Sample records for ii iii iv

  1. Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances) Guidelines for Acquiring & Accounting for Controlled Substances for Scientific Use Lawrence Berkeley National;LAWRENCEBERKELEYr\\IATIOMLI-ABOMTORY CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCEPROTOCOL (SCHEDULEr& il CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCES) Gontrolled

  2. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  3. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  4. Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

  5. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  6. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  7. Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

  8. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    -Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium Fubo Luan and William D. Burgos*, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Information ABSTRACT: Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department

  9. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  10. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  11. CAMIRD III: Computer Assisted Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry. FORTRAN IV version

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellina, C. R.; Guzzardi, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper desribes the FORTRAN IV version of the P.A. Feller's CAMIRD/II Package (1) revised. In addition another FORTRAN IV program named TILDY (2), which determines the cumulated activity, has been revised and modified to be used as a subroutine of CAMIRD's main program. With such an organization all the calculation involved in dose computation becomes easier and quicker.

  12. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local studentsEJ/EK EN V EN IV EN

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced stage iii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    embryo(G1,G2) Unnatural advancement... , Tokyo, Japan 1412 x zy Syringes Heater- Chiller plates Hot Cold Heat exchangeri) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) A i... ) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) A A...

  14. TOTAL SES EJ/EK EN V EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local studentsEJ/EK EN V EN IV EN III

  15. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.] [ed.; Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology] [ed.; Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility] [ed.; National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  16. Ni(III)/(IV) Bis(dicarbollide) as a Fast, Noncorrosive Redox Shuttle for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni(III)/(IV) Bis(dicarbollide) as a Fast, Noncorrosive Redox Shuttle for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells-marks@northwestern.edu; chadnano@northwestern.edu The favorable energetics of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) constituents have. Marks,*,, and Joseph T. Hupp*,,,§ Department of Chemistry, Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research

  17. Repertori Orquestra de Cambra curs 2010-2011 I i II trimestre III trimestre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    Stamitz (Mannheim 1745 - Jena 1801) Orchester-Quartett en Fa major Op.4. IV - Allegro assai - Andante ma (Salzburg, 1756 - Viena, 1791) Divertiment II en sib major Kv 137 - Andante - Allegro di molto - Allegro - Allegro molto - Largo - Vivace #12;

  18. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  19. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I. [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  20. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - amuse-virgo ii down-sizing Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;Green Bank Solar Radio Burst... by Type II (45 mins) 12;Type II followed by Type IV (2 hours) 12;Solar Radio Bursts Type III bursts... narrowband Type II bursts:...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-igg solidscreen ii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;Green Bank Solar Radio Burst... by Type II (45 mins) 12;Type II followed by Type IV (2 hours) 12;Solar Radio Bursts Type III bursts... narrowband Type II bursts:...

  3. Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

  4. J. PHYS. IV FRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque C2, SupplBment au Journal d e Physique III d'avril 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    that significant reduction takes place in the presence of the cement additives blast furnace slag (BFS) and Na2SJ. PHYS. IV FRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque C2, SupplBment au Journal d e Physique III d'avril 1997 forms, where it is desirable to stabilizethe highly soluble form of Tc(VII),TcOg, by in situ reduction

  5. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air JumpMaine. Its FIPSJVII & III Jump

  6. Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

  7. Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Nita

    Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution Michel R 16, 2005 We present 29 Si, 27 Al, and 67 Zn NMR evidence to show that silicate ions in alkaline, with aluminate (Al(OH)4 - ). Zincate reacts with monomeric silicate at pH 14-15 to form [(HO)O2Si-O-Zn(OH)3

  8. 16.01-04 Unified Engineering I, II, III, & IV, Fall 2003-Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Steven Ray

    The basic objective of Unified is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures ...

  9. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-303 Collogue C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique II, Vol. 1, septembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-303 Collogue C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique II, Vol. 1, septembre 1991). In these conditions, conductance versus temperarature curves can exhibit maxima with some gases. There are principally and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1991237 #12;JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV possible, in some cases

  10. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  11. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  12. Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Twentieth quarterly report: September-November 1979. [Hanna IV and Hoe Creek III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second phase of the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification test, Hanna IV-B, which was initiated on April 20, 1979, was completed on October 4, 1979. Sandia National Laboratories provided support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. During the final gasification stage, 765 tons of coal were reacted involving 17,000 cubic feet. The Hoe Creek III experiment conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratories began on August 15, 1979, and was terminated on October 10, 1979. The purpose of the experiment was to test the drilled borehole linking concept. Sandia National Laboratories' involvement consisted of fielding and monitoring both an inverted thermocouple and a surface electrical resistivity network. The inverted thermocouple was successfully tested and provided thermal data from beneath the burn zone. A real time analysis procedure for the electrical resistivity technique was implemented at Hoe Creek III. Unfortunately, there was insufficient change in the data for this to have been a useful diagnostic. Efforts are continuing to identify the reason for this lack of response.

  13. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure link to2, Issue 27, aIII

  14. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  15. A photometric survey for Lyalpha-HeII dual emitters: Searching for Population III stars in high-redshift galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagao, Tohru; Maiolino, Roberto; Grady, Celestine; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew; Motohara, Kentaro; Murayama, Takashi; Schaerer, Daniel; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new photometric search for high-z galaxies hosting Population III (PopIII) stars based on deep intermediate-band imaging observations obtained in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF), by using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. By combining our new data with the existing broad-band and narrow-band data, we searched for galaxies which emit strongly both in Ly_alpha and in HeII 1640 (``dual emitters'') that are promising candidates for PopIII-hosting galaxies, at 3.93 2 Msun/yr was found by our photometric search in 4.03 x 10^5 Mpc^3 in the SDF. This result disfavors low feedback models for PopIII star clusters, and implies an upper-limit of the PopIII SFR density of SFRD_PopIII < 5 x 10^-6 Msun/yr/Mpc^3. This new selection method to search for PopIII-hosting galaxies should be useful in future narrow-band surveys to achieve the first observational detection of PopIII-hosting galaxies at high redshifts.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: ŕ thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; ŕ NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); ŕ coal providing >65% of heat input; ŕ all solid wastes benign; ŕ cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: ŕ Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; ŕ Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  17. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M. [Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  18. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  19. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niazi, Tamim M. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahoric, Boris [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gilbert, Lucy [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Stanimir, Gerald [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are equivalent to that of surgery. We believe that the alternative option of HDRB as the primary therapy for selected Stage I endometrial carcinoma, even in patients with low operative risks, needs further evaluation.

  20. Chronopotentiometry of Sm(II) and Pm(III) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Richard Allen

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Samarium (III) and promethium (III) were studied by chronopotentiometry in a molten LiCl-KC1 eutectic. Tungsten electrodes were used to avoid alloying effects encountered with platinum… (more)

  1. Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(?-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

  2. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  3. CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

  4. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    avoid major schedule delays and meet commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity,...

  5. D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I,II,IIS,III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310--381 C), time (12--144h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330 C for 72h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS {gt} II {approximately} III {gt} I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 250 C for 72 h or 330 C for 133 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115 C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of their results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, the authors suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation water are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected by exchange with water hydrogen at typical reservoir conditions over geologic time. It will be difficult to utilize D/H ratios of thermally mature bulk or fractions or organic matter to quantitatively reconstruct isotopic aspects of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment. Hope resides in compound-specific D/H ratio of thermally stable, extractable biomarkers (molecular fossils) that are less susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water-derived hydrogen.

  6. Reactivity studies of a pseudo three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex: Synthesis of terminal oxo and sulfido complexes of vanadium(IV) and S?S and Se?Se reductive bond cleavage reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Ba L.; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J. (Indiana)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Terminal oxo and sulfido complexes in the form of (nacnac)V=E(Ntol{sub 2}) (nacnac = [ArNC(CH{sub 3})]{sub 2}CH{sup -}, Ar = 2,6-(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, Ntol{sub 2} = {sup -}N(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-Me), E = O (1), S (2)) were isolated from treatment of the masked three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex, (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}), with C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO and S{sub 8}, respectively. Both vanadium(IV) species, 1 and 2, have been characterized by room temperature X-band EPR spectroscopic studies, and in the case of complex 1, a single crystal molecular structure confirmed the presence of a terminal oxo moiety. Moreover, reaction of (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}) with diphenyl-disulfide and diphenyl-diselenide results in the reductive cleavage of these compounds to produce the vanadium(III) complexes (nacnac)V(XPh)(Ntol{sub 2}) (X = S, (3), Se (4)). A molecular structure of the phenylsulfide complex, 3, confirmed formation of the d{sup 2} complex resulting from reductive cleavage of the S-S bond.

  7. Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and text in English. Updated periodically. N° 4 - Strategy of Aristide Government for Social and Economic Reconstruction (August 1994). 1994. Pp. iv-9. Official document setting forth recovery plan for Haiti. Introduction and text in English. N° 5... Peyi Dayiti. 1995. Pp. v-71. Haitian-language version of N° 5, in Pressoir-Faublas orthography. Introduction in English. N° 7 - Samuel G. Perkins, "On the Margin of Vesuvius": Sketches of St. Domingo, 1785-1793. 1995. Pp. vi-75. First-hand account...

  8. Operational risk: A Basel II++ step before Basel III July 19, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    II guidelines), 2. The choice of the risk measure which provides the capital amount. We emphasize these incidents in depth and propose strategies for carrying out the supervisory guidelines proposed that the expected shortfall measure enables a better anticipation of large incidents pertaining to operational risks

  9. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2120005 05/05/2014 15:00 102, 103 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologas Industriales Matemticas II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías Industriales Matemáticas II 2120008 08/05/2014 15:00 201, 202 Aulario II 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías Industriales Principios Jurídicos Básicos, Deontología Profesional e Igualdad 2120006 12/05/2014 15:00 106, 107 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías

  10. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  11. Relationship between fuel composition and properties. III. Physical properties of US Navy Shale-II fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affens W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC); Hall, J.M.; Beal, E.; Hazlett, R.N.; Nowack, C.J.; Speck, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Research Laboratory and the Naval Air Propulsion Center are currently participating in a program to characterize the products from the Shale-II refining process conducted by the Standard Oil Company of Ohio at their refinery in Toledo, Ohio. This paper is concerned with a part of this program and is a summary of the work on the physical and related properties of three military type fuels derived from shale: JP-5 and JP-8 jet turbine fuels, and diesel fuel marine (DFM). The shale derived fuels which were used in these studies were derived from Paraho crude shale oil. The boiling range distribution of a representative sample of each of the three fuels was determined by gas chromatography. Data for specific gravity, freezing point, pour point, flammability, ignition and electrostatic properties and copper corrosion tests were also obtained. Conclusions from this study are: physical properties of the Shale-II fuels are similar to that of equivalent fuels derived from petroleum; and differences observed could be minimized by modest changes in refining steps.

  12. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

  13. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@UCHSC.edu

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  14. Cell, Vol. 120, 613622, March 11, 2005, Copyright 2005 by Elsevier Inc. DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2005.02.007 Plant Nuclear RNA Polymerase IV Mediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikaard, Craig

    .02.007 Plant Nuclear RNA Polymerase IV Mediates siRNA and DNA Methylation-Dependent Heterochromatin Formation for a fourth class of RNA polymerase in addition to Pol I, II, and III (CSP and Jonathan Eisen, discussed eubacterial-type RNAPs of chloroplasts, ingly, plants have catalytic subunits for a fourth from mitochondrial

  15. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  16. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  17. Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Patricia Arlene

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

  18. Stratigraphy and Paleodepositional Interpretation of the Lower Nacatoch Formation (Maastrichtian), Robertson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, III, Frank Wayne

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................................. ii DEDICATION .......................................................................................................... iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ...................................................................................... iv NOMENCLATURE... ................................................................. 43 III.4 Summary of Results ............................................................................. 47 IV. DISCUSSION ..................................................................................................... 48 IV.1...

  19. The effect of pH and temperature on the sorption of zinc(II), cadmium(II), and aluminum(III) onto new metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pehlivan, E.; Ersoz, M.; Pehlivan, M.; Yildiz, S. [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey)] [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey); Duncan, H.J. [Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorption of metal ions from aqueous solution onto metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin derivatives has been measured as a function of pH at several temperatures between 20 and 50 C. Novel metal-ligand exchange resins possessing oxime and carboxylic acid side arm functionality were prepared through the reaction of diaminosporopollenin with dichloro-antiglyoxime and bromoacetic acid. The pH dependencies and sorption isotherms of various metal ions such as Zn (II), Cd(II), and Al(III) on the resin were investigated from aqueous solution. The sorption behavior of these metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin derivatives and the possibilities of selectively removing and recovering heavy metals are explained on the basis of their chemical nature and complex properties and the results are interpreted in terms of the variations of pH.

  20. The four biomedical institutional review boards at Yale University, known as the Human Investigation Committee (HIC) I, HIC II, HIC III and HIC IV, seek representatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The four biomedical institutional review boards at Yale University, known as the Human reviews all biomedical human subject research for its ethical soundness and regulatory compliance

  1. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  2. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  3. Comparison of Four Cisplatin-Based Radiochemotherapy Regimens for Nonmetastatic Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck;Head-and-neck cancer; Cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy; Toxicity; Treatment outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie; Meyners, Thekla; Bohlen, Guenther [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Tribius, Silke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Schroeder, Ursula [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer G. [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AR (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of four cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 311 patients with Stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 (Group A, n = 74), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group B, n = 49), two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 plus 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group C, n = 102), or two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 (Group D, n = 86). The groups were retrospectively compared for toxicity and outcomes, and 11 additional factors were evaluated for outcomes. Results: No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding radiation-related acute oral mucositis and radiation-related late toxicities. Acute Grade 3 skin toxicity was significantly more frequent in Group B than in the patients of the other three groups (p = .013). The chemotherapy-related Grade 3 nausea/vomiting rate was 24% for Group A, 8% for Group B, 9% for Group C, and 6% for Group D (p = .003). The corresponding Grade 3 nephrotoxicity rates were 8%, 1%, 2%, and 1% (p = .019). The corresponding Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity rates were 35%, 41%, 19%, and 21% (p = .027). Chemotherapy could be completed in 50%, 59%, 74%, and 83% of the Group A, B, C, and D patients, respectively (p = .002). Toxicity-related radiotherapy breaks occurred in 39%, 43%, 21%, and 15% of Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .005). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 67%, 72%, 60%, and 59% for Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively (p = .48). The corresponding 3-year metastasis-free survival rates were 67%, 74%, 63%, and 79% (p = .31), and the corresponding 3-year survival rates were 60%, 63%, 50%, and 71% (p = .056). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky performance status, histologic grade, T/N category, preradiotherapy hemoglobin level, completion of chemotherapy, and radiotherapy breaks were associated with the outcome. Conclusion: The four compared radiochemotherapy regimens were not significantly different regarding treatment outcomes. Two courses of cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5 were better tolerated than the other three regimens.

  4. Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAPLAN, DANIEL

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

  5. APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, 22-25 April 2013, NIST , but... RAL: Diamond & ISIS ISIS TSII Oxford Chemistry Oxford #12;APD IV, 22-ray diffractometer CMS @ CERN CMS @ CERN (II) WISH detectors PILATUS ISIS electronics PILATUS electronics #12;APD IV

  6. Dwarf Novae in the OGLE Data. II. Forty New Dwarf Novae in the OGLE-III Galactic Disk Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroz, P; Poleski, R; Udalski, A; Soszynski, I; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Kozlowski, S; Skowron, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of forty erupting cataclysmic variable stars in the OGLE-III Galactic disk fields. Among them seventeen objects are of U Gem type, four of Z Cam type. Nineteen of the stars show outbursts and superoutbursts typical for SU UMa-type dwarf novae. In the case of five stars we were able to estimate their supercycle lengths. The obtained lengths are in the range 20-90 d, generally between the typical SU UMa-type variables and a few objects classified as the ER UMa-type variables. Since there is no significant difference between the two types but a higher mass-transfer rate resulting in more frequent outbursts and superoutbursts in the ER UMa-type stars, we propose to discard this type as a separate class of variables. We note that in one of the SU UMa-type stars, OGLE-GD-DN-039, we found a negative supercycle period change, in contrast to other active systems of this type. Two of the new OGLE objects showed long-duration WZ Sge-like superoutbursts followed by a sequence of echo outbursts. Al...

  7. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  8. Wind-wind collision in the eta Carinae binary system - III. The HeII 4686 line profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Abraham; D. Falceta-Goncalves

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We modeled the HeII 4686 line profiles observed in the eta Carinae binary system close to the 2003.5 spectroscopic event, assuming that they were formed in the shocked gas that flows at both sides of the contact surface formed by wind-wind collision. We used a constant flow velocity and added turbulence in the form of a gaussian velocity distribution. We allowed emission from both the primary and secondary shocks but introduced infinite opacity at the contact surface, implying that only the side of the contact cone visible to the observer contributed to the line profile. Using the orbital parameters of the binary system derived from the 7 mm light curve during the last spectroscopic event (Paper II) we were able to reproduce the line profiles obtained with the HST at different epochs, as well as the line mean velocities obtained with ground based telescopes. A very important feature of our model is that the line profile depends on the inclination of the orbital plane; we found that to explain the latitude dependent mean velocity of the line, scattered into the line of sight by the Homunculus, the orbit inclination should be close to 90 degrees, meaning that it does not lie in the Homunculus equatorial plane, as usually assumed. This inclination, together with the relative position of the stars during the spectroscopic events, allowed us to explain most of the observational features, like the variation of the Purple Haze with the orbital phase, and to conciliate the X-ray absorption with the postulated shell effect used to explain the optical and UV light curves.

  9. Ti (II) Mediated Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeff S.

    ' #12;Generation of Ti(II) from Ti(IV) · Bercaw accessed and characterized the first Ti'X -X Generation of Ti(II) via Reductive Alkylation · Ti(IV) converted to Ti(II) via reductive/Acetylene Functionalizations · Reductive Couplings #12;Advantages of Titanium · Titanium (IV) reagents are cheap and readily

  10. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

  11. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

  12. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  13. ORFEUS II and IUE Spectroscopy of EX Hydrae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ORFEUS-SPAS II FUV spectra, IUE UV spectra, and archival EUVE deep survey photometry, we present a detailed picture of the behavior of the magnetic cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae. Like HUT spectra of this source, the FUV and UV spectra reveal broad emission lines of He II, C II-IV, N III and V, O VI, Si III-IV, and Al III superposed on a continuum which is blue in the UV and nearly flat in the FUV. Like ORFEUS spectra of AM Her, the O VI doublet is resolved into broad and narrow emission components. Consistent with its behavior in the optical, the FUV and UV continuum flux densities, the FUV and UV broad emission line fluxes, and the radial velocity of the O VI broad emission component all vary on the spin phase of the white dwarf, with the maximum of the FUV and UV continuum and broad emission line flux light curves coincident with maximum blueshift of the broad O VI emission component. On the binary phase, the broad dip in the EUV light curve is accompanied by strong eclipses of the UV emission lines and by variations in both the flux and radial velocity of the O VI narrow emission component. The available data are consistent with the accretion funnel being the source of the FUV and UV continuum and the O VI broad emission component, and the white dwarf being the source of the O VI narrow emission component.

  14. On the origins of C IV absorption profile diversity in broad absorption line quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Alexei; Hamann, Fred

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a large diversity in the C IV broad absorption line (BAL) profile among BAL quasars (BALQs). We quantify this diversity by exploring the distribution of the C IV BAL properties, FWHM, maximum depth of absorption and its velocity shift ($v_{\\rm md}$), using the SDSS DR7 quasar catalogue. We find the following: (i) Although the median C IV BAL profile in the quasar rest-frame becomes broader and shallower as the UV continuum slope ($\\alpha_{\\rm UV}$ at 1700-3000 A) gets bluer, the median individual profile in the absorber rest-frame remains identical, and is narrow (FWHM = 3500 km/s) and deep. Only 4 per cent of BALs have FWHM > 10,000 km/s. (ii) As the He II emission equivalent-width (EW) decreases, the distributions of FWHM and $v_{\\rm md}$ extend to larger values, and the median maximum depth increases. These trends are consistent with theoretical models in which softer ionizing continua reduce overionization, and allow radiative acceleration of faster BAL outflows. (iii) As $\\alpha_{\\rm UV}$ become...

  15. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  16. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

  17. Enhanced ferromagnetic order in Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} featuring canted [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ?} spin chains of mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV). Aliovalent substitution of the Sr{sub 4?x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sup III}{sub 2+x}Mn{sup IV}{sub 1?x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid-solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, J. Palmer; Sulejmanovic, Dino [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Becht, Gregory [E. I. du Pont, Wilmington, DE 19880-0500 (United States); He, Jian; Hitchcock, Dale [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Yan, Yonggao [Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, E-mail: shwu@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of Sr{sub 4?x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0; x?0.15 for Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm. Eu, Gd, Dy; x?0.3 for Ln=Gd) were isolated upon using high-temperature, solid-state methods in molten-salt media. These compounds are isostructural with the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Ln=La, Sm, Gd) series that contains the same [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ?} spin chains. The synthesis of the Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0) phase was carried out by a double aliovalent substitution with respect to the Sr{sup 2+} and Ge{sup 4+} ions that replace Na{sup +}/Ln{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, respectively. The title series contains mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV) and shows a limited range of solid solution, both of which were not observed in the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series. To form the Sr{sub 4?x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid solution, one of the Sr{sup 2+} sites, i.e., the original Ln-site in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is partially substituted by Ln{sup 3+} in a statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1?x}/Ln{sub x}. Initial magnetic investigations of selected derivatives reveal higher ferromagnetic ordering temperatures than those reported for the Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series, presumably attributed to a lesser degree of canting as a result of introducing non-Jahn–Teller Mn{sup 4+} ions. Also intriguing is the observation of multiple anomalies at low temperatures which appear to be of electronic origins. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 4?x}Ln{sub x}Mn(III){sub 2+x}Mn(IV){sub 1?x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Double aliovalent substitution: Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} with respect to Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}. • Solid solution with respect to statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1?x}Ln{sub x} in one of the two Sr sites. • Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} magnetic ions are spatially arranged in a triangular kagomé fashion. • Enhanced ferromagnetic ordering attributed to doping non-Jahn–Teller Mn{sup 4+}.

  18. LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric current ­ charges in motion. The current in the CRT was simple

  19. I IIII1IiI II1Ii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fiom I -

  20. / P/>;.I II Fian(.e 4 (1994) 1813-1822 OCTOBER 1994, PAGE f813 C la,, ii icJtion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,e ic,ult, me tli,cLi,,ctl in tci iii, iii the tui hitliij, hemp di>ii ii,itetl hi Lt>I uiiii~ii ~ithei

  1. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  2. XAS Characterization of a Nitridoiron(IV) Complex with a Very Short Fe-N Bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohde,J.; Betley, T.; Jackson, T.; Saouma, C.; Peters, J.; Que, Jr., L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to characterize the novel nitridoiron(IV) units in two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes (R = iPr and CyCH{sub 2}) and obtain direct spectroscopic evidence for a very short Fe-N distance. The distance of 1.51-1.55 {angstrom} reflects the presence of an Fe{triple_bond}N triple bond in accord with the observed Fe{triple_bond}N vibration observed for one of these species ({nu}{sub FeN} = 1034 cm{sup -1}). This highly covalent bonding interaction results in the appearance of an unusually intense pre-edge peak, whose estimated area of 100(20) units is much larger than those of the related tetrahedral complexes with Fe{sup I}-N{sub 2}-Fe{sup I}, Fe{sup II}-NPh{sub 2}, and Fe{sup III}NAd motifs, and those of recently described six-coordinate Fe{sup V}{triple_bond}N and Fe{sup VI}{triple_bond}N complexes. The observation that the Fe{sup IV}-N distances of two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes are shorter than the Fe{sup IV}-O bond lengths of oxoiron(IV) complexes may be rationalized on the basis of the greater {pi} basicity of the nitrido ligand than the oxo ligand and a lower metal coordination number for the Fe(N) complex.

  3. XAS Characterization of a Nitridoiron(IV) Complex With a Very Short Fe-N Bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohde, J.-U.; Betley, T.A.; Jackson, T.A.; Saouma, C.T.; Peters, J.C.; Que, L.; Jr.

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to characterize the novel nitridoiron(IV) units in two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes (R = iPr and CyCH{sub 2}) and obtain direct spectroscopic evidence for a very short Fe-N distance. The distance of 1.51--1.55 {angstrom} reflects the presence of an Fe{triple_bond}N triple bond in accord with the observed Fe{triple_bond}N vibration observed for one of these species (v{sub FeN}=1034 cm{sup -1}). This highly covalent bonding interaction results in the appearance of an unusually intense pre-edge peak, whose estimated area of 100(20) units is much larger than those of the related tetrahedral complexes with Fe{sup I}-N{sub 2}-Fe{sup I}, Fe{sup II}-NPh{sub 2}, and Fe{sup III}{triple_bond}NAd motifs, and those of recently described six-coordinate Fe{sup V}{triple_bond}N and Fe{sup VI}{triple_bond}N complexes. The observation that the Fe{sup IV}-N distances of two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes are shorter than the Fe{sup IV}-O bond lengths of oxoiron(IV) complexes may be rationalized on the basis of the greater ? basicity of the nitrido ligand than the oxo ligand and a lower metal coordination number for the Fe(N) complex.

  4. VERY-LOW-MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. III. A SHORT-PERIOD BROWN DWARF CANDIDATE AROUND AN ACTIVE G0IV SUBGIANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Fleming, Scott W.; Lee, Brian L.; Wang Ji [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Barnes, Rory; Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Dutra-Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, G. F. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira do Pedro Antonio, 43, CEP: 20080-090, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lctea S/N, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Gaudi, B. Scott [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ghezzi, Luan [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia (LIneA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Wisniewski, John P. [Homer L Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks St, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry, E-mail: boma@astro.ufl.edu [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); and others

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an eccentric, short-period brown dwarf candidate orbiting the active, slightly evolved subgiant star TYC 2087-00255-1, which has effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5903 {+-} 42 K, surface gravity log (g) = 4.07 {+-} 0.16 (cgs), and metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.23 {+-} 0.07. This candidate was discovered using data from the first two years of the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey, which is part of the third phase of Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From our 38 radial velocity measurements spread over a two-year time baseline, we derive a Keplerian orbital fit with semi-amplitude K = 3.571 {+-} 0.041 km s{sup -1}, period P = 9.0090 {+-} 0.0004 days, and eccentricity e = 0.226 {+-} 0.011. Adopting a mass of 1.16 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} for the subgiant host star, we infer that the companion has a minimum mass of 40.0 {+-} 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Assuming an edge-on orbit, the semimajor axis is 0.090 {+-} 0.003 AU. The host star is photometrically variable at the {approx}1% level with a period of {approx}13.16 {+-} 0.01 days, indicating that the host star spin and companion orbit are not synchronized. Through adaptive optics imaging we also found a point source 643 {+-} 10 mas away from TYC 2087-00255-1, which would have a mass of 0.13 M{sub Sun} if it is physically associated with TYC 2087-00255-1 and has the same age. Future proper motion observation should be able to resolve if this tertiary object is physically associated with TYC 2087-00255-1 and make TYC 2087-00255-1 a triple body system. Core Ca II H and K line emission indicate that the host is chromospherically active, at a level that is consistent with the inferred spin period and measured v{sub rot}sin i, but unusual for a subgiant of this T{sub eff}. This activity could be explained by ongoing tidal spin-up of the host star by the companion.

  5. Red variables in the OGLE-II data base -- III. Constraints on the three-dimensional structures of the LMC and SMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lah; L. L. Kiss; T. R. Bedding

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the 3-D structure of the Magellanic Clouds, using period-luminosity (P-L) relations of pulsating red giants in the OGLE-II sample. By interpreting deviations from the mean P-L relations as distance modulus variations, we examine the three-dimensional distributions of the sample. The results for the Large Magellanic Cloud, based solely on stars below the tip of the Red Giant Branch, confirm previous results on the inclined and possibly warped bar of the LMC. The depth variation across the OGLE-II field is about 2.4 kpc, interpreted as the distance range of a thin but inclined structure. The inclination angle is about 29 deg. A comparison with OGLE-II red clump distances revealed intriguing differences that seem to be connected to the red clump reddening correction. A spatially variable red clump population in the LMC can explain the deviations, which may have a broader impact on our understanding of the LMC formation history. For the Small Magellanic Cloud, we find a complex structure showing patchy distribution scattered within 3.2 kpc of the mean. However, the larger range of the overall depth on every line-of-sight is likely to smooth out significantly the real variations.

  6. The preparation and characterization of aquoruthenium(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes in Y-type zeolite / by Ben-Zu Wan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Ben-Zu

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    at 500 C for 1 h; (5) after degassing 2H at 400 C for 1 h. xii LIST OF F IGURES ( CONT INUED ) P 1. gure 7. EPR spectra of quoruthenium(III) in toluene- sulfonic acid solution at -196 C at differer . pH values: (1) in 2 Pi toluenesulfonic acic... solution; (2) at pH 0. 57; (3) at pH 2. 8 8. EPR spectra of a Ru3 6Y zeolite: (1) after degassing at room temperature overnight; (2) after degassing at 100 C for 1 h; (3) after degassing at 200 C for 2 h; (4) after degassing at 300 C for 3 h. Page 9...

  7. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - antitrombina iii em Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Biology and Medicine 15 Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica Summary: tem um polo simples em z 1. II. f tem uma singularidade...

  9. A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

  10. State of competition in gasoline marketing. Book I. A study of refiner subsidization. Book II. An analysis of the subpoenaed documents (as required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Practices Act was enacted in June 1978. One part of that Act, Title III, required the Department of Energy to study the role of vertically integrated petroleum companies in the marketing of gasoline. Specifically, the study was to focus on the pricing practices of these companies at their salaried retail outlets. A preliminary, limited analysis of nationwide market share trends was forwarded to Congress in December 1979 finding no evidence of pedatory practices. Part I of the Title III Study was transmitted to Congress in April 1980. The Part I analysis tentatively found no evidence of predatory subsidization or allocation subsidization by refiners at their company-operated retail gasoline outlets. These tentative conclusions were debated by industry groups and legislative spokesmen both favoring and opposing the dissolution of major petroleum companies at various Congressional hearings concerning legislation prohibiting refiner operations at retail. This Final Report supersedes the analysis conducted in Part I since it includes all the data used in Part I as well as additional data. The Final Report is divided into two parts. Book I examines several alleged predatory practices of refiner marketers in light of recent developments in gasoline marketing. Its basic thrust is to explore fully the hypothesis that refiners are engaged in a predatory campaign to eliminate their independent competitors, ultimately monopolizing gasoline marketing. Book II focuses on the internal financial and planning documents of nine integrated petroleum companies subpoenaed during the course of the study. This volume specifically examines the marketing strategies adopted by these companies over the last decade, i.e., if investments in gasoline marketing were made for predatory or pecuniary reasons. A brief overview of each book follows.

  11. Procurement Specialist III/IV - REVISED | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16 FORPointsProcess forContactsProcurement Specialist

  12. Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III(O2 CO)4 3- Based Molecule Based Magnets: Three-Dmensional Network Structure and Two Dimensional Magnetic Ordering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennon, B.; Her, J; Stephens, P; Miller, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

  13. Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Topping, R.F.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

  14. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)J TOC PART III List

  15. Instructor, Languages & Translation, Dutch "U of T Continuing Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    ­ Portuguese: Level III 210 romanian 210 Romanian for Beginners 210 russian 210 Russian: Level I, II, III, IV

  16. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  17. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 ?mol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 ?mol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 ?mol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 ?mol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 ?mol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving nsls ii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design 12;1-ii Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 4. SUSTAINABLE... ;1-iv Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 11.4...

  19. Mutation in the Kv3.3 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Causing Spinocerebellar Ataxia 13 Disrupts Sound-Localization Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation III) and grand-children (generation IV) [11].19 members of generations II, III, and IV, 13 of whom were

  20. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04...

  1. POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources Chapter 4: Classification Issuing Office: Human Resource Resource Services Originally Issued: August 19, 1968 Most Recently Revised: March 3, 2006 1 Classification Responsibilities 7 History 7 Official Documentation 7 Statement of Policy Human Resource Services classifies

  2. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier,Jump to:Wilmette,Transport &GM

  3. LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

  4. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper soil pressure on the tank walls. Seismic time histories (in the horizontal and vertical directions) are applied to the seismic model. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has code requirements for nuclear safety-related concrete structures (ACI-349-06) that are used to evaluate the structural integrity of the SSTs. ACI-349-06 recommends evaluating factored load combinations against reduced tank section capacities to account for both loading and material uncertainties. From both the TOLA and seismic models the structural demands (forces and moments) are extracted from sections throughout the tank under the appropriate load combinations. These demands are compared against the ACI-349-06 capacities at each of the sections. This ratio of demand to capacity is reported as a measure of structural integrity. The Type II and Type III appurtenances configurations are found to increase the demand to capacity ratios in local regions near the appurtenances. Away from the appurtenances the influence on structural integrity is minor. A comparison of the Type II and III results show that even though the Type II offset pits weight less, they have a larger impact on the structural integrity of the tanks due to their locations. Finally, lessons learned from the Type II and Type III appurtenance analysis, and their application to the more complex Type IV structural integrity analysis, will be discussed.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide iii cations Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Actinide(III) 2.26x10-7 log f(CO2) -5.50 Actinide(IV) 5.66x10... Actinide(III) case: Americium in WIPP Brine 12;Figure 2 Actinide(V) case: Neptunium in WIPP Brine 12... November...

  6. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  7. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    nuclear energy Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum...

  8. UMBC Policy # IV-2.20.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # IV-2.20.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS UMBC IV-2.20.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of the University to comply with U.S. Export control regulations nationals on U.S. soil. II. PURPOSE FOR POLICY Export control regulations are a group of federal regulations

  9. VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Craig E.

    Material: Chp. 1: I, II.1,III, Chp.2: I,II,III.1-3, Chp. 3: I-V, Chp. 4: I.1-3,II, Chp.5: I,II Important

  10. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  11. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

  12. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, UtahResources/FullGarden Wind Farm I JumpIVFarm

  13. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

  14. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  15. KNMI publication; 196 -IV Rainfall generator for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    KNMI publication; 196 - IV Rainfall generator for the Meuse basin Description of 20 000-year simulations R. Leander and T.A. Buishand De Bilt, 2008 #12;KNMI publication = KNMI publicatie; 196 - IV De, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. . . . . #12;KNMI-publication; 196-IV

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  17. On the role of Mn(IV) vacancies in the photoreductive dissolution of hexagonal birnessite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.D.; Refson, K.; Sposito, G.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoreductive dissolution of layer type Mn(IV) oxides (birnessite) under sunlight illumination to form soluble Mn(II) has been observed in both field and laboratory settings, leading to a consensus that this process is a key driver of the biogeochemical cycling of Mn in the euphotic zones of marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, the underlying mechanisms for the process remain unknown, although they have been linked to the semiconducting characteristics of hexagonal birnessite, the ubiquitous Mn(IV) oxide produced mainly by bacterial oxidation of soluble Mn(II). One of the universal properties of this biogenic mineral is the presence of Mn(IV) vacancies, long-identified as strong adsorption sites for metal cations. In this paper, the possible role of Mn vacancies in photoreductive dissolution is investigated theoretically using quantum mechanical calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT). Our DFT study demonstrates unequivocally that Mn vacancies significantly reduce the band-gap energy for hexagonal birnessite relative to a hypothetical vacancy-free MnO{sub 2} and thus would increase the concentration of photo-induced electrons available for Mn(IV) reduction upon illumination of the mineral by sunlight. Calculations of the charge distribution in the presence of vacancies, although not fully conclusive, show a clear separation of photo-induced electrons and holes, implying a slow recombination of these charge-carriers that facilitates the two-electron reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II).

  18. The School of Music of the College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    " Franz Schubert I. Allegro con fuoco, ma non troppo (1797-1828) II. Adagio III. Presto IV. Allegro. Allegro con fuoco, ma non troppo (1797-1828) II. Adagio III. Presto IV. Allegro This is the forty

  19. EnvWiltonIV-EIS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects the FutureEnrico RossiEnvironmentWilton IV

  20. Alta IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta IIIAlta IV

  1. The School of Music of the College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    a 4 Georg Philipp Telemann I. Adagio (1681-1767) II Allegro arr. Alan Lumsden III. Grave IV. Allegro

  2. AMERICAN FISHES IN ITALY By Giuseppe Besana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of their abundance, river perch, tench, roach, pike, bleak, eel, and burbot. Tables I, II, III, and IV show

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - atps part iii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIST GCR 07-908 12;ii 12;iii Findings from the Advanced Technology Program's Survey of ATP... NIST GCR 07-908 Findings from the Advanced Technology Program's Survey of ATP...

  4. ISO SWS Observations of H II Regions in NGC 6822 and I ZW 36: Sulfur Abundances and Temperature Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua G. Nollenberg; Evan D. Skillman; Donald R. Garnett; Harriet L. Dinerstein

    2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report ISO SWS infrared spectroscopy of the H II region Hubble V in NGC 6822 and the blue compact dwarf galaxy I Zw 36. Observations of Br alpha, [S III] at 18.7 and 33.5 microns, and [S IV] at 10.5 microns are used to determine ionic sulfur abundances in these H II regions. There is relatively good agreement between our observations and predictions of S^+3 abundances based on photoionization calculations, although there is an offset in the sense that the models overpredict the S^+3 abundances. We emphasize a need for more observations of this type in order to place nebular sulfur abundance determinations on firmer ground. The S/O ratios derived using the ISO observations in combination with optical data are consistent with values of S/O, derived from optical measurements of other metal-poor galaxies. We present a new formalism for the simultaneous determination of the temperature, temperature fluctuations, and abundances in a nebula, given a mix of optical and infrared observed line ratios. The uncertainties in our ISO measurements and the lack of observations of [S III] lambda 9532 or lambda 9069 do not allow an accurate determination of the amplitude of temperature fluctuations for Hubble V and I Zw 36. Finally, using synthetic data, we illustrate the diagnostic power and limitations of our new method.

  5. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  6. IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074 Public discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry

  7. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernsman, Bernard [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute Thermionics Evaluation Facility 901 University SE Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  8. Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III2(O2CO)4]3?, Based Molecule-Based Magnets: Three-Dimensional Network Structure and Two-Dimensional Magnetic Ordering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novoa, J.; Stephens, P; Weerasekare, M; Shum, W; Miller, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

  9. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  10. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn4Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (Si-states, i =0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn4(III2,IV2) and Mn4(III,IV3) for S1 and S2 states, while it is still controversial for the S0 and S3 states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn4Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mncomplexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p3/2 RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S0 to S1, and S1 to S2 transitions is twice as large as that during the S2 to S3 transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  11. Chromium (III), Titanium (III), and Vanadium (IV) sensitization of rare earth complexes for luminescent solar concentrator applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Nicholas John

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High optical concentrations without excess heating in a stationary system can be achieved with a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Neodymium (Nd) and ytterbium (Yb) are excellent infrared LSC materials: inexpensive, ...

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery . Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for...

  13. Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems By Jacques Bouchard...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems By Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory. Generation IV...

  14. The Blues and the Abstract Truth: Music and Mental Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steedman, Mark

    ;7 ; III7 VIm7 ; II7 Vm7 ; I7 IV (M7) IVm7 ; [VII7 [III (M7) [IIIm7 ; [VI (7 0 ) IIm7 V7 I (M7) I (M7) f) I (M7) IV (7 0 ) I (M7) [IIm7 ; [V7 IV (7 0 ) ]IV Ă? 7 IIIm7 VI7 IIm7 ; V7 [VIm7 ; [II7 I (M7) I (M7) g) [II7 ; [V7 VII7 ; III7 VI7 ; II7 V7 ; I7 IV (7 0 ) ]IV Ă? 7 IIIm7 [III7 VIm7 [II7 I (M7) I (M7) Figure

  15. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions...

  16. XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

  17. Multicenter phase II study of matured dendritic cells pulsed with melanoma cell line lysates in patients with advanced melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TAAs (Melan-A/MART1, NY-ESO-1, tyrosinase or gp100), with noi) gp100 family, ii) tyrosinase and TRP-2 family, iii) MAGE

  18. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  19. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernsman, B. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute Thermionics Evaluation Facility 901 University SE Albuquerque, New Mexico87106 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Ehud

    TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation H demonstra- tion that methane can be catalytically activated by an organometallic complex of Pt(II).2 report that although 1 has a very high energy barrier for the liberation of methane, it readily forms

  1. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  2. THE CHEMISTRY OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS -CLEAVAGE OF ALIPHATIC BRIDGES BETWEEN AROMATIC NUCLEI CATALYSED BY LEWIS ACIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Newell D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Background I. II. III. IV. II. Coal Liquefaction . •Coal Structure • • . Lewis Acid Catalysts. Scope andOrganic Structure of Bituminous Coal", Proceedings, Stanford

  3. III IIU Em Smiii

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptember» ;,III

  4. Iii;.} An Ann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type| EMSLemployed inIhorIii;.} An

  5. Alpha self-irradiation effects in ternary oxides of actinides elements: The zircon-like phases Am{sup III}VO{sub 4} and A{sup II}Np{sup IV}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2} (A=Sr, Pb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goubard, F. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et Interfaces, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville-sur-Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)]. E-mail: fabrice.goubard@chim.u-cergy.fr; Griesmar, P. [Equipe Circuits Instrumentation et Modelisation Electronique, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville-sur-Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Tabuteau, A. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et Interfaces, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville-sur-Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental studies of irradiation damage from alpha decay in neptunium and americium vanadates versus cumulative dose. The isotopes used were the transuranium {alpha}-emitter {sup 237}Np and the {alpha},{gamma}-emitter {sup 241}Am. Neptunium and americium vanadates self-irradiation was studied by X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The comparison of the powder diffraction patterns reveal that the irradiation has no apparent effect on the neptunium phases while the americium vanadate swells and becomes metamict as a function of cumulative dose.

  6. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC5, supplment au Journalde Physique III, Volume4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is presented. The aeroacoustic sources are obtained from a numerical calculation of the unsteady blade 1oadings.An example illustrates the masking effect of a short duct on a rotor free field. 1.INTRODUCTION Pour étudier dernières années (propulseurs de sous-marins, rotors anti-couple de certains hélicoptères (fenestron

  7. IV The CLEO-c Detector 155 1 The CLEO III Detector 155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the CLEO-c Environment 193 7.1 Processing and Storage of Data to helium-propane. This configuration has also proven very successful, among other things ushering

  8. IV The CLEOc Detector 155 1 The CLEO III Detector 155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the CLEO­c Environment 193 7.1 Processing and Storage of Data to helium­propane. This configuration has also proven very successful, among other things ushering

  9. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC6,suppltmentau Journalde Physique III,Vol. 1,dkembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    injectingvery close to the surface. The ease of manufacture of silicon solid state electronics has fuelled in their guiding media (eg copper wave-guides, co-axial cable). The metallic conduction band electrons to convert from electrical to photonic signals and back gives a minimum distance over which photonic

  10. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplkmentau Journal de PhysiqueIII,Volume 6, dicembre 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    crystals (Li20-A1203-nSi02).Glass-ceramic C is opaque and its main crystalline phase is P-spodumene (Li20-A

  11. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5,supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on sound propagation data of fluorocarbon fluids and low density solids by Madigosky et a l C33 t h a t ($1 capacity and adiabatic bulk mo& i n quasi-spherical molecular liquids and fluorocarbon fluids

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-TWP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM Data DiscoveryIV and V-TWP

  13. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing (backing, mechanical pumps) Rotary vane Sorption Rotary lobe Scroll ScrewSorption, Rotary lobe, Scroll Phy250-1, 2011, NanoFab16 #12;IIIIII--A. Roughing: Rotary Vane PumpA. Roughing: Rotary Vane Pump (Gas

  14. I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    1 I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet III Molecular motors Maxwell's demon and Feynman's ratchet://www.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/ arcquery?Feynman Physics of ratchets pawl asymetric tooths The Feynman Lectures on Physics, I-46 ratchet rate with attempt frequency energy provided to ratchet L work done on load Lf f B power delivered

  15. EXEMPT POSTING JOB TITLE: Research Engineer I/II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    analytical mechanical testing laboratory and engineering problem solving projects. The position will be responsible to design and conduct advanced mechanical testing, including testing procedures, fixtures, method. The position will also take responsibility for coordinating and managing daily activities in the testing lab

  16. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

  17. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Procurement Training A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Independent Oversight Activity Report,...

  18. Strong reactions in quantum super PDE's. I-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostino Prástaro

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a work in three parts, devoted to encode strong reactions of the high energy physics, in the algebraic topologic theory of quantum super PDE's, (previously formulated by A. Pr\\'astaro). In particular strong reactions are characterized by means of boundary value problems in quantum super PDE's. In such a way one obtains representations of quantum nonlinear propagators in quantum super PDE's, by means of elementary ones (quantum handle decompositions of quantum nonlinear propagators). These are useful to encode nuclear and subnuclear reactions in quantum physics. Pr\\'astaro's geometric theory of quantum PDE's allows us to obtain constructive and dynamically justified answers to some important open problems in high energy physics.

  19. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(Held &InformationWindMaliEnergy

  20. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:Diesel Engines |ServicesfromJanuary2,3-13

  1. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air Jump to:KingKirkwoodKlondike IISherman

  2. Competitive Reduction of Pertechnetate (99TcO4?) by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria and Biogenic Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Heald, Steve M.; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Chong M.; Resch, Charles T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of pertechnetate (99Tc(VII)O4 -) during bioreduction was investigated in the presence of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh) and various dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) (Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella) in comparison with TcO4 - bioreduction in the absence of Fh. In the presence of Fh, Tc was present primarily as a fine-grained Tc(IV)/Fe precipitate that was distinct from the Tc(IV)O2 ·nH2O solids produced by direct biological Tc(VII) reduction. Aqueous Tc concentrations (<0.2 ?m) in the bioreduced Fh suspensions (1.7 to 3.2 × 10-9 mol L-1) were over 1 order of magnitude lower than when TcO4 - was biologically reduced in the absence of Fh (4.0 × 10-8 to 1.0 × 10-7 mol L-1). EXAFS analyses of the bioreduced Fh-Tc products were consistent with variable chain length Tc-O octahedra bonded to Fe-O octahedra associated with the surface of the residual or secondary Fe(III) oxide. In contrast, biogenic TcO2 ·nH2O had significantly more Tc-Tc second neighbors and a distinct long-range order consistent with small particle polymers of TcO2. In Fe-rich subsurface sediments, the reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) may predominate over direct microbial pathways, potentially leading to lower concentrations of aqueous 99Tc(IV).

  3. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  4. SPEAR III: A brighter source at SSRL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hettel, R.; Boyce, R.; Brennan, S. [and others

    1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    By replacing the magnets and vacuum chamber for the 3 GeV SPEAR II storage ring, the natural emittance of the machine can be reduced from 130 to 18 nm-rad and the stored current can be raised from 100 to 200 mA with a 50 h lifetime. This configuration increases focused photon flux for insertion device beamlines by an order of magnitude and the photon brightness for future undulators would exceed 10{sup 18} at 5 keV. Due to a higher critical energy, the photon flux in the 20 keV range for bending magnet beamlines increases by more than two orders of magnitude. We present preliminary SPEAR III design study results and plans to implement the facility upgrade with minimal downtime for SSRL users.

  5. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  6. Synergies Between Generation-IV and Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to these changes · Requires experimental data for validation Limited resources require careful selection both recognize potential risk to environment and public health Safety goals and requirements Waste minimization Regulatory reform #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 11/17 Safety Common safety goal

  7. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  8. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  9. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: IV. Comparison to Previous Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare our Monte Carlo reaction rates (see Paper II of this series) to previous results that were obtained by using the classical method of computing thermonuclear reaction rates. For each reaction, the comparison is presented using two types of graphs: the first shows the change in reaction rate uncertainties, while the second displays our new results normalized to the previously recommended reaction rate. We find that the rates have changed significantly for almost all reactions considered here. The changes are caused by (i) our new Monte Carlo method of computing reaction rates (see Paper I of this series), and (ii) newly available nuclear physics information (see Paper III of this series).

  10. Under the Saturn IV Rocket | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rocket October 10, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Under the Saturn IV Rocket Photo credit: Kelly Visconti Under the Saturn IV Rocket Photo credit: Kelly Visconti On the Road with...

  11. Variations of the HeII 1640A Line in B0e--B2.5e Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myron A. Smith

    2006-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the IUE data archive, we have examined the SWP-camera echellograms of 74 B0--B2.5e stars for statistically significant fluctuations in the He II ("Halpha") 1640A line profile. In this sample we found that the HeII line is occasionally variable in 10 stars over short to long timescales. The HeII-variable stars discovered are lambda Eri, omega Ori, mu Cen, 6 Cep, HD 67536, psi-1 Ori, eta Cen, pi Aqr, 2 Vul, and 19 Mon. The most frequent two types of variability are an extended blue wing absorption and a weakening of the line along the profile. Other types of variability are a weak emission in the red wing and occasionally a narrow emission feature. In the overwhelming number of cases, the CIV resonance doublet exhibits a similar response; rarely, it can exhibit a variation in the opposite sense. Similar responses are also often seen in the SiIV doublet, and occasionally even the SiIII 1206A line. We interpret the weakenings of HeII and of high-velocity absorptions of CIV to localized decreases in the photospheric temperature, although this may not be a unique interpretation. We discuss the variable blue wing absorptions and red wing emissions in terms of changes in the velocity law and mass flux carried by the wind. In the latter case, recent experimental models by Venero, Cidale, & Ringuelet require that during such events the wind must be heated to 35kK at some distance from the star.

  12. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2107007 05/05/2014 9:00 101, 108 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ingeniera Ambiental Fsica II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    13/05/2014 12:00 201 Aulario III 3 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental EvaluaciĂłn del Impacto Ambiental Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental FĂ­sica II 2107010 13/05/2014 9:00 202, 203 Aulario II 1 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental BiologĂ­a 2107005 07/05/2014 9:00 104, 105 Aulario III 1 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental

  13. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  14. Identification of the Dinuclear and Tetranuclear Air-Oxidized Products Derived from Labile Phenolate-Bridged Dimanganese(II) Pyridyl-Chelate Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen,F.; Boisen, A.; Berry, K.; Moubaraki, B.; Murray, K.; McKee, V.; Scarrow, R.; McKenzie, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dioxygen-sensitive dinuclear manganese complexes of the phenoxo-hinged dinucleating ligand 2,6-bis{l_brace}[N,N{prime}-bis(2-picolyl)amino]methyl{r_brace}-4-tert-butylphenolato (bpbp{sup -}) containing exogenous labile THF, water and perchlorato ligands are described. The manganese(II) complexes [Mn{sub 2}(bpbp)(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}(THF)]{sup +} (1) and [Mn{sub 2}(bpbp)(ClO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sup 2+} (2) have been isolated as the salts 1{center_dot}ClO{sub 4}{center_dot}THF{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, 1{center_dot}B(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 4}{center_dot}4THF and 2{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4})2{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. Complexes 1 and 2 are spontaneously oxidised in air in solution and the solid state. The reaction products of the air oxidation in THF, water and methanol solutions are labile dinuclear Mn{sup II}-Mn{sup III}, Mn{sup III}{sub 2} and Mn{sup III}-Mn{sup IV} complexes containing water- and methanol-derived exogenous ligands. In addition, a Mn{sub 4} complex has been isolated. Magnetic susceptibility data confirm the Mn{sup II}-Mn{sup III} oxidation state assignment with an S = 2/S = 5/2 model with weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J = -3.7 cm{sup -1}) in [Mn{sub 2}(bpbp)(CH{sub 3}O){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} [3{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}]. A tetranuclear complex, [Mn{sub 4}(O){sub 4-n}(OH){sub n}(bpbp){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} [n = 1 or 2; 7{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 4}], recovered from THF shows a Mn{sub 4}O{sub 6} adamantane-type core with the O bridges furnished by the two phenolato groups and four hydroxide/oxide bridges. We have arrived at two feasible formulations for the core metal oxidation states and oxo-bridge protonation states, namely [Mn{sup III}{sub 4}(O){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(bpbp){sub 2}]{sup 4+} and [Mn{sup III}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV}(O){sub 3}(OH)(bpbp){sub 2}]{sup 4+}, for 7, on the basis of a bond valence sum analysis of the crystal structure, elemental analysis and XANES. Thus, complex 7 is at least two oxidation state levels lower than known complexes with the Mn{sub 4}O{sub 6} adamantane core structure. The magnetism of 7 was fitted well to an MnIII4 three-J model. Complex cations related to 3 by homology, and to 7 by hydration/solvation, have been identified by ESI mass spectrometry. The [Mn{sub 2}(bpbp)(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sup 2+} ion (4) present in aqueous solutions on dissolution of 1{center_dot}ClO4{center_dot}THF{center_dot}3H2O in air or by simple dissolution of 3 in water-containing solvent is isoelectronic to 3. In the presence of significant amounts of water the Mn{sup II}-Mn{sup III} complexes 3 and 4 are susceptible to further metal oxidation and concomitant aquo ligand deprotonation to give ions assignable to [Mn{sup III/IV}{sub 2}(bpbp)O(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2+} (5) and [Mn{sup III}{sub 2}(bpbp)(OH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2+} (6). ESI mass spectra of water or methanol solutions of 1, 2, 3 and 7 show predominantly an ion assignable to the oxide [Mn{sub 2}(bpbp)(O)]{sup 2+} (8). Cation 8 is most likely not present in solution. Using mild source conditions and MS-MS techniques, the gas-phase fragmentation pathways to generate 8 have been mapped.

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    28 Regional maps Source Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V - California PADD V - other PADD III - Gulf PADD III - inland PADD I PADD II - inland PADD IV...

  16. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories, and the Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos produces flash radiographs of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) make the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each test. The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. The 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by kicking them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{mu}s flattop. The Axis-II injector, LIA, kicker, and downstream transport (DST) to the bremsstrahlung converter are described. Adjusting the magnetic focusing and steering elements to optimize the electron-beam transport through an LIA is often called 'tuning.' As in all high-current LIAs, the focusing field is designed to be as close to that of the ideal continuous solenoid as physically possible. In ideal continuous solenoidal transport a smoothly varying beam size can easily be found for which radial forces balance, and the beam is said to be 'matched' to the focusing field. A 'mismatched' beam exhibits unwanted oscillations in size, which are a source of free energy that contributes to emittance growth. This is undesirable, because in the absence of beam-target effects, the radiographic spot size is proportional to the emittance. Tuning the Axis-II LIA is done in two steps. First, the solenoidal focusing elements are set to values designed to provide a matched beam with little or no envelope oscillations, and little or no beam-breakup (BBU) instability growth. Then, steering elements are adjusted to minimize the motion of the centroid of a well-centered beam at the LIA exit. This article only describes the design of the tune for the focusing solenoids. The DARHT Axis-II LIA was required to be re-tuned after installing an accelerator cell to replace a failed solenoid in March of 2012. We took advantage of this opportunity to improve the design of the focusing tune with better models of the remaining partially failed solenoids, better estimates of beam initial conditions, and better values for pulsed-power voltages. As with all previous tunes for Axis-II, this one incorporates measures to mitigate beam-breakup (BBU) instability, image displacement instability (IDI), corkscrew (sweep), and emittance growth. Section II covers the general approach to of design of focusing solenoid tunes for the DARHT Axis-2 LIA. Section III explains the specific requirements and simulations needed to design the tune for the injector, which includes the thermionic electron source, diode, and six induction cells. Section IV explains the requirements and simulations for tuning the main accelerator, which consists of 68 induction cells. Finally, Section V explores sensitivity of the tune to deviations of parameters from nominal, random variations, and uncertainties in values. Four appendices list solenoid settings for this new tune, discuss comparisons of different simulation codes, show halo formation in mismatched beams, and present a brief discussion of the beam envelope equation, which is the heart of the method used to design LIA solenoid tunes.

  17. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis phase ii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 39 www.praxair.com Low Cost Hydrogen Summary: 2004 2005 2006 Phase I Phase II Phase III 2002 Phase I...

  19. The Strange Career of DDT: Experts, Federal Capacity, and ‘Environmentalism’ in World War II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Edmund P.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. The strange career of DDT: Experts, federal capacity, and environmentalism in World War II Russell, Edmund P, III Technology and Culture; Oct...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - africa phase ii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    africa phase ii Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Call For Papers SOUTHERN FORESTS Summary: in South Africa - the next phase iii JSB Scotcher Scientific Papers Variation in foliar water...

  1. Radioluminescence of curium(III) in solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusov, A.B.; Perminov, V.P.; Krot, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioluminescence of curium(III) under the action of the intrinsic ..cap alpha..-radiation was studied in aqueous, heavy water, and organic solutions. The luminescence maximum falls at lambda approx. 600 nm. The yield of radioluminescence G is proportional to the concentration (or electronic fraction) of curium, and for a 10/sup -2/ M aqueous solution of Cm(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, G approx. 5 x 10/sup -4/ quanta per 100 eV of absorbed energy. In dilute acids the yield of radioluminescence is the same as in neutral solution, but in concentrated acid it is substantially changed. In the presence of ligands (formate, acetate, citrate ions, and others), the yield of the radioluminescence of curium in aqueous solutions increases, which is associated with complex formation, leading to a decrease in the quenching of excited curium by water molecules. The intensification of the radioluminescence of curium in the presence of sodium paratungstate is especially great; it is suggested that in this case a significant role is played by energy transfer from the ligand to curium. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/NH/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/OH, Ce/sup (IV)/, and uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in various oxidation states have no great influence on the radioluminescence of curium. Its quenching by NpO/sub 2//sup +/ ions is somewhat greater than by other actinide ions and is associated with the formation of cation-cation complexes of NpO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with Cm/sup 3 +/. In heavy water and organic solutions, a substantial increase in the radioluminescence yield of curium is observed, which is in good agreement with the data on photoluminescence. The results obtained suggest that the radioluminescence of curium in solutions (in the absence of energy-donor ligands) is excited mainly directly, while the role of energy transfer to curium from the solvent or its radiolysis products is negligible.

  2. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  3. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThe nature of theIV:

  4. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E. [TSI Research, Inc. (United States); Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design.

  5. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  6. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  7. Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum Renewed energy and enhanced coordination...

  8. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  9. A study of the reaction between metal ions and thiomalic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Clyde Ernest

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (II), chromium(III), chromium(VI)(dichromate ion), co'balt(II), copper(II), iron(II1), lead(II ), mercury- ( II), molybdenum(VI)(molybdate ion), nickel(II), silver(I ), and zinc(II). Of these, only copper gave a titration which was of analytical precision...(III), lead(II), manganese(II), mercury(II), molybdenum(VI) (molybdate ion), nickel(II), silver(I), tin(1V), and zinc(II). No reactions were observed between thiomalic acid and the ions: aluminum- (III), chromium(III), and thorium(IV). Under the conditions...

  10. Modcomp MAX IV System Processors reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user almost always faces a big problem when having to learn to use a new computer system. The information necessary to use the system is often scattered throughout many different manuals. The user also faces the problem of extracting the information really needed from each manual. Very few computer vendors supply a single Users Guide or even a manual to help the new user locate the necessary manuals. Modcomp is no exception to this, Modcomp MAX IV requires that the user be familiar with the system file usage which adds to the problem. At General Atomics there is an ever increasing need for new users to learn how to use the Modcomp computers. This paper was written to provide a condensed Users Reference Guide'' for Modcomp computer users. This manual should be of value not only to new users but any users that are not Modcomp computer systems experts. This Users Reference Guide'' is intended to provided the basic information for the use of the various Modcomp System Processors necessary to, create, compile, link-edit, and catalog a program. Only the information necessary to provide the user with a basic understanding of the Systems Processors is included. This document provides enough information for the majority of programmers to use the Modcomp computers without having to refer to any other manuals. A lot of emphasis has been placed on the file description and usage for each of the System Processors. This allows the user to understand how Modcomp MAX IV does things rather than just learning the system commands.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - active chromatin marks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure Summary: structure II. HATs are co-activatorsHDACscorepressors III. ATP-driven chromatin remodeling complexes IV... is the silent state? What is the active...

  12. New convertible isocyanides for the Ugi Reaction : application to the stereoselective synthesis of omuralide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilley, Cynthia Brooke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ii) N (iii) R 3 O R Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis O R 1 NH 2 O (iv)of benzoxazoles by flash vacuum pyrolysis. 18 In addition to

  13. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technology achievement; (ii) smart sensors integration; (iii) Ambient Intelligence (AmI) in manufac- turing; (iv) strengthening the European Sensor System Suppliers (SMEs)

  14. als teil des: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1990: TBL prgt Begriff "World Wide Web" - Beginn eines gro?en Hypertext Zachmann, Gabriel 4 Whitehead's Ausdehnungslehre Die Kapitel II und III im Teil IV von...

  15. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final...

  16. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

  17. CONJUNCTIVE USE OPPORTUNITIES IN SOUTHERN Manuel A. Pulido -Velazquez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    ..........................................................................................................4 I. INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................5 II. CONJUNCTIVE USE OF SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER......................12 III. ECONOMICS OF CONJUNCTIVE USE.......................................................23 IV. MODELING CONJUNCTIVE USE

  18. Sparse LU Factorization for Large Circuit Matrices on Heterogenous Parallel Computing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belsare, Aditya Sanjay

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximate Minimum Degree v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii DEDICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv NOMENCLATURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLE OF CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii LIST...

  19. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Dwarf Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 4395. IV. The Variable UV Absorption Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of variable UV absorption lines in NGC 4395, based on UV observations with the HST STIS carried out in April and July, 2004, as part of a reverberation-mapping campaign. Low-ionization lines of O I, N I, Si II, C II, and Fe II, are present in the low-state spectra (April 2004) at a velocity v_shift=-250 km/s (system A_l), and additional high-ionization lines of C IV and N V appear in the high-state spectra (July 2004) at v_shift=-250 km/s (system A_h) and at v_shift=-840 km/s (system B). The absence of absorption from the low metastable levels of Si II implies a density <~10^3 cm^(-3) for system A_l, indicating a location outside the narrow line region (NLR). System A_h is peculiar as only N V absorption is clearly detected. A high N V/C IV absorption ratio is expected for a high metallicity absorber, but this is excluded here as the metallicity of the host galaxy and of the nuclear gas is significantly subsolar. A simple acceptable model for systems A_h and B is an absorber located between the broad line region (BLR) and the NLR, which absorbs only the continuum and the BLR. At the low-state the strong narrow emission lines of C IV and N V dominate the spectrum, making the absorption invisible. At the high-state the absorbed continuum and BLR emission dominate the spectrum. Thus, the change in the observed absorption does not reflect a change in the absorber, but rather a change in the continuum and BLR emission from behind the absorber, relative to the emission from the NLR in front of the absorber. Studies of the absorption line variability in highly variable objects can thus break the degeneracy in the absorber distance determination inherent to single epoch studies.

  20. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta III

  1. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes fifteen MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  2. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  3. CMAD IV 11/14/96 Information Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    utilities, power pools, vendors etc.. #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 #12; #12; GridCo LineCo PoolCo Energy Merchant INFO INFO INFO $ $ $ PWR PWR PWR #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 "Future" Is At Hand · Federal Energy Regulatory protection and audit practices inadequate. · Internal priorities limiting attention to security concerns

  4. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  5. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  6. The Solubility of 242PuO2 in the Presence of Aqueous Fe(II): The Impact of Precipitate Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Abrecht, David G.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of different forms of precipitated 242PuO2(am) were examined in solutions containing aqueous Fe(II) over a range of pH values. The first series of 242PuO2(am) suspensions were prepared from a 242Pu(IV) stock that had been treated with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) to remove the 241Am originating from the decay of 241Pu. These 242PuO2(am) suspensions showed much higher solubilities at the same pH value and Fe(II) concentration than previous studies using 239PuO2(am). X ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy of the precipitates showed a substantially reduced Pu-Pu backscatter over that previously observed in 242PuO2(am) precipitates, indicating that the 242PuO2(am) precipitates purified using TTA lacked the long range order previously found in 239PuO2(am) precipitates. The Pu(IV) stock solution was subsequently repurified using an ion exchange resin and an additional series of 242PuO2(am) precipitates prepared. These suspensions showed higher redox potentials and total aqueous Pu concentrations than the TTA purified stock solution. The higher redox potential and aqueous Pu concentrations were in general agreement with previous studies on 242PuO2(am) precipitates, presumably due to the removal of possible organic compounds originally present in the TTA purified stock. 242PuO2(am) suspensions prepared with both stock solutions showed almost identical solubilities in Fe(II) containing solutions even though the initial aqueous Pu concentrations before the addition of Fe(II) were orders of magnitude different. By examining the solubility of 242PuO2(am) prepared from both stocks in this way we have essentially approached equilibrium from both the undersaturated and oversaturated conditions. The final aqueous Pu concentrations are predictable using a chemical equilibrium model which includes the formation of a nanometer sized Fe(III) reaction product, identified in the 242PuO2(am) suspension both by use of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis.

  7. Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and PetL in the b6 f complex of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex - 1 - Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and Pet IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6 f complex Additional keywords : PetG, PetM, PetN, transmembrane topology, mass spectrometry, State Transitions, protein phosphorylation. #12;Subunit IV-PetL chimeras

  8. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  9. Mg II Selected Absorbers: Ionization structures and a Survey of Weak Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Churchill

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    First results from a study of high ionization absorption properties in roughly 30 Mg II absorption selected galaxies are presented. We have tested for correlations of Mg II, C IV, Si IV, N V, and O VI equivalent widths with the galaxy properties and Mg II gas kinematics. The results are suggestive of multi-phase halos with little to no global ionization gradient with impact parameter. C IV may arise in both the Mg II - Lyman alpha clouds and a high ionization "halo" traced by O VI. We also report on an unbiased survey for weak Mg II systems using HIRES/Keck spectra. At = 0.9, we find dN/dz = 1.6 +/- 0.1 for 0.02 = -0.3 +/- 0.4 measured for the sample. We suggest that weak Mg II absorbers comprise a substantial yet-to-be explored population. If weak systems select the LSB and/or dwarf galaxy population, then the weakest Mg II absorbers may provide one of the most sensitive tracers of chemical enrichment and evolution of the UV background from z = 2 to z = 0.

  10. Electronic Structure of the Mn(4)Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem Ii Studied By Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i=0--4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states also showed characteristic features which were not clear from the K-edge spectroscopy.

  11. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  12. Encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the NH{sub 4}USY zeolite: Preparation, characterization and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro do Carmo, Devaney [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.br; Dias Filho, Newton Luiz [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Ramos Stradiotto, Nelson [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Instituto de Quimica PO Box, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the supercavities of NH{sub 4}USY ultra stabilized zeolite, after chemical treatment. The modified zeolite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, Nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravity. This encapsulated titanium (IV) silsesquioxane can adsorb Azure A chloride after treatment with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, without modifier leaching problems. In an electrochemical study, the cyclic voltammograms of the graphite paste modified electrode, shows two redox couples with formal potential (E{sup 0}') -0.1 V and 0.21 V to I and II redox couples respectively (v=700mVs{sup -1}; Britton Robinson buffer (B-R) solution, pH 3) versus SCE ascribed to a monomer and dimmer of azure. This paper shows the use of ultra stabilized zeolite in the electrochemical field as host for molecules with nanometric dimensions.

  13. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdatesValleyJablonowskiWCI-III Recap Workshop

  14. Minco III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources JumpMicrelBirds JumpMilner Dam WindIII Jump to:

  15. Registration List - WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONews Media »WCI-III Registration List

  16. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Ning [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuya [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsunaga, Tetsuro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Takeda, Jun [Department of Endocrinology Diabetes and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Tsujimoto, Gozoh [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yasuda, Koichiro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Diabetic Center, Tsunashimakai-Kosei Hospital, Himeji (Japan); Tsuda, Kinsuke [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)]. E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  17. Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88II Jump

  18. SciTech Connect: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling A...

  19. Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    34 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and...

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin Jeff

    The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

  1. Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

    An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 31

  2. Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

    An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 27

  3. Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

    An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 2o ¯ Semestre -- 28

  4. Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

    An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 6

  5. action phase iv: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on all fields of N4 vector multiplet. We also consider the derivation of leading low-enrgy effective action at two loops. I. L. Buchbinder 2004-02-12 256 Painleve IV and...

  6. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in different ways. MC inhibits...

  7. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean Energy Systems, the webinar will be on February 3, 2015, from 8:00 to 9:30 AM PST...

  8. iIilIi!i11i1il1i IV. Medical Examination Manuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the examining table. Abdominal and Babinski reflexes are to be tested in the supine position. Romberg and gait of a specialized protocol. It is intended for a particular purpose, is designed to be highly reproducible on testing procedures described ill standard references. Of particular importance in compiling th

  9. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  10. The Crystal Structure of a High-Spin Oxoiron(IV) Complex and Characterization of Its Self-Decay Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, J.; Guo, Y; Farquhar, E; Young, Jr., V; Münck, E; Que, Jr., L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMG{sub 3}tren)]{sup 2+} (1; TMG{sub 3}tren = 1,1,1-tris{l_brace}2-[N{sup 2}-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino)]ethyl{r_brace}amine) is a unique example of an isolable synthetic S = 2 oxoiron(IV) complex, which serves as a model for the high-valent oxoiron(IV) intermediates observed in nonheme iron enzymes. Congruent with DFT calculations predicting a more reactive S = 2 oxoiron(IV) center, 1 has a lifetime significantly shorter than those of related S = 1 oxoiron(IV) complexes. The self-decay of 1 exhibits strictly first-order kinetic behavior and is unaffected by solvent deuteration, suggesting an intramolecular process. This hypothesis was supported by ESI-MS analysis of the iron products and a significant retardation of self-decay upon use of a perdeuteromethyl TMG{sub 3}tren isotopomer, d{sub 36}-1 (KIE = 24 at 25 C). The greatly enhanced thermal stability of d{sub 36}-1 allowed growth of diffraction quality crystals for which a high-resolution crystal structure was obtained. This structure showed an Fe=O unit (r = 1.661(2) {angstrom}) in the intended trigonal bipyramidal geometry enforced by the sterically bulky tetramethylguanidinyl donors of the tetradentate tripodal TMG{sub 3}tren ligand. The close proximity of the methyl substituents to the oxoiron unit yielded three symmetrically oriented short C-D {hor_ellipsis} O nonbonded contacts (2.38-2.49 {angstrom}), an arrangement that facilitated self-decay by rate-determining intramolecular hydrogen atom abstraction and subsequent formation of a ligand-hydroxylated iron(III) product. EPR and Moessbauer quantification of the various iron products, referenced against those obtained from reaction of 1 with 1,4-cyclohexadiene, allowed formulation of a detailed mechanism for the self-decay process. The solution of this first crystal structure of a high-spin (S = 2) oxoiron(IV) center represents a fundamental step on the path toward a full understanding of these pivotal biological intermediates.

  11. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

  12. 2. Results-Fe(II) concentrations and oxidation kinetics 1. Introduction -why, where and how?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    IIISMP II SMP IV a Study site - Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea Study site - Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea Intense solar radiation year round High dust flux, no runoff Low DOM well aerated oligotrophic waters Summer- thermal stratification Winter- deep mixing Sample is withdrawn continuously into flow cell

  13. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  14. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  15. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  16. LABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ENERGY You have a job in a University research group investigating the effect of solar flaresLABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS Lab III - 1 Our modern society functions in part because we have learned how to manipulate electrical energy. Almost all of our technology involves

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - ARESE II IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM DatagovCampaignsARESE II IOP

  18. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of [(H3buea)FeIII-X]n1 (X= S2-, O2-,OH-): Comparison of Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding in Oxo and Sulfido Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; /Kansas U.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC,

    2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

  19. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC5, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . We show that contributionof each mode to response cm be pointed out using an approximate sound speed aux interfaces entre couches liquides de la pression et de la vitesse normale on explicite la solution

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, suppltment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Application of collinear mirage detection for thermal diffusivity measurements of solids at high temperatures in order to measure the thermal diffusivity of bulk homogeneous solids at temperatures up to 1000K signal and the probe to pump offset. Its slope directly yields the thermal diffusivity of the sample

  1. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplkment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermal surface wave technique for thin film thermal diffusivity measurement B. Zhang, R.E. Irnhof and W thermal diffusivities of isolated thin films, using variable transverse displacement between focused, is presented. 1. INTRODUCTION The main difficulty of measuring thermal diffusivity using opto

  2. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplkment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    layers is small, because of the low thermal diffusivity of skin (1.7-12~10-~m~s",depending on hydration, t is the opto-thermal decay time and D the thermal diffusivity. The method characterises skin hydration. Furthermore, since a*, the excitation is in photothermal Article published online by EDP Sciences

  3. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thermal diffusivity determination by the photodeflection method. The influence of wave optical effects H of thermal diffusivity are considered. The calculation of the transverse photodeflection signal. The influence of the account of wave optical effects on the accuracy of the thermal diffusivity determination

  4. JOURNAL DE PHYSlQUE IV Colloque C8, supplkmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, septelnbre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the imperfections analysis, the thermal diffusivity is (temporarily) neglected, as well as the inertial effects la dkformation plastique est initi6. Dans cet article, les effets de la forrne et de l'amplitude des); it is designed to model the torsion of a thin walled tube in a torsional Kolsky bar. Article published online

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (enginesnoise at launch, take off transonic aeronoise,phases of maximum dynamicpressure during atmos heric

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplkment au Jou~nalde Physique III, Volume 4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , China Resume - Des specimens d'aluminium, cuivre OFHC et alliage titane Ti-6A1-4V sont charges par un-'. Abstract - Aluminum, OFHC copper and Ti-6A1-4V specimenshave been impacted with the two stage electric gun- locity histories, especially the important velocity recession process. In contrast to it, the common

  7. Extensive hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) Hurly stage III disease treated with intravenous (IV) linezolid and meropenem with rapid remission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wall synthesis, but does not treat MRSA. The patients had aErtapenem is not active against MRSA, ampicillin-resistant

  8. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueCl, supplment au Journal dePhysique III,Volume 2, avril 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    succession pour des vitesses rapides, b) motrices dans la production de cadences élevées [4,5], et c,6]. Pour des cadences très rapides, les difficultés motrices rendent la performance hasardeuse et les

  9. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 3,novembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rueil Malmaison, France ABSTRACT A new process, dynarnic-diffusion-bonding (DDB) was improved in our laboratory (1). It offers the advantages of both classical diffusion-bonding and rapidity, which Comportement mécanique d'assemblages en acier 27CD4 et 100C6 soudés rapidementpar soudage-diffusion-dynamique G

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC6 SupplCment au Journalde Physique III, Volume 4,juin 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Tc-based Josephson-junctions and SQUIDs by mechanically induced growth disorder M. Schmitt, A. Hadish, P. Wagner, Th of the deformation with quite interesting features, resulting in a Josephson junction. The substrate deformation-Tc-superconductors, there had to be developed new and sophisticated methods for the production of Josephson-junctions and SQUIDs

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCment au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1,dkembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    applications including, for instance, optical communications, signal processing and all fiber laser or distributed fiber sensors. Thus, a new class of such optical fiber devices that make use of a permanently.V. irradiated Ge fibers /7/. From these experiments, it appears that the relative concentrations of Ge(I), Ge(I1

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 3, novembre 1993 743

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Galilée, avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse, France Abstract Self-propagating high temperature synthesis of titanium carbide from finely divided powders of Ti and C is initiated in the solid state(s) and absolute temperature T(K). The reaction rate a (moles of carbon reacted relative to the initial amount

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sample are given and are compared to that obtained by scanning using a conventionallargephotoacoustic (PA)cell and focused down onto the sample surface. The photothermal detection system uses a diode laser probe beam spot on the sample while the probe beam diameteris 25pm at the RIG. A sodium lamp sourceprovides

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7, supplCment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, juillet 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . This technique allows for shorter imaging time and depth profiling. Non-uniformity of heating area and optical of thermography where the temperature field is monitored with an infrared camera is its fast imaging capability are measured. The phase of the modulated infrared emission is independent of optical/infrared surface

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque CX, supplCment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, septembre 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Institute of TechnicalPhysics,P.O. Box 245,Chelyabinsk-70,454070,Russia Rtsumt: le phenomene &attenuation du prkurseur

  16. Materials testing at the Hanna-IV and Hoe Creek-III in situ coal-gasification sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loop, R.B.; LaRue, D.M.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Candidate structural alloys were exposed to the direct product gas stream during three different in situ coal gasification experiments at two sites. Physical appearance and chemical analysis indicate that the coating on the specimens following exposure is typical of condensed hydrocarbons, coal char, coal ash, and mineral particles from the overburden. Deposits on specimens from one test had a fairly high concentration of sulfur (about 8 w/o) while the others had very low sulfur concentrations (0.313 w/o and 0.014 w/o, respectively). Energy-dispersive x-ray spectra indicate that corrosion occurred principally by oxidation, with some sulfidation. Mean penetration rates expressed in millimetres/year were calculated from weight loss data. No material evaluated showed a truly unacceptable degradation. There was no consistent difference in the amount of material removed from specimens with or without welds. Specimens from one test experienced no consistent difference in material removal between different exposure angles; a consistent difference in material loss and dents from particle impact indicated that erosion may have occurred in the other two tests. There was no indication of carburization, decarburization, or severe localized attack in the form of pitting or intergranular corrosion on any of the specimens examined. Results obtained for the flame-sprayed 316 SS specimens and one of the Alonized specimens indicated that use of these processes may be questionable in this environment.

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C6 SupplCmentau Journal de Physique III, Volume 4,juin 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    cooling requirements, - low-cost manufacturingwhich implies compatibilitywith silicon integrated of activity has been devoted to study and fabrication of "second generation" infrared detectors. Today, the trends are towards detector developments which are sometimes contradictory, as the demand is focused

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC5, supplmentauJournal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Helmholtzsource. Two modellingtools have been used :the finite-element codeATlLA and an equivalent circuit model'ensemble qui correspond au noeud de vibration de la structure. L'utilisation de ce boîtier est nécessaire au

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM DatagovCampaignsARESE

  20. Duke University Climate Action Plan October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    Buildings iv. Onsite Renewable Energy v. Fuel Mix d. Recommended Energy Mitigation Strategy ............................................................................. 45 #12;iii i. Purchased Electricity ii. Green Building iii. Energy Conservation in Existing ................................................................................................... 6 b. Energy

  1. Beta Cephei stars in the ASAS-3 data. II. 103 new Beta Cephei stars and a discussion of low-frequency modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pigulski; G. Pojma?ski

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analysed ASAS-3 photometry of bright early-type stars with the goal of finding new Beta Cephei stars. We were particularly interested in stars that would be good for seismic analysis, i.e., stars that (i) have a large number of excited modes, (ii) show rotationally split modes, (iii) are components of eclipsing binary systems, (iv) have low-frequency modes, that is, are hybrid Beta Cephei/SPB stars. Our study was made with a homogeneous sample of over 4100 stars having MK spectral type B5 or earlier. For these stars, the ASAS-3 photometry was analysed by means of a Fourier periodogram. We have discovered 103 Beta Cephei stars, nearly doubling the number of previously known stars of this type. Among these stars, four are components of eclipsing binaries, seven have modes equidistant or nearly equidistant in frequency. In addition, we found five Beta Cephei stars that show low-frequency periodic variations, very likely due to pulsations. We therefore regard them as candidate hybrid Beta Cephei/SPB pulsators. All these stars are potentially very useful for seismic modeling. Moreover, we found Beta Cephei-type pulsations in three late O-type stars and fast period changes in one, HD 168050.

  2. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2120001 13/12/2013 15:00 105, 106 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologas Industriales Matemticas I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías Industriales Matemáticas I 2120002 17/12/2013 15:00 203 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías Industriales Física I 2120003 08/01/2014 15:00 202, 203 Aulario II 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologías Industriales Química 2120004 20/12/2013 15:00 102, 103 Laboratorios III

  3. Endonuclease IV of Escherichia coli is induced by paraquat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, E.; Weiss, B.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of paraquat (methyl viologen) to a growing culture of Escherichia coli K-12 led within 1 hr to a 10- to 20-fold increase in the level of endonuclease IV, a DNase for apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. The induction was blocked by chloramphenicol. Increases of 3-fold or more were also seen with plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced no more than a 2-fold increase in endonuclease IV activity. The following agents had no significant effect: streptonigrin, nitrofurantoin, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ..gamma.. rays, 260-nm UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and ascorbate. Paraquat, plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate are known to generate superoxide radical anions via redox cycling in vivo. A mutant lacking superoxide dismutase was unusually sensitive to induction by paraquat. In addition, endonuclease IV could be induced by merely growing the mutant in pure O/sub 2/. The levels of endonuclease IV in uninduced or paraquat-treated cells were unaffected by mutations of oxyR, a H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-inducible gene that governs an oxidative-stress regulon. The results indicate that endonuclease IV is an inducible DNA-repair enzyme and that its induction can be mediated via the production of superoxide radicals.

  4. Constitution Constitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warkentin, Ian G.

    12 Councils of Unions IV 10 District Councils IV 8 Elections XI 32 General Vice-Presidents XII 36.III 54 Business Agent B.III 55 Charter B.I 48 Duties of Officers B.III 50 Elections B.II 49 Executive) The promotion of peace and freedom in the world, and the cooperation with free and democratic labour movements

  5. The School of Music of the College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Sonata Henry Eccles I. Largo (1671-1742) II. Corrente: Allegro III. Adagio IV. Allegro vivace Meditation and Processional Ernest Bloch (1880-1959) Adagio and Allegro, Op. 70 Robert Schumann (1810-1856) The School. Largo (1671-1742) II. Corrente: Allegro III. Adagio IV. Allegro vivace Meditation and Processional

  6. Salle Pollack Hall 555, rue Sherbrooke ouest, Montral, QC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    / harp classe de / class of Stefano Algieri 6 Bagatelles Gyorgy Ligeti I. Allegro con spirito II. Rubato. Lamentos III. Allegro grazioso IV. Presto ruvido V. Adagio. Mesto (Béla Bartók, in memoriam) VI. Molto moto - Allegro vivace II. Andante con moto quasi allegretto III. Menuetto: Grazioso IV. Allegro molto

  7. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    /pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37 ROLES OF PRESSURE AND FLOW RATE IN DEFINING THE RADIUS-28 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 38 Hurst et al. (1961) introduced a radius of drainage formula. This formula4th International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  9. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  10. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  11. Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Site, Vol III - August 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August 2001 August 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site This report...

  12. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  13. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  14. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  15. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  16. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  17. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  18. Cross Section Evaluation Group shielding benchmark compilation. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the release of ENDF/B-IV in 1974, the Shielding Subcommittee had identified a series of 12 shielding data testing benchmarks (the SDT series). Most were used in the ENDF/B-IV data testing effort. A new concept and series was begun in the interim, the so-called Shielding Benchmark (SB) series. An effort was made to upgrade the SDT series as far as possible and to add new SB benchmarks. In order to be designated in the SB class, both an experiment and analysis must have been performed. The current recommended benchmark for Shielding Data Testing are listed. Until recently, the philosophy has been to include only citations to published references for shielding benchmarks. It is now our intention to provide adequate information in this volume for proper analysis of any new benchmarks added to the collection. These compilations appear in Section II, with the SB5 Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark as the first entry.

  19. Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ct3_ 3.of 6 UC-95c ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES ANDBARRIERS TO INDUSTRIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION I. II. III.. IV.II. RETROFIT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION EQUIPMENT A. CONCEPT

  20. IV.1. UNITARY GROUPS AND BASE CHANGE Michael Harris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    IV.1. UNITARY GROUPS AND BASE CHANGE Michael Harris 1. Classification of unitary groups over number-split and we set (G) = 1. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 MICHAEL HARRIS Returning to the real case, we set (U(p, q

  1. I.V. Stasyuk, O.V. Velychko CONFIGURATIONAL MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex formation reactions of metal ions and ligand groups are of great importance due to pollution of environment by heavy metal (including actinides) species. In general this type of reaction can be described' & $ % I.V. Stasyuk, O.V. Velychko CONFIGURATIONAL MODEL OF METAL ION COMPLEX FORMATION IN WATER

  2. UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PLANIFICATION URBAINE SUR LES PRIX IMMOBILIERS ET FONCIERS EN ZONE LITTORALE : LE CAS DU BASSIN D'ARCACHON ThčseUNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU ­ BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION ET professionnalisme dans la gestion administrative. Un grand merci ŕ Sébastien Lavaud pour son énorme patience face ŕ

  3. GEODESIC FRCHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    GEODESIC FR�CHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV Carola Wenk Abstract We present the first algorithm to compute the geodesic Fréchet distance between two polygonal curves in a plane of from a point source). This shortest path map supports geodesic distance queries from any point s ab

  4. Constraints to Stop Deforestation FB IV Informatik, Universitat Trier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik, Universit¨at Trier, D­54286 Trier, Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark. rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation algorithm, deforestation must terminate on all programs. Several techniques exist to ensure termination of de­ forestation

  5. Constraints to Stop HigherOrder Deforestation FB IV Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Higher­Order Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik Universit¨at Trier, D of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation in a compiler, it must terminate on all programs. Several techniques to ensure termi­ nation of deforestation

  6. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field Early development of quantum mechanics was led by the fact that electro- magnetic radiation (electric current den- sity) jµ = (, j/c). For a point particle of charge e, the charge density is = e

  7. Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

  8. A VACANCY MODEL IN SOLID HELIUM IV B. CASTAING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    536 A VACANCY MODEL IN SOLID HELIUM IV B. CASTAING Groupe de Physique des Solides de l here a new approach to the problem of vacancies in solid Helium 4, describing them as small liquid droplets. In this model the vacancy effective mass is very small : 0.1 mHe, where mHe is the atomic mass

  9. Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide Jessica Whalen, Oscar Marin Flores, Su University INTRODUCTION Energy consumption continues to skyrocket worldwide. Biodiesel is a renewable fuel as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel

  10. Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation over Sn(IV) Phosphonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarajeeewa, Sandani

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    attractive feature of these catalysts is that the reaction can be carried out under solvent-free conditions using aqueous H2O2 (30 %) as the oxidant. Various Sn(IV) phosphonates have been synthesized using phosphonic acid in different solvent systems...

  11. Hawaii Energy Strategy Project 2: Fossil Energy Review. Task IV. Scenario development and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Breazeale, K. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) Program is a seven-project effort led by the State of Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism (DBEDT) to investigate a wide spectrum of Hawaii energy issues. The East-West Center`s Program on Resources: Energy and Minerals, has been assigned HES Project 2, Fossil Energy Review, which focuses on fossil energy use in Hawaii and the greater regional and global markets. HES Project 2 has four parts: Task I (World and Regional Fossil Energy Dynamics) covers petroleum, natural gas, and coal in global and regional contexts, along with a discussion of energy and the environment. Task II (Fossil Energy in Hawaii) focuses more closely on fossil energy use in Hawaii: current utilization and trends, the structure of imports, possible future sources of supply, fuel substitutability, and energy security. Task III`s emphasis is Greenfield Options; that is, fossil energy sources not yet used in Hawaii. This task is divided into two sections: first, an in-depth {open_quotes}Assessment of Coal Technology Options and Implications for the State of Hawaii,{close_quotes} along with a spreadsheet analysis model, which was subcontracted to the Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division of Argonne National Laboratory; and second, a chapter on liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the Asia-Pacific market and the issues surrounding possible introduction of LNG into the Hawaii market.

  12. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  13. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2106007 06/05/2014 15:00 205, 206 Aulario III 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geografa Humana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geografía Humana 2106008 08/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Historia Cultural e Instituciones de España y Europa 2106006 09/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Biología I 2106021 12/05/2014 15:00 102, 103 Laboratorio III 1

  14. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  15. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  16. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

  17. Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dercher, Andrew Steven

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, multiple countries are investing a great deal of time and energy towards developing a new class of technologically advanced nuclear reactors. These new reactors have come to be known as the Generation IV (Gen IV) class of nuclear...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - azapodandov iv indutsirovannyj Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LAP: Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry SUBJECT: Category IV (mixed betas and photons... ) - ANSI N13.32-2008 Category IV of ANSI N13.32-2008, Performance Testing of Extremity...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution iv Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iv Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution iv Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Pacific Institute 654 13th Street, Oakland, CA...

  20. COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar Ttm ttpait * i OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar APPLIED PHYSICS DIVISION, ARGONNE

  1. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  2. ;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    ;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei eiEilEiEiia ii?:lsiiiiiiiligF;i!;u gi;*:g!ifEi I iiii: '=;:E:;i:ii iii;Eliiliiilii5il:i=i:;;;Ei=? o o o \\ E r--/-o ( f EIE i l g \\ I E sli o o(J !" ( sQit s s?,3 t:is : ;*:: iqi5 ' i:iU l a . , i ^ . 9 e i;i1 li * sEisg :iiSrrl! S:ii;;.e !8*g B f E3::g f i:E; E', {*=f "sEi !xi! t i3;t

  3. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  4. Doublet III neutral beam power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

  5. A COMPARISON OF BKY-FTN4 AND VAX-FORTRAN IV-PLUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a statement label. name block sn lJ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus sneestat fn type 'L~ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus the label of anskip a line- Separator VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus 4.0 Description

  6. EKF BASED ESTIMATOR FOR FDI IN THE MODEL IV FCCU Yuanjie Huang, Sourabh Dash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Venkat

    EKF BASED ESTIMATOR FOR FDI IN THE MODEL IV FCCU Yuanjie Huang, Sourabh Dash G. V. Reklaitis study, a EKF based estimator for the Model IV FCCU is investigated. This model is multivariable variables. Performance of the estimator's application to the AmocoModel IV FCCU case study in terms of early

  7. Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite.reiller@cea.fr The influence of addition order and contact time in the system hematite (-Fe2O3) ­ humic acid (HA) ­ thorium (IV) was studied in batch experiments. Thorium (IV) is considered here as a chemical analogue of other actinides

  8. On the properties of massive Population III stars and metal-free stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schärer, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present realistic models for massive Population III stars and stellar populations based on non-LTE model atmospheres, recent stellar evolution tracks and up-to-date evolutionary synthesis models, to study their spectral properties, including their dependence on age, star formation history, and IMF. (..) The main results regarding integrated stellar populations are: * For young bursts and the case of a constant SFR, nebular continuous emission - neglected in previous studies - dominates the spectrum redward of Lyman-alpha (...). Therefore predicted emission line equivalent widths are considerably smaller than found in earlier studies, whereas the detection of the continuum is eased. Nebular line and continuous emission strongly affect the broad band photometric properties of Pop III objects. * Due to stellar evolution, the hardness of the ionising spectrum decreases rapidly, leading to the disappearance of the characteristic HeII 1640 recombination lines after ~ 3 Myr in instantaneous bursts. * The relative...

  9. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  10. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear Polarisation of Optically Pumped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear ~IT) is close to the earth field value. From this measurement, we determine the ~He nuclear in the gaseous and fluid phases at low temperature [ii, magnetometry [2], to polarised targets for nuclear

  11. Vacancy diffusion in the Cu(001) surface II: Random walk theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Saarloos, Wim

    Vacancy diffusion in the Cu(001) surface II: Random walk theory E. Somfai a,*,1 , R. van Gastel b Abstract We develop a version of the vacancy mediated tracer diffusion model, which follows the properties for the vacancy, and (iii) the diffusion rate of the vacancy is different, in our case strongly enhanced

  12. Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS sulfate mineralogy on Mars. Rice M. S. Bell J. F. III Cloutis E. A. Wang A. Ruff S. W. Craig M. A. Bailey) full630.pdf #12;McGlynn I. O. McSween H. Y. Jr. Fedo C. M. Mineralogical Characterization of Soils

  13. IV Festival Controamericano de Teatro: El Salvador 96

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizk, Beatriz J.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FALL 1997 151 IV Festival Centroamericano de Teatro: El Salvador 96 Beatriz J. Rizk En la ciudad de San Salvador, la llamada apropiadamente Valle de las Hamacas por sus temblores de tierra que parecen formar parte de las actividades cotidianas... Honduras, Costa Rica, El Salvador y Guatemala, además de contar con la participación de Cuba, Argentina, Estados Unidos y México. Para la ocasión se utilizaron tres espacios de manera simultánea: la Gran Sala y la Pequeńa Sala del fastuoso Teatro...

  14. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  15. Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

  16. Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Cobalt(III) Monohydride Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Roberts, John A.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new tetraphosphine ligands, PnC-PPh22NPh2 (1,5-diphenyl-3,7-bis((diphenylphosphino)alkyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl = (CH2)2, n = 2 (L2); (CH2)3, n = 3 (L3)), have been synthesized. Coordination of these ligands to cobalt affords the complexes [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+, which are reduced with KC8 to afford [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and [CoI(L3)(CH3CN)]1+. Protonation of the CoI complexes affords [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [HCoIII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+. Reduction of HCoIII results in formation of the analogous CoI complex through H-Co bond cleavage. Under voltammetric conditions, the reduced cobalt hydride reacts rapidly with a protic solvent impurity to generate H2 in a monometallic process involving two electrons per cobalt. In contrast, under bulk electrolysis conditions, H2 formation requires only one reducing equivalent per [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, indicating a bimetallic route wherein two cobalt hydride complexes react to form two equiv [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and one equiv H2. The cyclic voltammetry of [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, analyzed using digital simulation, is consistent with an ErCrEr reduction mechanism involving reversible acetonitrile dissociation from [HCoII(L2)(CH3CN)]1+. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, for support of the initial parts of this study. Current work is supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacevic, Jelena; Popovic, Luka C.; Dimitrijevic, Milan S., E-mail: jkovacevic@aob.bg.ac.r [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of optical Fe II emission in 302 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We group the strongest Fe II multiplets into three groups according to the lower term of the transition (b{sup 4} F, a{sup 6} S, and a{sup 4} G terms). These approximately correspond to the blue, central, and red parts, respectively, of the 'iron shelf' around H{beta}. We calculate an Fe II template that takes into account transitions into these three terms and an additional group of lines, based on a reconstruction of the spectrum of I Zw 1. This Fe II template gives a more precise fit of the Fe II lines in broad-line AGNs than other templates. We extract Fe II, H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III], and [N II] emission parameters and investigate correlations between them. We find that Fe II lines probably originate in an intermediate line region. We note that the blue, red, and central parts of the iron shelf have different relative intensities in different objects. Their ratios depend on continuum luminosity, FWHM H{beta}, the velocity shift of Fe II, and the H{alpha}/H{beta} flux ratio. We examine the dependence of the well-known anti-correlation between the equivalent widths of Fe II and [O III] on continuum luminosity. We find that there is a Baldwin effect for [O III] but an inverse Baldwin effect for the Fe II emission. The [O III]/Fe II ratio thus decreases with L {sub {lambda}5100}. Since the ratio is a major component of the Boroson and Green Eigenvector 1 (EV1), this implies a connection between the Baldwin effect and EV1 and could be connected with AGN evolution. We find that spectra are different for H{beta} FWHMs greater and less than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, and that there are different correlation coefficients between the parameters.

  18. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  19. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  20. PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES Professors: AALBERTS, S. BOLTON*, K. JONES a laser work? What is a black hole? What are the fundamental building blocks of the universe? Physics majors and Astrophysics majors study these and related questions to understand the physical world around

  1. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  2. Edgy Science III: From NSF Physics Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Edgy Science III: From NSF Physics Frontier Centers NSTA 2010 Philadelphia, PA From brains to the Big Bang, take a crash course in forefront science with the NSF Physics Frontier Centers, including - National Science Foundation (NSF) Physics Frontier Centers (PFCs) · Each Center - Science News - Resources

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME III)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM DatagovCampaignsARESE II

  4. Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

  5. Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

  6. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  7. Salle Pollack Hall 555, rue Sherbrooke ouest, Montral, QC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    études, opus 8 (extraits) / Twelve Etudes, Op. 8 (excerpts) Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915) I. Allegro II (1770-1827) I. Allegro vivace II. Largo appassionato III. Scherzo and Trio: Allegretto IV. Grazioso (1904-1987) I. Allegro con moto II. Andante cantabile III. Allegro giocoso Ce concert fait partie des

  8. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

  9. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  10. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  11. Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izequeido, Alexandor

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  12. VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Craig E.

    is the tentative schedule: Test #1, Thurs., Sept. 16, on Chp. 1 Test #2, Thurs., Oct. 14 on Chp. 2 Test #3, Tues., Nov. 16 on Chp. 3 Final, Tues., Dec. 14, 1-3:50, comprehensive but with extra weight on Chps 4 and 5 Material: Chp. 1: I, II.1,III, Chp.2: I,II,III.1-3, Chp. 3: I-V, Chp. 4: I.1-3,II, Chp.5: I,II Important

  13. VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Craig E.

    is the tentative schedule: Test #1, Thurs., Feb. 10, on Chp. 1 Test #2, Thurs., Mar. 10 on Chp. 2 Test #3, Tues., Apr. 12 on Chp. 3 Final, Thurs., May 12, 1-3:50, comprehensive but with extra weight on Chps 4 and 5 Material: Chp. 1: I, II.1,III, Chp.2: I,II,III.1-3, Chp. 3: I-V, Chp. 4: I.1-3,II, Chp.5: I,II Important

  14. Relativistic Modeling of Quark Stars with Tolman IV Type Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaver, Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we studied the behavior of relativistic objects with anisotropic matter distribution considering Tolman IV form for the gravitational potential Z. The equation of state presents a quadratic relation between the energy density and the radial pressure. New exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell system are generated. A physical analysis of electromagnetic field indicates that is regular in the origin and well behaved. We show as the presence of an electrical field modifies the energy density, the radial pressure and the mass of the stellar object and generates a singular charge density.

  15. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, UtahResources/FullGarden Wind Farm I JumpIV

  16. Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland isDiscoveries Inc JumpIV Facility

  17. Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm Jump to:Sector Wind energyIV

  18. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClient updateTRI-STATE GENERATION AND|Energy IV:

  19. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  20. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  1. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  2. Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks · REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

  3. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  4. Analysis of cadmium in undissolved anode materials of Mark-IV electro-refiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Tae-Sic; Fredrickson, G.L.; Vaden, D.; Westphal, B. [Separation Department, Materials and Fuels Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mark-IV electro-refiner (Mk-IV ER) is a unit process in the FCF (Fuel Conditioning Facility), which is primarily assigned to treating the used driver fuels. Mk-IV ER contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation. (authors)

  5. lOS :II. PELLET. -COXTHIBDTIOX GAUCHER, de l'action mcanique de l'estom~c et de la dure du sjour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    lOS :II. PELLET. - COXTHIBDTIOX GAUCHER, de l'action mécanique de l'estom~c et de la durée du animaux. CONTRIBUTION' A L'�TUDE DU LAIT ST�RILIS� par :M. PELLET, Ingénieur agronome. (8uite) IV

  6. Calculo Numerico II. Curso 04/05. Hoja 3 1. Comprobar que los problemas de valor inicial involucrados en la prueba del

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QuirĂłs, Fernando

    C´alculo Num´erico II. Curso 04/05. Hoja 3 1. Comprobar que los problemas de valor inicial que el m´etodo num´erico del apartado (iv) es convergente de orden 2. (vi) Aplicar el m´etodo num´erico

  7. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide standard ii-iii Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a-U (*) Summary: and costly. Thus, while we were able to study the light and heavy actinide metals 1 in their cubic (high... applied to the study of some actinide...

  9. Title: Research Associate I, II, or III Positions Open Pool Employment Type: Administrative Professional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by persistent effort, active planning, allocation of resources and/or accountability for diversity outcomes). Management duties may consist of managing inventory and databases, and ensuring a supply of solutions; and basic techniques in cell culture. Personal or professional commitment to diversity as demonstrated

  10. ii IS -3 -( Volume V.iii THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY -Spring 1991 Volume V.111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    to the chip allows for a complete solid-state voice recorder. The chip device includes on chip pre-amplifiers, filters, addressing logic, and power amplifiers. Not only is solid-state memory capacity being increased memory chip, the ISD1016. In its simplest sense, connect- ing a battery, microphone, and speaker

  11. Anne-Marie Mercier-Faivre UMR LIRE (CNRS-Lyon II-Grenoble III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    lecture fantasmatique de la Gazette d"Amsterdam au temps des Lettres persanes (1720-21) : le cas du despotisme oriental Les Lettres persanes, dit leur traducteur fictif, sont " une espèce de roman ", bien qu les Lettres persanes : Je te parlerai dans cette lettre d'une certaine nation qu'on appelle les

  12. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a new type of â??cumulative seismic attributeâ?ť (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  13. State Laboratory Program -Calibration Scope Summary Certificate Date Comments Mass I Mass II Mass III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 3000 lb 500 gal to 1 gal 500 gal to 20 gal LPG Corn 21 % to 14 % Wheat 18 % to 13 % Soy Bean 17 % to 12 gal Los Angeles County 2014 10 kg to 100 g 5000 lb to 1 lb 8 oz to 4 oz 5 gal to 1 gal Louisiana 2014

  14. Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    areas of a building located outside of the enclosed structure). OGSF50 is also known as "California consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including in the context of the local watershed, and enhance economic, social and environmental sustainability while

  15. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

  16. J. Phys. III Fiance 3 II 993) 1825-1832 SEPTEMBER 1993, PAGE 1825 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for producing ohmic contacts onto Gasb have been investigated. The minimization of contact resistivity'~ cm~ ~ to 4 x 10'~ cm~ ~. Two polishing ways were used : a chemical-mechanical one made of a bromine-methanol the samples are cleaned with trichlorethylene, acetone and methanol, and they are dried under N2 fIOW. 2.I p

  17. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral sheet. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral...

  18. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  19. ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A.

    WAREHOUSE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH PAGE 1 OF 3 General project description WAREHOUSE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH PAGE 2 OF 3 Resources: 1. Motors: Design and build an autonomous robot to compete in the 2009 Mechanical Engineering Indiana Jones

  20. Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    acceptor (ferrihydrite) was used (13). Addition of the humic acid analogue 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate

  1. activated glomeruli, (ii) the spatial combination of active neurons, (iii) the slow temporal sequence of activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system is not a static phenomenon but a dynamical process with different temporal components, eachof them probably readout byan adapted mechanism. This spatio-temporal representation is moreover dyna- mically be selected on the basis of their respiratory phase. Such a functional phase-coding relative to theta cycle (i

  2. Appunti di Fisica Matematica III-II semestre Lezioni di Sandro Graffi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bologna, UniversitĂ  di

    perpendicolarmente all'asse x. 1 Jean le Rond d'Alembert (Parigi 1717-Parigi 1783). L'equazione fu da lui scritta nel

  3. ajcc stage i-ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This thesis focuses on the design of a public theatre for the entire city of Boston, a "city stage." The intention is to explore through design the boundaries of an architectural...

  4. G Subject: Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for Fast-Track Cooperative ResearchD,F, Title

  5. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives Initiatives Through a variety ofthe Supportingand2011 |

  6. WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI

  7. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron transfer in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysisVents Using1of MassSurfaces.the

  8. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 FronteraMarijuana useDepartment6Assistance

  9. Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket

  10. Flexible Link Continual Reassessment Methods for Trivariate Binary Outcome Phase I/II Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, Bradley P.

    , or power function, to model the relationship between the dose levels and the true toxicity probabilities (O'Quigley from excessive doses and proposed by Faries (1994), Goodman et al. (1995), and O'Quigley and Shen (1996 al. (1994), O'Quigley et al. (2001), Braun (2002), and Thall and Cook (2004). One class of approaches

  11. 4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 | Open GRED Drilling

  12. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna E-Car Opening MagnaDesign Changes

  13. Aspects of aqueous iron and manganese (II/III) self-exchange electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -Grown by AtomicAshley

  14. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Model Predictive Control, Matlab Iterative Learning Control for Internal Combustion Engines Modeling and Control Description: In classical. The objective of this work is to apply learning algorithms to highly dynamic internal combustion engines

  15. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems, IC Engines, ...), Optimization Course, Matlab The gas-diesel engine is a natural gas engine, where the combustion is initiated by a small quantity on the investigation of the combustion process of the gas-diesel engine. A highly flexible engine test-bench with COC

  16. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Matlab/Simulink experience Contact for a Novel Engine Concept Position Control for an Internal Combustion Engine (Simulation) Description an internal combustion engine piston follow a reference position trajectory with sufficient accuracy

  17. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  18. Status of shell galaxies Jean-Louis Prieur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Status of shell galaxies Jean-Louis Prieur European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzshild-Str 2 D-ellipticity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 II.3 Radial distribution of the shells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV IV. Spectroscopy of the shells 15 IV.1 Nature of the stellar population

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual iv zoledronic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation Prostate Cancer Summary: to treatment with zoledronic acid (4 mg) IV infusion or placebo every 3 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, left... randomly assigned to...

  20. Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    IV Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES...

  1. Analise Matematica IV Licenciaturas: Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

    An´alise Matem´atica IV Licenciaturas: Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 2o

  2. Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation...

  3. What controls the C IV line profile in active galactic nuclei?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The high ionization lines in active galactic nuclei (AGN), such as C IV, tend to be blueshifted with respect to the lower ionization lines, such as H beta, and often show a strong blue excess asymmetry not seen in the low ionization lines. There is accumulating evidence that the H beta profile is dominated by gravity, and thus provides a useful estimate of the black hole mass in AGN. The shift and asymmetry commonly seen in C IV suggest that non gravitational effects, such as obscuration and radiation pressure, may affect the line profile. We explore the relation between the H beta and C IV profiles using UV spectra available for 81 of the 87 z 4000 km/s. This argues against the view that C IV generally originates closer to the center, compared to H beta. (3) C IV appears to provide a significantly less accurate, and possibly biased estimate of the black hole mass in AGN, compared with H beta. (4) All objects where C IV is strongly blueshifted and asymmetric have a high L/L_Edd, but the reverse is not true. This suggests that a high L/L_Edd is a necessary but not sufficient condition for generating a blueshifted asymmetric C IV emission. (5) We also find indications for dust reddening and scattering in `normal' AGN. In particular, PG quasars with a redder optical-UV continuum slope show weaker C IV emission, stronger C IV absorption, and a higher optical continuum polarization.

  4. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (

  5. Far-infrared spectra of complexes which exhibit magnetic cross-over: iron (III) complexes of tris (N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Alan Paul

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (III) complexes as a function of temperature, it was possible to obtain a correlation between the ground state electronic configuration and the Fe-S stretching vibrations. The pyrrolidyl (high-spin) and diisopropyl (low-spin) complexes exhibited temperature...-spin states is a function of temperature. In order to assign the Fe-S stretching vibrations in the various iron(III) dithiocarbamates the metal-isotope technique was used. ACKNOW'&LEDG&~iiENTS The author wishes to express his sincere appreciation to Dr...

  6. CMPO-functionalized C{sub 3}-symmetric tripodal ligands in liquid/liquid extractions : efficient, selective recognition of Pu(IV) with low affinity for 3+ metal ions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matloka, K.; Sah, A. K.; Peters, M. W.; Srinivasan, P.; Gelis, A. V.; Regalbuto, M.; Scott, M. J.; Univ. of Florida

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural modifications of carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CPMO)-functionalized triphenoxymethane platforms are described, and the influence of these changes on the ability of the ligand to extract actinides from simulated acidic nuclear waste streams has been evaluated. The ligand system has been shown to have excellent binding efficiency and a selectivity for An(IV) in comparison to the a simple monomeric CMPO ligand under analogous conditions. Both the extraction efficiency and selectivity are strongly dependent on the flexibility and electronic properties of the ligating units in the triphenoxymethane construct. The Tb(III) and Bi(III) nitrate complexes of tris-CMPO derivatives have been isolated, and their structures were elucidated by NMR, ESI FT-ICR MS, and X-ray analysis, providing information on the interactions between metal ions and the tris-CMPO molecules.

  7. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

  8. FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

  9. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  10. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

  11. Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperimentsInformationAnuvu IncSolarIII LLC Jump to:

  12. Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA RegionSpringviewNameGeothermal FacilitySteamboat III

  13. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom EnergyEnergy Wind Farm JumpIII

  14. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.doc RadiationI: EnergyIII:

  15. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCrete Inc JumpGland,Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump

  16. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik - Research FellowTechnology:III -

  17. TASS Mark IV Photometric Survey of the Northern Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Droege; Michael W. Richmond; Michael P. Sallman; Robert P. Creager

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Amateur Sky Survey (TASS) is a loose confederation of amateur and professional astronomers. We describe the design and construction of our Mark IV systems, a set of wide-field telescopes with CCD cameras which take simultaneous images in the $V$ and $I_C$ passbands. We explain our observational procedures and the pipeline which processes and reduces the images into lists of stellar positions and magnitudes. We have compiled a large database of measurements for stars in the northern celestial hemisphere with $V$-band magnitudes in the range 7 < V < 13. This paper describes data taken over the four-year period starting November, 2001. One of our results is a catalog of repeated measurements on the Johnson-Cousins system for over 4.3 million stars.

  18. Unexpected formation of a trinuclear complex containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond in the reactions of ButN=Ta(NMe2)3 with silanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Shu-Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dougan, Brenda A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Steren, Carlos A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Chen, Xue-Tai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lin, Zhenyang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xue, Zi-Ling [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new trinuclear species containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond, Ta{sub 3}({mu}-H)({mu}-NMe{sub 2})({mu}NBu{sup t}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t})(NMe{sub 2}){sub 5}, has been formed by reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. Ta{sub 2}H{sub 2}({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} has also been isolated. O{sub 2} oxidizes the Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond to yield Ta{sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)(H)({mu}NBu{sup t})({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} under ligand exchange. Delocalization of d electrons is discussed.

  19. Structural characterization of a family of cytochromes c{sub 7} involved in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Yang, X.; Duke, N. E. C.; Erickson, J.; Orshonsky, V.; Johnson, G.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periplasmic cytochromes c{sub 7} are important in electron transfer pathway(s) in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The genome of G. sulfurreducens encodes a family of five 10-kDa, three-heme cytochromes c{sub 7}. The sequence identity between the five proteins (designated PpcA, PpcB, PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE) varies between 45% and 77%. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE determined by X-ray diffraction. This new information made it possible to compare the sequences and structures of the entire family. The triheme cores are largely conserved but are not identical. We observed changes, due to different crystal packing, in the relative positions of the hemes between two molecules in the crystal. The overall protein fold of the cytochromes is similar. The structure of PpcD differs most from that of the other homologs, which is not obvious from the sequence comparisons of the family. Interestingly, PpcD is the only cytochrome c{sub 7} within the family that has higher abundance when G. sulfurreducens is grown on insoluble Fe(III) oxide compared to ferric citrate. The structures have the highest degree of conservation around 'heme IV'; the protein surface around this heme is positively charged in all of the proteins, and therefore all cytochromes c{sub 7} could interact with similar molecules involving this region. The structures and surface characteristics of the proteins near the other two hemes, 'heme I' and 'heme III', differ within the family. The above observations suggest that each of the five cytochromes c{sub 7} could interact with its own redox partner via an interface involving the regions of heme I and/or heme III; this provides a possible rationalization for the existence of five similar proteins in G. sulfurreducens.

  20. COBRA-IV PC: A personal computer version of COBRA-IV-I for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, B.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-IV PC is a modified version of COBRA-IV-I, adapted for use with most IBM PC and PC-compatible desktop computers. Like COBRA-IV-I, COBRA-IV PC uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV PC as the implicit solution scheme option. An explicit solution scheme is also available, allowing the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsions, and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. In addition, several modifications have been incorporated into COBRA-IV PC to allow the code to run on the PC. These include a reduction in the array dimensions, the removal of the dump and restart options, and the inclusion of several code modifications by Oregon State University, most notably, a critical heat flux correlation for boiling water reactor fuel and a new solution scheme for cross-flow distribution calculations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Updated 8/25/2014 Syllabus for EEL 4930 Physics of EE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    -state devices work? (3 weeks) i. How diode works 1. Example rectifier 2. Example solar cell 3. Example LED ii works iii. How an inductor works iv. How a transformer works II. Application to power (3 weeks) i. How. How a MOSFET works 1. Example switch IV. Application to electronics (2 weeks) i. How does an amplifier

  2. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  3. ARIES-III divertor engineering design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States); Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Herring, J.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valenti, M.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Plasma Dynamics Lab.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}. The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed.

  4. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual Release 4.2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes 19 MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  5. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  6. Houston, We Have a Success Story: Technology Transfer at the NASA IV&V Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekhtyar, Alexander

    Houston, We Have a Success Story: Technology Transfer at the NASA IV&V Facility Ken McGill, Wes of and technology transfer from NASA's research program in Independent Verification and Validation (IV, Verification. Keywords Technology transfer, Independent Verification and Validation, Research. 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Critical evaluation of PASSER IV: a progression-based network signal timing program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chada, Shireen Reddy

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TRANSYT-7F showed less delay than PASSER 11 or PASSER IV in case of total intersection delay especially for runs having larger cycle lengths. PASSER IV proved to be an excellent tool for arterial progression when compared to PASSER 11. The green splits...

  8. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report IV.F Photoelectrochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure TechnologiesDOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report 13 IV.F Photoelectrochemical IV.F.1 High-Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water - UNLV: Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen

  9. Fluorescence of [Fe II] in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rodriguez

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of [Fe II] lines at various positions within the H II regions M42 and M43 is presented. The relative intensities of selected optical [Fe II] lines are shown to be correlated with the intensity of the apparent nebular continuous spectrum. Since the continuum of H II regions is known to be mostly stellar radiation scattered by dust intermixed with the emitting gas, these correlations provide direct evidence for the existence of fluorescent excitation in the formation process of the [Fe II] lines, irrespective of the prevailing physical state.

  10. Analysis of Cadmium in Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Guy L. Fredrickson; DeeEarl Vaden; Brian R. Westphal

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mark-IV electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER) contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation.

  11. Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    coating. DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used...

  12. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical...

  13. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  14. Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

  15. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  16. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  17. Two Zebrafish Alcohol Dehydrogenases Share Common Ancestry with Mammalian Class I, II, IV, and V Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 Ethanol is teratogenic there is an association between ethanol metab- olism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report that ADH8A metabolizes ethanol, with a Vmax of 13.4 nmol/min/mg protein, whereas ADH8B does not metabolize

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV 549 Colloque C3, suppl6ment au Journal de Physique II, Volume 3, aout 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composites with a treatment of the fiber/matrix interfaces by metal Composite ceramic/ceramic materials find increasing applications because of their remarkable mechanical technique has demonstrated promising capabilities [1]. The fracture toughness of these ceramic composites

  19. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5, supplCment au Journal de Physique II,Volume 5,juin 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    been optimized by simulation modelling using the Si-H chemical system. A reactor has been designed separately through two concentric tub6 in the reactor. Our reactor geometry is an optimization of Taylor-Less Like Reactor: Simulation and Experimental Results C. Bisch, Y.B. Wang and F. Teyssandier lnstitutde

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on the impact of hydrogen on water reactor safety. Volume II of IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M. (ed.)

    1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the subject area: hydrogen sources and detection.

  1. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  2. PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

  3. SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

  4. The SMC Complex MukBEF Recruits Topoisomerase IV to the Origin of Replication Region in Live Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Emilien

    The Escherichia coli structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) complex, MukBEF, and topoisomerase IV (TopoIV) interact in vitro through a direct contact between the MukB dimerization hinge and the C-terminal domain of ...

  5. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  6. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  7. Syntheses, crystal structures and optical properties of the first strontium selenium(IV) and tellurium(IV) oxychlorides: Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Hailong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Mao Jianggao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)], E-mail: mjg@fjirsm.ac.cn

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new quaternary strontium selenium(IV) and tellurium(IV) oxychlorides, namely, Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}, have been prepared by solid-state reaction. Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} features a three-dimensional (3D) network structure constructed from strontium(II) interconnected by Cl{sup -}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} as well as Se{sub 2}O{sub 5}{sup 2-} anions. The structure of Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4} features a 3D network in which the strontium tellurium oxide slabs are interconnected by bridging Cl{sup -} anions. The diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements and results of the electronic band structure calculations indicate that both compounds are wide band-gap semiconductors. - Graphical abstract: Solid-state reactions of SrO, SrCl{sub 2}, and SeO{sub 2} or TeO{sub 2} in different molar ratios and under different temperatures lead to two new strontium selenium(IV) or tellurium(IV) oxychlorides with two different types of structures, namely, Sr{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3})(Se{sub 2}O{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} and Sr{sub 4}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})Cl{sub 4}. Both compounds are wide band-gap semiconductors based on the diffuse reflectance spectra and the electronic band structures.

  8. Selection of Correlations and Look-Up Tables for Critical Heat Flux Prediction in the Generation IV "IRIS" Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, A.

    In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded

  9. On the solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Aiguo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of five chapters and three major contributions are presented in Chapter II, III and IV. Chapter I provided a review of studies on solute transport in aquifer-aquitard system. If the aquitard is considered, two...

  10. evolutionary thought I. Before Darwin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    1 History of evolutionary thought I. Before Darwin II. Darwin & Wallace III. After Darwin IV: · The Renaissance ­ 17th Century · Age of Enlightenment ­ C. Linneus ­ James Hutton & Uniformitarianism Steno his contemporaries that extinction was a fact ­ William Buckland & Catastrophism (1784

  11. Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals i SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS January 2001;Systems Engineering Fundamentals Introduction ii #12;Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals iii ............................................................................................................................................. iv PART 1. INTRODUCTION Chapter 1. Introduction to Systems Engineering Management

  12. Universal Extra Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Kundu

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief discussion of the following features of the Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model: (i) Formulation, (ii) Indirect bounds, (iii) Collider search and the Inverse Problem, (iv) Astrophysical bounds, and (v) UED with two extra dimensions.

  13. Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

  14. Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms, SUPRI TR-127

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program spans a spectrum of topics and is divided into five categories: (i) multiphase flow and rock properties, (ii) hot fluid injection, (iii) primary heavy-oil production, (iv) reservoir definition, and (v) in-situ combustion.

  15. Retail Policies and Competition in the Gasoline Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, Jim

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Volume Table 4 - Gasoline Price Components Year RetailEvidence from Retail Gasoline Markets." Journal of Law,and Competition in the Gasoline Industry I. II. III. IV. V.

  16. Le mardi 11 mars 2014 Tuesday, March 11, 2014 15h30 3:30 p.m.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Sonate en fa majeur / Sonata in F major, Hob XVI:23 F.J. Haydn I. Allegro II. Adagio III. Presto Anna (extraits / excerpts) Sergei Rachmaninoff IV. Allegro con brio V. Moderato VI. Allegro appassionato (1873

  17. Energy modeling IV--planning for energy disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, B.W.; Courtney, L. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 10-12, 1982, the Institute of Gas Technology held the symposium ''Energy Modeling IV: Planning for Energy Disruptions,'' the fourth in a series of energy modeling symposia. Although all four of the energy modeling symposia presented by IGT emphasized new modeling techniques, each had a specific theme. This symposium addressed the role of modeling in dealing with the problems of disruptions in the supply and price of energy. The symposium brought together modelers and planners from federal and state governmental agencies, utilities, management and consulting organizations, and academic institutions. The participants discussed the complex planning problems presented by both gradual and sudden fluctuations in energy supply or price, whether caused by political, physical, economic, or natural events, and the resultant threats to the stability of businesses and the security of nations. A separate abstract was pepared for each paper for the Energy Data Base (EDB); on paper is included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and 22 for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  18. Product: Tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium(IV) P-6331 Date: February 2005 Copyright 2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Product: Tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium(IV) P-6331 Date: February 2005 Copyright © 2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 All rights reserved. Praxair Material Safety Data Sheet 1. Chemical Product-(dimethylamino)titanium(IV)] (MSDS No. P-6331) Trade Name: Praxair® TDMAT Chemical Name: Tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium(IV) Synonyms

  19. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezuela

    2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

  20. The School of Music of the College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Sonata No. 7, "Heroic" Ludwig van Beethoven I. Allegro con brio (1770-1827) II. Adagio cantabile III. Scherzo: Allegro IV. Finale: Allegro; Presto Legende Henryk Wieniawski (1835-1880) The Call Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) Concerto No. 1 in G minor Max Bruch II. Adagio (1838-1920) III. Finale: Allegro

  1. Univerzita Karlova v Praze Matematicko-fyzikln fakulta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Dusík (1760­1812) Sonáta c moll op. 35, c. 3 I. Allegro agitato assai II. Adagio patetico ed espressivo III. Intermezzo. Presto IV. Finale. Allegro molto Jan Ktitel Vahal (1739­1813) Sonáta B dur pro klarinet a pianoforte I. Allegro moderato II. Adagio III. Rondo. Allegro PESTÁVKA Jan Ktitel Vahal Sonáta B

  2. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  3. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  4. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88II Jump to:Meadow

  5. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC

  6. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |GContract115I,I

  7. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  8. Solvent Extraction Behavior of Plutonium (IV) Ions in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; Maher, C. J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Formo-and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Pu(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have been obtained and trends established. The affinity of aceto-hydroxamic acid for Pu(IV) ions and its selectivity over U(VI) ions is demonstrated by the values of the stability constants in HCIO4. These data support the applications of simple hydroxamic acids in advanced Purex-type solvent extraction systems.

  9. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  10. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Saglia, Roberto P; Bender, Ralf; Tojeiro, Rita; Chen, Yan-Mei; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R; Johansson, Jonas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Nichol, Robert C; Schneider, Donald P; Senger, Robert; Skibba, Ramin; Wake, David; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Shelden, Alaina; Ebelke, Garrett

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ~180,000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.12sigma significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z~0.7 up to z>2 as Mdyn/Mstar~ (1+z)^{-0.30+/- 0.12} further strengthening the evidence for an increase of Mdyn/Mstar with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  11. III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY MISCONDUCT Approved. GENERAL These procedures implement the Board of Regents Policy on Misconduct in Scholarly Work (November 30, 1989). All references to the "University" in these procedures mean the University of Maryland

  12. ADAVIDCRIGHTONBENEFITCONCERTJGMS102 ADAVIDCRIGHTONBENEFITCONCERTJGMS102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Vivace 7'20 Franz Schubert (1797-1828) Piano Trio in B flat major 35'49 D 898 (ca.1825-27) I. Allegro moderato 10'58 II. Andante un poco mosso 9'03 III. Scherzo: Allegro 6'35 IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace 8. Allegro ma non troppo 14'02 II. Allegretto grazioso 7'25 III. Poco adagio 9'00 IV. Allegro con brio 10

  13. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -57 iii #12;Contents · iv Rainwater .............................................................................................. A-85 Stormwater .................................................

  14. PROGRAMA FISICA II. INTRODUCCI O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    PROGRAMA F´ISICA II. INTRODUCCI ´O I ELECTRICITAT I.1 Camp electrost`atic I.2 Potencial i energia I.4 `Optica #12;BIBLIOGRAFIA B`asica 1. Tipler, P.A. F´isica. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1992. 2. Purcell Blum, R. F´isica: Electricidad, Mag- netismo y Luz. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1986. Complement`aria 1

  15. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  16. New seismological results on the G0 IV eta Bootis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Carrier; P. Eggenberger; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Several attempts have been made to detect solar-like oscillations in the G0 IV star eta Boo. We present here new observations on this star simultaneously conducted with two spectrographs: Coralie mounted on the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) and Elodie based on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). In total, 1239 spectra were collected over 13 nights. The power spectrum of the high precision velocity time series clearly presents several identifiable peaks between 0.4 and 1.0 mHz showing regularity with a large and small separations of Delta_nu = 39.9 uHz and delta_nu02 = 3.95 uHz respectively. Twenty-two individual frequencies have been identified. Detailed models based on these measurements and non-asteroseismic observables were computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining these seismological data with non-asteroseismic observations, we determine the following global parameters for eta Boo: a mass of 1.57 +- 0.07 M_sol, an age t=2.67 +- 0.10 Gyr and an initial metallicity Z/X_i=0.0391 +- 0.0070. We also show that the mass of eta Boo is very sensitive to the choice of the observed metallicity, while the age of eta Boo depends on the input physics used. Indeed, a higher metallicity favours a higher mass, while non-rotating models without overshooting predict a smaller age.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  18. Analysis of the raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Action Plan (PRAP). The report details the results of an analysis of the raw data of primary sample plots (PSPs) collected during Cycle IV of the National Forest Inventory and...

  19. Architecture and urbanism in Henri IV's Paris : the Place Royale, Place Dauphine, and Hôpital St. Louis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballon, Hilary Meg

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation concerns the extensive building program which Henri IV undertook in Paris from 1600 to 1610. Focusing on the place Royale (now called the place des Vosges) , the place Dauphine, rue Dauphine, and Pont ...

  20. Feasibility of risk-informed regulation for Generation-IV reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matos, Craig H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of new and innovative Generation-IV reactor designs, new regulations must be developed to assure the safety of these plants. In the past a purely deterministic way of developing design basis accidents was ...

  1. Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). IV. Occurrence of an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sever, David M.

    Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). IV gefu¨llt sein." In the next paragraph, van den Broek turns his atten- tion to snakes and reported, "Auf

  2. Stark broadening of B IV lines for astrophysical and laboratory plasma research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrijevi?, Milan S; Simi?, Zoran; Kova?evi?, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stark broadening parameters for 36 multiplets of B IV have been calculated using the semi-classical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series and temperature dependence.

  3. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  4. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-347 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    THE MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION DURING DEFORMATION UNDER SEVERAL STRAIN RATES IN A COMMERCIAL 5182 ALUMINIUM ALLOY K'ecoulement d'un alliage d'aluminium 5182 a 6t6 d6termin6e en fonction de la Vites- se de deformation entre 10 deformation est observee. Abstract - The flow stress of a commercial 5182 aluminum alloy has been investigated

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-341 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ductility decertains alliagesd'aluminium (1050,3003,3004,5182 et 7N01) ont ete determiners en fonction de la 3004, 5182 et 7N01 diminue quand la vitesse de deformation augmente dans le domaine de 10-3 s_1 h 102 s of some commercial aluminum alloys (1050, 3003, 3004, 5182 and 7N01) have been investigated as a function

  7. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-19 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'a prati- quement aucune influence sur la réponse dynamique en contrainte-déformation. En accord avec ces. W-7405-ENG-48. Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http://dx.doi.org/10

  8. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C6, supplement au Journal de Physique III, Volume 6, octobre 1996 C6-243

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Technology. The purpose of such a programme is to have a better knowledge of this approach for RPV fracture, is the l j volume of the mesh element and V, the volume of the material cell. The integration is made of the material and characterizes the resistance to cleavage fracture. Both parameters, which are assumed

  9. Nanostructures produced by phase-separation during growth of (III-V).sub.1-x(IV.sub.2).sub.x alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Andrew G. (Evergreen, CO); Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures (18) and methods for production thereof by phase separation during metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). An embodiment of one of the methods may comprise providing a growth surface in a reaction chamber and introducing a first mixture of precursor materials into the reaction chamber to form a buffer layer (12) thereon. A second mixture of precursor materials may be provided into the reaction chamber to form an active region (14) on the buffer layer (12), wherein the nanostructure (18) is embedded in a matrix (16) in the active region (14). Additional steps are also disclosed for preparing the nanostructure (18) product for various applications.

  10. The bacterial blight disease of cotton. III. A statistical study of the inheritance of Stoneville 20 resistance. IV. The physiological nature of Stoneville 20 resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, L. S.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................. 2li LIST OF TABLES Table Text Page 10 D, H, Ei and E2 values for the three crosses RGD S R 2 9 Pi x P3 and ?i x P^ . ................................. 26 11 Analysis of variance for the linkage tests for the three crosses where Vjp O ^BFo FN1.U...2 are e x c l u d e d ...........? . . . ......................... 28 12 Analysis of variance for the linkage tests for the three crosses where VBF3 excluded entirely and and Vgi+32 3X6 excluded for the t e s t ........... 29 13 Observed...

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C2, supplement au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, fevrier 1994 C2-123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    modes and in some cases the interactions between the defects and the acoustic vibrations are presented method, the Czochralsky growth method,which is used, for instance, for lithium tantalate(2), lithium the vibration modes and in some cases the interactions between the defects and the acoustic vibrations

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-675 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Union Research Institute of Technical Physics, P.O. BOK 245, 454070, Chelyabinsk-70, USSR Résumé : Les résultats

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C5, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, mai 1994 C5-31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    les turbines ( Fig. no 1). LES SOURCESDE BRUIT DU MOTEUR 2.1.1.Le bruit dejet C 'est un bruit de type pression et ŕ la température des gaz. Il est dű ŕ la génération de fortes turbulences dans la zone ou les gaz éjectés se mélangent ŕ l'air ambiantcettezone de mélangeest située ŕ plusieurs diamčtresdu plan de

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C3, supplment au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, fvrier 1994 C3-251

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    350 ŕ 400°C. D'oů leur utilisation dans des parties plus chaudes des avions comme les turbines ŕ gaz

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-197 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the given paper consists in obtaining such data for depleted uranium and for four uranium alloys at strain BEHAVIOUR OF URANIUM ALLOYS AT HIGH LOADING RATES J. BUCHAR* , S. ROLC**, J. PECHA&K* * and J. KREJ of Physical Metallurgy, C.R.S, "iitkova 22, 616 62 Brno, Czechoslovakia Résumé: Le comportement d'uranium

  16. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-597 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to the use of specialised alloys in armour-piercing and fragmenting projectiles. Alloys of depleted uranium

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C3-795 Colloque C3, suppl. au Journal de Physique III, Vol. 1, octobre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    s t l'implantation du modèle dans le code HEMP et son évaluation par des simulations numériques. Par introduced into the HEMP hydrocode, and numerical simulations are performed to test the constituve equations déformations. Lors d'études antérieures /1,2/, nous avions implanté dans le code de calcul HEMP, les lois de

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C2, supplement au Journal de Physique III, Volume 4, fevrier 1994 C2-73

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is always possible. In the case of a quartz only, the equivalent electrical circuit can be a R t C classicaI circuit. When the quartz is introduced inbthe mini-device, the electrical circuit of the metal/electrolyte and the quartdelectrolyte contacts are added in serie. The parameters that change the quartz mode vibration are liquid

  19. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  20. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  1. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  2. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  3. On the origin of the C IV Baldwin effect in AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the luminosity dependence of the equivalent width (EW) of broad emission lines in AGN (the Baldwin effect) is not firmly established yet. We explore this question for the broad C IV \\lambda 1549 line using the Boroson & Green sample of the 87 z < 0.5 Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) quasars. Useful UV spectra of the C IV region are available for 81 of the objects, which are used to explore the dependence of the C IV EW on various emission properties. We confirm earlier results on the strong correlations of the C IV EW with some of the emission parameters which define the Boroson & Green Eigenvector 1, and with the optical to X-ray slope \\alpha_ox. In addition, we find a strong correlation of the C IV EW with the relative accretion rate, L/L_Edd. Since L/L_Edd drives some of the Eigenvector 1 correlations, it may be the primary physical parameter which drives the Baldwin effect for C IV.

  4. A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, James Ferrell

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isobutylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bi s-l, 3-dimethylbu tyl ammoni- umpentabromobi smutha (III) Bis-4-p1coliniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis-cyclohexylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bis-piperidiniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis...103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 6x103 Tri, s-methyl ammoni um- hexabromobismuthate (III) 355 7. 5x103 7, 2x103 7 ~ 5xl03 7, 6x103 7. 5x103 20 TABLE III CONTINUED Tris-dimethylammonium- hexabromobismuthate (III) Tris...

  5. Structure and Stability of Hexa-Aqua V(III) Cations in Vanadium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrolytes. Structure and Stability of Hexa-Aqua V(III) Cations in Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes. Abstract: The Vanadium (III) cation structure in mixed acid based...

  6. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  7. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  8. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -benzyltrimethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 56. 79 55. Z7 + 0. 07 27. tris-cyclehexylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 6l, 39 59. 92 0. 08 TABLE III Compound Concentration l=-"'). " ~ass ( '"' o-' Avg (ass liter mole-cm tris-methylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 10 8...-di-ethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) tris-tri-ethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 10 8 6 4 10 8 6 4 7. 79 7. 75 7. 90 7. 90 7. 66 7. 66 7. 75 7. 78 7. 8 7. 7 TABLE III (Contd) Compound tris-n-propylammonium- hexaiodobismutbate(III) Concentration x...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - agn iii zw Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted, millimeterpeaked spectrum Summary: A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted,...

  10. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9˘/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87˘/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  11. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curve CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Cubic Bezier Curves · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions: = = 3 0 3 )()( i ii uBpuc ip CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves (degree n) · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions

  12. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

  13. A study of RELAP5/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 predictions of a small break LOCA simulation conducted at the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Sandra Mernell

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )pl / ? DE -Upp r Head Spray Nozzle rVent Valve Simulator Line Hot Leo Upper Plenum Leak Line r9 Core normal flow transient 'low ECCH Induction E-l EltO QtQ EltC] El Lower Plenum Figure 4. Pressure Vessel 12 Table II Primary... simulation codes RELAP5/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 were utilized to calculate the phenomena which occurred during a small break LOCA simulation conducted at the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility. The transient scenario was a 5% break in the cold leg with a loss...

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  15. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  16. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  17. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  18. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  19. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  20. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...