. Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Frito Lay's Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the in-service performance of 10 medium-duty Smith Newton electric vehicles (EVs) and 10 comparable conventional diesel vehicles operated by Frito Lay North America in the Seattle, Washington, area. Launched in late 2013, the on-road portion of this 12-month evaluation focuses on collecting and analyzing vehicle performance data, such as fuel economy and maintenance costs, to better understand how to optimize the use of such vehicles in a large-scale commercial operation. In addition to the on-road portion of this evaluation, NREL is analyzing charging data to support total cost of ownership estimations and investigations into smart charging opportunities. NREL is also performing a battery life degradation analysis to quantify battery pack health, track battery performance over time, and determine how various drive cycles and battery charging protocols impact battery life.

  1. Quantitative performance-based evaluation of a procedure for flexible design concept generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Michel-Alexandre, 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an experimental methodology for objective and quantitative design procedure evaluation based on anticipated lifecycle performance of design concepts, and a procedure for flexible design concept generation. ...

  2. Demonstration of Worldsens: A Fast Prototyping and Performance Evaluation of Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Demonstration of Worldsens: A Fast Prototyping and Performance Evaluation of Wireless Sensor environment for fast pro- totyping of wireless sensor protocols and applications. Our environment proposes sensor network simulation is feasible and that complex application design and deployment is affordable

  3. Quality of Service and Performance Evaluation: A Fluid Approach for Poisson Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    -Marc Kelif1, Stephane Senecal2, Constant Bridon3, Marceau Coupechoux4 Abstract--The evaluation of performance.bridon@ens-cachan.fr 4Marceau Coupechoux is with Telecom ParisTech, France Email: marceau

  4. An integrated methodology for the performance and reliability evaluation of fault-tolerant systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Alejandro D. (Alejandro Dan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new methodology for the integrated performance and reliability evaluation of embedded fault-tolerant systems used in aircraft, space, tactical, and automotive applications. This methodology uses a ...

  5. Evaluation of tire pressure, tire construction, axle configuration, and axle load on flexible pavement performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamy, Ahmad Najeeb

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF TIRE PRESSURE, TIRE CONSTRUCTION, AXLE CONFIGURATION, AND AXLE LOAD ON FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE A Thesis by AHMAD NAJEEB JAMY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF TIRE PRESSURE, TIRE CONSTRUCTION, AXLE CONFIGURATION, AND AXLE LOAD ON FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE. A Thesis by AHMAD NAJEEB JAMY Approved...

  6. A method of evaluating the performance deterioration of aircraft gas-turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, V

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A METHOD OF EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE DETERIORATION OF AIRCRAFT GAS-TURBINES A Thesis by V. SUBRAMANIAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1978 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A METHOD OF EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE DETERIORATION OF AIRCRAFT GAS-TURBINES A Thesis by V. SUBRAMANIAN Approved as to style and content by: Charrman o Commztt (Head o D pa ment Sg D~ Member...

  7. The performance and evaluation of the damaging downburst prediction and detection algorithm for bow echo storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl, Beth Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION AND DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR BOW ECHO STORMS A Thesis by BETH ANN KARL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION...

  8. RAPID for high-performance computing systems: architecture and performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louri, Ahmed

    Karanth Kodi and Ahmed Louri The limited bandwidth and the increase in power dissipation at longer power consump- tion, and enhances scalability. We also present two cost-effective design alternatives RAPID architecture and compare it to several electrical HPCS interconnects. Based on the performance

  9. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  10. On the Complexity of an Accurate and Precise Performance Evaluation of Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the Complexity of an Accurate and Precise Performance Evaluation of Wireless Networks Using-marie.gorce@insa-lyon.fr ABSTRACT In wireless multi-hop networks, there is a growing need for the per- formance evaluation I.6.7 [Simulation Support Systems]: Environments; C.2.1 [Network Architecture and Design]: Wireless

  11. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wagner, K.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

  12. Cost-E ective Flow Table Designs for High-Speed Routers: Architecture and Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun "Jim"

    Cost-E#11;ective Flow Table Designs for High-Speed Routers: Architecture and Performance Evaluation State variables Service Parameters update read read Incoming packet action Search Y N Lookup Initialize to be performed (e.g., which output port to route the packet) on the packet and the new values the state variables

  13. Evaluating the Energy Performance of the First Generation of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating the Energy Performance of the First Generation of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings ABSTRACT Over three hundred buildings have been certified under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental the modeled and actual energy performance of a sample of 21 of these buildings that certified under LEED

  14. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems Ming Zhang Cookeville, TN 38505, USA hexb@tntech.edu Abstract In this paper we introduce SPEK (Storage Performance storage systems at block level. It can be used for both DAS (Direct Attached Storage) and block level

  15. Evaluation of Application-aware Heterogeneous Embedded Systems for Performance and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    In this work, we first present an application-initiated strategy that aims to control the energy consumptionEvaluation of Application-aware Heterogeneous Embedded Systems for Performance and Energy benefits and im- provements are apparent, the performance-energy trade- offs are not prominently noticeable

  16. Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors Marcelo A analysis of the key factors impacting on the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors of America OCIS codes: (060.2310) Fiber optics; (060.2370) Fiber optics sensors; (290.5900) Scattering

  17. A Union Bound Approximation for Rapid Performance Evaluation of Punctured Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    A Union Bound Approximation for Rapid Performance Evaluation of Punctured Turbo Codes Ioannis a simple technique to approximate the performance union bound of a punctured turbo code. The bound to calculate the most significant terms of the transfer function of a turbo encoder. We demonstrate that

  18. Design Optimization and Performance Evaluation of the Relaying Algorithms, Relays and Protective Systems Using Advanced Testing Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design Optimization and Performance Evaluation of the Relaying Algorithms, Relays and Protective quality measures for designing, optimizing, setting and evaluating the protective relaying algorithms the performance indices for the operating principles, relays and protection systems. Multi-objective formal

  19. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective strategies to address moisture and thermal needs.

  20. Solar Trough Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00289

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, A.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New HCEs were installed on the hot sides of the thermal loops at SEGS VIII and IX from mid-2007 to mid-2008. Due to significant increases in plant performance, an interest in a further increase performance by installing new HCEs on the cold portions of the loop developed. Although it was assumed that the plant performance would increase, the exact amount was unknown. The objective of this project was to estimate the performance improvements with new HCEs installed on the cold sides of the loop, with performance being evaluated as potential increases in electrical power production (megawatt-hours). A comparison of performance prior to and post installation of new HCEs on the hot sides of the loops was done. For completeness, an estimate of performance losses - such as the optical efficiency, mirror reflectivity, and optical accuracy - was also included in this analysis. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) HCE Survey System was used to determine if the HCEs were hot or cold.

  1. Performance of the VLT Planet Finder SPHERE II. Data analysis and Results for IFS in laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesa, D; Zurlo, A; Vigan, A; Claudi, R U; Alberi, M; Antichi, J; Baruffolo, A; Beuzit, J -L; Boccaletti, A; Bonnefoy, M; Costille, A; Desidera, S; Dohlen, K; Fantinel, D; Feldt, M; Fusco, T; Giro, E; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Langlois, M; Maire, A -L; Martinez, P; Moeller-Nilsson, O; Mouillet, D; Moutou, C; Pavlov, A; Puget, P; Salasnich, B; Sauvage, J -F; Sissa, E; Turatto, M; Udry, S; Vakili, F; Waters, R; Wildi, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the performance of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) of SPHERE, the high-contrast imager for the ESO VLT telescope designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy of extrasolar planets, obtained from tests performed at the Institute de Plan\\'etologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble facility during the integration phase of the instrument.} {The tests were performed using the instrument software purposely prepared for SPHERE. The output data were reduced applying the SPHERE data reduction and handling software, adding an improved spectral deconvolution procedure. To this aim, we prepared an alternative procedure for the spectral subtraction exploiting the principal components analysis algorithm. Moreover, a simulated angular differential imaging procedure was also implemented to estimate how the instrument performed once this procedure was applied at telescope. The capability of the IFS to faithfully retrieve the spectra of the detected faint companions was also considered.} {We found that the applic...

  2. Evaluation of alternate-fuels performance in an external combustion system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, R.A.; Connelly, M.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the economic attractiveness of many alternate fuels increases relative to gasoline, the viability of any future automotive power plant may soon depend on the ease with which these alternate fuels can be utilized. It is generally assumed that external-combustion engines are more tolerant of alternate fuels than internal-combustion engines. This study attempted to verify that assumption. The purpose of the Alternate-Fuels Performance Evaluation Program was to evaluate and compare the impact of burning six different liquids fuels in an external-combustion system. Testing was conducted in the automotive Stirling engine (ASE) combustion performance rig, which duplicates the external heat system (EHS) of a Stirling engine. The program expanded the range of fuels evaluated over previous studies conducted at Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI). The specific objective was to determine the optimal combustion stoichiometry considering the performance parameters of combustion efficiency, temperature profile, exhaust emissions, and burner wall temperature. 14 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

  4. Hot gas path analysis and data evaluation of the performance parameters of a gas turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanawa, David Allen

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HOT GAS PATH ANALYSIS AND DATA EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF A GAS TURBINE A Thesis by DAVID AI, LEN HANAWA Approved as to style and content by: PfnA J 7 EY3 .j (Chairman... of -Committee) zr (Head of Depai'tment) Member) /i ~E" Egg(JQJ a g i (Member) (Member) December l974 ABSTRACT Ho Gas Path Ana'ysis and Data Evaluation o. the Performance Parameters of a Gas Turbine (December 1974) David Allen Hanawa, B. S. , Texas A...

  5. U.S. DOE TAP Webinar: New Energy Savings Performance Contracting Resources Part II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This month, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) is excited to offer a webinar reviewing new resources on energy saving performance contracting (ESPC).

  6. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Date/Time:  August 13, 2014; 3:00-4:30 PM EDTDescription: The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective...

  7. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Gen2 - 1Q2014 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  8. An application of performance goal based method for the design and evaluation of structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an application of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) performance goal based method for the design and evaluation of structures, systems, and components (SSCS) at Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH). The philosophy on which DOE`s method is based has been employed to construct a graded approach to the minimum structural design and evaluation criteriz@ used at the DOE Hanford Site that complies with the DOE Order 54E;0.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation. The FDH structural design and evaluation criteria applies to both nuclear and non-nuclear SSCs that are not covered by a reactor safety analysis report.

  9. Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The model allows for material properties variations with temperature. Parameters that were varied in the study include ambient outdoor temperature and cavity surface emissivity. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated wall cavities is essential for accurate prediction of energy use in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of homes with uninsulated walls.

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Data Center Network Architectures on Application Performance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    architecture classes and shed a new light on the impact of server virtualization on DCN's and applicationEvaluating the Impact of Data Center Network Architectures on Application Performance [2]) received a surge of interest from both the industry and academia. However, none of existing

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    -furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C1 Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators waste incinerators, good combustion practices(GCP or GOP) have been established. These operating (and

  12. Earthquake early warning system in southern Italy: Methodologies and performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Earthquake early warning system in southern Italy: Methodologies and performance evaluation A the effect of extended faulting processes and heterogeneous wave propagation on the early warning system. Citation: Zollo, A., et al. (2009), Earthquake early warning system in southern Italy: Methodologies

  13. DE-AC02-76SF00515 Contractor Performance Evaluation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    #12;#12;DE-AC02-76SF00515 Appendix B M544 FY 2008 Contractor Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan for Management and Operations ofthe Stanford Linear Accelerator Center 10-03-07 09:58 RCVD J

  14. WALTy: A tool for Evaluating Web Application Performance G. Ruffo, R. Schifanella, and M. Sereno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffo, Giancarlo

    WALTy: A tool for Evaluating Web Application Performance G. Ruffo, R. Schifanella, and M. Sereno Dipartimento di Informatica Universit`a degli Studi di Torino {ruffo,schifane,matteo}@di.unito.it R. Politi CSP Sc.a.r.l. c/o Villa Gualino roberto.politi@csp.it Abstract In this paper we present WALTy (Web

  15. Evaluation of the acoustical performance and behaviour of a hybrid truck in urban use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    engine truck, hybrid truck under hybrid use, hybrid truck under electrical use). Noise emission laws of the noise emission of the hybrid and the reference engine trucks over a wide range of real drivingEvaluation of the acoustical performance and behaviour of a hybrid truck in urban use M.-A. Pallas

  16. Evaluating local contributions to global performance in wireless sensor and actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozell, Christopher J.

    Evaluating local contributions to global performance in wireless sensor and actuator networks, Houston, TX 77025-1892 {crozell,dhj}@rice.edu Abstract. Wireless sensor networks are often studied-network. In such settings, optimizing the sensor node behavior with respect to sensor information fidelity does

  17. A Scaled, Performance Driven Evaluation of the Layered Sensing Framework Utilizing Polarimetric Infrared Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Hamid

    sensing, distributed sensing, polarimetric, infrared, tracking, feature-aided, fusion, multi- sensor 1A Scaled, Performance Driven Evaluation of the Layered Sensing Framework Utilizing Polarimetric Infrared Imagery Hamilton Scott Clousea and Hamid Krima and Olga Mendoza-Schrockb aNorth Carolina State

  18. Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk December 2011 Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Bulk metallic glass Corrosion Biocompatibility Electrochemical characterization Biomedical applications The aim of this work is to investigate the corrosion

  19. A Study of Austenite Precipitate Growth in Duplex Stainless Steel A Research Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    A Study of Austenite Precipitate Growth in Duplex Stainless Steel A Research Performance Evaluation-based metals handbooks. Due the multi-component nature of the duplex stainless steels which are the basis stainless steel. Current State of Knowledge The velocity of an interface during a phase transformation can

  20. FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN of rubberized bitumen has been spread out mainly due to environmental aspects, but high mixing and compaction temperatures are necessary due to the higher viscosity of this bitumen. A WMA mixture (using a surfactant

  1. A paratre dans SIJ Beyond Productivity Measurement and Strategies: Performance Evaluation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A paraître dans SIJ 1 Beyond Productivity Measurement and Strategies: Performance Evaluation and Strategies in Services FARIDAH DJELLAL AND FAIZ GALLOUJ1 Abstract: The concept of productivity and methodologically, services are indeed a major challenge to the concept of productivity. The objective of this paper

  2. A Multiobjective Performance Evaluation Framework for Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffrès-Runser, Katia

    network when delay, robustness and energy are considered. I. INTRODUCTION Wireless ad hoc and sensor to transmission delay [8], energy consumption [9] or fairness [10] are added on top of its main design goalA Multiobjective Performance Evaluation Framework for Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Katia

  3. Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Stephen

    Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid H´el`ene N. Lim, 2003 Abstract The Grid Information Service (GIS) is one of the Grid Common Services which make up the basic functions belonging to Grids. This service offers a resource discovery mechanism, of which

  4. Storage-Enabled Access Points for Improved Mobile Performance: An Evaluation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsaoussidis, Vassilis

    Networks and DTNs has been mainly con- cerned with storage and energy constraints for mobile devices and to which extend the storage and energy constraints can now be somewhat relaxed. We motivate our study basedStorage-Enabled Access Points for Improved Mobile Performance: An Evaluation Study Efthymios

  5. RFID MAC Performance Evaluation Based on ISO/IEC 18000-6 Type C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Sumit

    1 RFID MAC Performance Evaluation Based on ISO/IEC 18000-6 Type C You-Chang Ko, Sumit Roy, Joshua R latency and read efficiency as a function of link parameters defined in ISO/IEC 18000-6 Type C standard. I for Standard/the International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) 18000-6 Type C (ISOC)[?] standard uses

  6. Initial Performance Evaluation of the Cray SeaStar Interconnect Ron Brightwell Kevin Pedretti Keith D. Underwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightwell, Ron

    Initial Performance Evaluation of the Cray SeaStar Interconnect Ron Brightwell Kevin Pedretti Keith supercomputer. The SeaStar was designed specifically to meet the performance and reliability needs of a large-scale, distributed-memory scientific computing platform. In this paper, we present an initial performance evaluation

  7. Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, H.; Braun, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing methods addressing automated fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) for vapor compression air conditioning system have good performance for faults that occur individually, but they have difficulty in handling multiple-simultaneous faults...

  8. Fast computation of the performance evaluation of biometric systems: application to multibiometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giot, Romain; Rosenberger, Christophe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance evaluation of biometric systems is a crucial step when designing and evaluating such systems. The evaluation process uses the Equal Error Rate (EER) metric proposed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/IEC). The EER metric is a powerful metric which allows easily comparing and evaluating biometric systems. However, the computation time of the EER is, most of the time, very intensive. In this paper, we propose a fast method which computes an approximated value of the EER. We illustrate the benefit of the proposed method on two applications: the computing of non parametric confidence intervals and the use of genetic algorithms to compute the parameters of fusion functions. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed EER approximation method in term of computing time, and the interest of its use to reduce the learning of parameters with genetic algorithms. The proposed method opens new perspectives for the development of secure multibiometrics systems by speedi...

  9. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  10. ATLAS Jet Trigger Performance in LHC Run I and Initial Run II Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immense rate of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be reduced from the nominal bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to approximately 1 kHz before the data can be written on disk offline. The ATLAS Trigger System performs real-time selection of these events in order to achieve this reduction. Dedicated selection of events containing jets is uniquely challenging at a hadron collider where nearly every event contains significant hadronic energy. Following the very successful first LHC run from 2010 to 2012, the ATLAS Trigger was much improved, including a new hardware topological module and a restructured High Level Trigger system, merging two previous software-based processing levels. This allowed the optimization of resources and a much greater re-use of the precise but costly offline software base. After summarising the overall performance of the jet trigger during the first LHC run, the software design choices and use of the topological module will be reviewed. The expected perform...

  11. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  12. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  13. Performance evaluation approach for the supercritical helium cold circulators of ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaghela, H.; Sarkar, B.; Bhattacharya, R.; Kapoor, H. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Chalifour, M.; Chang, H.-S.; Serio, L. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon - 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITER project design foresees Supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling for the main cryogenic components, namely, the superconducting (SC) magnets and cryopumps (CP). Therefore, cold circulators have been selected to provide the required SHe mass flow rate to cope with specific operating conditions and technical requirements. Considering the availability impacts of such machines, it has been decided to perform evaluation tests of the cold circulators at operating conditions prior to the series production in order to minimize the project technical risks. A proposal has been conceptualized, evaluated and simulated to perform representative tests of the full scale SHe cold circulators. The objectives of the performance tests include the validation of normal operating condition, transient and off-design operating modes as well as the efficiency measurement. A suitable process and instrumentation diagram of the test valve box (TVB) has been developed to implement the tests at the required thermodynamic conditions. The conceptual engineering design of the TVB has been developed along with the required thermal analysis for the normal operating conditions to support the performance evaluation of the SHe cold circulator.

  14. Fuel-conservation evaluation of US Army helicopters. Part 6. Performance calculator evaluation. Final report for period ending January 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, F.; Lockwood, R.A.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity conducted an evaluation of Flight Management Calculator for the UH-1H. The calculator was a Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV. The performance calculator was evaluated for flight planning and in-flight use during 14 mission flights simulating operational conditions. The calculator was much easier to use in-flight than the operator's manual data. The calculator program needs improvement in the areas of pre-flight planning and execution speed. The mission flights demonstrated a 19% fuel saving using optimum over normal flight profiles in warm temperatures (15/sup 0/C above standard). Savings would be greater at colder temperatures because of increasing compressibility effects. Acceptable accuracy for individual aircraft under operational conditions may require a regressive analog model in which individual aircraft data are used to update the program. The performance data base for the UH-1H was expanded with level flight and hover data to thrust coefficients and Mach numbers to the practical limits of aircraft operation.

  15. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  16. Methodologies and new user interfaces to optimize hydraulic fracturing design and evaluate fracturing performance for gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenxin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents and develops efficient and effective methodologies for optimal hydraulic fracture design and fracture performance evaluation. These methods incorporate algorithms that simultaneously optimize all of ...

  17. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  19. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste: Volume 3, Site evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussion of the results for each site.

  20. Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu Rengie; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide discusses important study design issues to consider when conducting an on-site evaluation of filtration system performance. The two most important dichotomies to consider in developing a study protocol are (1) whether systems are being evaluated in occupied or unoccupied homes and (2) whether different systems are being compared in the same homes or if the comparison is between systems installed in different homes. This document provides perspective and recommendations about a suite of implementation issues including the choice of particle measurement devices, selection of sampling locations, ways to control and/or monitor factors and processes that can impact particle concentrations, and data analysis approaches.

  1. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  2. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules F1-F8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with eight of the functional modules in the code. Those are: BONAMI - resonance self-shielding by the Bondarenko method; NITAWL-II - SCALE system module for performing resonance shielding and working library production; XSDRNPM - a one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code for transport analysis; XSDOSE - a module for calculating fluxes and dose rates at points outside a shield; KENO IV/S - an improved monte carlo criticality program; COUPLE; ORIGEN-S - SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms; ICE.

  3. Performance Evaluation of a ground source heat pump system based on ANN and ANFIS models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, W.; Hu, P.; Lei, F.; Zhu, N.; Zhang,J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation of a ground source heat pump system based on ANN and ANFIS models Weijuan SUN a, Pingfang HUa,*, Fei Leia, Na Zhua, Jiangning Zhanga aHuazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, P. R. China Abstract...: The aim of this work is to calculate the heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) and the system COP of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system based on an artificial neural network (ANN) model and (adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model...

  4. Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David K. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

  5. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranville, Frédéric; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such as polyurethane foam. On a further stage, the thermal mathematical model is replaced by a thermo-aeraulic model which is used to evaluate the thermal resistance of the roof as a function of the airflow rate. The results shows a better performance of the roof in this new configuration, which is widely used in practice. Finally, the mathematical relation between the thermal resistance and the airflow rate is proposed.

  6. Performance evaluation of source extraction in wireless sensor networks Hong-Bin Chen a,b,*, Chi Kong Tse a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    Performance evaluation of source extraction in wireless sensor networks Hong-Bin Chen a,b,*, Chi wireless sensor networks are evaluated. The sensor observations are assumed to be linear instantaneous: Available online 6 May 2008 Keywords: Wireless sensor network Blind source separation Cluster Performance

  7. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

  8. Economic evaluation of closure CAP barrier materials Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study prepared by the Site Geotechnical Services (SGS) and Environmental Restoration (ER) departments of the WSRC evaluates a generic closure cover system for a hazardous waste site, using 10 different surface areas, ranging from 0.1 acre to 80 acres, and 12 barrier materials. This study presents a revision to the previous study (Rev. 0) published in June 1993, under the same title. The objective of this study was to revise the previous study by incorporating four additional site sizes into the evaluation process and identifying the most cost-effective barrier material for a given closure cover system at the SRS.

  9. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation Quality Procedure: Personnel Qualification and Certification Radiographic Testing-Levels I& II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, K; Rikard, R D; Rodriquez, J

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operational Procedure establishes the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification/recertification of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) personnel in the nondestructive testing (NDT) radiographic testing (RT) method. This document is in accordance with the American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice SNT-TC-1A, 1996, except as amended herein.

  11. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

  12. Evaluation of potential performance additives for the advanced lithium bromide chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Del Cul, W.; Perez-Blanco, H.; Ally, M.R.; Zaltash, A.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness and stability of potential heat-and-mass transfer (performance) additives for an advanced lithium bromide (LiBr) chiller were evaluated in a series of experimental studies. These studies of additive effectiveness and stability were necessary because many currently used performance additives decompose at the high generator temperatures (220{degrees}C to 260{degrees}C) desired for this particular advanced LiBr chiller. For example, one common performance additive, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol (2EH), reacts with the corrosion inhibitor, lithium chromate (Li{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}), even at moderate generator temperatures ({ge}180{degrees}C). These stability problems can be mitigated by using less reactive corrosion inhibitors such as lithium molybdate (Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) and by using more stable performance additives such as 1-heptanol (HEP) or 1H,1H,7H-dodecafluoro-1-heptanol (DFH). There seems to be a trade-off between additive stability and effectiveness: the most effective performance additives are not the most stable additives. These studies indicate that HEP or DFH may be effective additives in the advanced LiBr chiller if Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is used as a corrosion inhibitor.

  13. Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Diesel Fuel Properties and Chemistry in an HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL; Eaton, Scott J [ORNL] [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting] [Rincon Ranch Consulting

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nine CRC fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE fuels) have been evaluated in a simple, premixed HCCI engine under varying conditions of fuel rate, air-fuel ratio, and intake temperature. Engine performance was found to vary mainly as a function of combustion phasing as affected by fuel cetane and engine control variables. The data was modeled using statistical techniques involving eigenvector representation of the fuel properties and engine control variables, to define engine response and allow optimization across the fuels for best fuel efficiency. In general, the independent manipulation of intake temperature and air-fuel ratio provided some opportunity for improving combustion efficiency of a specific fuel beyond the direct effect of targeting the optimum combustion phasing of the engine (near 5 CAD ATDC). High cetane fuels suffer performance loss due to easier ignition, resulting in lower intake temperatures, which increase HC and CO emissions and result in the need for more advanced combustion phasing. The FACE fuels also varied in T90 temperature and % aromatics, independent of cetane number. T90 temperature was found to have an effect on engine performance when combined with high centane, but % aromatics did not, when evaluated independently of cetane and T90.

  14. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  15. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

  16. Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngberg, A.D.; Sinks, D.J.; Craig, G.N. II; Ethridge, F.G.; Burns, L.K.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data delineate a reactor cavity 42.7m (140 ft.) long, 35.1 m (115 ft.) and 21.3 m (70 ft.) high that is partially filled with rubble, char and pyrometamorphic rock. Sedimentographic studies were completed on the overburden. Reflectance data on coal samples within the reactor cavity and cavity wall reveal that the coal was altered by temperatures ranging from 245/sup 0/C to 670/sup 0/C (472/sup 0/-1238/sup 0/F). Overburden rocks found within the cavity contain various pyrometamorphic minerals, indicating that temperatures of at least 1200/sup 0/C (2192/sup 0/F) were reached during the tests. The calcite cemented fine-grained sandstone and siltstone directly above the Hanna No. 1 coal bed formed a strong roof above the cavity, unlike other UCG sites such as Hoe Creek which is not calcite cemented. 30 references, 27 figures, 8 tables.

  17. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

  18. Wireless Communication for Controlling Microgrids: Co-simulation and Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Rukun [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Husheng [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microgrid with wireless communication links for microgrid control has been designed and developed. The complete simulation model has been developed in MatLab SimuLink with seamless integration of the power subsystem and the communication subsystem. Unlike the conventional co-simulators that usually glue two existing simulators together by creating an interface, which has a steep learning curve, the proposed simulator is a compact single-unit model. Detailed modeling of the power subsystem and communication system is presented as well as the microgrid control architecture and strategies. The impact of different communication system performances on microgrid control has been studied and evaluated in the proposed simulator.

  19. Performance evaluation of the R6R018 fuel plate using PLATE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel G. Medvedev; Hakan Ozaltun

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results of performance evaluation of the R6R018 fuel plate using PLATE code. R6R018 is a U-7Mo dispersion type mini-plate with Al-3.5Si matrix irradiated in the RERTR-9B experiment. The design of this plate is prototypical of the planned LEONIDAS irradiation test. Therefore, a detailed performance analysis of this plate is important to confirm acceptable behavior in pile, and to provide baseline and justification for further analysis and testing. Specific results presented in the paper include fuel temperature history, growth of the interaction layer between the U-Mo and the matrix, swelling, growth of the corrosion layer, and degradation of thermal conductivity. The methodology of the analysis will be discussed including the newly developed capability to account for the formation of the interaction layer during fuel fabrication.

  20. Performance and degradation evaluation of five different commercial lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Shim, Joongpyo

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial performance of five different types of Li-ion rechargeable batteries, from Quallion Corp, UltraLife Battery and Toshiba, was measured and compared. Cell characterization included variable-rate constant-current cycling, various USDOE pulse-test protocols and full-spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Changes in impedance and capacity were monitored during electrochemical cycling under various conditions, including constant-current cycling over 100 percent DOD at a range of temperature and pulse profile cycling over a very narrow range of DOD at room temperature. All cells were found to maintain more than 80 percent of their rated capacity for more than 400 constant current 100 percent DOD cycles. The power fade (or impedance rise) of the cells varied considerably. New methods for interpreting the pulse resistance data were evaluated for their usefulness in interpreting performance mechanism as a function of test protocol and cell design.

  1. State-of-the-art evaluation of condensate polisher performance. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmiger, S.J.; Potterton, S.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operating environments in power plant cycles require the use of high-purity feedwater combined with careful chemical control to minimize deposition and corrosion problems. Condensate polishing system provide plant operators with a tool to control the transport of soluble impurities and corrosion products during normal operation, start-ups, shutdowns, and other plant transients. The objective of this program was to provide an understanding of the factors that influence condensate polisher performance. In order to achieve a large data base for evaluation, a lengthy and detailed plant survey was chosen as the means by which to accumulate the data. Response to the survey was excellent. Of the 268 surveys distributed, 147 were completed and returned with 135 of these included in a computerized condensate polishing data base. The data from the effort have been summarized in this report to show the environment, operation problems as performance of both deep bed and powdered condensate polisher system.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control, performance evaluation, and accreditation is -25% to +50% and less than or equal to 40%, respectively.

  3. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

  4. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

  5. Evaluation of a High-Performance Solar Home in Loveland, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building America (BA) partner McStain Neighborhoods built the Discovery House in Loveland, Colorado, with an extensive package of energy-efficient features, including a high-performance envelope, efficient mechanical systems, a solar water heater integrated with the space-heating system, a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV), and ENERGY STAR? appliances. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Building Science Consortium (BSC) conducted short-term field-testing and building energy simulations to evaluate the performance of the house. These evaluations are utilized by BA to improve future prototype designs and to identify critical research needs. The Discovery House building envelope and ducts were very tight under normal operating conditions. The HRV provided fresh air at a rate of about 75 cfm (35 l/s), consistent with the recommendations of ASHRAE Standard 62.2. The solar hot water system is expected to meet the bulk of the domestic hot water (DHW) load (>83%), but only about 12% of the space-heating load. DOE-2.2 simulations predict whole-house source energy savings of 54% compared to the BA Benchmark [1]. The largest contributors to energy savings beyond McStain's standard practice are the solar water heater, HRV, improved air distribution, high-efficiency boiler, and compact fluorescent lighting package.

  6. Evaluation of a High-Performance Solar Home in Loveland, Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building America (BA) partner McStain Neighborhoods built the Discovery House in Loveland, Colorado, with an extensive package of energy-efficient features, including a high-performance envelope, efficient mechanical systems, a solar water heater integrated with the space-heating system, a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV), and ENERGY STAR appliances. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Building Science Consortium (BSC) conducted short-term field-testing and building energy simulations to evaluate the performance of the house. These evaluations are utilized by BA to improve future prototype designs and to identify critical research needs. The Discovery House building envelope and ducts were very tight under normal operating conditions. The HRV provided fresh air at a rate of about 35 l/s (75 cfm), consistent with the recommendations of ASHRAE Standard 62.2. The solar hot water system is expected to meet the bulk of the domestic hot water (DHW) load (>83%), but only about 12% of the space-heating load. DOE-2.2 simulations predict whole-house source energy savings of 54% compared to the BA Benchmark. The largest contributors to energy savings beyond McStain's standard practice are the solar water heater, HRV, improved air distribution, high-efficiency boiler, and compact fluorescent lighting package.

  7. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  8. Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

  9. Evaluation of energy saving opportunities in a public education facility via performance contracting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchins, P.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public education facilities were one of the earliest targets for energy conservation. Such ideas as turning off lights and other systems and reducing outside air were often recommended. It is surprising that today, almost twenty years after the beginning of many of these energy saving programs, opportunities are still abundant. Some are a product of improved technology, but most are simple control and management of the systems in place. In the continual competition for budget dollars, maintenance of mechanical and electrical systems rarely fares well. The lure, of no initial capital outlay for energy system improvements and positive cash flows from day one, make performance contracting very attractive. The facility studied here is a secondary education public facility in the southeastern United States. It is a single building facility with slightly more than 100,000 square feet in floor space. The school was built in the late 1970`s during the height of the first phase of many energy conservation programs. Energy savings were evaluated using Trane`s TRACE{reg_sign} 600 computer simulation program. These results, together with cost estimates from local vendors, provide the foundation for a contract based on the performance of energy saving systems. An Energy Service Company (ESCO) was used to provide financing and much more. The performance contract was structured to include equipment performance guarantees, maintenance, training, monitoring, savings verification and purchase of aging equipment. Probably the most important aspect of performance contracting is the concept of purchasing services and expertise rather than equipment. It is through knowledge, understanding, monitoring and maintenance that savings can be achieved year after year.

  10. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  11. Subsolidus sintering of SYNROC: II. Materials selections, process improvements, waste form evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmour, H. III.; Hare, T.M.; Russ, J.C.; Boss, C.B.; Solomah, A.G.; Batchelor, A.D.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal areas of research were related to materials selections and characterization, process optimizations, crystalline phase development, sinterability, resultant microstructures and evaluations of leaching behavior. With and without simulated radwaste doping, the Modified SYNROC-B formulation was found to be sinterable to technical density (D > 0.95 in the CTS mode) at temperatures in the range 1195/sup 0/C to 1285/sup 0/C, depending upon TiO/sub 2/ and CaCO/sub 3/ materials selections, and upon powder processing methods employed prior to firing. Of the 16 TiO/sub 2/ raw materials evaluated in air-fired, undoped batches, 15 yielded technically dense compacts (D > 0.95). Three fine pigmentary grades of TiO/sub 2/ were selected for further study in doped and undoped versions fired in Ar, 4% H/sub 2/. When intensively milled with other well chosen matrix constituents and 10% spray-calcined simulated waste, each of them yielded sintered densities of greater than or equal to 4.2 g/cm/sup 3/ (D greater than or equal to 0.96) at 1260/sup 0/C, 2h in Ar, 4% H/sub 2/ atmosphere. Leachability studies have been carried out in triple distilled H/sub 2/O according to MCC-1 and MCC-2 procedures at 25/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, and under ..gamma..-irradiation for dose rates of 2-5 x 10/sup 5/ rad/h at approx. 25/sup 0/C. The results obtained showed that freshly exposed interions of sintered Modified SYNROC-B ceramics were highly stable in the leaching environment, and were very retentive of simulated waste ions, including the most leachable species, Cs. Depending on leaching conditions, the highest Cs leach rates (after 3 days) were on the order of 10/sup -1/ g.m/sup -2/.day/sup -1/, but diminished sharply for longer times (up to 92 days) to the range 10/sup -2/ - 10/sup -4/ g.m/sup -2/.day/sup -1/.

  12. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

  13. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: II. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y., E-mail: euling.susan@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); White, Lori D. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kim, Andrea S. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Sen, Banalata [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wilson, Vickie S. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Keshava, Channa; Keshava, Nagalakshmi [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Hester, Susan [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ovacik, Meric A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P. [National Center for Environmental Research Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Bioinformatics Center, Environmental Bioinformatics and Computational Toxicology Center (ebCTC), Rutgers University and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gaido, Kevin W. [Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD 20855 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the toxicogenomic data set for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and male reproductive developmental effects was performed as part of a larger case study to test an approach for incorporating genomic data in risk assessment. The DBP toxicogenomic data set is composed of nine in vivo studies from the published literature that exposed rats to DBP during gestation and evaluated gene expression changes in testes or Wolffian ducts of male fetuses. The exercise focused on qualitative evaluation, based on a lack of available dose–response data, of the DBP toxicogenomic data set to postulate modes and mechanisms of action for the male reproductive developmental outcomes, which occur in the lower dose range. A weight-of-evidence evaluation was performed on the eight DBP toxicogenomic studies of the rat testis at the gene and pathway levels. The results showed relatively strong evidence of DBP-induced downregulation of genes in the steroidogenesis pathway and lipid/sterol/cholesterol transport pathway as well as effects on immediate early gene/growth/differentiation, transcription, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways in the testis. Since two established modes of action (MOAs), reduced fetal testicular testosterone production and Insl3 gene expression, explain some but not all of the testis effects observed in rats after in utero DBP exposure, other MOAs are likely to be operative. A reanalysis of one DBP microarray study identified additional pathways within cell signaling, metabolism, hormone, disease, and cell adhesion biological processes. These putative new pathways may be associated with DBP effects on the testes that are currently unexplained. This case study on DBP identified data gaps and research needs for the use of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. Furthermore, this study demonstrated an approach for evaluating toxicogenomic data in human health risk assessment that could be applied to future chemicals. - Highlights: ? We evaluate the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data for use in risk assessment. ? We focus on information about the mechanism of action for the developing testis. ? Multiple studies report effects on testosterone and insl3-related pathways. ? We identify additional affected pathways that may explain some testis effects. ? The case study is a template for evaluating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment.

  14. University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources Sample Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document For Monthly Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    & Financial / Budget Management - Ability and extent to which the individual defines a project, gathers Planning Document For Monthly Staff For use with the administrative, professional, managerial, other monthly (exempt) staff. 1. The original Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Cascaded H-Bridge Multi Level Inverter Fed BLDC Motor Drive in an Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emani, Sriram S.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . The design parameters are meant to meet the requirements of a commercial car. The various advantages of a multi level inverter fed PMSM have been demonstrated and an exhaustive performance evaluation has been done. The investigation is done by testing...

  16. Noise Performance Evaluation of the Candidate Digitizers for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The noise performance evaluation of the two digitizer cards being considered for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) is presented in this document. The procurement of the data acquisition electronics for the MJD is scheduled to happen this year. At the time of writing this document, there are two candidate digitizer electronic boards. One aspect that is being considered by the collaboration is the feasibility of using the MJD for dark matter searches. The feasibility of using the MJD for this application is going to be dictated by the ability of the demonstrator to reach sub-keV energy resolution. One of the potential sources of noise in the MJD is the data acquisition system. This document will is concluded with a recommendation for the final digitizer board by comparing the noise performance of the two electronics systems. Noise parameters such as the effective number of bits, input range linearity and signal to noise ratio are experimentally determined. The two digitizer cards feature different on-board digital signal processing and these features are compared. The experimental set-up was also used to identify sources of noise. This paper describes these sources of noise in the data acquisition system, along with mitigation strategies. Issues such as grounding and wiring scheme have an impact in the overall data acquisition system performance and are discussed in detail. As a conclusion, the suitability of each one of the cards to become the back bone of the data acquisition system of the MJD is discussed.

  17. DESIGN OF EPOXY-FREE SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS AND PERFORMANCE IN BOTH HELIUM I AND PRESSURIZED HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exchange I " L ^ v v / / / / > > y^ffHn Helium II cryostatWarren et. al. , "A Pressurized Helium H-Cooled Magnet Testin Pressurized Superfluid Helium", CXS 40 11th International

  18. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  19. Evaluation of infrasound sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kromer, R.P.; McDonald, T.S.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is evaluating the performance of various infrasound sensors that could be used as part of the International Monitoring Systems (IMS). Specifications for infrasound stations are outlined in CTBT/PC/II/1/Add.2. This document specifies minimum requirements for sensor, digitizer and system. The infrasound sensors evaluation task has the following objectives: provide an overview of the sensors presently in use; evaluate these sensors with respect to the requirements of the IMS.

  20. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLOUDS OCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH The impact of high-altitude clouds along an electro- optical sensor line of sight has been studied, F-91761 Palaiseau, France, email : karine.caillault@onera.fr KEYWORDS: sensor performance

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 15, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2000 433 An Approach to Evaluate the General Performance of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMeres, Brock J.

    the General Performance of Stand-Alone Wind/Photovoltaic Generating Systems M. Hashem Nehrir, Senior Member for evaluating the general performance of stand-alone wind/photovoltaic generating systems. Simple models of stand-alone generating systems and gaining a better insight in the component sizes needed before

  2. SynchroPhasor Measurements: System Architecture and Performance Evaluation in Supporting Wide-Area Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The infrastructure of phasor measurements have evolved over the last two decades from isolated measurement units to networked measurement systems with footprints beyond individual utility companies. This is, to a great extent, a bottom-up self-evolving process except some local systems built by design. Given the number of phasor measurement units (PMUs) in the system is small (currently 70 each in western and eastern interconnections), current phasor network architecture works just fine. However, the architecture will become a bottleneck when large number of PMUs are installed (e.g. >1000~10000). The need for phasor architecture design has yet to be addressed. This paper reviews the current phasor networks and investigates future architectures, as related to the efforts undertaken by the North America SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI). Then it continues to present staged system tests to evaluate the performance of phasor networks, which is a common practice in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system. This is followed by field measurement evaluation and the implication of phasor quality issues on phasor applications.

  3. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of radiant barriers and low-emittance surface coatings in residential building attics can significantly reduce conditioning loads from heat flow through attic floors. The roofing industry has been developing and using various radiant barrier systems and low-emittance surface coatings to increase energy efficiency in buildings; however, minimal data are available that quantifies the effectiveness of these technologies. This study evaluates performance of various attic radiant barrier systems under simulated summer daytime conditions and nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions using the large scale climate simulator (LSCS). The four attic configurations that were evaluated are 1) no radiant barrier (control), 2) perforated low-e foil laminated oriented strand board (OSB) deck, 3) low-e foil stapled on rafters, and 4) liquid applied low-emittance coating on roof deck and rafters. All test attics used nominal RUS 13 h-ft2- F/Btu (RSI 2.29 m2-K/W) fiberglass batt insulation on attic floor. Results indicate that the three systems with radiant barriers had heat flows through the attic floor during summer daytime condition that were 33%, 50%, and 19% lower than the control, respectively.

  4. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Reid, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  5. Engineering Process Model for High-Temperature Electrolysis System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar; Grant L. Hawkes

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the potential hydrogen production performance of large-scale High-Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) operations, we have developed an engineering process model at INL using the commercial systems-analysis code HYSYS. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all of the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional electrolyzer model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT. This report provides details on the one-dimensional electrolyzer model, the HYSYS process model for a 300 MW HTE plant, and some representative results of parametric studies performed using the HYSYS process model.

  6. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This manual covers an array of modules written for the SCALE package, consisting of drivers, system libraries, cross section and materials properties libraries, input/output routines, storage modules, and help files.

  7. Performance evaluation of passive cooling in office buildings based on uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breesch, H. [Building Physics, Construction and Services, Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sustainable Building Research Group, Department of Construction, Catholic University College Ghent, Gebroeders Desmetstraat 1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Janssens, A. [Building Physics, Construction and Services, Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural night ventilation is an interesting passive cooling method in moderate climates. Driven by wind and stack generated pressures, it cools down the exposed building structure at night, in which the heat of the previous day is accumulated. The performance of natural night ventilation highly depends on the external weather conditions and especially on the outdoor temperature. An increase of this outdoor temperature is noticed over the last century and the IPCC predicts an additional rise to the end of this century. A methodology is needed to evaluate the reliable operation of the indoor climate of buildings in case of warmer and uncertain summer conditions. The uncertainty on the climate and on other design data can be very important in the decision process of a building project. The aim of this research is to develop a methodology to predict the performance of natural night ventilation using building energy simulation taking into account the uncertainties in the input. The performance evaluation of natural night ventilation is based on uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. The results of the uncertainty analysis showed that thermal comfort in a single office cooled with single-sided night ventilation had the largest uncertainty. The uncertainties on thermal comfort in case of passive stack and cross ventilation were substantially smaller. However, since wind, as the main driving force for cross ventilation, is highly variable, the cross ventilation strategy required larger louvre areas than the stack ventilation strategy to achieve a similar performance. The differences in uncertainty between the orientations were small. Sensitivity analysis was used to determine the most dominant set of input parameters causing the uncertainty on thermal comfort. The internal heat gains, solar heat gain coefficient of the sunblinds, internal convective heat transfer coefficient, thermophysical properties related to thermal mass, set-point temperatures controlling the natural night ventilation, the discharge coefficient C{sub d} of the night ventilation opening and the wind pressure coefficients C{sub p} were identified to have the largest impact on the uncertainty of thermal comfort. The impact of the warming climate on the uncertainty of thermal comfort was determined. The uncertainty on thermal comfort appeared to increase significantly when a weather data set with recurrence time of 10 years (warm weather) was applied in the transient simulations in stead of a standard weather data set. Natural night ventilation, designed for normal weather conditions, was clearly not able to ensure a high probability of good thermal comfort in warm weather. To ensure a high probability of good thermal comfort and to reduce the performance uncertainty in a warming climate, natural night ventilation has to be combined with additional measures. Different measures were analysed, based on the results of the sensitivity analysis. All the measures were shown to significantly decrease the uncertainty of thermal comfort in warm weather. The study showed the importance to carry out simulations with a warm weather data set together with the analysis under typical conditions. This approach allows to gain a better understanding of the performance of a natural night ventilation design, and to optimize the design to a robust solution. (author)

  8. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutov, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.; Chunyaev, E.I. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Marshall, A.C. [International Nuclear Safety, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Sapir, J.L.; Pelowitz, D.B. [Reactor Design and Analysis Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  9. The Design and Performance Evaluation of a Proactive Multipath Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinder, Phil

    in Libya, and the Cultural Affairs in London, for the financial support during my study. I would like in Libya, also to my father (Allah bless his soul). ii #12;Declaration I hereby declare that the work

  10. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, TengFang

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. In the meanwhile, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has created significant opportunities for precision cooling suppliers to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 3. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a modular, scalable liquid-rack cooling system in this study. The scope is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit in operation as it corresponds to a combination of varied server loads and inlet air temperatures, under various chilled-water supply temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with documented energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

  11. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Overhead Cooling Systems In Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, TengFang T.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. Naturally, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has, in the meanwhile, created significant opportunities for precision cooling suppliers to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants' input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 1. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a modular, scalable overhead cooling system. The system was tested in a hot/cold aisle environment without separation, or containment or the hot or cold aisles. The scope of this report is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit in operation as it corresponds to a combination of varied server loads and inlet air temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with a concurrent research study to document the energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

  12. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Cooling Systems with Hot Aisle Containment in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Barbara J

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. Naturally, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has, in the meanwhile, created significant opportunities for precision cooling suppliers to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 2. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a modular, scalable pair of chilled water cooling modules that were tested in a hot/cold aisle environment with hot aisle containment. The scope of this report is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit in operation as it corresponds to a combination of varied server loads and inlet air temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with a concurrent research study to document the energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

  13. Performance Evaluation for a Modular, Scalable Passive Cooling System in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, TengFang

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. In the meanwhile, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has created significant opportunities for precision cooling to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected passive, modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 4. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a passive, modular, scalable liquid cooling system in this study. The scope is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit corresponding to various server loads and inlet air temperatures, under various chilled-water supply temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with documented energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Smith, G. [GeoSmith Engineering, LLC, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Danforth, B. [Cordilleran Compliance Services, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Gee, G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kothari, V.; Pauling, T. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is evaluating the performance of disposal cell covers at LM sites and exploring ways to enhance their sustainability. The cover of the Lakeview, Oregon, disposal cell relies on a compacted soil layer (CSL) to limit radon escape and water percolation into underlying tailings. The design created habitat favorable for growth of woody plants that sent roots through the CSL. The mean saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub sat}) of the CSL, measured at 17 locations, was 3.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, 300 times greater than the design target. The highest K{sub sat} values were measured near the top of the CSL at locations both with and without roots; the lowest K{sub sat} values were measured deeper in the CSL. Water flux meters (WFMs) installed in 2005 to directly measure percolation flux show significant percolation through the cover. Three WMFs began recording percolation in mid-November, 7 days after the start of a prolonged precipitation event, and continued until early June 2006. Percolation flux during this period ranged between 3.1 x 10{sup -5} and 8.5 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}. The cumulative percolation was greater than total precipitation during the period, probably because of a water-harvesting effect. The WFMs were strategically placed in down-gradient positions on the cover top slope where water likely accumulated in a sand drainage layer. Routine monitoring at Lakeview shows that the ground water remains protected. LM plans to evaluate potential effects of high percolation rates in covers to ensure that disposal cells remain protective for the long term. (authors)

  15. Performance evaluation of two-stage fuel cycle from SFR to PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, T.; Hoffman, E.A.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One potential fuel cycle option being considered is a two-stage fuel cycle system involving the continuous recycle of transuranics in a fast reactor and the use of bred plutonium in a thermal reactor. The first stage is a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel cycle with metallic U-TRU-Zr fuel. The SFRs need to have a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 in order to produce fissile material for use in the second stage. The second stage is a PWR fuel cycle with uranium and plutonium mixed oxide fuel based on the design and performance of the current state-of-the-art commercial PWRs with an average discharge burnup of 50 MWd/kgHM. This paper evaluates the possibility of this fuel cycle option and discusses its fuel cycle performance characteristics. The study focuses on an equilibrium stage of the fuel cycle. Results indicate that, in order to avoid a positive coolant void reactivity feedback in the stage-2 PWR, the reactor requires high quality of plutonium from the first stage and minor actinides in the discharge fuel of the PWR needs to be separated and sent back to the stage-1 SFR. The electricity-sharing ratio between the 2 stages is 87.0% (SFR) to 13.0% (PWR) for a TRU inventory ratio (the mass of TRU in the discharge fuel divided by the mass of TRU in the fresh fuel) of 1.06. A sensitivity study indicated that by increasing the TRU inventory ratio to 1.13, The electricity generation fraction of stage-2 PWR is increased to 28.9%. The two-stage fuel cycle system considered in this study was found to provide a high uranium utilization (>80%). (authors)

  16. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  17. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, TengFang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance for its partial load operation in this study.performance for its partial load operation in this study.s cooling performance for its partial load operation, which

  18. Evaluation of PEMFC System Contaminants on the Performance of Pt Catalyst via Cyclic Voltammetry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Macomber, C.; Dinh, H. N.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using electrochemical cyclic voltammetry as a quick ex-situ screening tool, the impact of the extracted solution and the individual leachable constituents from prospective BOP component materials on the performance and recoverability of the platinum catalyst were evaluated. Taking an extract from Zytel{trademark} HTN51G35HSLR (PPA) as an example, the major leachable organic components are caprolactam and 1,6 hexanediol. While these organic compounds by themselves do poison the Pt catalyst to some extent, such influence is mostly recoverable by means of potential holding and potential cycling. The extracted solution, however, shows a more drastic poisoning effect and it was not recoverable. Therefore the non-recoverable poisoning effect observed for the extracted solution is not from the two organic species studied. This demonstrates the complexity of such a contaminant study. Inorganic compounds that are known poisons like sulfur even in very low concentrations, may have a more dominant effect on the Pt catalyst and the recoverability.

  19. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  20. Decision-Making Aid Tool for the Evaluation and Improvement of the Energy Performance of Stock of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Lahrech, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most adapted one to develop each functionality of the decision- making aid tool for the evaluation and improvement of the energy performance of stock of buildings. Existing methods The Table 1 [1] & [4] shows a brief comparison between... buildings and distribute whole consumptions on end uses. Figure 3 shows the process used to validate the Benchmarking method. Simulations will be carried out with the SIMBAD Toolbox according to the stock data to evaluate energy consumptions...

  1. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

  2. VALVE FUNNEL SPRING PIN PRESS PERFORMANCE AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS EVALUATION FOR SPECIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITHERSPOON JT

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This evaluation allows use of the valve funnel spring pin press and describes appropriate handling instructions for the tool. The engineering evaluation is required for operations and field use of special tools and equipment.

  3. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

  4. Decision-Making Aid Tool for the Evaluation and Improvement of the Energy Performance of Stock of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Lahrech, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most adapted one to develop each functionality of the decision- making aid tool for the evaluation and improvement of the energy performance of stock of buildings. Existing methods The Table 1 [1] & [4] shows a brief comparison between... the development of a tool. This tool is intended for building professionals, particularly managers, to help them manage their building stock and improve energy performance. Several studies based on simulation and benchmarking methods have been carried out...

  5. Performance Evaluation of a Cascaded H-Bridge Multi Level Inverter Fed BLDC Motor Drive in an Electric Vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emani, Sriram S.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -emf ................................................................................................. 77 6.8 Regenerative Capability of the Implemented System ....................................... 78 6.9 Fault Analysis .................................................................................................... 79 6.10 Fault Diagnostics... follow the reference drive cycle. e) To evaluate the performance of the batteries during charge and recharge cycles, especially during regeneration which is achieved through the electrical braking. 1.5 Demand for Electric Vehicles In a popular...

  6. Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization Schemes in Convection-Permitting Ensemble Forecasts using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    uncertainty in how to include various processes (e.g., drop breakup and ice-phase categories 1 Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization In this study, the ability of several cloud microphysical and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes

  7. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED INTO A DWELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED.peuportier@mines-paristech.fr, Tel.: +33 1 40 51 91 51 ABSTRACT An inverter-driven air-to-air heat pump model has been developped capacity air-to-air heat pump coupled with temperate air sources (crawlspace, attic, sunspace, heat

  8. An evaluation of the concurrent discrimination task as a measure of habit learning: performance of amnesic subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corkin, Suzanne

    learning system [43]. The habit learning model is distinct from other types of implicit learningAn evaluation of the concurrent discrimination task as a measure of habit learning: performance November 1997; received in revised form 15 February 1999; accepted 22 February 1999 Abstract Habit learning

  9. PerformanceEvaluation of Adaptiveand Energy-efficient MAC Protocolsfor WirelessSensor Networks Torsten Braun, Philipp Hurni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Torsten

    PerformanceEvaluation of Adaptiveand Energy-efficient MAC Protocolsfor WirelessSensor Networks Bern, Switzerland braun@iam.unibe.ch, hurni@iam.unibe.ch Abstract The paper describes an energy-efficient schemes. Keywords: Wireless Sensor Networks, Energy-efficient Protocols, MediumAccessControl I

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 58, NO. 4, MAY 2009 1647 Performance Evaluation of Vehicle-Based Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    set with long sampling intervals to save communication costs and to avoid network congestion problem to be addressed. A performance evaluation has been carried out in Shanghai, China, by utilizing, such as 1­2 min, not only because they want to reduce communication costs but also because they are only

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  12. Commercial remodeling : using computer graphic imagery to evaluate building energy performance during conceptual redesign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Kyle D

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is an investigation of the relationship between commercial remodeling and building thermal performance. A computer graphic semiotic is developed to display building thermal performance based on this relationship. ...

  13. Proc. 4th St.Petersburg Workshop on Simulation, St.Petersburg, Russia, 2001, 233-238 Modeling and Performance Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivulin, Nikolai K.

    and Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems Security Operation1 D. Guster2 St.Cloud State University3 N is developed based on the fork-join queueing network formalism. We introduce a secu- rity operation performance system security, security attack, security vul- nerability, performance evaluation, fork-join queueing

  14. Evaluating the energy performance of the first generation of LEED-certified commercial buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Rick

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Commitment to Green Building: Experiences andEvaluation Report. Cascadia Green Building Council.U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). 2003. "Green Building

  15. Case Study: Evaluating Liquid versus Air Cooling in the Maui High Performance Computing Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study evaluates the energy efficiency of a new, liquid-cooled computing system applied in a retrofit project compared to the previously used air-cooled system.

  16. High performance photodiodes based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for very long wavelength infrared detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, A. M.; Chen, G.; Chevallier, R.; Haddadi, A.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Very long wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices are demonstrated on GaSb substrate. A heterostructure photodiode was grown with 50% cut-off wavelength of 14.6??m. At 77?K, the photodiode exhibited a peak responsivity of 4.8?A/W, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 46% at ?300?mV bias voltage from front side illumination without antireflective coating. With the dark current density of 0.7?A/cm{sup 2}, it provided a specific detectivity of 1.4?×?10{sup 10} Jones. The device performance was investigated as a function of operating temperature, revealing a very stable optical response and a background limited performance below 50?K.

  17. Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Kramer, W.; Kroposki, B.; Martin, G.; McNutt, P.; Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Hoke, A.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a test plan for V2G testing. The test plan is designed to test and evaluate the vehicle's power electronics capability to provide power to the grid, and to evaluate the vehicle's ability to connect and disconnect from the utility according to a subset of the IEEE Std. 1547 tests.

  18. A chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave/pulsed uniform flow spectrometer. II. Performance and applications for reaction dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekera, Chamara

    This second paper in a series of two reports on the performance of a new instrument for studying chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics at low temperatures. Our approach employs chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave ...

  19. A Procedure for the Performance Evaluation of a New Commercial Building: Part II – Overall Methodology and Comparison of Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, S.; Haberl, J.S.

    Transactions Vol. 114, Part 2. For personal use only. Additional reproduction, distribution, or transmission in either print or digital form is not permitted without ASHRAE’s prior written permission. ESL-PA-08-06-02 Published in ASHRAE Transactions Vol. 114... reproduction, distribution, or transmission in either print or digital form is not permitted without ASHRAE’s prior written permission. ESL-PA-08-06-02 Published in ASHRAE Transactions Vol. 114, Part 2. ASHRAE Transactions 391 mance of the case-study building...

  20. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  1. Evaluation of Climate-Based Daylight Performance in Tropical Office Buildings- A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szu-Cheng, CHIEN; King Jet, TSENG

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Z. Rogers, Dynamic Daylight Performance Metrics forof interior design on the daylight availability in open plan2002. [14] Z. Rogers, Daylight metric development using

  2. Evaluation of biotin supplementation on the performance of turkey breeder hens and turkey poults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Kenneth Kay

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basal I Basal II Basal III Soybean meal (50X) Ground grain sorghum Fish meal (60X) Poultry by-product meal (58X) Vitamin mix + 10 gm. B6 + bacitracin premix* Trace mineral mix** NaCI SQ premix (40X) Polyphos (18X P-32X Ca) Vegefat... and maintains more ideal brooding temperatures. 20 TABLE III. Average eight week body weight, feed efficiency, and mortality by groups for experiment I. (Broad Breasted White male turkeys). Groups Mean eight week body weight (gm. ) Feed efficiency...

  3. Psychophysical evaluations of modulated color rendering for energy performance of LED-based architectural lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Maria do Rosário

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on the visual perception evaluation of colors within an environment of a highly automated lighting control strategy. Digitally controlled lighting systems equipped with light emitting diodes, LEDs, ...

  4. Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Cooling Systems with Hot Aisle Containment in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Barbara J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply water temperature to the cooling modules used ininlet supply air temperatures, as was the cooling module’sCooling System 2 be evaluated when operating with higher supply

  5. Performance Evaluation and Prediction for Legacy Information Systems , Antony Tang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jun

    that com- bines benchmarking, production system monitoring, and performance modelling (BMM) to address and quantify its performance characteristics under varying load conditions via monitoring and benchmarking, developing a brand new system to deal with such changes could be risky and costly. Therefore, a way

  6. Evaluation of the impact chip multiprocessors have on SNL application performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerfler, Douglas W.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes trans-organizational efforts to investigate the impact of chip multiprocessors (CMPs) on the performance of important Sandia application codes. The impact of CMPs on the performance and applicability of Sandia's system software was also investigated. The goal of the investigation was to make algorithmic and architectural recommendations for next generation platform acquisitions.

  7. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

  8. Evaluation de la performance des villes franaises Universit de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, IAE de Nice, GRM (EA 4711)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Evaluation de la performance des villes françaises Damien Bo Université de Nice Sophia.bo@unice.fr Aude DEVILLE Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, IAE de Nice, GRM (EA 4711) 24 avenue des Diables.deville@unice.fr Philippe Luu Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, IAE de Nice, GRM (EA 4711) 24 avenue des Diables Bleus

  9. Acciona Solar Technology Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-384

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this agreement, NREL will work with Acciona to conduct joint testing, evaluation, and data collection related to Acciona's solar technologies and systems. This work includes, but is not limited to, testing and evaluation of solar component and system technologies, data collection and monitoring, performance evaluation, reliability testing, and analysis. This work will be conducted at Acciona's Nevada Solar One (NSO) power plant and NREL test facilities. Specific projects will be developed on a task order basis. Each task order will identify the name of the project and deliverables to be produced under the task order. Each task order will delineate an estimated completion date based on a project's schedule. Any reports developed under this CRADA must be reviewed by both NREL and Acciona and approved by each organization prior to publication of results or documents.

  10. Coil performance evaluation based on electrodynamics : tools for hardware design and validation in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel MRI techniques allow acceleration of MR imaging beyond traditional speed limits. In parallel MRI, radiofrequency (RF) detector coil arrays are used to perform some degree of spatial encoding which complements ...

  11. Evaluation of the Performance/Energy Overhead in DSP Video Decoding and its Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -phones and tablets. In fact, Lithium battery technologies are not evolving fast enough, this negatively impacts In the experimentations, we followed two steps. 1) A video frame level performance and energy characterization where

  12. Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very...

  13. A language measure for performance evaluation of discrete-event supervisory control systems q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    on permissiveness as the (qualitative) performance index. Construction of the proposed language measure follows similar to the conditional probability, each event is assigned a cost based on the state at which

  14. Design, Conformance Verification, and Performance Evaluation of OpenFlow Message Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Daoqi

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and errors in the implementation lead to safety issues, performance inefficiencies, and expose vulnerabilities, opening door to potential exploitations and attacks. In this thesis we develop a systematic approach to design and implementation of efficient...

  15. An Experimental Methodology to Evaluate Concept Generation Procedures Based on Quantitative Lifecycle Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Michel-Alexandre

    This study presents an experimental methodology to measure how concept generation procedures can affect the anticipated lifecycle performance of engineering systems design concepts. The methodology is based on objective ...

  16. An Iterative Approach to Comprehensive Performance Evaluation of Integrated Services Networks \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is supported in part by ONR and DARPA under contract N00014­91­C­0195 to Honeywell and Computer Science Research Projects Agency, ONR, the U.S. Government or Honeywell. cial to the overall performance

  17. Performance evaluation of configurable arrays with mesh interconnections and wormhole routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Deviusha

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applications (with and without the embeddings) are obtained through an execution driven simulation. The embeddings are shown to provide similar performance to the original mesh when the rectangular grid's height-width ratio is closer to unity. However...

  18. Evaluation of the effect of capacity upon the performance of four industrial asbestos vacuum cleaners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loflin, Wilburn Joseph

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of asbestos which the manufacturing company specified that its vacuum cleaner was designed to contain (manufacturer's specified capacity). The suction pressure and airborne fiber concentrations were taken at each amount to determine what effect capacity... had upon vacuum cleaner performance. The analysis conducted on the collected data and the graphical repre- sentations of that data indicated that the effect capacity had upon vacuum cleaner performance was not evident in the airborne fiber con...

  19. Evaluation of Model Results and Measured Performance of Net-Zero Energy Homes in Hawaii: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Kiatreungwattana, K.; Kelly, K. J.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kaupuni community consists of 19 affordable net-zero energy homes that were built within the Waianae Valley of Oahu, Hawaii in 2011. The project was developed for the native Hawaiian community led by the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled and measured energy performance of the homes. Over the first year of occupancy, the community as a whole performed within 1% of the net-zero energy goals. The data show a range of performance from house to house with the majority of the homes consistently near or exceeding net-zero, while a few fall short of the predicted net-zero energy performance. The impact of building floor plan, weather, and cooling set point on this comparison is discussed. The project demonstrates the value of using building energy simulations as a tool to assist the project to achieve energy performance goals. Lessons learned from the energy performance monitoring has had immediate benefits in providing feedback to the homeowners, and will be used to influence future energy efficient designs in Hawaii and other tropical climates.

  20. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  1. Hot gas path analysis and data evaluation of the performance parameters of a gas turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanawa, David Allen

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VITA 83 LIST OF FIGURES F g. 1. 1 Centrifugal Compressor Performance Nap 1. 2 Compressor and Turbine Shaft Assembly ? ag'e 1. 3 Axial Compressor Performance Nap 2. 1 Variation of Compressor Pressure Ratio Over the Load Range 2. 2 Variation... of Compressor Pressure Ratio With the Flow Rate 13 2. 3 T-s Diagram of Brayton Cycle 2. 4 Sketch of Open Cycle Gas Turbine 1 7 2. 5 Specific Heat versus Temperature 18 2. 6 Optimum Cycle Efficiency by Pressure Ratios . . . . 20 3. 1 Different Compressor...

  2. A biometrical evaluation of relationships between dam weight and progeny preweaning performance in beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gerald Max

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A BIDMETRICA' EVALUA11ON Oi. RELATIONSV, IPS BFT'AEENI DAM W. IGHT AND PROGENY nREIfEANING PERFORMANCE IN BEEF CATILE A Thesis by GFRALD MAX SMITH Suf&mitfed to the Cradua'te Colleae of Texas Aiild University in pardial f. . lfillmen...& I TH App oved as Io style and content by: (Head of Doper t nant ) I Pie p1 be I' ) AoGnst ISSB ABS'IRAC) A P&ometricaI Bvaluation o~ Relationships Betweor Dam lrieight and Progeny Preweaning Performance in Beef Cattle. (Augusl I"GB) Gerald...

  3. A performance vs. cost framework for evaluating DHT design tradeoffs under churn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    networks. This paper presents a performance versus cost framework (PVC) that allows designers to compare the effects of different protocol features and parameter values. PVC views a protocol as consuming a certain with which protocols use additional network resources to improve latency. To demonstrate the value of PVC

  4. Performance based evaluation of the seismic resistance of structures with concrete diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, Joel Martin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    building models with end shear walls for 3-story and 5-story buildings with 2:1 and 3:1 aspect ratios have been constructed and designed according to current code procedures assuming a rigid diaphragm. The performance-based design criteria outlined...

  5. Green Building Performance Evaluation in the United States: Measured Results from LEED- New Construction Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewitt, D.; Turner, C.; Frankel, M.

    of energy bills and brief descriptions of actual building use from owners, plus modeled energy usage information from the U.S. Green Buildings Council‘s (USGBC) LEED submittal files. The actual building performance was viewed through several whole-building...

  6. Experimental Evaluation of the UML Profile for Schedulability, Performance and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    for the performance analysis is the Labelled Transition System Analyser (LTSA) tool which supports model solution via discrete-event simula- tion. Simultaneously, LTSA allows functional properties of a system to be explored the ways in which UML, the SPT profile and the LTSA tool can be used to design systems that satisfy

  7. Evaluation of spatial database management systems: A performance-based comparison 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbesser-Rastburg, Thomas

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This analytical research paper investigates the question which of three Spatial Database Management Systems (Oracle 11g, PostgreSQL 8.3 with PostGIS 1.2 and MySQL 5) installed on a Linux platform performs best in queries ...

  8. Rise-M-2211 EVALUATION OF LHR FUEL PERFORMANCE UNDER TRANSIENT AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF RECENT REPORTS Per Knudsen Abstract. Reports from the meetings at Petten (Nov. - Dec. 1978), Portland on Fuel Behaviour 10 4. Three-Mile Island Fuel Performance 12 APPENDIX A: Petten Meeting A-l Paper List A the following technical meetings: - "Ramping and Load Following Behaviour of Reactor Fuel", Petten, 3C November

  9. Performance Evaluation of DCA and SRC on a Single Bot Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    a better performance in detecting malicious activities. Keywords: Security, Intrusion Detection, Botnet/bot techniques use different types of signatures-based detection by analysing network traffic in order to detect or encrypting the bot's traffic when communicating with the attacker. In addition, a bot can connect to non

  10. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  11. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  12. Performance Evaluation of DCA and SRC on a Single Bot Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hammadi, Yousof; Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malicious users try to compromise systems using new techniques. One of the recent techniques used by the attacker is to perform complex distributed attacks such as denial of service and to obtain sensitive data such as password information. These compromised machines are said to be infected with malicious software termed a "bot". In this paper, we investigate the correlation of behavioural attributes such as keylogging and packet flooding behaviour to detect the existence of a single bot on a compromised machine by applying (1) Spearman's rank correlation (SRC) algorithm and (2) the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). We also compare the output results generated from these two methods to the detection of a single bot. The results show that the DCA has a better performance in detecting malicious activities.

  13. An evaluation of four quantitative laboratory fume hood performance test methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodrow, Lisa Michele

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lnstruraentation 25 26 30 30 34 36 Test Procecture Diffusion Apparatus . Sampling Instrumentation EPA Sulfur Hexafluoride Test ~ 50 50 TAKE OF CCVlKNTS (Continued) Viii Diffusion Apparatus . Sampling Instruraentation Mcdified EPA Sulfur Hexafluoride... of laboratory fume hood containment, and in devel~ of design criteria for future laboratory facilities. As the first stage in this research, a comparison of four laboratory fume hood performance test ~ was completed. Curry testing procedures used...

  14. The evaluation of sorghum contaminated with ergot on broiler chicken performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fazzino, Johnny Joseph

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on growth and FCR were shown (Misir and Marquardt, 1978; Young and Marquardt 1982). In a study conducted by Young and Marquardt (1982) 40 ppm of dietary ergotamine tartrate did not alter feed consumption or weight gain in chickens. Even concentrations... performance was not effected (Misir and Marquardt, 1978). Their study consisted of 14 days of feeding to Leghorn chicks. This wide variety of effects is probably due to the fact that ergot from different sources can vary in content and concentration...

  15. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  16. Evaluation of surface sampling method performance for Bacillus Spores on clean and dirty outdoor surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Einfeld, Wayne; Boucher, Raymond M.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Tezak, Matthew Stephen

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of Bacillus atrophaeous spores from grime-treated and clean surfaces was measured in a controlled chamber study to assess sampling method performance. Outdoor surfaces investigated by wipe and vacuum sampling methods included stainless steel, glass, marble and concrete. Bacillus atrophaeous spores were used as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores in this study designed to assess whether grime-coated surfaces significantly affected surface sampling method performance when compared to clean surfaces. A series of chamber tests were carried out in which known amounts of spores were allowed to gravitationally settle onto both clean and dirty surfaces. Reference coupons were co-located with test coupons in all chamber experiments to provide a quantitative measure of initial surface concentrations of spores on all surfaces, thereby allowing sampling recovery calculations. Results from these tests, carried out under both low and high humidity conditions, show that spore recovery from grime-coated surfaces is the same as or better than spore recovery from clean surfaces. Statistically significant differences between method performance for grime-coated and clean surfaces were observed in only about half of the chamber tests conducted.

  17. Performance Evaluation of O-Ring Seals in Model 9975 Packaging Assemblies (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, Eric

    1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed a review of existing literature and data regarding the useable service life of Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer O-rings currently used in the Model 9975 packaging assemblies. Although the shipping and transportation period is normally limited to 2 years, it is anticipated that these packages will be used for longer-term storage of Pu-bearing materials in KAMS (K-Area Materials Storage) prior to processing or disposition in the APSF (Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility). Based on the service conditions and review of available literature, Materials Consultation concludes that there is sufficient existing data to establish the technical basis for storage of Pu-bearing materials using Parker Seals O-ring compound V835-75 (or equivalent) for up to 10 years following the 2-year shipping period. Although significant physical deterioration of the O-rings and release of product is not expected, definite changes in physical properties will occur. However, due to the complex relationship between elastomer formulation, seal properties, and competing degradation mechanisms, the actual degree of property variation and impact upon seal performance is difficult to predict. Therefore, accelerated aging and/or surveillance programs are recommended to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions. Such programs could provide a unique opportunity to develop nonexistent long-term performance data, as well as address storage extension issues if necessary.

  18. Evaluation of in-situ cemented backfill performance. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesarik, D.R.; Vickery, J.D.; Seymour, J.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its research program to investigate ways of improving resource recovery and reducing subsidence, researchers from the U.S. Bureau of Mines placed instruments in the B-North ore body of the Cannon Mine, Wenatchee, WA, to monitor cemented backfill and rock deformation during mining. The vibrating-wire guages proved to be reliable and versatile, and approximately half of the instruments are providing data after 2 years of use. A two-dimensional, finite-element model was used to analyze the Cannon Mine's multilevel bench cut-and-fill mining method and predict rock and backfill displacements. The model accurately predicted rock displacements, but the predicted and measured displacements in cemented backfill had a correlation coefficient near zero, indicating that the model should only be used to predict rock displacements and not backfill displacements. A finite-difference model was also used to evaluate the stability of a cemented backfill pillar. Results can be used to conservatively predict backfill stresses, but on-site observations of pillar failures coupled with in situ measurements are needed to make more accurate predictions. An ongoing evaluation of the mining system has indicated that filling the primary stopes tight to the back with cemented backfill allowed these pillars to carry overburden loads soon after the cemented backfill was placed.

  19. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. [Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  20. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  1. A custom-designed limited-angle actuator for an electromechanical engine valve drive Part II: Fabrication and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassakian, John G.

    Research has shown that variable valve timing (VVT) can improve significantly the performance of internal combustion (IC) engines, including higher fuel efficiencies, lower emissions, and larger torque outputs at each point ...

  2. Evaluation of a Rice/Soy Fermentate on Broiler Performance, Litter Characteristics, and Fecal Odorant Volatilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mallori

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    : Moore et al., 1995, 2000; Shreve et al., 1995, 1996; Burgess et al., 1998). A study conducted by Moore et al. (2000), compared ammonia levels in broiler houses treated with Al+Clear (Al2(SO4)3;Alum) to control houses. Ammonia concentrations during... the first three weeks were 6-20 ppm in the treated houses, compared to the control houses with ammonia concentrations at 28-43 ppm. Performance parameters including body weight and feed conversion were improved in the alum-treated houses compared...

  3. An Evaluation of Improper Refrigerant Charge on the Performance of a Split System Air Conditioner with Capillary Tube Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the coil was 20.94 ft2 with refrigerant tube sizes of 3/8". The outdoor fan was located on the top of the outdoor coil. The fan specifications are given in Table 3.1. Figure 3.3 - Detail of Outdoor Test Section 25 Table 3.1 - Fan Specification...ESL-TR-88/07-01 AN EVALUATION OF IMPROPER REFRIGERANT CHARGE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A SPLIT SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONER WITH CAPILLARY TUBE EXPANSION FINAL REPORT Submitted by Mohsen Farzad Dennis L. O'Neal Prepared For ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY RESEARCH...

  4. Performance measures for evaluating public participation activities in DOE`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.; Schweitzer, M.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.; Munro, J.F.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation in decision-making in the United States has become a dominant theme throughout the public sector and is increasingly used in the private sector. Recent reports by the National Research Council and the Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, set up jointly by the White House and Congress, conclude that risk decisions must increasingly be structured in such a manner as to involve stakeholders meaningfully in the processes and activities leading to decisions and, perhaps, through decision implementation. Both of these reports indicate that decisions may take longer but be better if officials: (1) bring all interested and affected parties to the table at the beginning of the risk-discussion process; (2) identify relevant concerns, losses, exposures and other information the parties have; (3) address significant concerns through appropriate research; and (4) present findings in an understandable, accessible way. This report is intended to facilitate subsequent evaluations of public participation activities and programs.

  5. Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, A K

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

  6. Influence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on LPG fuel performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Saad, E-mail: iqbalmouj@gmail.com; Ahmed, Iqbal, E-mail: iqbalmouj@gmail.com; Mutalib, Mohammad Ibrahim bin Abdul, E-mail: iqbalmouj@gmail.com; Nadeem, Saad, E-mail: iqbalmouj@gmail.com; Ali, Shahid, E-mail: iqbalmouj@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this mode of combustion is to insertion of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) combustion on spark plug ignition engines. The addition of hydrogen peroxide may probably decrease the formation of NO{sub x}, CO{sub x} and unburned hydrocarbons. Hypothetically, Studies have shown that addition of hydrogen peroxide to examine the performance of LPG/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} mixture in numerous volumetric compositions starting from lean LPG until obtaining a better composition can reduce the LPG fuel consumption. The theory behind this idea is that, the addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can cover the lean operation limit, increase the lean burn ability, diminution the burn duration along with controlling the exhaust emission by significantly reducing the greenhouse gaseous.

  7. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System 3, Glendo, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBM System 3 Solar Energy System was designed by the Federal Systems Division of IBM in Huntsville, Alabama to provide 46% of the space heating and 80% of the domestic hot water (DHW) for a 1078 square foot retrofit of an existing building used as a residence at the Glendo Reservoir State Park Ranger Station. The system consists of fourteen Sunworks Model LA1001A flat plate liquid collectors (294 square feet), a 1000 gallon hot water storage tank, a 65 gallon electric domestic hot water tank, pumps, heat exchangers, controls, and associated plumbing. Water is the heat transfer medium for this closed volume, passive drain down system. A gas furnace is used for auxiliary space heating energy. The system which became operational in October 1978 has five modes of operation. Performance data for the year of 1979 are presented and assessed.

  8. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System 4 at Clinton, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBM System 4 Solar Energy System was designed to provide 35 percent of the space heating and 62 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) preheating for a single-family residence located within the United States. The system is a prepackaged unit called the Remote Solar Assembly which has been integrated into the heating and DHW system in a dormitory in Clinton, Mississippi. The system consists of 259 square feet of Solaron 2001 Series flat-plate-air collectors, a rock thermal storage containing 5 1/2 ton of rock, heat exchangers, blowers, a 52 gallon preheat tank, controls, and associated plumbing, two 30 gallon electric water heaters draw water from the preheat tank. A 20 kilowatt, duct mounted, electric heater supplies auxiliary energy. This system which has three modes of system operation was activated September, 1978. A system performance assessment is presented.

  9. Evaluating the Performance of a Commercial Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are rapidly becoming the energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) of choice, especially for scanning electron microscopy x-ray microanalysis. The complementary features of large active areas (i.e., high collection angle) and high count rate capability of these detector contribute to their popularity, as well as the absence of liquid nitrogen cooling and good energy resolution of these detectors. The performance of an EDAX Apollo 40 SDD on a JEOL 6500F SEM is discussed. The larger detector resulted in an significant increase (~3.5x) in geometric collection efficiency compared to the original 10mm2 Si(Li) detector that it replaced. The SEM can provide high beam currents (up to 200nA in some conditions) at small probe diameters. The high count rate capability of the SDD and the high current capability of the SEM compliment each other and provide excellent EDS analytical capabilities for both single point and spectrum imaging applications.

  10. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  11. Evaluating tantalum oxide stoichiometry and oxidation states for optimal memristor performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael T., E-mail: mtbrumb@sandia.gov; Mickel, Patrick R.; Lohn, Andrew J.; Mirabal, Alex J.; Kalan, Michael A.; Stevens, James E.; Marinella, Matthew J. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tantalum oxide has shown promising electrical switching characteristics for memristor devices. Consequently, a number of reports have investigated the electrical behavior of TaO{sub x} thin films. Some effort has been made to characterize the composition of the TaO{sub x} films and it is known that there must be an optimal stoichiometry of TaO{sub x} where forming and switching behavior are optimized. However, many previous reports lack details on the methodology used for identifying the chemistry of the films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been the most commonly used technique; however, peak fitting routines vary widely among reports and a native surface oxide of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} often confounds the analysis. In this report a series of large area TaO{sub x} films were deposited via sputtering with controlled O{sub 2} partial pressures in the sputtering gas, resulting in tunable oxide compositions. Spectra from numerous samples from each wafer spanning a range of oxide stoichiometries were used to develop a highly constrained peak fitting routine. This procedure allowed for the composition of the TaO{sub x} films to be identified with greater detail than elemental ratios alone. Additionally, the peak fitting routine was used to evaluate uniformity of deposition across individual wafers. The appearance of a greater contribution of Ta{sup 4+} oxidation states in the oxygen starved films are believed to relate to films with optimal forming characteristics.

  12. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Meyer, J.H.; Vidt, E.J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ceramic cross-flow filter (CXF) system is a promising method to be used in advanced coal based power systems for high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) particle removal. Using a subpilot scale pressurized fluid-bed combustor (PFBC) at Argonne National Laboratory and various PFBC simulators, prior projects have indicated that CXF systems can be used in oxidizing environments at PFBC conditions. To extend the use of CXF systems, this project completed an economic analysis comparing the cost of various oxygen and air blown gasification systems with the CXF system incorporated, initiated the scaleup of the CXF element from development to commercial size, predicted the characteristics of gasifier dust cake, evaluated cleaning pulse characteristics in a large multielement simulation, upgraded pulse cleaning mathematical model, and completed additional testing of the CXF elements under gasification (reducing) and PFBC conditions. Coors Ceramic Company and GTE Products Corporation were integrally involved in this program through the development and fabrication of the CXF elements. 39 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried Ducts Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried...

  14. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction The webinar is the...

  15. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harry, Herbert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  16. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative performance indicators of daylight sufficiency?assumptions of existing daylighting performance indicators.existing daylight performance indicators overestimated the

  17. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 �ºC to 600 �ºC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

  18. Evaluation of a Surface Treatment on the Performance of Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, Adler, T.A.; G.R.; Wilson, R.D.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pack cementation-like Cerium based surface treatments have been found to be effective in enhancing the oxidation resistance of ferritic steels (Crofer 22APU) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The application of either a CeN- or CeO2 based surface treatment results in a decrease in weight gain by a factor of three after 4000 hours exposure to air+3%H2O at 800oC. Similar oxide scales formed on treated and untreated surfaces, with a continuous Cr-Mn outer oxide layer and a continuous inner Cr2O3 layer formed on the surface. However, the thickness of the scales, and the amount of internal oxidation were significantly reduced with the treatment, leading to the decrease in oxidation rate. This presentation will detail the influence of the treatment on the electrical properties of the interconnect. Half-cell experiments (LSM cathode sandwiched between two steel interconnects) and full SOFC button cell experiments were run with treated and untreated interconnects. Preliminary results indicate the Ce treatment can improve SOFC performance.

  19. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System IA, Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The long-term field performance of the installed system is reported. The Solar Energy System, Sims Prototype System 1A, was designed by IBM to provide 50 to 60% of the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) preheating load to a 2000 square foot floor space single faily residence in the Huntsville area. The load design temperature inside the building was to be maintained at 70 degrees fahrenheit with auxiliary energy for heating supplied by an electric heat pump assisted by an electric resistance strip heater. Auxiliary energy for domestic hot water is from a conventional 20-gallon DHW storage tank. The solar energy system, uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 720 square foot Solar Energy Products Collector Array, a 22-ton rock storage located within the office building, a pump, heat exchanger, air handler, pre-heat tank, fan and associated plumbing. The system has five different modes of operation.

  20. Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.; Norton, P.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Evaluation of the Performance of Houses with and without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, describes a research study that that was conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team. BSC seeks to research and report on the field monitoring of the performance of in-situ supplemental dehumidification systems in low energy, high performance, homes in a Hot-Humid climate. The purpose of this research project was to observe and compare the humidity control performance of new, single family, low energy, and high performance, homes. Specifically, the study sought to compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses, homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were ten single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA.Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012. Interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space. However, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  1. Bentonite mat demonstration: Field performance evaluation of an alternative geosynthetic composite cover system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is investigating an alternative RCRA closure cover system configuration for hazardous solid-waste landfills. The bentonite mat demonstration is a field performance test of an alternative composite geosynthetic material cover configuration. The bentonite mat demonstration consists of four test pads; each test pad is a compacted sandy clay layer 30 ft wide, 80 ft long, and 2 ft deep. Three of the test pads will be blanketed with one of the commercially available bentonite mats (geosynthetic clay liner), then overlain by a flexible membrane liner to form the composite barrier. The remaining test pad will not contain any geosynthetic materials and will be used as the control pad for the demonstration. Each test pad will be constructed over a 4-ft sand layer. A series of access pipes will be embedded in the sand layer to provide a means for evacuating portions of the sand layer in order to create underlying cavities, thus inducing localized subsidence in the test pad. Material stress data will be collected to identify the composite barrier failure point. Infiltration data will be collected for each test pad to correlate permeability as a function of deflection. At the conclusion of the subsidence testing, the test pads will be dismantled to identify the failure mechanisms of the barriers. A finite-element analysis computer model is being developed to predict the structural behavior of the composite barrier system. The bentonite mat demonstration data will be used to verify this model, which will serve as a diagnostic tool for future designs. The formulation and execution of this demonstration is one element in achieving regulatory approval of the composite geosynthetic materials alternative cover system design configuration.

  2. Evaluation of the Role of Water in the H2 Bond Formation by Ni(II)-based Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the role of water in the H-H bond formation by a family of nickel molecular catalysts that exhibit high rates for H2 production in acetonitrile solvent. A key feature leading to the high reactivity is the Lewis acidity of the Ni(II) center and pendant amines in the diphosphine ligand that function as Lewis bases, facilitating H-H bond formation or cleavage. Significant increases in the rate of H2 production have been reported in the presence of added water. Our calculations show that molecular water can displace an acetonitrile solvent molecule in the first solvation shell of the metal. One or two water molecules can also participate in shuttling a proton that can combine with a metal hydride to form the H-H bond. However the participation of the water molecules does not lower the barrier to H-H bond formation. Thus these calculations suggest that the rate increase due to water in these electrocatalysts is not associated with the elementary step of H-H bond formation or cleavage, but rather with the proton delivery steps. We attribute the higher barrier in the H-H bond formation in the presence of water to a decrease in direct interaction between the protic and hydridic hydrogen atoms forced by the water molecules. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flood performance, springer ''A'' sand, NE Purdy Unit, Garvin County, OK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, M.J.; Beaty, W.G.; Simlote, V.N.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes and presents results of an overall program of monitoring and evaluation of a carbon dioxide flood being conducted in the Northeast Purdy Springer ''A'' Sand Unit in Garvin County, Oklahoma. The response of one specific five-spot pattern is described through detailed reservoir simulation utilizing data from observation well logging, pressure transient analysis, carbon dioxide injection profiling, sampling of produced fluids, and monitoring of production rates. A reservoir description satisfying primary, secondary and tertiary performance is also described in detail. History matching of the carbon dioxide flood performance is being utilized to define the effects on reservoir performance of waterblocking, viscous fingering and residual oil saturation to carbon dioxide flooding. These parameters are not laboratory defined. Sensitivity work was conducted to design the best process. In-situ saturation changes obtained from an observation well logging program are presented and correlated with model calculated saturation changes and indicate that oil is being mobilized as predicted by the simulator. A comparison of carbon dioxide injection profiles to water injection profiles and the results of observation well logging indicates that the carbon dioxide is flooding certain reservoir layers that were not waterflooded. The model reservoir description was modified to include these layers. Results of compositional analyses of produced fluids are presented.

  4. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation update: GSA/Federal Youth Center, Bastrop, Texas, October 1982-April 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logee, T.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second in a series of performance evaluation reports on the GSA/Federal Youth Center located in Bastrop, Texas. The GSA/Federal Youth Center is a federal correctional institute for youthful, male offenders in Bastrop, Texas. The active solar energy system is equipped with: 21,760 square feet of single-glazed, liquid flat-plate collectors manufactured by Cole Solar Systems. The storage consists of 40,000 gallons of insulated outdoor water tanks. Two 100-horsepower boilers and one 30-horsepower boiler burning natural gas with the capability to use Number 2 diesel fuel make up the auxiliary system. Solar energy is used to supply the hot water and space heating loads of the dormitory, offices, cafeteria, and hospital. During the summer, solar energy can also be used to supply some of the cooling load. The solar energy system at this Federal Correctional Institute operated well from October 1982 through April 1983. The solar system provided an estimated 12% or 866 million of the estimated total load of 7600 million Btu. There were 10 days of downtime in April caused by a failure of the collector pump. However, the collector pump high-speed motor had started to fail earlier in November. There were no other unusual solar system maintenance requirements during this period. The system performance during the monitoring period was 39% of the expected annual design performance, based on a proportional number of months.

  5. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 2: Technical basis and discussion of results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Hospelhorn, M.B. [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 first describes the screening process used to determine the sites to be considered in the PEs. This volume then provides the technical details of the methodology for conducting the performance evaluations. It also provides a comparison and analysis of the overall results for all sites that were evaluated. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site.

  6. Integrated Planning and Performance Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Performance Monitoring and Analysis Monitor, measure, and evaluate performance * Performance Indicators * Assessment * Performance Analysis Communication, Feedback, and...

  7. Methodology for evaluation of insulation-debris effects. Containment emergency sump performance-unresolved safety issue A-43

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysocki, J.; Kolbe, R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The postulated failure of high energy piping within a light water reactor containment has raised safety questions related to the generation of insulation debris, the migration of such debris to the containment emergency sump screens and the potential for severe screen blockages. High, or total, screen blockages could result in impairment of the long term RHR recirculation systems. Debris considerations are an integral part of the unresolved Safety Issue A-43, Containment Emergency Sump Performance. This report develops calculational methods and debris transport models which can be used for estimating the quantities of debris that might be generated by a LOCA, the transport of such debris, methods for estimating screen blockages and attendant pressure losses. Five operating plants were analyzed using this debris evaluation methodology. These calculations show the dependency on plant containment layout, sump location and design, and types and quantities of insulation employed. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  9. Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) thermionic converter string evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, G.J.; Ramsey, W.D.; Chao, C.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A serial string of eighth (8) thermionic converters were performance tested at New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) by Frank Wyant et al1. The tests results from the second String Thermionic Assembly Research Testbed (START II) produced less than one half the expected power based on individual converter performance tests. Seven of the eight converters were returned to Lockheed Martin Information Systems-EOS for performance evaluation. Six of the seven produced nominal performance while the seventh converter showed a drastic reduction in performance due to a cesium leak to atmosphere. Several models were proposed to explain why the individual converter performance differed so markedly from the START II serial array. This paper discusses the models, evaluates model validity and compares the models with results from a tow converter serial test using of the returned START II converters.

  10. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative performance indicators of daylight sufficiency?set of daylighting performance indicators for examination inassumptions of performance indicators under real work

  11. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative performance indicators of daylight sufficiency?set of daylighting performance indicators for examination inassumptions of performance indicators under real work

  12. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules, F9-F11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with three of the functional modules in the code. Those are the Morse-SGC for the SCALE system, Heating 7.2, and KENO V.a. The manual describes the latest released versions of the codes.

  13. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Control modules C4, C6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume is part of the manual related to the control modules for the newest updated version of this computational package.

  14. NREL Evaluates the Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve the Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop models of uninsulated wall assemblies that help to improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when modeling potential energy savings in older homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed models for evaluating the thermal performance of walls in existing homes that will improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when predicting potential energy savings of existing homes. Uninsulated walls are typical in older homes where the wall cavities were not insulated during construction or where the insulating material has settled. Accurate calculation of heat transfer through building enclosures will help determine the benefit of energy efficiency upgrades in order to reduce energy consumption in older American homes. NREL performed detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to quantify the energy loss/gain through the walls and to visualize different airflow regimes within the uninsulated cavities. The effects of ambient outdoor temperature, radiative properties of building materials, and insulation level were investigated. The study showed that multi-dimensional airflows occur in walls with uninsulated cavities and that the thermal resistance is a function of the outdoor temperature - an effect not accounted for in existing building energy simulation tools. The study quantified the difference between CFD prediction and the approach currently used in building energy simulation tools over a wide range of conditions. For example, researchers found that CFD predicted lower heating loads and slightly higher cooling loads. Implementation of CFD results into building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus will likely reduce the predicted heating load of homes. Researchers also determined that a small air gap in a partially insulated cavity can lead to a significant reduction in thermal resistance. For instance, a 4-in. tall air gap (Figure 1a) led to a 15% reduction in resistance. Similarly, a 2-ft tall air gap (Figure 1c) led to 54% reduction in thermal resistance. NREL researchers plan to extend this study to include additional wall configurations, and also to evaluate the performance of attic spaces with different insulation levels. NREL's objective is to address each potential issue that leads to inaccuracies in building energy simulation tools to improve the predictions.

  15. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation (PE) to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 1 is an executive summary both of the PE methodology and of the results obtained from the PEs. While this volume briefly reviews the scope and method of analyses, its main objective is to emphasize the important insights and conclusions derived from the conduct of the PEs. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site.

  16. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

  17. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  18. Performance evaluation of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at a low range of mesophilic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianbin, E-mail: jianbinguo@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Dong, Renjie [College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, P.O. Box 184, Beijing 100083 (China); Clemens, Joachim [Institute of Crop Science and Resource Reservation (INRES), University of Bonn, Karlrobert-Kreiten-Strasse 13, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Wang, Wei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The biogas process can run stably at 20 °C at extremely low OLR after long-term acclimation of bacteria. • A biogas plant running at 28 °C seems as efficient as that operated at 38 °C at low OLR of 1.3 g ODM L{sup ?1} d{sup ?1}. • Lower temperature operation is inadvisable for the commercial biogas plant running at rather high OLR. • The estimated sludge yield at 28 °C is higher than that at 38 °C. - Abstract: Many Chinese biogas plants run in the lower range of mesophilic conditions. This study evaluated the performance of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at different temperatures (20, 28 and 38 °C). The start-up phase of the reactor at 20 °C was very long and extremely poor performance was observed with increasing organic loading rate (OLR). At an OLR of 4.3 g ODM L{sup ?1} d{sup ?1}, methane production at 28 °C was comparable (3% less) with that at 38 °C, but the risk of acidification was high at 28 °C. At low OLR (1.3 g ODM L{sup ?1} d{sup ?1}), the biogas process appeared stable at 28 °C and gave same methane yields as compared to the reactor operating at 38 °C. The estimated sludge yield at 28 °C was 0.065 g VSS g{sup ?1} COD{sub removed,} which was higher than that at 38 °C (0.016 g VSS g{sup ?1} COD{sub removed})

  19. BPACK -- A computer model package for boiler reburning/co-firing performance evaluations. User`s manual, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.T.; Li, B.; Payne, R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual presents and describes a package of computer models uniquely developed for boiler thermal performance and emissions evaluations by the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The model package permits boiler heat transfer, fuels combustion, and pollutant emissions predictions related to a number of practical boiler operations such as fuel-switching, fuels co-firing, and reburning NO{sub x} reductions. The models are adaptable to most boiler/combustor designs and can handle burner fuels in solid, liquid, gaseous, and slurried forms. The models are also capable of performing predictions for combustion applications involving gaseous-fuel reburning, and co-firing of solid/gas, liquid/gas, gas/gas, slurry/gas fuels. The model package is conveniently named as BPACK (Boiler Package) and consists of six computer codes, of which three of them are main computational codes and the other three are input codes. The three main codes are: (a) a two-dimensional furnace heat-transfer and combustion code: (b) a detailed chemical-kinetics code; and (c) a boiler convective passage code. This user`s manual presents the computer model package in two volumes. Volume 1 describes in detail a number of topics which are of general users` interest, including the physical and chemical basis of the models, a complete description of the model applicability, options, input/output, and the default inputs. Volume 2 contains a detailed record of the worked examples to assist users in applying the models, and to illustrate the versatility of the codes.

  20. An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000’s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

  1. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  2. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac., Mexico. and Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares. C. Cip (Mexico)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural net approach it is possible to reduce the rate counts used to unfold the neutron spectrum. To evaluate these codes a computer tool called Neutron Spectrometry and dosimetry computer tool was designed. The results obtained with this package are showed. The codes here mentioned are freely available upon request to the authors.

  3. Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

  4. Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellanger, Philippe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

  5. Performance and evaluation of the infrared AO sensor CALICO Leander H. Mehrgan*, Siegfried Eschbaumer, Gert Finger, Manfred Meyer, and Joerg Stegmeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    Performance and evaluation of the infrared AO sensor CALICO , Leander H. Mehrgan*, Siegfried and to investigate the best unit cell circuit for future infrared wavefront sensors, ESO has teamed up with CALTECH-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany ABSTRACT The CALICO sensor is a pathfinder for the development

  6. Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellanger, Philippe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Design Options for Locating Ducts...

  8. Extending Performance and Evaluating Risks of PV Systems Failure Using a Fault Tree and Event Tree Approach: Analysis of the Possible Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colli A.

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance and reliability of photovoltaic (PV) systems are important issues in the overall evaluation of a PV plant and its components. While performance is connected to the amount of energy produced by the PV installation in the working environmental conditions, reliability impacts the availability of the system to produce the expected amount of energy. In both cases, the evaluation should be done considering information and data coming from indoor as well as outdoor tests. In this paper a way of re-thinking performance, giving it a probabilistic connotation, and connecting the two concepts of performance and reliability is proposed. The paper follows a theoretical approach and discusses the way to obtaining such information, facing benefits and problems. The proposed probabilistic performance accounts for the probability of the system to function correctly, thus passing through the complementary evaluation of the probability of system malfunctions and consequences. Scenarios have to be identified where the system is not functioning properly or at all. They are expected to be combined in a probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) based approach, providing not only the required probability, but also being capable of giving a prioritization of the risks and the most dominant scenario associated to a specific situation. This approach can offer the possibility to highlight the most critical parts of a PV system, as well as providing support in design activities identifying weak connections.

  9. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  10. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Task 21 / Annex 29, Daylight in Buildings. October, 1997.Energy performance of daylight-linked automatic lightingField Commissioning of a daylight-dimming lighting system.

  11. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Task 21 / Annex 29, Daylight in Buildings. October, 1997.Energy performance of daylight-linked automatic lightingBegemann, G. et al. (1997). Daylight, artificial light and

  12. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance,” or “energy efficient” design. This approach isstandards for the design of energy efficient buildings (standards for the design of energy efficient buildings (e.g.

  13. Network protocol changes can improve DisCom WAN performance : evaluating TCP modifications and SCTP in the ASC tri-lab environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Distance Computing (DisCom) Wide Area Network (WAN) is a high performance, long distance network environment that is based on the ubiquitous TCP/IP protocol set. However, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the algorithms that govern its operation were defined almost two decades ago for a network environment vastly different from the DisCom WAN. In this paper we explore and evaluate possible modifications to TCP that purport to improve TCP performance in environments like the DisCom WAN. We also examine a much newer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) that claims to provide reliable network transport while also implementing multi-streaming, multi-homing capabilities that are appealing in the DisCom high performance network environment. We provide performance comparisons and recommendations for continued development that will lead to network communications protocol implementations capable of supporting the coming ASC Petaflop computing environments.

  14. Evaluation of Exogenous Enzymes Targeting Non-starch Polysaccharides in Reduced Energy Diets on Broiler Growth Performance and Processing Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Joseph Thomas

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    of NSPase negated the negative effects of energy reduction in experiment 1. Experiment 2 evaluated increased pelleting temperature on NSPase activity. Body weight (BW) was increased (Ppelleted at 80, 85, and 90 C...

  15. Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction Zhe Chen, Nan Guo-user prediction of channel state is proposed to minimize the negative impact of response delays caused by hardware-SU) prediction is proposed and examined. In order to have convincing performance evaluation results, real- world

  16. An Evaluation of Improper Refrigerant Charge on the Performance of a Split System Air Conditioner with Capillary Tube Expansion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ] conducted a laboratory test to determine the performance of a 3-ton air-to-air heat pump as a function of R-22 refrigerant charge in the heating mode. The tests were conducted with 50?F outdoor air and 70?F indoor air temperatures. The test unit did....8) 11 Figure 2.5 - Coefficient of Performance as a Function of Refrigerant Charge (adopted from ref.8) 12 A. A. Domingorena and S. J. Ball [9] studied the performance of a selected three-ton air-to-air heat pump in the heating mode at Oak Ridge...

  17. Performance-oriented packaging testing of PPP-B-601 ERAPS wood box for packing Group II solid hazardous material. Test report for Oct 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, E.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Qualification tests were performed to determine whether the in-service PPP-B-601 ERAPS Wood Box could be utilized to contain properly dunnaged solid type hazardous materials weighing up to a gross weight of 237 kg (523 pounds). The tests were conducted in accordance with Performance Oriented Packaging (POP) requirements specified by the United Nations Recommendations on the Transportation of Dangerous Goods. The box has conformed to the POP performance requirements; i.e., the box successfully retained its contents throughout the stacking, vibration and drop tests.

  18. Evaluation of a Novel Xylanase and Algal Beta-Glucan on Broiler Performance, Energy Digestibility, and Immune Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieniazek, Jake Stephen

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to determine the effects of a novel xylanase and algal ?-glucan (ABG) when included in broiler diets on broiler performance, ileal digestibility of energy (IDE), and immune status. Three experiments were conducted...

  19. NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heater.  Gas Quality and LNG Research Study.  Southern device performance impacts of LNG use in California.    5.02005): FVIR  Water Heater.  LNG Gas Acceptability Research 

  20. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymer Networks as Passive and Active Antibiofouling Coatings: From Fundamental Chemical Development to Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imbesi, Philip

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of fluorinated species in the water-swollen state. A series of coatings was replicated, and found to have variable performance against three marine fouling organisms. The HBFP-PEG surfaces almost entirely resisted the settlement of barnacle cyprids (Balanus...

  1. An Evaluation of Improper Refrigerant Charge on the Performance of a Split System Air Conditioner with a Thermal Expansion Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the manufacturer for a specific indoor and outdoor temperatures. Once the full charge was determined, the unit was subjected to 40%, 30%, 20%, 15%, 10%, and 5% undercharging and 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% overcharging of refrigerant by mass. The fully charged tests were... CONDITION All tests were performed on a split system central air conditioner provided by the Trane company. To determine the proper amount of refrigerant charge needed in the system and the unit's corresponding performance, charging specifications...

  2. Evaluation of F1 cows sired by Brahman, Boran, and Tuli for reproductive and maternal performance and cow longevity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Samantha Fern

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in 143 F1 females who were sired by Brahman (B), Boran (Bo), and Tuli (T) bulls and who were out of Angus and Hereford cows. In 2004, mouth scores (MS) (n = 71) were assigned to the remaining females. PR, CCB, CCW, CW, and BCS were evaluated using a model...

  3. Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matheney, Kara J.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24...

  4. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

  5. Heat-pipe-coupled planar thermionic converter: Performance characterization, nondestructive testing, and evaluation. Final report, 1 Aug 90-30 Nov 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, T.J.; Lamp, T.R.; Tsao, B.H.; Ramalingam, M.L.

    1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical details on the research activities conducted by Wright Laboratory and UES, Inc. personnel during the period of August 1990 to November 1991. The performance of two heat pipe coupled, planar thermionic energy converters was characterized using experimental and analytical methods. Nondestructive failure analysis was performed to evaluate the causes for the failure of a molybdenum-rhenium converter. The experimentation was carded out at the thermionic facilities at the USAF Wright Laboratory while the computer simulations were performed at Wright Laboratory and the University of Central Florida. A maximum current density of 10.1 amps/cm[sup 2] and a peak power density of 7.7 watts/cm[sup 2] were obtained from the rhenium-rhenium diode operating in the ignited mode.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of ammonium hydrosulfide reagent for precipitation of group II cations at 1.0 molar hydrogen ion concentration and for separation of group II and group III cations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Jerry Warren

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ basher~ The egaeea n9tr9c aced. was carefnll j nsutra19eed. . m3;th f9;ltex ' , ed. Xg" I ejnm6n9nm hykvexMe~ leav9ng the se1ntken. ud. 1$1j ac9Me, ' ~she 'beaker was p3. ace@ 9. n an 9. ee bah, '. bring9ns '. the eelu49qn terzperature tb 20 2p Q...9848?? KGB 'GQMBKRARXQS-AK& PGR. 1' k v'MC&M BG~V IM') U' 6'vLET EVE '. , ' Papa f XligRQi3UCPJX9$4" e ''i''" i' e' ' ~ e ~, ''w . ~ '. v ' ~ ' ~ s ' i:ii ' Rheo~-'+ -;~'gjjk4'@09. oy. . @ltgi, 8jrd'iso@. ', :Ging;gidjj 4h'-;~G!9i'gBk '8fd...

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Evaluation of the Low-Energy Design Process and Energy Performance of the Zion National Park Visitor Center: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.; Judkoff, R.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper discusses NREL's role in the participation of the design process of the Zion National Park Visitor Center Complex and the results documented from monitoring the energy performance of the building for several years. Paper includes PV system and Trombe wall description and lessons learned in the design, construction, and commissioning of the building.

  9. Performance oriented packaging testing of nine Mk 3 Mod 0 signal containers in PPP-B-621 wood box for packing group II solid hazardous materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libbert, K.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PPP-B-621 wood box containing nine Mk 3 Mod 0 Signal containers was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging criteria established by Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 CFR. The container was tested with a gross weight of 123.3 pounds (56 kilograms) and met all requirements.

  10. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and Phase III. Quarter progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is presented on the development of a coal-fired high performance power generation system by the year 2000. This report describes the design of the air heater, duct heater, system controls, slag viscosity, and design of a quench zone.

  11. Performance of Trasuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Interim Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer; Gilles Youinou; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranice (TRU) in light water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles would be pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code in order assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells containing typical UO2 and MOX fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into a pin without significant quantities of uranium challenges the design from the standpoint of several key reactivity parameters, particularly void reactivity, and to some degree, the Doppler coefficient. These unit cells, while providing an indication of how a whole core of similar fuel would behave, also provide information of how individual pins of TRU-only FCM fuel would influence the reactivity behavior of a heterogeneous assembly. If these FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly with LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance of the TRU-only FCM fuel pins may be preserved. A configuration such as this would be similar to CONFU assemblies analyzed in previous studies. Analogous to the plutonium content limits imposed on MOX fuel, some amount of TRU-only FCM pins in an otherwise-uranium fuel assembly may give acceptable reactivity performance. Assembly calculations will be performed in future work to explore the design options for heterogeneous assemblies of this type and their impact on reactivity coefficients.

  12. Solar-energy-system performance-evaluation update: Wood Road School, Ballston Spa, New York, October 1982-April 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, P

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wood Road School Solar Project is a 216,000 square foot combined elementary and middle school in Ballston Spa, New York. The solar energy system supplies energy to the space heating and domestic hot water subsystems. Heat is collected by flat plate collector panels and stored in two storage tanks. Performance data are given for the system overall and for each of the four subsystems - energy collection, storage, space heating, and domestic hot water. Data are also provided on operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions. Design and actual system solar fraction are compared, and percentage of incident solar energy and collected solar energy utilized are given. Also given are building loads analysis, system thermal losses, and system coefficient of performance. (LEW)

  13. Evaluation of physiological, performance and self report reactivity to cue-controlled and progressive muscle relaxation training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reardon, Dennis Joseph

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appenaices G & H). For the three subjects in the control group who elected to partici- pate in learning the relaxation method, the experimenter performed an initial induction and began an identical program of instructions as received by treatment group I... ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION METHOD Experimenters Subjects . Apparatus, Measures, and Instruments Cognitive Assessment. Devices Physiological Assessment Devices Procedure Subject Meeting for Program Outline Pre...

  14. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  15. Performance Evaluation of K-DEMO Cable-in-conduit Conductors Using the Florida Electro-Mechanical Cable Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for design of the Toroidal Field (TF) insert coil, which will allow validation of the performance of significant lengths of the conductors to be used in the full scale TF coils in relevant conditions of field, current density and mechanical strain. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) will build the TF insert which will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test facility at JAEA, Naka, Japan. Three dimensional mathematical model of TF Insert was created based on the initial design geometry data, and included the following features: orthotropic material properties of superconductor material and insulation; external magnetic field from CSMC, temperature dependent properties of the materials; pre-compression and plastic deformation in lap joint. Major geometrical characteristics of the design were preserved including cable jacket and insulation shape, mandrel outline, and support clamps and spacers. The model is capable of performing coupled structural, thermal, and electromagnetic analysis using ANSYS. Numerical simulations were performed for room temperature conditions; cool down to 4K, and the operating regime with 68kA current at 11.8 Tesla background field. Numerical simulations led to the final design of the coil producing the required strain levels on the cable, while simultaneously satisfying the ITER magnet structural design criteria.

  16. Pentium Pro inside: I. a treecode at 430 Gigaflops on ASCI Red; II. price/performance of $50/Mflop on Loki and Hyglac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Becker, D.J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Sterling, T.; Salmon, J.K. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Computing Research; Goda, M.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Winckelmans, G.S. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain (Belgium). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an entry for the 1997 Gordon Bell performance prize, we present results from two methods of solving the gravitational N-body problem on the Intel Teraflops system at Sandia National Laboratory (ASCI Red). The first method, an O(N{sup 2}) algorithm, obtained 635 Gigaflops for a 1 million particle problem on 6800 Pentium Pro processors. The second solution method, a tree-code which scales as O(N log N), sustained 170 Gigaflops over a continuous 9.4 hour period on 4096 processors, integrating the motion of 322 million mutually interacting particles in a cosmology simulation, while saving over 100 Gigabytes of raw data. Additionally, the tree-code sustained 430 Gigaflops on 6800 processors for the first 5 time-steps of that simulation. This tree-code solution is approximately 105 times more efficient than the O(N{sup 2}) algorithm for this problem. As an entry for the 1997 Gordon Bell price/performance prize, we present two calculations from the disciplines of astrophysics and fluid dynamics. The simulations were performed on two 16 Pentium Pro processor Beowulf-class computers (Loki and Hyglac) constructed entirely from commodity personal computer technology, at a cost of roughly $50k each in September, 1996. The price of an equivalent system in August 1997 is less than $30. At Los Alamos, Loki performed a gravitational tree-code N-body simulation of galaxy formation using 9.75 million particles, which sustained an average of 879 Mflops over a ten day period, and produced roughly 10 Gbytes of raw data.

  17. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Miscellaneous -- Volume 3, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, L.M.; Jordon, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice; (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System developments has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3--for the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  18. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  19. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  20. An Evaluation of Improper Refrigerant Charge on the Performance of a Split System Air Conditioner with a Thermal Expansion Valve 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and was exhausted by the unit fan back into the room through the outdoor coil. PSYCHROMETRIC ROOMS The psychrometric rooms could simulate all testing conditions required for air conditioning and heat pump performance testing. Dew point and room temperatures could..., Including Heat Pumps (1979)[7]. The entering dry bulb temperature for the outdoor coil for steady state and cyclic tests was 82? +/-0.3 F DB and 20% relative humidity. The steady state tests were repeated for outdoor temperatures of 90?, 95?, and 100?F...

  1. Performance Evaluation of A Household Refrigerator Using Cuo Nanoparticle Lubricant Mixture and Various Other Compressor Oils with Different Condenser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreejith. K

    Abstract:- The objective of this paper was to study the performance of household refrigerator having both air and water-cooled condenser, with 0.06 % mass fraction CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture and different types of compressor oils. The experiment was done using HFC134a as the refrigerant, CuO nanoparticles, Polyol-ester oil (POE) oil which is used as the conventional lubricant in the household refrigerator and SUNISO 3GS mineral oil as the lubricant alternatively. The result indicates that the refrigerator performance had improved while using CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture. The performance was also improved when HFC134a/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system was used instead of HFC134a/POE oil system and there was also an enhancement when water-cooled condenser was used instead of the conventional air-cooled condenser on all load conditions. The HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system works normally and safely in the refrigerator. HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system reduced the energy consumption between 12 % and 19 % when compared with the HFC134a/POE oil system and between 9 % and 14 % while working with water-cooled condenser on various load conditions. There was also an enhancement in coefficient of performance (COP) when CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture was used instead of POE oil as the lubricant. The water cooled heat exchanger was designed and the system was modified by retrofitting it, along with the conventional air-cooled condenser by making a bypass line and thus the system can be utilized as a waste heat recovery unit. Experimental result shows that about 200 litres of hot water at a temperature of about 58ºC over a day can be generated. Techno economic analysis shows that the installation cost and running cost of the waste heat recovery system for a day is much lower than that of a conventional

  2. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation and performance of escape-type self-contained breathing apparatus. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hack, A.; Trujillo, A.; Carter, K.; Bradley, O.D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of escape type breathing apparatus was evaluated for weight, comfort, ease of use, and protection factor (calculated from facepiece leakage). All of the devices tested provided a self-contained air supply of 5- to 15-min duration. Five of them have the provision to connect an air line but allow the use of the self-contained supply for safe egress. The air supply was stored in cylinders, tubing, or disposable containers. Respiratory inlet coverings were half masks, full facepieces, hoods, and mouthpieces. An estimate is given for the ease of quick donning. Recommendations for conditions of use of the equipment are given. 8 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Science and Technology Operations Annual Evaluation of PNNL Environment, Health and Safety, and Facility Operations Performance for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRISTENSEN, R.F.

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The framework required by P450 5 is clearly in place and includes regular interaction with DOE-RL. There is also a good balance between contractor DOE and other external oversight interactions. The integrated assessment program is fully capable of uncovering weaknesses in performance (e.g. compliance) This point is evidenced by the fact that the contractor has identified most if not all issues prior to that of external sources. However there are also areas for improvement. Self assessments need to be better connected to overall strategy. Varying levels of maturity across management systems exist regarding there ability to assess deployment. There is a need to improve the ability to prioritize and respond to identified opportunities for improvement. There is also a need to improve the integration of assessment results from multiple Self-Assessment plans as well as to improve the integration of the performance of assessments. Finally the partnership between DOE-RL and Battelle must continue to improve DOE RL s development of an appraisal plan early in the fiscal year working in close conjunction with the contractor can further strengthen the assessment program and help ensure that there is the right balance between contractor and external oversight activities and that such activities are focused toward appropriate issues.

  4. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using antiperspirants during their treatment, and the decision to use an antiperspirant or not in this setting should be left to the discretion of the patient.

  5. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository, B00000000-01717-2200-00099, Rev. 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during the site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. A parallel effort was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and is reported in Wilson et al. (1994, in press).

  6. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Next Gen Advanced Framing for High Performance Homes Integrated...

  8. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdani, Ramin, E-mail: ryazdani@sbcglobal.net [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Augenstein, Don, E-mail: iemdon@aol.com [Institute for Environmental Management, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94306 (United States); Kayhanian, Masoud, E-mail: mdkayhanian@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tchobanoglous, George, E-mail: gtchobanoglous@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

  9. Performance evaluation of rotating pump jet mixing of radioactive wastes in Hanford Tanks 241-AP-102 and -104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Recknagle, K.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the adequacy of a single mixer pump to fully mix the wastes that will be stored in Tanks 241-AP-102 and -104. These Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs) will be used as staging tanks to receive low-activity wastes from other Hanford storage tanks and, in turn, will supply the wastes to private waste vitrification facilities for eventual solidification. The TEMPEST computer code was applied to Tanks AP-102 and -104 to simulate waste mixing generated by the 60-ft/s rotating jets and to determine the effectiveness of the single rotating pump to mix the waste. TEMPEST simulates flow and mass/heat transport and chemical reactions (equilibrium and kinetic reactions) coupled together. Section 2 describes the pump jet mixing conditions the authors evaluated, the modeling cases, and their parameters. Section 3 reports model applications and assessment results. The summary and conclusions are presented in Section 4, and cited references are listed in Section 5.

  10. NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Apte, Michael G.; Black, Douglas R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Lucas, Donald; Lunden, Melissa M.; Mirer, Anna G.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of liquefied natural gas on pollutant emissions was evaluated experimentally with used and new appliances in the laboratory and with appliances installed in residences, targeting information gaps from previous studies. Burner selection targeted available technologies that are projected to comprise the majority of installed appliances over the next decade. Experiments were conducted on 13 cooktop sets, 12 ovens, 5 broiler burners, 5 storage water heaters, 4 forced air furnaces, 1 wall furnace, and 6 tankless water heaters. Air-free concentrations and fuel-based emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and the number of (predominantly ultrafine) particles over complete burns?including transient effects (device warm-up and intermittent firing of burners) following ignition--and during more stable end-of-burn conditions. Formaldehyde was measured over multi-burn cycles. The baseline fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number (a measure of fuel energy delivery rate) of 1320-1340; test fuels had Wobbe numbers of roughly 1390 and 1420, and in some cases 1360. No ignition or operational problems were observed during test fuel use. Baseline emissions varied widely across and within burner groups and with burner operational mode. Statistically significant emissions changes were observed for some pollutants on some burners.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the performance, water use, and current application trends of evaporative coolers in California climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Hanford, J.W.; Wu, H.F.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing analysis investigating the potential for evaporative cooling as an energy-efficient alternative to standard air-conditioning in California residences. In particular, the study uses detailed numerical models of evaporative coolers linked with the DOE-2 building energy simulation program to study the issues of indoor comfort, energy and peak demand savings with and without supplemental air-conditioning and consumptive water use. In addition, limited surveys are used to assess the current market availability of evaporative cooling in California, typical contractor practices and costs, and general acceptance of the technology among engineers, contractors, and manufacturers. The results show that evaporative coolers can provide significant energy and peak demand savings in California residences, but the impact of the increased indoor humidity on human comfort remains an unanswered question that requires further research and clarification. Evaluated against ASHRAE comfort standards developed primarily for air-conditioning both direct and two-stage evaporative coolers would not maintain comfort at peak cooling conditions due to excessive humidity. However, using bioclimatic charts that place human comfort at the 80% relative humidity line, the study suggests that direct evaporative coolers will work in mild coastal climates, while two-stage models should provide adequate comfort in Title 24 houses throughout California, except in the Imperial Valley. The study also shows that evaporative coolers will increase household water consumption by less than 6% on an annual basis, and as much as 23% during peak cooling months, and that the increases in water cost are minimal compared to the electricity savings. Lastly, a survey of engineers and contractors revealed generally positive experiences with evaporative coolers, with operational cost savings, improved comfort, unproved air quality as the primary benefits in their use.

  12. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Evaluation of the Performance of Houses with and without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, describes a research study that that was conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team. BSC seeks to research and report on the field monitoring of the performance of in-situ supplemental dehumidification systems in low energy, high performance, homes in a Hot-Humid climate. The purpose of this research project was to observe and compare the humidity control performance of new, single family, low energy, and high performance, homes. Specifically, the study sought to compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses, homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were ten single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA. Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012. Interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space. However, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  13. Annual Performance Evaluation of a Pair of Energy Efficient Houses (WC3 and WC4) in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in 2008, two pairs of energy-saver houses were built at Wolf Creek in Oak Ridge, TN. These houses were designed to maximize energy efficiency using new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The first two houses contained 3713 square feet of conditioned area and were designated as WC1 and WC2; the second pair consisted of 2721 square feet conditioned area with crawlspace foundation and they re called WC3 and WC4. This report is focused on the annual energy performance of WC3 and WC4, and how they compare against a previously benchmarked maximum energy efficient house of a similar footprint. WC3 and WC4 are both about 55-60% more efficient than traditional new construction. Each house showcases a different envelope system: WC3 is built with advanced framing featured cellulose insulation partially mixed with phase change materials (PCM); and WC4 house has cladding composed of an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). The previously benchmarked house was one of three built at the Campbell Creek subdivision in Knoxville, TN. This house (CC3) was designed as a transformation of a builder house (CC1) with the most advanced energy-efficiency features, including solar electricity and hot water, which market conditions are likely to permit within the 2012 2015 period. The builder house itself was representative of a standard, IECC 2006 code-certified, all-electric house built by the builder to sell around 2005 2008.

  14. High Performance Computing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

  15. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

  17. ALT-II armor tile design for upgraded TEXTOR operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, B.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McGrath, R.T.; Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohlhaas, W.; Finken, K.H. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Noda, N. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrade of the TEXTOR tokamak at KFA Juelich was recently completed. This upgrade extended the TEXTOR pulse length from 5 seconds to 10 seconds. The auxiliary heating was increased to a total of 8.0 MW through a combination of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. Originally, the inertially cooled armor tiles of the full toroidal belt Advanced Limiter Test -- II (ALT-II) were designed for a 5-second operation with total heating of 6.0 MW. The upgrade of TEXTOR will increase the energy deposited per pulse onto the ALT-II by about 300%. Consequently, the graphite armor tiles for the ALT-II had to be redesigned to avoid excessively high graphite armor surface temperatures that would lead to unacceptable contamination of the plasma. This redesign took the form of two major changes in the ALT-II armor tile geometry. The first design change was an increase of the armor tile thermal mass, primarily by increasing the radial thickness of each tile from 17 mm to 20 mm. This increase in the radial tile dimension reduces the overall pumping efficiency of the ALT-II pump limiter by about 30%. The reduction in exhaust efficiency is unfortunate, but could be avoided only by active cooling of the ALT-II armor tiles. The active cooling option was too complicated and expensive to be considered at this time. The second design change involved redefining the plasma facing surface of each armor tile in order to fully utilize the entire surface area. The incident charged particle heat flux was distributed uniformly over the armor tile surfaces by carefully matching the radial, poloidal and toroidal curvature of each tile to the plasma flow in the TEXTOR boundary layer. This geometry redefinition complicates the manufacturing of the armor tiles, but results in significant thermal performance gains. In addition to these geometry upgrades, several material options were analyzed and evaluated.

  18. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  19. Measurement of harmonic currents and evaluation of the dc filter performance of the New England - Hydro-Quebec Phase I HVDC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, T.F.; Hassan, I.D.; Donahue, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of harmonic currents in the New England-Hydro-Quebec Phase I HVDC Project de transmission line are presented in this paper. Measurements were conducted to determine the cause of increased telephone interference and to evaluate the dc filter performance. The measurements revealed unexpected high levels of 3-pulse harmonic currents in the dc pole conductors. The cause is attributed to imbalances within the 6-pulse bridges caused by the converter transformer and valve stray capacitances to ground. The conventional model of the converter power circuit used as the basis for the dc filter design does not reproduce the measured 3-pulse harmonics. Modification to this model is required to account for the effect of the converter transformer and valve stray capacitances to ground.

  20. Evaluation of Effect of Fuel Assembly Loading Patterns on Thermal and Shielding Performance of a Spent Fuel Storage/Transportation Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Jenquin, Urban P.; McKinnon, Mikal A.

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The licensing of spent fuel storage casks is generally based on conservative analyses that assume a storage system being uniformly loaded with design basis fuel. The design basis fuel typically assumes a maximum assembly enrichment, maximum burn up, and minimum cooling time. These conditions set the maximum decay heat loads and radioactive source terms for the design. Recognizing that reactor spent fuel pools hold spent fuel with an array of initial enrichments, burners, and cooling times, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of load pattern on peak cladding temperature and cask surface dose rate. Based on the analysis, the authors concluded that load patterns could be used to reduce peak cladding temperatures in a cask without adversely impacting the surface dose rates.

  1. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station. Final report (revised October 21, 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Katipamula, S.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance was evaluated of a new US cooling technology that has been installed for the first time at a federal facility. The technology is a 15-ton natural gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning unit made by Thermo King. Two units were installed to serve the Navy Exchange at Willow Grove. The savings potential at Willow Grove is described and that in the federal sector estimated. Conditions for implementation are discussed. In summary, the new technology is generally cost-effective at sites where marginal electricity cost (per MBtu at the meter) is more than 4 times the marginal gas cost (per MBtu at the meter) and annual full-load-equivalent cooling hours exceed 2,000.

  2. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  3. Bottleneckology: evaluating supercomputers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlton, J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating supercomputer performance is more difficult than evaluating performance for other types of computers because of the wide range of performances encountered. Depending on the purpose of the evaluation, methods of evaluation can be used that trade off level of effort and accuracy, including rules of thumb, analytical models, testing, and simulation.

  4. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  5. II f

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f - f

  6. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r' (-r

  7. Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalmsthe Price (Percent)5 Contract No.

  8. PERFORMANCE OF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Meuser, J. Rechen, C. Taylor, and R. Warren March 1981R. Mauser, J. ROCIMM, C. Taylor, R. Mirren Licence Berkeley

  9. GASPAR II: Technical reference and user guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strenge, D.L.; Bander, T.J.; Soldat, J.K.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the computer program GASPAR II used by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into the atmosphere. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals and population groups from inhalation, ingestion (terrestrial foods), and external-exposure (ground and plume) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program. 20 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  10. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 ±20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico’s Megapolis.

  11. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  12. PEP-II Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wienands, H.U.; Biagini, M.E.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.H.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.V.; Meyer, T.; Nelson, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Reichel, I.; Sullivan, M.; Seeman, J.T.; Turner, J.; /SLAC; Steier, C.; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    PEP-II/BABAR are presently in their second physics run. With machine and detector performance and reliability at an all-time high, almost 51 fb{sup -1} have been integrated by BABAR up to mid-October 2001. PEP-II luminosity has reached 4.4 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and our highest monthly delivered luminosity has been above 6 pb{sup -1}, exceeding the performance parameters given in the PEP-II CDR by almost 50%. The increase compared to the first run in 2000 has been achieved by a combination of beam-current increase and beam-size decrease. In this paper we will summarize the PEP-II performance and the present limitations as well as our plans to further increase machine performance.

  13. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  14. PEP II 16-channel corrector controller using BITBUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 16-channel controller has been implemented to control the PEP II corrector switching power converters. The design and performance are discussed.

  15. Puncture evaluation of Shippingport package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Ting-Yu

    1989-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A puncture evaluation of a 900-ton type B category II shipping package was performed. The package consisted of the decommissioned Shippingport reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with its neutron shield tank (NST) in a concentric arrangement. The space inside the RPV and in annulus between the RPV and the 1-inch-thick NST was filled with concrete. The package was assumed to drop 40 inches into a 6-inch-diameter puncture bar of sufficient length to reach the RPV. The objective was to evaluate the puncture potential of the RPV. A nonlinear dynamic finite element analysis was performed. The NST and the concrete in the annulus were assumed to provide little resistance to puncture because the NST shell is thin and the concrete strength is low. In addition to the dynamic finite element evaluation of the package, a simple buckling analysis of the puncture bar was also performed. The buckling analysis was based on the tangent modulus theory of inelastic buckling. It was found that the puncture bar will not penetrate the RPV under the most severe stress state during the impact process. It was also found that the puncture bar will buckle long before this most severe stress state in the RPV can be reached. The package possesses so much kinetic energy before impact, a small fraction of this energy is sufficient to either buckle or overstress the puncture bar before the stresses in the RPV become critical. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Section II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t .9 'Isoscalar

  17. Reservoir characterization and performance predictions for the E.N. Woods lease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aka-Milan, Francis A.

    2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The task of this work was to evaluate the past performance of the E.N. WOODS Unit and to forecast its future economic performance by taking into consideration the geology, petrophysics and production history of the reservoir. The Decline Curve Analysis feature of the Appraisal of Petroleum Properties including Taxation Systems (EDAPT) software along with the Production Management Systems (PMS) software were used to evaluate the original volume of hydrocarbon in place and estimate the reserve. The Black Oil Simulator (BOAST II) was then used to model the waterflooding operation and estimate the incremental oil production attributable to the water injection. BOAST II was also used to predict future performance of the reservoir.

  18. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation Building America Webinar:...

  19. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  20. High Performance Computing School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    High Performance Computing School COMSC This module aims to provide the students with fundamental knowledge and understanding of techniques associated with High Performance Computing and its practical' skills in analysing and evaluating High Performance Computing and will be structured around

  1. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  2. Evaluation of F1 Cows Sired by Brahman, Boran, and Tuli Bulls for Reproductive and Maternal Performance Traits and Cow Longevity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntean, Carl

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ,666) were evaluated from 1994 to 2010 in 143 F1 females sired by Brahman (B), Boran (Bo), and Tuli (T) bulls and out of Angus and Hereford cows. Mouth scores (MS) (n = 253) were assigned to the remaining cows from 2004 to 2009, excluding 2008. Pregnancy...

  3. Evaluation of USDA feeder calf grades and health status of steers and their impact on live and carcass performance in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groschke, David Wayne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003-2004, the Texas A&M University Ranch to Rail South program evaluated 430 steers in Edroy, TX. Data were analyzed on several traits, but feeder calf frame and muscle grades and health status were emphasized. Muscle thickness grade (M), frame...

  4. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  5. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 2, Part 3: Functional modules F16--F17; Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

  6. Sample M&V Plan from the Texas Workshop: Preparing and Evaluating Measurement and Verification Plans for Energy Performance Contracts in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a sample M&V plan that has been prepared in accordance with the Texas Guidelines for Measurement and Verification for Energy Performance Contracts. This sample M&V plan was extracted from the March 1999 workshop, entitled...

  7. air pollution ii road: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 2.2 Non Frey, H. Christopher 2 Assessment of air quality benefits from national air pollution control policies in China. Part II: Evaluation of air quality predictions...

  8. air pollution ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Assessment of air quality benefits from national air pollution control policies in China. Part II: Evaluation of air quality predictions...

  9. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility- Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) will evaluate the potential impacts of the Phase II Facility of the Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant.

  10. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  11. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Haskin, E. (Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Institute for Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States))

    1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  12. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  13. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bertarelli, A.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Roesler, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; /CERN; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; /SLAC; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  14. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  15. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

  16. DOE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V. [Space Computer Corporation

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR has been to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking. The primary application is to show improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Examples include scenarios where the target vehicle is obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or where the target is engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II resulted in the completion of a software tool suitable for evaluation and testing of advanced tracking concepts.

  17. Design And Verification of Controllers for Coupled Bunch Instabilities Using Optimal Control Theory And Numerical Simulation: Predictions for PEP II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindi, Haitham; Prabhakar, Shyam; Fox, John D.; Linscott, Ivan; Teytelman, Dmitri; /SLAC

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power - one of the most expensive components of a feedback system - and define the limits of the closed loop system performance. Our design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator uses PEP-II parameters and identifies unstable coupled bunch modes, their growth rates and their damping rates with feedback. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  18. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  19. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  20. Sorption Speciation of Nickel(II) onto Ca-Montmorillonite: Batch, EXAFS Techniques and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    management and remediation methods for contaminated environments. Sorption of Ni(II) on clay minerals has of sorption sites (such as exchange sites, amphoteric edge sites). Ni(II) sorption mechanisms on this mineral to clearly identify the adsorbed Ni(II) species on clay minerals, and to evaluate the interaction of Ni

  1. Recovery of uranium from seawater. 13. Long-term stability tests for high-performance chelating resins containing amidoxime groups and evaluation of elution process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Kabay, Nalan; Shuto, Taketomi; Jyo, Akinori (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale adsorption/elution cycles were performed to investigate the long-term stability of the chelating resins employed. The adsorbed metal ions were rapidly and quantitatively eluted from the resins with acid eluants. The shrinkage of the resins with successive adsorption/elution cycles influenced the adsorption capacity. The uranium recovery was maintained at a nearly constant value by the employment of bicarbonate eluants. In particular, 2 mol dm[sup [minus]3] NH[sub 4]HCO[sub 3] yielded an efficient stripping for uranium. However, it was clarified that the elution with 0.25 mol dm[sup [minus]3] H[sub 2]SO[sub 4], which gave a high efficiency, was better than the bicarbonate eluants.

  2. Systematic Microstructural and Corrosion Performance Evaluation of CK-3MCuN and CN-3MN High Molybdenum Stainless Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.D. Lundin; S. Wen; W. Liu; G. Zhou

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are widely accepted for their high strength, excellent weldability, and good corrosion resistance over a wide range of temperatures in highly oxidizing aqueous and gaseous media in chemical processing and other environments. With their desirable performance, high molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are increasingly applied in industry in a similar manner as wrought materials. In general, cast and wrought stainless and high alloy steels are anticipated to possess equivalent resistance to corrosive media, and they are frequently used in conjunction with each other. However, alloying element segregation usually is more evident in castings than in wrought counterparts. Segregation of alloying elements can lead to the formation of secondary phases, such as sigma. Mechanical properties and especially the corrosion resistance of castings may be affected by the secondary phases. In addition, improper heat treatment procedures c an also lead to the formation of carbides and secondary phases in high alloy and austenitic stainless steels.

  3. National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

  4. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widyolar, Bennett

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    47 3.8 Economic Evaluation…………………………………………………………….49 4. AElectrical (kWh) Electrical COP 3.8 Economic Evaluation Asimple economic evaluation of the system was performed using

  5. Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Durability Parameters of an Integrated Aftertreatment System used to Meet Tier II Emission Standards Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    18: Live Webinar on High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II Webinar Sponsor: Building Technologies Office The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled...

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  8. Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  9. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions; Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt-recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  10. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  12. Evaluation of Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting -- Methodology for Comparing Processes and Costs of ESPC and Appropriatins-Funded Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal agencies have had performance contracting authority since 1985, when Congress first authorized agencies to enter into shared energy savings agreements with Public Law 99-272, the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. By the end of FY 2001, agencies had used energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) to attract private-sector investment of over $1 billion to improve the energy efficiency of federal buildings. Executive Order 13123 directs agencies to maximize their use of alternative financing contracting mechanisms such as ESPCs when life-cycle cost effective to reduce energy use and cost in their facilities and operations. Continuing support for ESPCs at the Administration and Congressional levels is evident in the pending comprehensive national energy legislation, which repeals the sunset provision on ESPC authority and extends ESPC authority to water savings projects. Despite the Congressional and Presidential directives to use ESPCs, some agencies have been reluctant to do so. Decision makers in these agencies see no reason to enter into long-term obligations to pay interest on borrowed money out of their own operating budgets if instead Congress will grant them appropriations to pay for the improvements up front. Questions frequently arise about whether pricing in ESPCs, which are negotiated for best value, is as favorable as prices obtained through competitive sourcing, and whether ESPC as a means of implementing energy conservation projects is as life-cycle cost effective as the standard practice of funding these projects through appropriations. The lack of any quantitative analysis to address these issues was the impetus for this study. ESPCs are by definition cost-effective because of their ''pay-from-savings'' requirement and guarantee, but do their interest costs and negotiated pricing extract an unreasonably high price? Appropriations seem to be the least-cost option, because the U.S. Treasury can borrow money at lower interest rates than the private sector, but appropriations for energy projects are scarce. What are the costs associated with requesting funding and waiting for appropriations? And how is the value of an energy project affected if savings that are not guaranteed do not last? The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate methods to help federal energy managers take some of the guesswork out of obtaining best value from spending on building retrofit energy improvements. We developed a method for comparing all-inclusive prices of energy conservation measures (ECMs) implemented using appropriated funds and through ESPCs that illustrates how agencies can use their own appropriations-funded project experience to ensure fair ESPC pricing. The second method documented in this report is for comparing life-cycle costs. This method illustrates how agencies can use their experience, and their judgment concerning their prospects for appropriations, to decide between financing and waiting.

  13. Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

  14. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

  16. Emitting gas regions in Mrk 493: An extensive Fe II line emission region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Popovic; A. Smirnova; D. Ilic; A. Moiseev; J. Kovacevic; V. Afanasiev

    2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed 3D spectroscopic observations of Mrk 493 in order to investigate the Fe II emitting region and their possible connection with the Hydrogen emitting region. We found that there is a strong Fe II emission in an extensive region ~ 4" x 4" around Sy 1 nucleus. The Fe II line width indicates that these lines are originated in an intermediate line region.

  17. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  18. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Haskin, E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz 11 space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safely assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  19. Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of Existing and Alternative Management Options (FINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CCA-TREATED WOOD ASH II.1 Sample Preparation 10 II.2 Laboratory Methods 15 II.3 Laboratory Results 24 CHAPTER III, SORTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SEPARATING TREATED WOOD FROM UNTREATED WOOD III.1

  20. CANDU human performance analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of human performance is presented in this paper in the context of the operational safety management system. To focus on problems, an experience review program has been developed to establish trends, demonstrate the degree of compliance with standards, and determine the causes of poor performance. The primary method by which the experience review takes place is significant event reporting (SER). A significant event is an incident that causes an undesirable effect on safety, product quality, environmental protection, or product cost. In spite of advanced technology and the degree of automation of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) design, mistakes and malfunctions to occur. Considerable effort has been made to prevent or reduce the incidence of error. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations developed a system to analyze human error, called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). To encourage an open exchange of information, the system is anonymous and nonpunitive. All data gathered during HPES evaluations are kept confidential.