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  1. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang; Ding, Jun; Yao, yugui

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  2. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  3. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV

  4. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Facility Victory Gardens- Phase IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  5. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SL EJEK EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdminSupport) RETIREMENT ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 11 13.9% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 29 36.7%...

  6. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for GRED III Phase II Citation Bernie Karl. 2010. GRED III Phase II. p....

  7. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  8. GRED III Phase II | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III Phase II GRED III Phase II Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: To gain a better understanding of the geothermal reservoir at Chena Hot Springs Resort in Alaska; Test and document the reliability of previous predictions as to the nature of the reservoir. egs_karl_gred_3_phase_2.pdf (601.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology

  9. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike III II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  10. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 PDF icon 000521 & ...

  11. Directed synthesis of crystalline plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalates: accessing redox-controlled separations in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runde, Wolfgang; Brodnax, Lia F; Goff, George S; Bean, Amanda C; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Both binary and ternary solid complexes of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) oxalates have been previously reported in the literature. However, uncertainties regarding the coordination chemistry and the extent of hydration of some compounds remain mainly because of the absence of any crystallographic characterization. Single crystals of hydrated oxalates of Pu(III), Pu{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (I) and Pu(IV), KPu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){center_dot}2.5H{sub 2}O (II), were synthesized under moderate hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds I and II are the first plutonium(III) or (IV) oxalate compounds to be structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Crystallographic data for I: monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 11.246(3) A, b = 9.610(3) A, c = 10.315(3) A, Z = 4 and II: monoclinic, space group C2/c, a = 23.234(14) A, b = 7.502(4) A, c = 13.029(7) A, Z = 8.

  12. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide ...

  13. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a liquid core waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide ...

  14. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide You ...

  15. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: ... agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the CEQ's regulations. ...

  16. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  17. TOTAL SES EJ/EK EN V EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EJEK EN V EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdmin Support) ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 9 11.8% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 23 30.3% Males 50 65.8%...

  18. GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report GRED Drilling Award GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review ...

  19. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  20. C IV and C III] reverberation mapping of the luminous quasar PG 1247+267

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevese, D.; Saturni, F. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Perna, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Vagnetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Dadina, M. [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-11-10

    So far the masses of about 50 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been measured through the reverberation mapping technique (RM). Most measurements have been performed for objects of moderate luminosity and redshift, based on H?, which is also used to calibrate the scaling relation that allows single-epoch (SE) mass determination based on AGN luminosity and the width of different emission lines. Due to the complex structure and gas dynamics of the relevant emission region, the SE masses obtained from the C IV(1549 ) line show a large spread around the mean values. Direct RM measures of C IV exist for only six AGNs of low luminosity and redshift, and only one luminous quasar. Since 2003, we have collected photometric and spectroscopic observations of PG1247+267, the most luminous quasar ever analyzed for RM. We provide light curves for the continuum and for C IV(1549 ) and C III](1909 ), and measures of the reverberation time lags based on the SPEAR method. The sizes of the line emission regions assume a ratio of R {sub C} {sub III]}/R {sub C} {sub IV} ? 2, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, indicating for the first time a similar ionization stratification in a luminous quasar and low-luminosity nuclei. Due to the relatively small size of the broad line region and the relatively narrow line widths, we estimate a small mass and an anomalously high Eddington ratio. We discuss the possibility that either the shape of the emission region or an amplification of the luminosity caused by gravitational lensing may be partly responsible for the result.

  1. Synthesis and properties of titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles: A tunable solid-state Fe(II/III) redox system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, Carolyn I.; Qafoku, Odeta; Liu, Juan; Arenholz, Elke; Heald, Steve M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Gorski, Christopher A.; Henderson, C. Michael B.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-12-01

    Titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles were synthesized by room temperature aqueous precipitation, in which Ti(IV) replaces Fe(III) and is charge compensated by conversion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the unit cell. A comprehensive suite of tools was used to probe composition, structure, and magnetic properties down to site-occupancy level, emphasizing distribution and accessibility of Fe(II) as a function of x. Synthesis of nanoparticles in the range 0 ? x ? 0.6 was attempted; Ti, total Fe and Fe(II) content were verified by chemical analysis. TEM indicated homogeneous spherical 10 12 nm particles. ?-XRD and Mssbauer spectroscopy on anoxic aqueous suspensions verified the inverse spinel structure and Ti(IV) incorporation in the unit cell up to x ? 0.38, based on Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio deduced from the unit cell edge and Mssbauer spectra. Nanoparticles with a higher value of x possessed a minor amorphous secondary Fe(II)/Ti(IV) phase. XANES/EXAFS indicated Ti(IV) incorporation in the octahedral sublattice (B-site) and proportional increases in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio. XA/XMCD indicate these increases arise from increasing B-site Fe(II), and that these charge-balancing equivalents segregate to those B-sites near particle surfaces. Dissolution studies showed that this segregation persists after release of Fe(II) into solution, in amounts systematically proportional to x and thus the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio. A mechanistic reaction model was developed entailing mobile B-site Fe(II) supplying a highly interactive surface phase that undergoes interfacial electron transfer with oxidants in solution, sustained by outward Fe(II) migration from particle interiors and concurrent inward migration of charge-balancing cationic vacancies in a ratio of 3:1.

  2. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: ... design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous ...

  3. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  4. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III .. III A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANAL.OGUE STATES IN 41K AND 23 Na by George A lbert Keyworth II Department of Physics Duke University A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Duke University 1968 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A HIGH RESOLUTION STUDY OF ISOBARIC ANALOGUE STATES IN 41 K - AND 23 Na ,. by George Albert Keyworth II

  5. Oil geochemistry study; Blocks III and IV Bachaquedro Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, B.A.; Villarroel, H.G. de; Rondon, L.

    1996-08-01

    Blocks III and IV Bachaquero, Field, located on the east side of Lake Maracaibo, comprise an area of 40 square kilometers. In 1956 the discovery well penetrated oil saturated sands in a south dipping homoclinal structure. In 1958 production reached a maximum of 245,000 barrels per day of moderate gravity oil from three Miocene age Lagunillas Formation sands, designated as L, M, and N. The Bachaquero Field has experienced production problems including high gas-oil ratios from M and N sands to the north, high water cuts in all three sands to the south, and low production rates in the southeast. In addition, the vertical and lateral continuity of the oil pools are unknown. High resolution gas chromatography and analysis of biological markers was employed in order to resolve the continuity of the oil pools, determine genetic origin of the oils, and shed light on erratic production. Oil in the L sands are vertically discontinuous from oil in the M+N sands. The two oil pools appear laterally continuous within the study area, indicating absence of fault barriers. Well VLD 311, open to both L and M sands, produces a mix of oils, but with a strong contribution from the M sand. Bachaquero Field reservoirs were charged with oil from two different facies of the Upper Cretaceous La Luna or perhaps from La Luna and Colon source rocks as the stratigraphically younger L sands contain less mature oil with a stronger terrigenous imprint than oil the M and N sands.

  6. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I.

    2013-01-15

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  7. Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No.113-6 Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III and Division G, ...

  8. GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Peer Review Report | Department of Energy Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report GRED Drilling Award … GRED III Phase II; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review lowtemp_011_karl.pdf (222.5 KB) More Documents & Publications 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Well Monitoring Systems for EGS; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report

  9. Extraction and separation of thorium(IV) from lanthanides(III) with room-temperature ionic liquids containing primary amine N{sub 1923}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Y.; Chen, J.; Bai, Y.; Li, D.Q.

    2008-07-01

    The extraction behavior of Th(IV) by primary amine N{sub 1923} in imidazolium-based ionic liquid namely 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (N{sub 1923}/IL) was studied in this paper. Results showed that N{sub 1923}/IL had poorer extraction ability for Th(IV) than N{sub 1923} in n-heptane (N{sub 1923}/HEP). The separation coefficients between Th(IV) and lanthanides(III) ({beta}{sub Th/Ln}) were obtained and compared with those in the N{sub 1923}/HEP system. On this basis, we made a preliminary assessment for the possibility of using ionic liquids as solvents for the separation of Th(IV) from lanthanides(III) sulfate in a clean process. (authors)

  10. Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    46 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 132 / Monday, July 11, 2011 / Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comment. SUMMARY: Through this notice, the Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of its preliminary plan for retrospective analysis of existing rules to make

  11. Application of sequence stratigraphy in an integrated reservoir characterization of the Miocene Lower Lagunillas member in the further development of blocks III/IV, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamero De Villarroel, H.; Coll, C.M.; Jimenez, Z.; Lozada, T.; Leon, K.; Brandt, R.; Padron, R.; Rondon, L.; Maraven, S.A.; Gomez, E.; Munoz, M.A.; Ripple, R.A.; Luneau, B.A.

    1996-08-01

    An integrated sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for the Lower Lagunillas and Laguna members of the Miocene Lagunillas Formation at Blocks III/IV, Lake Maracaibo. These reservoirs were discovered in the 1950s and have produced over 1132 MMBO. The Lower Lagunillas and Laguna had traditionally been interpreted as delta plain and coastal bar deposits, with each member consisting of 3 reservoir subdivisions developed as single drainage units. Subsequent engineering studies showed that this geologic model did not adequately address the heterogeneity of the reservoirs. Sedimentological interpretation of 8 cored wells led to the development of a new model which was further enhanced by integrating 210 well logs, 3D seismic data, petrophysical analysis, and production and pressure data. In this model the basal Lower Lagunillas is interpreted as a fluvially dominated upper delta plain. The upper part of the Lower Lagunillas and Laguna represents deposition in a tidally dominated lower delta plain and delta front environment. Fluctuations between tides and river floods were responsible for generating thick, very heterogeneous reservoirs. The new reservoir model provides the basis for additional development by the identification of (1) recompletion intervals, (2) low resistivity pay zones as potential targets for horizontal wells, and (3) infill drilling targets. Use of this predictive reservoir model will ensure the optimal exploitation and recovery of the remaining oil at Blocks III/IV.

  12. Coordinated NO{sub x} control strategies: Phase II Title IV, ozone transport region and ozone transport assessment group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, W.F.; Dunn, R.M.; Baublis, D.C.

    1998-12-31

    Many electric utilities are faced with future nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) reduction requirements. In some instances, these utilities will be affected by multiple regulatory programs. For example, numerous fossil fired plants must comply with Phase II of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), state NO{sub x} rules as a result of the recommendations of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) and future requirements of the Proposed Rule for Reducing Regional Transport of Ground-Level Ozone (Ozone Transport SIP Rulemaking). This paper provides an overview of NO{sub x} regulatory programs, NO{sub x} compliance planning concepts, and NO{sub x} control technology options that could be components of an optimized compliance strategy.

  13. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  14. CONSTRAINING VERY HIGH MASS POPULATION III STARS THROUGH He II EMISSION IN GALAXY BDF-521 AT z = 7.01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Dav, Romeel; Zabludoff, Ann; Jiang, Linhua; Oh, S. Peng; Yang, Yujin

    2015-01-30

    Numerous theoretical models have long proposed that a strong He II?1640 emission line is the most prominent and unique feature of massive Population III (Pop III) stars in high-redshift galaxies. The He II?1640 line strength can constrain the mass and initial mass function (IMF) of Pop III stars. We use F132N narrowband filter on the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 to look for strong He II?1640 emission in the galaxy BDF-521 at z = 7.01, one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies to date. Using deep F132N narrowband imaging, together with our broadband imaging with F125W and F160W filters, we do not detect He II emission from this galaxy, but place a 2? upper limit on the flux of 5.310{sup ?19}ergs{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2}. This measurement corresponds to a 2? upper limit on the Pop III star formation rate (SFR{sub PopIII}) of ?0.2 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}, assuming a Salpeter IMF with 50 ? M/M {sub ?} ? 1000. From the high signal-to-noise broadband measurements in F125W and F160W, we fit the UV continuum for BDF-521. The spectral flux density is ?3.610{sup ?11}?{sup ?2.32}ergs{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} {sup 1}, which corresponds to an overall unobscured SFR of ?5 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. Our upper limit on SFR{sub PopIII} suggests that massive Pop III stars represent ? 4% of the total star formation. Further, the HST high-resolution imaging suggests that BDF-521 is an extremely compact galaxy, with a half-light radius of 0.6 kpc.

  15. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  16. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume IV. FBC-Model-II manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fourth of the seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. The purpose of this manual is to describe how to access and use M.I.T.'s Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) System Program. Presently, the FBC program is stored in a Honeywell Computer System and can be accessed using the Multics interactive system. The intention in writing this manual is to answer the questions that may arise regarding the mechanics of operating the system program, as well as warn the user of possible pitfalls and mistakes that could be made. No attempt is made here to describe the internals of the systems program. The manual describes the procedures an individual would follow to become an active user of the system program. It then explains the various options available for reaching the Multics interactive system on Honeywell 6180 computer on which the program runs. For users outside the Metropolitan Boston area, a public network for data communications is described which is relatively inexpensive. As the system program is approached through Multics using a special command facility TPSA, a separate introduction is provided for Multics TPSA. This facility allows commands appropriate for testing the program and carrying out parametric studies to be executed in a convenient way. Multics TPSA was formulated to meet the needs of the FBC project in particular. Finally, some sample sessions are presented which illustrate the login and logout procedures, the command language, and the data manipulation features of the FBC program. The use of commands helpful in debugging the program is also illustrated.

  17. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary "Technical targets for fuel cell membranes in stationary applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). " technical_targets_membr_stat.pdf (83.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Table I: Technical Targets for

  18. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  19. Nonresidential-building energy-consumption survey, 1979. Final report, Part II and Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The Utility Survey component of the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Survey was designed to provide data on the quantity and costs of energy consumed during 1979 by each building represented in the Building Survey data. To this end, 13,386 consumption and cost reporting forms were mailed to 1509 companies/organizations/agencies who supplied some type of energy to the 6222 buildings represented in the data from the earlier Building Survey. Part II, Section 2 discusses the step-by-step process of building the computer and manual files that were needed in order to conduct the Utility Survey. How the files were actually used in order to implement, control, and manage the Utility Survey was also discussed. Section 3 discusses the reporting forms and the accompanying instructional material used to collect data from the energy suppliers and Section 4 discusses the various operations for implementing the data collection task. The proessing of the data is described in Section 5 and the method of keeping the data confidential is described in Section 6. Part III, Section 7 presents several analyses of the costs associated with the Interim Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Survey. Tables included reflect costs incurred through April 25, 1981. Administrative correspondence, record sheets, and explanatory notes are included in appendices. (MCW)

  20. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  1. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI)=1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (?), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  2. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate, Lactate, and Oxalate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), and U(VI) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bynaum, R.V.; Free, S.J.; Moore, R.C.

    1999-01-15

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands is of concern because complexation of the actinides with the ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical retardation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV), Np(V), and U(W) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in NaCl media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporite systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations.

  3. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  4. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  5. Atlantic coastal experiment IV, R/V Atlantis II cruise, 3-13 April 1978, data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, W.

    1980-12-01

    The R/V ATLANTIS II cruise to New York Bight and Georges Bank during the spring of 1978 was part of a study of the physical, chemical, and biological interactions between these two regions.

  6. MODERATE C IV ABSORBER SYSTEMS REQUIRE 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} DARK MATTER HALOS AT z {approx} 2.3: A CROSS-CORRELATION STUDY OF C IV ABSORBER SYSTEMS AND QUASARS IN SDSS-III BOSS DR9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikas, Shailendra; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Lundgren, Britt; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; AlSayyad, Yusra; York, Donald G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Ge, Jian; Muna, Demitri; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; and others

    2013-05-01

    We measure the two-point cross-correlation function of C IV absorber systems and quasars, using spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS; Data Release 9). The 19,701 quasars and 6149 C IV ''moderate'' absorbers, 0.28 A < rest-frame equivalent width (EW) < 5 A, in our study cover a redshift range of 2.1 < z < 2.5 over 3300 deg{sup 2} and represent a factor of two increase in sample size over previous investigations. We find a correlation scale length and slope of the redshift-space cross-correlation function of s{sub 0} = 8.46 {+-} 1.24 Mpc, {gamma} = 1.68 {+-} 0.19, in the redshift-space range 10 < s < 100 Mpc. We find a projected cross-correlation function of C IV absorption systems and quasars of r{sub 0} = 7.76 {+-} 2.80 Mpc, {gamma} = 1.74 {+-} 0.21. We measure the combined quasar and C IV bias to be b{sub QSO} b{sub C{sub IV}} = 8.81 {+-} 2.28. Using an estimate of b{sub QSO} from the quasar auto-correlation function we find b{sub CIV} = 2.38 {+-} 0.62. This b{sub CIV} implies that EW > 0.28 A C IV absorbers at z {approx} 2.3 are typically found in dark matter halos that have masses {>=}10{sup 11.3}-10{sup 13.4} M{sub Sun} at that redshift. The complete BOSS sample will triple the number of both quasars and absorption systems and increase the power of this cross-correlation measurement by a factor of two.

  7. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  8. Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No.113-6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2013-06 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2013-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No.113-6.

  9. Raman spectra of Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}X{sub 4}{sup VI} magnetic quaternary semiconductor compounds with tetragonal stannite type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rincón, C. Quintero, M.; Power, Ch.; Moreno, E.; Quintero, E.; Morocoima, M.; Henao, J. A.; Macías, M. A.

    2015-05-28

    A comparative study of the Raman spectra of Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}S{sub 4}{sup VI} and Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}Se{sub 4}{sup VI}(where B = Mn or Fe) magnetic quaternary semiconductor compounds with stannite-type structure (I4{sup ¯}2m) has been done. Most of the fourteen Raman lines expected for these materials were observed in the spectra. The two strongest lines observed have been assigned to the IR inactive A{sub 1}{sup 1} and A{sub 1}{sup 2} stannite modes that originated from the motion of the S or Se anion around the Cu and C{sup IV} cations remaining at rest. The shift in the frequency of these two lines of about 150 cm{sup −1} to lower energies observed in Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}Se{sub 4}{sup VI} compounds as compared to those in Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}S{sub 4}{sup VI} ones, can then be explained as due to the anion mass effect. Based on the fact that values of these frequencies depend mainly on anion mass and bond-stretching forces between nearest-neighbor atoms, the vibrational frequencies v{sup ¯}(A{sub 1}{sup 2}) and v{sup ¯}(A{sub 1}{sup 2}) of both modes for several Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}X{sub 4}{sup VI} stannite compounds (where X = S, Se, or Te) very close to the experimental data reported for these materials were calculated from a simple model that relates these stretching forces to the anion-cation bond-distances.

  10. Investigation of the second discharge plateau of the {beta}(III)-NiOOH/{beta}(II)-Ni(OH){sub 2} system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leger, C.; Tessier, C.; Menetrier, M.; Denage, C.; Delmas, C. |

    1999-03-01

    The galvanostatic reduction of the nickel hydroxide electrode is known to proceed at two successive potentials without this phenomenon being well understood. In this paper the authors prove that this second discharge plateau is unrelated to oxygen reduction and that it can be observed in the absence of the {gamma}-NiOOH hydrated phase. Some earlier studies have connected it to the phase diagram of the {beta}(III)/{beta}(II) system. Using highly precise X-ray measurements, the authors demonstrate that the latter is quite different from the one commonly used. They then interpret the unusual shapes of potential relaxation curves during the lower discharge plateau. Measurements over a wide range of current density (four orders of magnitude) yield experimental clues for an original interpretation of the second discharge plateau based on the dynamics of the discharge process. They suggest that the second plateau is due to the existence of a phase close to Ni(OH){sub 2}, which is not ionically conductive but (poorly) electronically conductive, in the vicinity of the current collector.

  11. Luminescent pillared Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Jia, Ji-Min; Cui, Yu; Han, Song-De; Chang, Ze

    2014-04-01

    In our efforts toward rational design and systematic synthesis of pillar-layer structure coordination frameworks, four new Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination polymers (CPs) based on two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylic ligands with formula ([LnZn(L1){sub 2}(L2)(H{sub 2}O){sub m}]nH{sub 2}O){sub ?} (Ln=La (1), Eu (2), Gd (3) and Dy (4), m=3 (for 1) and 2 (for 24), n=8 (for 1) and 7 (for 24), H{sub 2}L1=pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate acid, HL2=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reaction of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO, H{sub 2}L1 and HL2. CP 1 has a three-dimensional (3D) structure with a (3,6)-connected sit topology network, while CPs 24 are isostructural with 3D single-node pcu alpha-Po topology network. Also, luminescent properties of these CPs have also been investigated. The emission of 1 and 3 should be attributed to the coordination-perturbed ligand-centered luminescence and the emission spectra of 2 and 4 show the characteristic bands of the corresponding Ln{sup III} ions. - Graphical abstract: Four new 3D Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} coordination frameworks with pillar-layer sit or pcu alpha-Po topology have been successfully obtained. Moreover, the photoluminescent properties of compounds 14 have also been investigated. - Highlights: Four new Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two types of topologies have been synthesized. Metal oxides and two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands were used for the construction of targeted coordination polymers. The luminescent properties of the coordination polymers are investigated.

  12. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  13. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  14. Magnetic and low temperature phonon studies of CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders doped with Fe(III) and Ni(II) ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptak, M. Mączka, M.; Pikul, A.; Tomaszewski, P.E.; Hanuza, J.

    2014-04-01

    Extensive temperature-dependent phonon studies and low-temperature magnetic measurements of CoCr{sub 2−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 4} (for x=0.5, 1 and 2) and Co{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} polycrystalline powders are presented. The main aim of these studies was to obtain information on phonon and structural properties of these compounds as well as strength of spin–phonon coupling in the magnetically ordered phases. IR and Raman spectra show that doping of CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} with Fe(III) ions leads to broadening of bands and appearance of new bands due to the formation of inverted spinel structure. In contrast to this behavior, doping with 10 mol% of Ni(II) ions leads to weak increase of band width only. Magnetization measured as a function of temperature and external magnetic field showed that magnetic properties of Co{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample are similar to those reported for pure CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, i.e., partial substitution of Ni(II) for Co(II) leads to slight shift of the ferrimagnetic phase transition at T{sub C} and spiral spin order transition at T{sub S} towards lower values. The change of crystallization preference induced by incorporation of increasing concentration of Fe(III) ions in the spinel lattice causes significant increase of T{sub C} and decrease of T{sub S}. The latter transition disappears completely for higher concentrations of Fe(III). The performed temperature-dependent IR studies revealed interesting anomalous behavior of phonons below T{sub C} for CoCr{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 4} and Co{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which was attributed to spin–phonon coupling. - Graphical abstract: Visualization of normal spinel-type AB{sub 2}O{sub 4} structure, where blue octahedrons denote BO{sub 6} and red tetrahedrons AO{sub 4} units as well as IR and Raman spectra of Co{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powder. - Highlights: • T{sub C} (T{sub S}) increases (decreases) with increasing Fe(III) concentration.

  15. Fiber optic and laser sensors IV: SPIE volume 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Paula, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following: Sensors overview I; Sensors overview II; Specialized fiber optic sensors I; Specialized fiber optic sensors II; and Specialized fiber optic sensors III.

  16. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  17. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  18. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume III. Model predictions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the third of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with parametric studies carried out using the FBC model. A comparison with available pilot plant data is included where such data are available. This volume in essence documents model performance; describing predictions on bubble growth, combustion characteristics, sulfur capture, heat transfer and related parameters. The model has approximately forty input variables which are at the disposal of the user. The user has the option to change a few or all of these input variables. In the parametric studies reported here, a large number of input variables whose variation is less critical to the predicted results, were maintained constant at the default values. On the other hand, those parameters whose selection is very important in design and operation of the FBC's were varied in suitable operating regions. The chief among such parameters are: bed temperature, coal feed size distribution (2 parameters), average bed-sorbent size, calcium to sulfur molar ratio, superficial velocity, excess air fraction, and bed weight (or bed height). The computations for obtaining the parametric relationships are based upon selection of a geometrical design for the combustor. Bed cross-section is 6' x 6', bed height is 4', and the freeboard height is 16'. The heat transfer tubes have 2'' OD, a pitch of 10'', and are located on an equilateral triangle pattern. The air distributor is a perforated plate with 0.1'' diameter holes on a rectangular grid with 0.75'' center-to-center spacing.

  19. Impact of 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography on Treatment Strategy and Radiotherapy Planning for Stage I-II Hodgkin Disease: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pommier, Pascal; Dussart, Sophie; Girinsky, Theodore; Chabaud, Sylvie; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Beckendorff, Veronique; D'Hombres, Anne; Artignan, Xavier; Bondiau, Pierre Yves; Carrie, Christian; Giammarile, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of preradiotherapy 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for patients with Stage I/II Hodgkin disease included in a large prospective multicenter study. Patients and Methods: Conventional computed tomography and FDG-PET were performed just before the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy plan was first elaborated under blinded conditions for FDG-PET data. Then, the medical staff was asked to confirm or not confirm the treatment strategy and, if appropriate, to modify the radiotherapy plan based on additional information from FDG-PET. Results: Between January 2004 and January 2006, 137 patients were included (124 were available for analysis) in 11 centers (108 adults, 16 children). All but 1 patient had received chemotherapy before inclusion. Prechemotherapy work-up included FDG-PET for 61 patients, and data were available for elaboration of the first radiotherapy plan. Based on preradiotherapy FDG-PET data, the radiotherapy was cancelled in 6 patients (4.8%), and treatment plan modifications occurred in 16 patients (12.9%): total dose (11 patients), CTV volume (5 patients), number of beam incidences (6 patients), and number of CTV (6 patients). The concordance between the treatment strategies with or without preradiotherapy FDG-PET was 82.3%. Concordance results were not significantly different when prechemotherapy PET-CT information was available. Conclusion: Preradiotherapy FDG-PET for treatment planning in Hodgkin lymphoma may lead to significant modification of the treatment strategy and the radiotherapy planning in patients with Stage I or II Hodgkin disease, even in those who have undergone FDG-PET as part of the prechemotherapy work-up.

  20. Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAPLAN, DANIEL

    2005-09-13

    repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

  1. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  3. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  4. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  5. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  6. The magic school bus TV project. Final technical performance report, July 1, 1992--July 31, 1995. Season III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    For Season III, our goal has been to produce 13 new episodes that can optimally benefit from our research and experience in developing this unique series. With a total of 39 episodes, MSB`s third season will move the production from a weekly to a daily series, airing Monday to Friday and Sundays on PBS. As we delivered the 13 Season II episodes to PBS during fall of 1995, we also completed 13 more scripts for Season III production. During the remaining portion of Season III, these 13 scripts are being animated and prepared for delivery to PBS for an October 7th, 1996 launch date. Based on staggered phases of production used since the project`s inception, the development of science topics and show scripting for Season IV occurs at the same time that Season III shows are in animation and post-production. Thus, topics for Season IV shows are being selected, and science research and scripting have also begun during this time period. Both the National Science Foundation and PBS have made a commitment to Season IV, and a proposal has been submitted to Microsoft for consideration.

  7. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  8. Enhanced ferromagnetic order in Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} featuring canted [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ∞} spin chains of mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV). Aliovalent substitution of the Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sup III}{sub 2+x}Mn{sup IV}{sub 1−x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid-solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, J. Palmer; Sulejmanovic, Dino; Becht, Gregory; He, Jian; Hitchcock, Dale; Yan, Yonggao; Hwu, Shiou-Jyh

    2013-10-15

    Crystals of Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0; x∼0.15 for Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm. Eu, Gd, Dy; x∼0.3 for Ln=Gd) were isolated upon using high-temperature, solid-state methods in molten-salt media. These compounds are isostructural with the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Ln=La, Sm, Gd) series that contains the same [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ∞} spin chains. The synthesis of the Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0) phase was carried out by a double aliovalent substitution with respect to the Sr{sup 2+} and Ge{sup 4+} ions that replace Na{sup +}/Ln{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, respectively. The title series contains mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV) and shows a limited range of solid solution, both of which were not observed in the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series. To form the Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid solution, one of the Sr{sup 2+} sites, i.e., the original Ln-site in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is partially substituted by Ln{sup 3+} in a statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1−x}/Ln{sub x}. Initial magnetic investigations of selected derivatives reveal higher ferromagnetic ordering temperatures than those reported for the Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series, presumably attributed to a lesser degree of canting as a result of introducing non-Jahn–Teller Mn{sup 4+} ions. Also intriguing is the observation of multiple anomalies at low temperatures which appear to be of electronic origins. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn(III){sub 2+x}Mn(IV){sub 1−x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Double aliovalent substitution: Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} with respect to Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}. • Solid solution with respect to statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1

  9. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  10. I IIII1IiI II1Ii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' , 9 ;* 3 . ...

  11. VERY-LOW-MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. III. A SHORT-PERIOD BROWN DWARF CANDIDATE AROUND AN ACTIVE G0IV SUBGIANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Fleming, Scott W.; Lee, Brian L.; Wang Ji; Barnes, Rory; Agol, Eric; Crepp, Justin R.; Dutra-Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I.; Ghezzi, Luan; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wisniewski, John P.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; and others

    2013-01-01

    We present an eccentric, short-period brown dwarf candidate orbiting the active, slightly evolved subgiant star TYC 2087-00255-1, which has effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5903 {+-} 42 K, surface gravity log (g) = 4.07 {+-} 0.16 (cgs), and metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.23 {+-} 0.07. This candidate was discovered using data from the first two years of the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey, which is part of the third phase of Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From our 38 radial velocity measurements spread over a two-year time baseline, we derive a Keplerian orbital fit with semi-amplitude K = 3.571 {+-} 0.041 km s{sup -1}, period P = 9.0090 {+-} 0.0004 days, and eccentricity e = 0.226 {+-} 0.011. Adopting a mass of 1.16 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} for the subgiant host star, we infer that the companion has a minimum mass of 40.0 {+-} 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Assuming an edge-on orbit, the semimajor axis is 0.090 {+-} 0.003 AU. The host star is photometrically variable at the {approx}1% level with a period of {approx}13.16 {+-} 0.01 days, indicating that the host star spin and companion orbit are not synchronized. Through adaptive optics imaging we also found a point source 643 {+-} 10 mas away from TYC 2087-00255-1, which would have a mass of 0.13 M{sub Sun} if it is physically associated with TYC 2087-00255-1 and has the same age. Future proper motion observation should be able to resolve if this tertiary object is physically associated with TYC 2087-00255-1 and make TYC 2087-00255-1 a triple body system. Core Ca II H and K line emission indicate that the host is chromospherically active, at a level that is consistent with the inferred spin period and measured v{sub rot}sin i, but unusual for a subgiant of this T{sub eff}. This activity could be explained by ongoing tidal spin-up of the host star by the companion.

  12. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the logrank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (?40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (?40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  13. Development of Tc(IV)-Incorporated Fe Minerals to Enhance 99Tc Retention in Glass Waste Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Luksic, Steven A.; Wang, Guohui; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-03-17

    Iron minerals have been considered to be good hosts for Tc immobilization because the Tc(IV) ion substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure of the Fe oxide due to similarities in (1) cation size [Tc(IV) = 78.5 pm ; Fe(III) = 69 or 78.5 pm], (2) metal-oxygen interatomic distance (Tc—O = 0.199 nm, Fe—O = 0.203 nm), (3) number of coordinating oxygen atoms (both 6-fold coordinated), and (4) the redox potential (Eh=ca. +20 mV at pH = 7) for a redox couple between Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) and Fe(III)/Fe(II). Magnetite, maghemite, and trevorite are iron oxide minerals and all belong to spinel mineral group. Laboratory testing shows that Tc can be removed from aqueous waste solutions by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation with iron oxide minerals during recrystallization of Fe(OH)2(s) used as an initial solid precursor. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed that Tc was in the +4 oxidation state in final Tc-Fe minerals. The Tc-incorporated Fe minerals were also tested for Tc retention in glass melts at different temperatures between 600 – 1,000 oC in a furnace. After being cooled in air, the solid glass specimens collected at different temperatures were analyzed for Tc oxidation state using XANES and Tc retention using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Even though Tc(IV) started to reoxidize at 600 oC, Tc retention in the final glass specimen prepared with Tc-incorporated Fe mineral even at high temperatures was at least two times higher than glass prepared with KTcO4 salt. Higher Tc retention in glass is considered to result from limited and delayed Tc volatilization process due to Fe mineral encapsulation for Tc. Therefore, the results showing the presence of Tc(IV) in the Fe mineral structure indicate strong possibility to enhance Tc retention in borosilicate glass as well as to reduce the remediation costs at the Hanford Site.

  14. Current-wave spectra coupling project. Volume IV. Part A. Formulation of the three-dimensional structure of storm-generated currents. Part B. Summaries of Volumes I, II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezian, G.; Bretschneider, C.L.

    1980-09-01

    An attempt is made to formulate the technical approach to the problem of three dimensional wind driven currents under hurricane conditions. Reference is given to the splendid piece of research on the subject by Forristall (1974) Three-dimensional structure of storm-generated currents, J. Geophys. Res. 79, 2721-2727. The present approach, although not entirely satisfactory, seems to be an improvement on the work by Forristall, but this remains to be verified with future work, including the use of measured data. An improvement could be made if there were some better way of representing the shear stress as a function of the wind velocity (wind speed and direction). It seems that the wind velocity relative to the water motion is what matters, but in turbulent flow the surface value is not well defined. This difficulty leaves one with an unbalanced vortex stretching which accounts for the spin-up of the fluid, but the details of that are lacking. Essentially, it appears that it is feasible to modify Forristall's approach to obtain a more realistic representation of the structure of the boundary layer to take into account the turbulent nature of the flow.

  15. The Preparation of an Ultrastable Mesoporous Cr(III)-MOF via...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Kinetic labilization of the Fe(III)-O coordination bond in a mesoporous metal-organic framework, PCN-333-Fe(III), is realized by the reduction of Fe(III) by Cr(II). The ...

  16. ACME-III and ACME-IV Final Campaign Reports

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (black dots), and two AirCore launches (green and red lines) on January 14 (left panel) ... 1.0 Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is an active member of the U.S. ...

  17. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Damien; Mishra, Mark; Onn, Amir; Dicker, Adam P.; Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv ; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  18. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  19. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University

  20. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J TOC i PART III List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J - List of Attachments Table of Contents Attachment No: Attachment: J.1 Appendix A - Advance Understandings on Human Resources J.2 Appendix B - Performance and Evaluation Measurement Plan J.3 Appendix C - Special Financial Institution Account Agreement J.4 Appendix D - Budget Program J.5 Appendix E - PPPL DOE (Lessee) Ingrants J.6 Appendix F - Contractor Resources, Commitments and

  1. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  2. Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    686 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 44 / Monday, March 7, 2016 / Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion For the reasons cited in this document, the NRC is denying PRM- 50-106. The NRC is denying this petition because the current regulations already address environmental qualification in both mild and design basis event conditions of electrical equipment located both inside and outside of the containment building that is important to safety, and the petitioners did not provide significant new or

  3. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects: Units II and III Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Environmental Science Associates Published Environmental Impact Report, prepared for Energy Management...

  4. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore » can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  5. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and

  6. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  7. Miravalles IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Name Miravalles IV Facility Geothermal Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 10.5251574, -85.254136 Loading map......

  8. Shiloh IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDF Renewable Energy Developer EDF Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Pacific...

  9. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Park, Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Doo Ho; Suh, Chang-Ok; Huh, Seung Jae

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  10. M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities

  11. Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-34 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 4-1 Chapter IV This chapter addresses the role of infrastructure in ensuring U.S. energy security in a global marketplace. It first describes the evolution of the concept of U.S. energy security in response to interconnected global energy markets. It then discusses the security

  12. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}: Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the mixed-valent europium(II,III) fluoride sulfide EuF{sub 2}.(EuFS){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossholz, Hagen; Hartenbach, Ingo; Kotzyba, Gunter; Poettgen, Rainer; Trill, Henning; Mosel, Bernd D.; Schleid, Thomas

    2009-11-15

    Using the method to synthesize rare-earth metal(III) fluoride sulfides MFS (M=Y, La, Ce-Lu), in some cases we were able to obtain mixed-valent compounds such as Yb{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} instead. With Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} another isotypic representative has now been synthesized. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} (tetragonal, I4/mmm, a=400.34(2), c=1928.17(9) pm, Z=2) is obtained from the reaction of metallic europium, elemental sulfur, and europium trifluoride in a molar ratio of 5:6:4 within seven days at 850 deg. C in silica-jacketed gas-tightly sealed platinum ampoules. The single-phase product consists of black plate-shaped single crystals with a square cross section, which can be obtained from a flux using equimolar amounts of NaCl as fluxing agent. The crystal structure is best described as an intergrowth structure, in which one layer of CaF{sub 2}-type EuF{sub 2} is followed by two layers of PbFCl-type EuFS when sheeted parallel to the (001) plane. Accordingly there are two chemically and crystallographically different europium cations present. One of them (Eu{sup 2+}) is coordinated by eight fluoride anions in a cubic fashion, the other one (Eu{sup 3+}) exhibits a monocapped square antiprismatic coordination sphere with four F{sup -} and five S{sup 2-} anions. Although the structural ordering of the different charged europium cations is plausible, a certain amount of charge delocalization with some polaron activity has to take place, which is suggested by the black color of the title compound. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements of Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} show Curie-Weiss behavior with an experimental magnetic moment of 8.19(5) mu{sub B} per formula unit and a paramagnetic Curie temperature of 0.3(2) K. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 4.2 K. In accordance with an ionic formula splitting like (Eu{sup II})(Eu{sup III}){sub 2}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} only one third of the europium centers in Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} carry permanent

  13. Evaluation of alternative thermochemical cycles-part III further development of the Cu-Cl cycle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M. A.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Tatterson, D. F.; Mathias, P.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers on alternative cycle evaluation. Part I described the evaluation methodology. Part II described the down-selection process where the most promising of the nine alternative cycles was determined. The Cu-Cl cycle was selected for further development because it alone meets the four criteria used. The current results indicate that the cycle is chemically viable, feasible with respect to engineering, energy-efficient, and capable of meeting DOE's timeline for an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) demonstration. All of the reactions have been proven and the remaining technical challenges should be met with current technologies. The maximum temperature requirement is around 550 C (823 K), which can be obtained with a variety of heat sources. The lower temperature should mitigate the demands on the materials of construction. This paper, Part III, describes the procedure used to develop the Cu-Cl cycle beyond the relatively simple Level 3 efficiency calculation completed by the universities. The optimization process consisted of (i) updating the thermodynamic database used in the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} simulation, (ii) developing a robust flowsheet and optimizing the energy usage therein, (iii) designing a conceptual process incorporating the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} mass and energy flows, and then (iv) estimating the hydrogen production costs. The results presented here are preliminary because further optimization is ongoing.

  14. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE A Pyroelectric Crystal Particle Accelerator ....................................................................................................................................................IV-1 J. Kalodimos and R.L. Watson Polarization of Ka Satellite Transitions in Potassium .....................................................................................................................................IV-4 K. S. Fruchey, R.L. Watson, V. Horvat, and Yong

  15. III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS For fiscal year 2010, no DOE programs have compliance requirements that are distinct from the general compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance (General Compliance Supplement). Therefore, audits of recipients and subrecipients with fiscal years ending in 2010 should be conducted in accordance with the compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance. For fiscal years subsequent to 2010, program-specific compliance

  16. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  17. WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Texas A&M University College Station, TX February 12-16, 2005 WCI-III Steering Committee Philippe Chomaz Francesca Gulminelli Joe Natowitz Sherry Yennello

  18. Standard Missile Block IV battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.

    1996-11-01

    During the 1980`s a trend in automatic primary battery technologies was the replacement of silver-zinc batteries by thermal battery designs. The Standard missile (SM 2) Block IV development is a noteworthy reversal of this trend. The SM2, Block IV battery was originally attempted as a thermal battery with multiple companies attempting to develop a thermal battery design. These attempts resulted in failure to obtain a production thermal battery. A decision to pursue a silver-zinc battery design resulted in the development of a battery to supply the SM 2, Block IV (thermal battery design goal) and also the projected power requirements of the evolving SM 2, Block IVA in a single silver-zinc battery design. Several advancements in silver-zinc battery technology were utilized in this design that improve the producibility and extend the boundaries of silver-zinc batteries.

  19. Electron transfer reactivity of the aqueous iron(IV)–oxo complex. Outer-sphere vs proton-coupled electron transfer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-06-18

    Here, the kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, FeIV(H2O)5O2+ (hereafter FeIVaqO2+), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)32+ (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS–/ABTS2–, phenothiazines, CoII(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. FeIVaqO2+ oxidizes even Ce(III) (E0 in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7more » V) with a rate constant greater than 104 M–1 s–1. In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)32+ (k = 2.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), IrCl63– (1.6 × 106), ABTS2– (4.7 × 107), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 107) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)32+ and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H+] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of FeIVaqO2+ and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E0Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E0Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+ couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10–5 M–1 s–1 and thus E0(FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E0 (FeIVaqO2+, H+/FeIIIaqOH2+) ≥ 1.95 V.« less

  20. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy...

  1. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2015-03-24

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  2. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  3. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  4. DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 2000 Edition NFPA 704 Hazards Assessment Screening (Chemical) DOE's Voluntary Protection Program, Parts I-IV Part I, Program Elements, October 1994 Part II, Procedures ...

  5. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers: Solid-State Lighting Science Center for Frontiers of ... III-Nitride Nanowires HomeEnergy ResearchEFRCsSolid-State Lighting Science EFRC...

  6. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the phase-space integral ...III-1 I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy The evaluation of V ud , experiment and theory ......

  7. Clear Path IV Exercise Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2016, DOE led Clear Path IV in Portland, Oregon and Washington, DC. Clear Path IV was an interagency exercise focused on testing and evaluating energy sector response plans to address...

  8. Part III The President

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    III The President Executive Order 13653-Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 05, 2013 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717...

  9. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy quark three-body collisional energy loss in quark-gluon plasma...... III-1 C. M. Ko and Wei Liu Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy ion ...

  10. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...III-1 A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, V.Z. Goldberg, G. Rogachev, E. Johnson, S. Brown, K. Kemper, A. Momotyuk, and B. Roeder The Trojan Horse Method: an Indirect Technique...

  11. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathways contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron

  12. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collisions... IV-3 R. D. DuBois, A. C. F. Santos, R. Olson, V. Horvat, R. L. Watson, A. N. Perumal, and Y. Peng...

  13. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    status of the Lead Fast Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Generation IV concepts, ... Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). ...

  14. Generation IV International Forum Framework Agreement Extended...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an ...

  15. SECTION IV: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematics of K and L x-ray satellite spectra...... IV-1 V. Horvat and R. L. Watson K x-ray satellite ...

  16. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  17. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  18. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  19. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M280 Attachment 1 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. DIRECTIVE NUMBER DATE DOE DIRECTIVE TITLE APPH Chapter X Revision 10 09/08/98 Accounting Practices & Procedures Handbook Chapter

  20. George F. Smoot III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George F. Smoot III About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit ⇒ Navigate Section About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit smoot 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) * Bibliography of Dr. Smoot's Works * October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) The October 3, 2006 press conference at Berkeley Lab introducing its newest Nobel Prize winner, George Smoot, to a throng of visiting media is available for viewing online.

  1. III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  2. Iii;.} An Ann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iii;.} An Ann otated Bibli ography of the Red - Coc kaded Woodpecker bv * Jerom e A. Jack son A Publi cati on of the Sava nnah River Plonl Notional En... ironmentol Research Pork PrOQ rom United Stales Dep ortment of Ene r gy An Annotated Bibliography of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker, Picoides borealis Jerome A. Jackson Department of Biological Sciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, Mississippi A Publication of the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park Prepared

  3. SECTION IV: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE A semiempirical scaling law for target K x-ray production in heavy ion collisions...... IV-1 R. L. Watson, Y. Peng, V. Horvat, and A. ...

  4. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  5. DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part III)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III) April 2012 III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS For fiscal year 2011, no DOE programs have compliance requirements that are distinct from the general compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance (General Compliance Supplement). Therefore, audits of recipients with fiscal years ending in 2011 should be conducted in accordance with the compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance. For fiscal years subsequent to 2011, program-specific compliance

  6. Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts for ... Title: Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts ...

  7. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling (Technical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  8. Generation IV International Forum 39th Policy Group Meeting ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

  9. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  10. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Access the recording and download ...

  11. Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IV Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte...

  12. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy ...

  13. EIS-0469: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota EIS-0469: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota Summary Western Area Power Administration is...

  14. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) Campaign Links Final Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) 2008.10.01, Biraud, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) 2013.10.01 - 2015.09.30 Lead Scientist : Sebastien Biraud For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM ACME observations and

  16. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with radioactive counting techniques provide superior limits of detection they may influence the plutonium redox equilibrium, are time consuming, waste intensive and costly. ...

  17. ACME-III and ACME-IV Final Campaign Reports (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility, 3) to develop and test bottom-up measurement and modeling approaches to estimate regional scale carbon balances, and 4) to develop and test inverse modeling approaches ...

  18. SPIDERS Phase III

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPIDERS Phase III John Bothof Burns & McDonnell Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a microgrid is "a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid [and can] connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island-mode." Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a

  19. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January

  20. SECTION III. NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III. NUCLEAR THEORY Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in 28Si and 208Pb A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonances in 28Si, 40Ca, 58Ni, and 116Sn by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets, O. Pochivalov and S. Shlomo Microscopic Description of Excitation of Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance in 58Ni by Inelastic Scattering of 240 MeV α-particles A. Kolomiets,

  1. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  3. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III (CEQ, 1984)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These appendices were prepared by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the CEQ's regulations.

  4. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

  5. INTERNAL ASSESSMENT COVER SHEETS, IB Biology I/II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? December 7, 2015 - 4:41pm Addthis This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser. If you are using IE9, you can also view the interactive here Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer KEY FACTS New interactive lets you compare annual carbon emissions of U.S.

  6. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  7. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2007-04-27

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  8. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  9. PARS II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... September 9, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 103 Project Updating and Reporting Page 49 4. Click to begin entering funding values. 5. Click + sign to expand detail for OPC, TEC, and UND, if ...

  10. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  11. Cours-IV/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jump across an hydrodynamic discontinuity IV 1) U L U b - U L Flame Unburnt mixture at rest Burnt gas Zoom T b T u d L Temperature u + 0 u u U L b U b p + u 2 + 0 w +...

  12. PART IV … REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    K, Page i PART IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS SECTION K REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFERORS K-1 FAR 52.204-8 ANNUAL REPRESENTATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS (DEC 2014) .................. 131 K-2 FAR 52.204-16 COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT ENTITY CODE REPORTING (JUL 2015) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 135 K-3 FAR 52.209-7 INFORMATION

  13. PART IV … REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    K, Page i PART IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS SECTION K REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFERORS K-1 FAR 52.204-8 ANNUAL REPRESENTATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS (DEC 2014) .................. 131 K-2 FAR 52.204-16 COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT ENTITY CODE REPORTING (JUL 2015) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 135 K-3 FAR 52.209-7 INFORMATION

  14. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  15. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  16. Suirr 300, 955 L*Enfwu Plaza. S. Iv.. Washingron. D.C. 200242174.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Suirr 300, 955 L*Enfwu Plaza. S. Iv.. Washingron. D.C. 200242174. 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: I ELIMINATION~RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND "NIY$RfITIES / t kphonc (202) d.t%xO The attached elimination recommendation was prepared lin accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommenda includes 26

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project Frank ...

  18. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  19. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-NSA ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? ... Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-NSA 2005.04.25 - 2006.04.24 Lead ...

  1. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location...

  2. Study on reduction and back extraction of Pu(IV) by urea derivatives in nitric acid conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, G.A.; Xiao, S.T.; Yan, T.H.; Lin, R.S.; Zhu, Z.W.

    2013-07-01

    The reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) by hydroxyl-semicarbazide (HSC), hydroxyurea (HU) and di-hydroxyurea (DHU) in nitric acid solutions were investigated separately with adequate kinetic equations. In addition, counter-current cascade experiments were conducted for Pu split from U in nitric acid media using three kinds of reductant, respectively. The results show that urea derivatives as a kind of novel salt-free reductant can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III) rapidly in the nitric acid solutions. The stripping experimental results showed that Pu(IV) in the organic phase can be stripped rapidly to the aqueous phase by the urea derivatives, and the separation factors of plutonium /uranium can reach more than 10{sup 4}. This indicates that urea derivatives is a kind of promising salt-free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. In addition, the complexing effect of HSC with Np(IV) was revealed, and Np(IV) can be back-extracted by HSC with a separation factor of about 20.

  3. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking ...

  4. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup 4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  5. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E.

    1987-08-04

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  6. BORE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  7. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  8. Job Code Description Hourly Wage TR-I Job Code TR I Wage TR-II Job

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Wage TR-I Job Code TR I Wage TR-II Job Code TR II Wage TR-III Job Code TR III Wage Job Code Description Hourly Wage TR-I Job Code TR I Wage TR-II Job Code TR II Wage TR-III Job Code TR III Wage 56-HOUR TOUR Hourly Premiums TR-I 0.25 TR-II $0.50 TR-III $0.75 10-HOUR SHIFT Hourly Premiums TR-I $0.45 TR-II $0.90 TR-III $1.35 CIC $0.60 CIC $1.08 HAZ $0.81 HAZ $1.46 UD/BA $0.25 UD/BA $0.45 ELF $0.30 ELF $0.54 TR-I $0.25 TR-I $0.45 TR-II $0.50 TR-II $0.90 TR-III $0.75 TR-III $1.35 021450 Entry-Level

  9. Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell membranes in automotive applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_membr_auto.pdf (99.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane

  10. SECTION IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE Cross Sections for Cu K-Vacancy Production in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, J.M. Blackadar and V. Horvat Enhancement of the Cu Kα x-ray Diagram Lines in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, V. Horvat and J.M. Blackadar K-shell Ionization by Secondary Electrons V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Target-atom Inner-shell Vacancy Distributions Created in Collisions with Heavy Ion Projectiles V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Systematics of

  11. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2009-12-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  12. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm 2 0.1 0.1 0.1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 160 160 170 Durability Hours 5000 >15000 >40000 Survivability o C -20 -30 -40 Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new

  13. Part IV Council on Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    79 Wednesday, No. 247 December 24, 2014 Part IV Council on Environmental Quality Revised Draft Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews; Notice VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:20 Dec 23, 2014 Jkt 235001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\24DEN2.SGM 24DEN2 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES2 77802 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 247 / Wednesday, December 24, 2014 / Notices 1 A

  14. Field Sampling Plan for the Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 Remedial Action, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wells

    2006-11-14

    This Field Sampling Plan outlines the collection and analysis of samples in support of Phase IV of the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 remedial action. Phase IV addresses the remedial actions to areas with the potential for unexploded ordnance at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. The remedial action consists of removal and disposal of ordnance by high-order detonation, followed by sampling to determine the extent, if any, of soil that might have been contaminated by the detonation activities associated with the disposal of ordnance during the Phase IV activities and explosives during the Phase II activities.

  15. Part II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    80 Thursday, No. 251 December 31, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Final Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 30, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\31DER2.SGM 31DER2 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES2 81886 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 251 / Thursday, December 31, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL

  16. PARS II TRAINING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1), September 13, 2010.

  17. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Recap Workshop Information Program Schedule Registration List Announcement Letter Tentative Outline for Book Steering Committee Presentation Files (Power Point or PDF) Saturday (Morning, Afternoon) Sunday (Morning, Afternoon) Monday (Morning, Afternoon) Tuesday (Morning, Afternoon) Wednesday (Morning, Afternoon) Misc. Pictures

  18. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  19. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  20. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" held on February 25, 2016. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Slides (2.59 MB) More Documents &

  1. Hotline IV …High Temperature ESP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hotline IV …High Temperature ESP Hotline IV …High Temperature ESP Project Objective: Increase temperature rating of high temperature ESPs. high_dhruva_hotline_iv.pdf (1.64 MB) More Documents & Publications Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

  2. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    2012-04-24

    solenoid in March of 2012. We took advantage of this opportunity to improve the design of the focusing tune with better models of the remaining partially failed solenoids, better estimates of beam initial conditions, and better values for pulsed-power voltages. As with all previous tunes for Axis-II, this one incorporates measures to mitigate beam-breakup (BBU) instability, image displacement instability (IDI), corkscrew (sweep), and emittance growth. Section II covers the general approach to of design of focusing solenoid tunes for the DARHT Axis-2 LIA. Section III explains the specific requirements and simulations needed to design the tune for the injector, which includes the thermionic electron source, diode, and six induction cells. Section IV explains the requirements and simulations for tuning the main accelerator, which consists of 68 induction cells. Finally, Section V explores sensitivity of the tune to deviations of parameters from nominal, random variations, and uncertainties in values. Four appendices list solenoid settings for this new tune, discuss comparisons of different simulation codes, show halo formation in mismatched beams, and present a brief discussion of the beam envelope equation, which is the heart of the method used to design LIA solenoid tunes.

  3. Separation of thorium (IV) from lanthanide concentrate (LC) and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Separation of thorium (IV) from lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach ...

  4. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Not Available...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Not Available 14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR ENERGY; EDUCATION; BIOMASS; CURRICULUM GUIDES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; METHANE; OCEAN THERMAL POWER PLANTS; RENEWABLE...

  5. Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, ...

  6. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office February 25, 2016 Presenter: Brian James - Strategic ...

  7. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions concerning conference spending, should be directed to Jason Taylor at ...

  8. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim

    2014-09-03

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S{sub 2}CNR′R″]{sub 2} (R= Ph, CH{sub 3}, R′ = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7} and R″ = C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, iC{sub 3}H{sub 7}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ν(CN), ν(CS) and ν(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 1444–1519, 954–1098 and 318–349 cm{sup −1} respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the π - π* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 – 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed an important shift for δ(N{sup 13}CS{sub 2}) in the range of 196.8 – 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Et)(i−Pr)]{sub 2}, MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Me)(Cy)]{sub 2} and MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(i−Pr)(CH{sub 2}Ph)]{sub 2}. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS{sub 4} donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  9. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  10. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer...

  11. Thomas Francis Miller III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THOMAS FRANCIS MILLER III Principal Investigator Email: tfm@caltech.edu Dr. Miller's research group develops theoretical and computational methods to understand a variety of molecular processes, including enzyme catalysis, solar-energy conversion, dendrite formation in lithium batteries, and the dynamics of soft matter and biological systems. An important aspect of this challenge is that many systems exhibit dynamics that couple vastly different timescales and lengthscales. A primary goal of

  12. SUPPLEMENT III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III REGARDING APPLICATION SUBMISSION SCHEDULE FOR: ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office (As of January 19, 2016) THIRD SUPPLEMENT TO LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION ANNOUNCEMENT FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEES FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS Solicitation Number: DE-SOL- DE-SOL-0007791 OMB Control Number: 1910-5134; OMB Expiration Date 11/30/2016 Announcement Type: Supplemental Supplement Date: January 19, 2016 The above-referenced Loan Guarantee Solicitation

  13. William A. Goddard III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    william a. goddard iii Principal Investigator Email: wag@wag.caltech.edu Dr. Goddard is a pioneer in developing methods for quantum mechanics (QM), force fields, molecular dynamics (MD), and Monte Carlo predictions on chemical and materials systems and is actively involved in applying these methods to ceramics, semiconductors, superconductors, thermoelectrics, metal alloys, polymers, proteins, nuclei acids, Pharma ligands, nanotechnology, and energetic materials. He uses QM methods to determine

  14. Registration List - WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Registration List Sandro Barlini, INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Wolfgang Bauer, Michigan State Aldo Bonasera, Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN Alexander Botvina, Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow Kyrill Bugaev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Xavier Campi, LPTMS Abdou Chbihi, GANIL Philippe Chomaz, GANIL Marco Cinausero, INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Gianluca Colo', Dipartimento di Fisica Romualdo deSouza, Indiana University/IUCF Massimo Di Toro,

  15. Joel W. Ager III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w. ager iii Principal Investigator Email: jwager@lbl.gov Dr. Ager's research interests include the fundamental electronic and transport characteristics of photovoltaic materials, development of new photoanodes and photocathodes based on abundant elements for solar fuels production, and the development of new oxide- and sulfide-based transparent conductors. In JCAP, Dr. Ager is investigating interactions of carbon-based supports with CO2-reduction electrocatalysts. His group is studying

  16. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  17. Reducing Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: 1996 Compliance with Title IV Limits

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the existing federal nitrogen oxide (Nox) regulations and the 1996 performance of the 239 Title IV generating units. It also reviews the basics of low-Nox burner technology and presents cost and performance data for retrofits at Title IV units.

  18. John H. Hale III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    John H. Hale III About Us John H. Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John H. Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged

  19. Suhr 7900.955 L*E+ru Pkzza. S. Iv.. Washington, D.C. 20024-i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Suhr 7900.955 L*E+ru Pkzza. S. Iv.. Washington, D.C. 20024-i 7117~03.8J.cdy.4 23 September 19E M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN11 The attached elimination recommendation was prepar with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enc Aerospace letter subject: Status of

  20. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated toolkit consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  1. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page 1 of 1 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1 Packaging Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered hereunder shall be in accordance with good commercial practice and adequate to insure acceptance by common carrier and

  2. Part IV: Section E - Inspection and Acceptance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page ii PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) 1 E.2 Acceptance 1 E.3 Certification 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page 1 of 1 PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) The Government has the right to inspect and

  3. Part IV: Section F - Deliveries or Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M933 Section F - Page ii PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENT F.1 Term of Contract 1 F.2 Principal Place of Performance 1 F.3 FAR 52.242-15 Stop-Work Order (Aug 1989) (Alternate 1) (Apr 1984) 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M933 Section F - Page 1 of 2 PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE F.1 Term of Contract (a) This contract shall be effective as specified in Block No. 28, Award Date, of SF 33, and shall

  4. Part IV: Section G - Contract Administration Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section G - Page ii PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) 1 G.2 Contract Administration 1 G.3 Modification Authority 1 G.4 Monthly Cost Reports 1 G.5 Indirect Charges 2 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section G - Page 1 of 2 PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) Contracting Officer's Representative(s)

  5. PARS II TRAINING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release ...

  6. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PDF icon SBIRPhaseIII.pdf More Documents...

  7. Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  8. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  9. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Instruments RHUBC-II Instruments - Cerro Toco, Chile Guest Instruments Instrument

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Regional maps Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V - California PADD V - other PADD III - Gulf PADD III - inland PADD I PADD II - inland PADD IV d a d i ...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 Regional maps Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V - California PADD V - other PADD III - Gulf PADD III - inland PADD I PADD II - inland PADD IV Trinidad...

  12. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  13. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    82 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver

  14. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility. [22, 45, 60/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luerkens, D W

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22/sup 0/C, 45/sup 0/C, and 60/sup 0/C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey...

  16. 2016 Annex IV State of the Science Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The recently published Annex IV State of the Science Report summarizes the state of the science of interactions and effects of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices on the marine environment, the...

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on the impact of hydrogen on water reactor safety. Volume III of IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1981-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the area of: combustion, experiments and analysis.

  18. Two-stage precipitation of neptunium (IV) oxalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luerkens, D. W.

    1983-07-01

    Neptunium (IV) oxalate was precipitated using a two-stage precipitation system. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitate characteristics. Process variables tested were input concentrations, solubility conditions in the first stage precipitator, precipitation temperatures, and residence time in the first stage precipitator. A procedure has been demonstrated that produces neptunium (IV) oxalate particles that filter well and readily calcine to the oxide.

  19. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office February 25, 2016 Presenter: Brian James - Strategic Analysis, Inc. DOE Host: Grace Ordaz- Technology Manager, Hydrogen Storage Program 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Question and Answer * Please type your questions into the question box 2 Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell

  20. DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,111 DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE *I W INDSOR, CONNECTICUT 111 E. W . ABELQUIST Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy I- II I- .:jj;jiE// .:::=::::: .ipij!li' ,:::i::.:. ..::I::::/. ,:ii~iiiiai, ..' iiiiiiiiii!!liiii~~~~,~:~:. ~i!i.~iii~' :' -' +g?' gg;; ,- ZY :i/ .:;i" .:!! .:::a .(/i?j i:/i;jl? I!kr ' -:~i~jg~;...,.;, ..,::&Si! :(j)//ji//(!: 3.. :jijiiiiiiqi:wi l~,. ,,v..::;:~/j~B/; g#;$ .;::::::::::!

  1. Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue...

  2. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Ning [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuya [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsunaga, Tetsuro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Takeda, Jun [Department of Endocrinology Diabetes and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Tsujimoto, Gozoh [Department of Genomic Drug Discovery Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yasuda, Koichiro [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Diabetic Center, Tsunashimakai-Kosei Hospital, Himeji (Japan); Tsuda, Kinsuke [Laboratory of Metabolism, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)]. E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  3. The Solubility of 242PuO2 in the Presence of Aqueous Fe(II): The Impact of Precipitate Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Abrecht, David G.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2014-01-28

    The solubility of different forms of precipitated 242PuO2(am) were examined in solutions containing aqueous Fe(II) over a range of pH values. The first series of 242PuO2(am) suspensions were prepared from a 242Pu(IV) stock that had been treated with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) to remove the 241Am originating from the decay of 241Pu. These 242PuO2(am) suspensions showed much higher solubilities at the same pH value and Fe(II) concentration than previous studies using 239PuO2(am). X ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy of the precipitates showed a substantially reduced Pu-Pu backscatter over that previously observed in 242PuO2(am) precipitates, indicating that the 242PuO2(am) precipitates purified using TTA lacked the long range order previously found in 239PuO2(am) precipitates. The Pu(IV) stock solution was subsequently repurified using an ion exchange resin and an additional series of 242PuO2(am) precipitates prepared. These suspensions showed higher redox potentials and total aqueous Pu concentrations than the TTA purified stock solution. The higher redox potential and aqueous Pu concentrations were in general agreement with previous studies on 242PuO2(am) precipitates, presumably due to the removal of possible organic compounds originally present in the TTA purified stock. 242PuO2(am) suspensions prepared with both stock solutions showed almost identical solubilities in Fe(II) containing solutions even though the initial aqueous Pu concentrations before the addition of Fe(II) were orders of magnitude different. By examining the solubility of 242PuO2(am) prepared from both stocks in this way we have essentially approached equilibrium from both the undersaturated and oversaturated

  4. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

  5. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  6. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  7. Aegir II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aegir II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates...

  8. Penascal II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola...

  9. Glacier II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Glacier II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer...

  10. Brazil-Low Carbon Growth Studies Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and forestry (LULUCF), including deforestation; (ii) transport systems; (iii) energy production and use, particularly electricity, oil and gas and bio-fuels; and (iv) solid...

  11. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - SS2_8H_NERC_SANS_Final.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Corporate ICCP Peer Utility Modem Pool I II III IV Sensor Campus Sensors 10 SANS SCADA ... Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) RFC 783 Sun Microsystems Network File System ...

  13. Magnetic separation of Dy(III) ions from homogeneous aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulko, B. Yang, X.; Lei, Z.; Odenbach, S.; Eckert, K.

    2014-12-08

    The possibility to enrich paramagnetic dysprosium(III) ions in a magnetic field gradient is proved by means of interferometry, which may open the route for a magnetic separation of rare earth ions from aqueous solutions. The separation dynamics are studied for three different concentrations of DyCl{sub 3} and compared with those found recently in a sulphate solution of the 3d ion Mn(II). In view of the similar-sized hydration spheres for Dy(III) and Mn(II), the slower separation dynamics in DyCl{sub 3} is attributed to both a higher densification coefficient and the strong impact of Brownian motion due to the absence of ion-pair clusters.

  14. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  15. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  16. Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  17. PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM SBIR_Phase_III.pdf (228.04 KB) More Documents & Publications SBIR_Phase_III.pdf PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM - pg 3 Albany HTS Power Cable

  18. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content

  19. Research Level I-V and QE Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, Keith

    2013-08-12

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) for various types of photovoltaic cells include the following: (1) Compare measurements with another trusted laboratory often enough to see the random error; (2) Have a calibration lab calibrate your research cell; (3) Document potential metastabilities and sensitivity to premeasurement conditions; (4) Measure the 1-sun spectral responsivity with a bias light level of 0.37 times the expected 1-sun short-current current; and (5) Be aware of bias rate artifacts in I-V and QE.

  20. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling (Technical Report) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SciTech Connect Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for

  1. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  3. Deletion of the paired [alpha]5(IV) and [alpha]6(IV) collagen genes in inherited smooth muscle tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; Mochizuki, T.; Reeders, S.T. ); Smeets, H. ); Antignac, C. ); Laurila, P. ); Paepe, A. de ); Tryggvason, K. )

    1993-08-27

    The gene encoding [alpha]6(IV) collagen, COL4A6, was identified on the human X chromosome in a head-to-head arrangement and within 452 base pairs of the [alpha]5(IV) collagen gene, COL4A5. In earlier studies, intragenic deletions of COL4A5 were detected in a subset of patients with Alport syndrome (AS), a hereditary defect of basement membranes. In some families, AS cosegregates with diffuse leiomyomatosis (DL), a benign smooth muscle tumor diathesis. Here it is shown that patients with AS-DL harbor deletions that disrupt both COL4A5 and COL4A6. Thus, type IV collagen may regulate smooth muscle differentiation and morphogenesis.

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  5. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  7. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS Experimental Determination of the Symmetry Energy of a Low Density Nuclear Gas ......II-1 S. ...

  8. Separation of actinides(III) from lanthanides(III) by extraction chromatography using new n,n'-dialkyl-n,n'-diphenyl-pyridine-2,6-di-carboxy-amides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arisaka, Makoto; Watanabe, Masayuki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2007-07-01

    Four N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diphenyl-pyridine-2,6- di-carboxy-amides (R-PDA; R butyl, octyl, decyl, dodecyl) were newly synthesized and were applied to extraction chromatography as extractant to attain the separation of actinides(III) from high level radioactive waste containing lanthanides(III). R-PDA was successfully impregnated into XAD-4 resin. It was found that (i) the leakage of R-PDA from XAD-4 resin was suppressed with an increase of the length of the alkyl groups in R-PDA, while the leakage for each adsorbent resin was promoted with an increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration in the aqueous phase and (ii) Oc-PDA or De-PDA/XAD-4 resin exhibits moderate separation ability of actinides(III) from lanthanides(III) at relatively high HNO{sub 3} concentration. (authors)

  9. A Computational Model of the Mark-IV Electrorefiner: Phase I -- Fuel Basket/Salt Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Shelly Li; Michael Simpson; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2009-09-01

    Spent driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being treated in the Mk-IV electrorefiner (ER) in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at Idaho National Laboratory. The modeling approach to be presented here has been developed to help understand the effect of different parameters on the dynamics of this system. The first phase of this new modeling approach focuses on the fuel basket/salt interface involving the transport of various species found in the driver fuels (e.g. uranium and zirconium). This approach minimizes the guessed parameters to only one, the exchange current density (i0). U3+ and Zr4+ were the only species used for the current study. The result reveals that most of the total cell current is used for the oxidation of uranium, with little being used by zirconium. The dimensionless approach shows that the total potential is a strong function of i0 and a weak function of wt% of uranium in the salt system for initiation processes.

  10. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.