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1

Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution Michel R 16, 2005 We present 29 Si, 27 Al, and 67 Zn NMR evidence to show that silicate ions in alkaline, with aluminate (Al(OH)4 - ). Zincate reacts with monomeric silicate at pH 14-15 to form [(HO)O2Si-O-Zn(OH)3

Sahai, Nita

3

Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances) Guidelines for Acquiring & Accounting for Controlled Substances for Scientific Use Lawrence Berkeley National;LAWRENCEBERKELEYr\\IATIOMLI-ABOMTORY CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCEPROTOCOL (SCHEDULEr& il CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCES) Gontrolled

Eisen, Michael

5

Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

Tjandra, Meiliana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04...

7

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air JumpMaine. Its FIPSJVII & III Jump

8

Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

9

Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure link to2, Issue 27, aIII

11

The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A photometric survey for Lyalpha-HeII dual emitters: Searching for Population III stars in high-redshift galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new photometric search for high-z galaxies hosting Population III (PopIII) stars based on deep intermediate-band imaging observations obtained in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF), by using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. By combining our new data with the existing broad-band and narrow-band data, we searched for galaxies which emit strongly both in Ly_alpha and in HeII 1640 (``dual emitters'') that are promising candidates for PopIII-hosting galaxies, at 3.93 2 Msun/yr was found by our photometric search in 4.03 x 10^5 Mpc^3 in the SDF. This result disfavors low feedback models for PopIII star clusters, and implies an upper-limit of the PopIII SFR density of SFRD_PopIII < 5 x 10^-6 Msun/yr/Mpc^3. This new selection method to search for PopIII-hosting galaxies should be useful in future narrow-band surveys to achieve the first observational detection of PopIII-hosting galaxies at high redshifts.

Nagao, Tohru; Maiolino, Roberto; Grady, Celestine; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew; Motohara, Kentaro; Murayama, Takashi; Schaerer, Daniel; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The effect of pH and temperature on the sorption of zinc(II), cadmium(II), and aluminum(III) onto new metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorption of metal ions from aqueous solution onto metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin derivatives has been measured as a function of pH at several temperatures between 20 and 50 C. Novel metal-ligand exchange resins possessing oxime and carboxylic acid side arm functionality were prepared through the reaction of diaminosporopollenin with dichloro-antiglyoxime and bromoacetic acid. The pH dependencies and sorption isotherms of various metal ions such as Zn (II), Cd(II), and Al(III) on the resin were investigated from aqueous solution. The sorption behavior of these metal-ligand complexes of sporopollenin derivatives and the possibilities of selectively removing and recovering heavy metals are explained on the basis of their chemical nature and complex properties and the results are interpreted in terms of the variations of pH.

Pehlivan, E.; Ersoz, M.; Pehlivan, M.; Yildiz, S. [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey)] [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey); Duncan, H.J. [Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: ŕ thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; ŕ NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); ŕ coal providing >65% of heat input; ŕ all solid wastes benign; ŕ cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: ŕ Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; ŕ Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Formation of a heterometallic AlIII/SmIII complex involving a novel [EtAl(2-py)2O]2- ligand (2-py = 2-pyridyl)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-THF, showing a 13C{1H}spectrum as the ‘external projection’. X-ray Crystallographic Studies. Data were collected on a Nonius Kappa CCD Diffractometer equipped with an Oxford Cryostream cooling device or, in the case of 1b, on Bruker SMART X2S... Supporting Information NMR spectra of 1b and 2, crystallographic data and cif files for 1b, 2, [{MeAl(2-py)3}{EtAl(2-py)2O}Sm]2.and 6,6'-Me(2)bipy.LiI This material is available free of charge via the Internet at http://pubs.acs.org. AUTHOR INFORMATION...

García-Rodríguez, Raúl; Simmonds, Hayley R.; Wright, Dominic S.

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.] [ed.; Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology] [ed.; Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility] [ed.; National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Chronopotentiometry of Sm(II) and Pm(III) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Samarium (III) and promethium (III) were studied by chronopotentiometry in a molten LiCl-KC1 eutectic. Tungsten electrodes were used to avoid alloying effects encountered with platinum… (more)

Nixon, Richard Allen

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mejora docente y adaptacin al Espacio Europeo de Educacin Superior Tabla III. Indicadores de Progreso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progreso Ámbito Actuación Indicador Situación inicial Situación fecha informe % progreso Mejora docente y Comercio de Cataluńa 0 70% 70% Mejora docente y adaptación al EEES A3: Fomento de las prácticas externas e Comercio de Cataluńa) 0 1 50% Mejora docente y adaptación al EEES A4: Modernización de los servicios e

Geffner, Hector

19

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 FronteraMarijuana useDepartment6Assistance

20

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flexible Link Continual Reassessment Methods for Trivariate Binary Outcome Phase I/II Trials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or power function, to model the relationship between the dose levels and the true toxicity probabilities (O'Quigley from excessive doses and proposed by Faries (1994), Goodman et al. (1995), and O'Quigley and Shen (1996 al. (1994), O'Quigley et al. (2001), Braun (2002), and Thall and Cook (2004). One class of approaches

Carlin, Bradley P.

22

Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

avoid major schedule delays and meet commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity,...

23

D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I,II,IIS,III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310--381 C), time (12--144h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330 C for 72h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS {gt} II {approximately} III {gt} I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 250 C for 72 h or 330 C for 133 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115 C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of their results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, the authors suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation water are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected by exchange with water hydrogen at typical reservoir conditions over geologic time. It will be difficult to utilize D/H ratios of thermally mature bulk or fractions or organic matter to quantitatively reconstruct isotopic aspects of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment. Hope resides in compound-specific D/H ratio of thermally stable, extractable biomarkers (molecular fossils) that are less susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water-derived hydrogen.

Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Repertori Orquestra de Cambra curs 2010-2011 I i II trimestre III trimestre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stamitz (Mannheim 1745 - Jena 1801) Orchester-Quartett en Fa major Op.4. IV - Allegro assai - Andante ma (Salzburg, 1756 - Viena, 1791) Divertiment II en sib major Kv 137 - Andante - Allegro di molto - Allegro - Allegro molto - Largo - Vivace #12;

Geffner, Hector

25

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al� -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¸ agin properties, of both solid and liquid Al/ -Al2O3 interfaces. The ReaxFF was developed solely with ab initio calculations on various phases of Al and Al2O3 and Al-O-H clusters. Our computed lattice constants, elastic

26

Operational risk: A Basel II++ step before Basel III July 19, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II guidelines), 2. The choice of the risk measure which provides the capital amount. We emphasize these incidents in depth and propose strategies for carrying out the supervisory guidelines proposed that the expected shortfall measure enables a better anticipation of large incidents pertaining to operational risks

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

27

AL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AL. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SYLLABUS ATTACHMENT. EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION PROCEDURES are based on a simple concept - if you hear a.

28

CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2120005 05/05/2014 15:00 102, 103 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologas Industriales Matemticas II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as Industriales MatemĂĄticas II 2120008 08/05/2014 15:00 201, 202 Aulario II 1 Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as Industriales Principios JurĂ­dicos BĂĄsicos, DeontologĂ­a Profesional e Igualdad 2120006 12/05/2014 15:00 106, 107 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

29

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Relationship between fuel composition and properties. III. Physical properties of US Navy Shale-II fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Naval Research Laboratory and the Naval Air Propulsion Center are currently participating in a program to characterize the products from the Shale-II refining process conducted by the Standard Oil Company of Ohio at their refinery in Toledo, Ohio. This paper is concerned with a part of this program and is a summary of the work on the physical and related properties of three military type fuels derived from shale: JP-5 and JP-8 jet turbine fuels, and diesel fuel marine (DFM). The shale derived fuels which were used in these studies were derived from Paraho crude shale oil. The boiling range distribution of a representative sample of each of the three fuels was determined by gas chromatography. Data for specific gravity, freezing point, pour point, flammability, ignition and electrostatic properties and copper corrosion tests were also obtained. Conclusions from this study are: physical properties of the Shale-II fuels are similar to that of equivalent fuels derived from petroleum; and differences observed could be minimized by modest changes in refining steps.

Affens W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC); Hall, J.M.; Beal, E.; Hazlett, R.N.; Nowack, C.J.; Speck, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Dwarf Novae in the OGLE Data. II. Forty New Dwarf Novae in the OGLE-III Galactic Disk Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of forty erupting cataclysmic variable stars in the OGLE-III Galactic disk fields. Among them seventeen objects are of U Gem type, four of Z Cam type. Nineteen of the stars show outbursts and superoutbursts typical for SU UMa-type dwarf novae. In the case of five stars we were able to estimate their supercycle lengths. The obtained lengths are in the range 20-90 d, generally between the typical SU UMa-type variables and a few objects classified as the ER UMa-type variables. Since there is no significant difference between the two types but a higher mass-transfer rate resulting in more frequent outbursts and superoutbursts in the ER UMa-type stars, we propose to discard this type as a separate class of variables. We note that in one of the SU UMa-type stars, OGLE-GD-DN-039, we found a negative supercycle period change, in contrast to other active systems of this type. Two of the new OGLE objects showed long-duration WZ Sge-like superoutbursts followed by a sequence of echo outbursts. Al...

Mroz, P; Poleski, R; Udalski, A; Soszynski, I; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Kozlowski, S; Skowron, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

Shepard, Patricia Arlene

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are equivalent to that of surgery. We believe that the alternative option of HDRB as the primary therapy for selected Stage I endometrial carcinoma, even in patients with low operative risks, needs further evaluation.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahoric, Boris [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gilbert, Lucy [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Stanimir, Gerald [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

EXI'UU~II-_:-;I AL \\IYCOI.OGY 17.000-000 (I'N~J Comparison of Seiridium Isolates Associated with Cypress Canker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXI'UU~II-_:-;I AL \\IYCOI.OGY 17.000-000 (I'N~J Comparison of Seiridium Isolates Associated with Cypress Canker using Sequence Data CHRISTOPHER D. VIl.JOEN. BRE"DA D. WINGFIELD, AND MICHAEL J. WI. Bloemfomein. 9300. Sourh Africa Accepted for publication ~tay 12. 1993 VIUOEN, C. D.. WI~GFIElD. B. D., A

40

Calculo Numerico II. Curso 03/04 Primer bloque: practica 1 Esta practica corresponde al primer tema del curso: "El problema de valor inicial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C´alculo Num´erico II. Curso 03/04 Primer bloque: pr´actica 1 Esta pr´actica corresponde al primer punto xn-1 de la malla, que habr´a sido seleccionado por el propio m´etodo num´erico. #12;

QuirĂłs, Fernando

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wind-wind collision in the eta Carinae binary system - III. The HeII 4686 line profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We modeled the HeII 4686 line profiles observed in the eta Carinae binary system close to the 2003.5 spectroscopic event, assuming that they were formed in the shocked gas that flows at both sides of the contact surface formed by wind-wind collision. We used a constant flow velocity and added turbulence in the form of a gaussian velocity distribution. We allowed emission from both the primary and secondary shocks but introduced infinite opacity at the contact surface, implying that only the side of the contact cone visible to the observer contributed to the line profile. Using the orbital parameters of the binary system derived from the 7 mm light curve during the last spectroscopic event (Paper II) we were able to reproduce the line profiles obtained with the HST at different epochs, as well as the line mean velocities obtained with ground based telescopes. A very important feature of our model is that the line profile depends on the inclination of the orbital plane; we found that to explain the latitude dependent mean velocity of the line, scattered into the line of sight by the Homunculus, the orbit inclination should be close to 90 degrees, meaning that it does not lie in the Homunculus equatorial plane, as usually assumed. This inclination, together with the relative position of the stars during the spectroscopic events, allowed us to explain most of the observational features, like the variation of the Purple Haze with the orbital phase, and to conciliate the X-ray absorption with the postulated shell effect used to explain the optical and UV light curves.

Z. Abraham; D. Falceta-Goncalves

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

44

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

45

Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced stage iii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

embryo(G1,G2) Unnatural advancement... , Tokyo, Japan 1412 x zy Syringes Heater- Chiller plates Hot Cold Heat exchangeri) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) A i... ) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) A A...

49

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fiom I -

50

/ P/>;.I II Fian(.e 4 (1994) 1813-1822 OCTOBER 1994, PAGE f813 C la,, ii icJtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,e ic,ult, me tli,cLi,,ctl in tci iii, iii the tui hitliij, hemp di>ii ii,itetl hi Lt>I uiiii~ii ~ithei

Boyer, Edmond

51

Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium Fubo Luan and William D. Burgos*, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Information ABSTRACT: Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department

Burgos, William

52

Red variables in the OGLE-II data base -- III. Constraints on the three-dimensional structures of the LMC and SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the 3-D structure of the Magellanic Clouds, using period-luminosity (P-L) relations of pulsating red giants in the OGLE-II sample. By interpreting deviations from the mean P-L relations as distance modulus variations, we examine the three-dimensional distributions of the sample. The results for the Large Magellanic Cloud, based solely on stars below the tip of the Red Giant Branch, confirm previous results on the inclined and possibly warped bar of the LMC. The depth variation across the OGLE-II field is about 2.4 kpc, interpreted as the distance range of a thin but inclined structure. The inclination angle is about 29 deg. A comparison with OGLE-II red clump distances revealed intriguing differences that seem to be connected to the red clump reddening correction. A spatially variable red clump population in the LMC can explain the deviations, which may have a broader impact on our understanding of the LMC formation history. For the Small Magellanic Cloud, we find a complex structure showing patchy distribution scattered within 3.2 kpc of the mean. However, the larger range of the overall depth on every line-of-sight is likely to smooth out significantly the real variations.

P. Lah; L. L. Kiss; T. R. Bedding

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

The preparation and characterization of aquoruthenium(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes in Y-type zeolite / by Ben-Zu Wan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 500 C for 1 h; (5) after degassing 2H at 400 C for 1 h. xii LIST OF F IGURES ( CONT INUED ) P 1. gure 7. EPR spectra of quoruthenium(III) in toluene- sulfonic acid solution at -196 C at differer . pH values: (1) in 2 Pi toluenesulfonic acic... solution; (2) at pH 0. 57; (3) at pH 2. 8 8. EPR spectra of a Ru3 6Y zeolite: (1) after degassing at room temperature overnight; (2) after degassing at 100 C for 1 h; (3) after degassing at 200 C for 2 h; (4) after degassing at 300 C for 3 h. Page 9...

Wan, Ben-Zu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

State of competition in gasoline marketing. Book I. A study of refiner subsidization. Book II. An analysis of the subpoenaed documents (as required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Marketing Practices Act was enacted in June 1978. One part of that Act, Title III, required the Department of Energy to study the role of vertically integrated petroleum companies in the marketing of gasoline. Specifically, the study was to focus on the pricing practices of these companies at their salaried retail outlets. A preliminary, limited analysis of nationwide market share trends was forwarded to Congress in December 1979 finding no evidence of pedatory practices. Part I of the Title III Study was transmitted to Congress in April 1980. The Part I analysis tentatively found no evidence of predatory subsidization or allocation subsidization by refiners at their company-operated retail gasoline outlets. These tentative conclusions were debated by industry groups and legislative spokesmen both favoring and opposing the dissolution of major petroleum companies at various Congressional hearings concerning legislation prohibiting refiner operations at retail. This Final Report supersedes the analysis conducted in Part I since it includes all the data used in Part I as well as additional data. The Final Report is divided into two parts. Book I examines several alleged predatory practices of refiner marketers in light of recent developments in gasoline marketing. Its basic thrust is to explore fully the hypothesis that refiners are engaged in a predatory campaign to eliminate their independent competitors, ultimately monopolizing gasoline marketing. Book II focuses on the internal financial and planning documents of nine integrated petroleum companies subpoenaed during the course of the study. This volume specifically examines the marketing strategies adopted by these companies over the last decade, i.e., if investments in gasoline marketing were made for predatory or pecuniary reasons. A brief overview of each book follows.

Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dissimilatory Bacterial Reduction of Al-Substituted Goethite in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbiologic reduction of the 0.2-2.0 mm size fraction of an Atlantic coastal plain sediment (Eatontown) was investigated using a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32) to evaluate mineralogic controls on the rate and extent of Fe(III) reduction and resulting distribution of biogenic Fe(II). Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) was used to show that the sedimentary Fe(III) oxide was Al-substituted goethite (11-17% Al) that existed as 1-5 mm aggregates of indistinct morphology. Bioreduction experiments were performed in two buffers [HCO3-, 1,4-piperazinediethansulfonic acid (PIPES)] both without and with 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle. The production of biogenic Fe(II) and the distribution of Al (aqueous and sorbed) were followed over time, as was formation of Fe(II) biominerals and physical/chemical changes to the goethite.

Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Liu, Chongxuan

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Final Technical Report; Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definitioni (GRED) Program-Phases I, II, and III for the Animas Valley, NM Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbon dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.

Cunniff, Roy A.; Bowers, Roger L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III(O2 CO)4 3- Based Molecule Based Magnets: Three-Dmensional Network Structure and Two Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Kennon, B.; Her, J; Stephens, P; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermoelectric figure of merit of (In0.53Ga0.47As)0.8(In0.52Al0.48As)0.2 III-V semiconductor alloys Je-Hyeong Bahk,1 Zhixi Bian,2 Mona Zebarjadi,2 Joshua M. O. Zide,3 Hong Lu,1,4 Dongyan Xu,5 Joseph P. Feser,5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 73.50.Lw, 73.61.Ey I. INTRODUCTION Seeking a better thermoelectric material for efficient thermal The efficiency of a thermoelectric material is directly linked to the dimensionless thermoelectric figureThermoelectric figure of merit of (In0.53Ga0.47As)0.8(In0.52Al0.48As)0.2 III-V semiconductor alloys

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PART III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)J TOC PART III List

62

als teil des: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1990: TBL prgt Begriff "World Wide Web" - Beginn eines gro?en Hypertext Zachmann, Gabriel 4 Whitehead's Ausdehnungslehre Die Kapitel II und III im Teil IV von...

63

Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part II: Effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydration and microstructural evolution of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents between 7 and 17% wt.% have been investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O. The formation of C(-A)-S-H and hydrotalcite was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag decreased the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite, increased the Al incorporation in the C(-A)-S-H and led to the formation of straetlingite. Increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag slowed down the early hydration and a lower compressive strength during the first days was observed. At 28 days and longer, no significant effects of slag Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the degree of hydration, the volume of the hydrates, the coarse porosity or on the compressive strengths were observed.

Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B., E-mail: barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch; Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

ORFEUS II and IUE Spectroscopy of EX Hydrae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using ORFEUS-SPAS II FUV spectra, IUE UV spectra, and archival EUVE deep survey photometry, we present a detailed picture of the behavior of the magnetic cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae. Like HUT spectra of this source, the FUV and UV spectra reveal broad emission lines of He II, C II-IV, N III and V, O VI, Si III-IV, and Al III superposed on a continuum which is blue in the UV and nearly flat in the FUV. Like ORFEUS spectra of AM Her, the O VI doublet is resolved into broad and narrow emission components. Consistent with its behavior in the optical, the FUV and UV continuum flux densities, the FUV and UV broad emission line fluxes, and the radial velocity of the O VI broad emission component all vary on the spin phase of the white dwarf, with the maximum of the FUV and UV continuum and broad emission line flux light curves coincident with maximum blueshift of the broad O VI emission component. On the binary phase, the broad dip in the EUV light curve is accompanied by strong eclipses of the UV emission lines and by variations in both the flux and radial velocity of the O VI narrow emission component. The available data are consistent with the accretion funnel being the source of the FUV and UV continuum and the O VI broad emission component, and the white dwarf being the source of the O VI narrow emission component.

Christopher W. Mauche

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier,Jump to:Wilmette,Transport &GM

66

NIF Title III engineering plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

Deis, G

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On EPR-type Entanglement in the Experiments of Scully et Al. II. Insight in the Real Random Delayed-choice Erasure Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It was pointed out in the first part of this study that EPR-type entanglement is defined by the possibility of performing any of two mutually incompatible distant, i. e.,direct-interaction-free, measurements. They go together under the term 'EPR-type disentanglement'. In this second part, quantum-mechanical insight is gained in the real random delayed-choice erasure experiment of Kim et al. [Kim et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1-5 (2000)] by a relative-reality-of- unitarily-evolving-state (RRUES) approach (explained in the first part). Finally, it is shown that this remarkable experiment, which performs, by random choice, two incompatible measurements at the same time, is actually an EPR-type disentanglement experiment, closely related to the micromaser experiment discussed in the first part.

Fedor Herbut

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

Post, Richard F

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

Darlington AL O'Reillys AL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CanungraCk Darlington AL Darlington Coom era R O'Reillys AL Beechmont AL Binna Burra AL BackCk Tyungun AL Numinbah Valley AL NerangR Natural Bridge Numinbah AL Little Nerang Dam AL Albert R Bromfleet AL Benobble AL Wolffdene AL Luscombe AL Wongawallan AL Mt Tamborine Canungra Pimpama R Laheys Lookout

Greenslade, Diana

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - amuse-virgo ii down-sizing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Green Bank Solar Radio Burst... by Type II (45 mins) 12;Type II followed by Type IV (2 hours) 12;Solar Radio Bursts Type III bursts... narrowband Type II bursts:...

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-igg solidscreen ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Green Bank Solar Radio Burst... by Type II (45 mins) 12;Type II followed by Type IV (2 hours) 12;Solar Radio Bursts Type III bursts... narrowband Type II bursts:...

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - al problema visual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disponibles Modelos lineales GLMs Problema I Problema II Prog. II Sweave et al. Docs. ESS, Emacs... disponibles Modelos lineales GLMs ... Source: Daz-Uriarte, Ramn -...

73

MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting III­V materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

Deshmukh, Mandar M.

74

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

Minnesota, University of

75

Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and...

76

Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

ALS Visitors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including Ethan Crumlin (at right) about current research in energy storage and battery efficiency. Berkeleyside Editor Lance Knoble toured the ALS and Berkeley Lab with...

78

Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - atps part iii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NIST GCR 07-908 12;ii 12;iii Findings from the Advanced Technology Program's Survey of ATP... NIST GCR 07-908 Findings from the Advanced Technology Program's Survey of ATP...

80

MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ALS@20  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasandArgonneALS in the News ALS

82

ALS Spectrum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALSSpectroscopyALS

83

Diruthenium Tetracarbonate Trianion, [RuII/III2(O2CO)4]3?, Based Molecule-Based Magnets: Three-Dimensional Network Structure and Two-Dimensional Magnetic Ordering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HxK1-xMII[Ru2(CO3)4](H2O)y(MeOH)z (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg) were synthesized from the reaction of MII and K3[Ru2(CO3)4] in water and are isomorphous with an orthorhombic three-dimensional network structures based on e3-CO32- linkages to Ru2 moieties forming layers and also to trans-MII(OH2)4 sites forming linked chains that connect the layers. They, as well as non-isomorphous M = Cu, magnetically order as canted ferrimagnets with Tc = 4.4 {+-} 1.0 K. The presence of S = 0 MII = Mg(II) has essentially no effect on Tc suggesting that the main magnetic pathway does not occur the through MII-based chains, but only via Ru2{center_dot}...Ru2 linkages that reside in layers. This is a rare example of a magnet based upon a second row transition metal.

Novoa, J.; Stephens, P; Weerasekare, M; Shum, W; Miller, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A study of the ground and excited states of Al3 and Al3 Computational analysis of the 488 nm anion photoelectron spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the ground and excited states of Al3 and Al3 - . II. Computational analysis of the 488 nm anion photoelectron spectrum and a reconsideration of the Al3 bond dissociation energy Stephen R-lying excited electronic states of Al3 - and Al3 and compared with the available spectroscopic data

Truhlar, Donald G

85

Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

Crawford, Samuel Curtis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title...

87

AL. I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r 'Xxy";^it ! (-AL.

88

ALS Visitors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory: The FirstUsers' ExecutiveALS

89

ALS Visitors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory: The FirstUsers'ALS Visitors

90

Industry @ ALS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In AboutIn theIndustry @ ALS

91

ALS Spectrum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALSSpectroscopy

92

ALS Spectrum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS

93

XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Multicenter phase II study of matured dendritic cells pulsed with melanoma cell line lysates in patients with advanced melanoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TAAs (Melan-A/MART1, NY-ESO-1, tyrosinase or gp100), with noi) gp100 family, ii) tyrosinase and TRP-2 family, iii) MAGE

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fabrication of AlN/BN bishell hollow nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN)/boron nitride (BN) bishell hollow nanofibers (HNFs) have been fabricated by successive atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlN and sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of BN on electrospun polymeric nanofibrous template. A four-step fabrication process was utilized: (i) fabrication of polymeric (nylon 6,6) nanofibers via electrospinning, (ii) hollow cathode plasma-assisted ALD of AlN at 100?°C onto electrospun polymeric nanofibers, (iii) calcination at 500?°C for 2 h in order to remove the polymeric template, and (iv) sequential CVD growth of BN at 450?°C. AlN/BN HNFs have been characterized for their chemical composition, surface morphology, crystal structure, and internal nanostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline hexagonal BN and AlN within the three dimensional (3D) network of bishell HNFs with relatively low impurity content. In contrast to the smooth surface of the inner AlN layer, outer BN coating showed a highly rough 3D morphology in the form of BN nano-needle crystallites. It is shown that the combination of electrospinning and plasma-assisted low-temperature ALD/CVD can produce highly controlled multi-layered bishell nitride ceramic hollow nanostructures. While electrospinning enables easy fabrication of nanofibrous template, self-limiting reactions of plasma-assisted ALD and sequential CVD provide control over the wall thicknesses of AlN and BN layers with sub-nanometer accuracy.

Haider, Ali; Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali Kemal [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

97

Astrophysically important {sup 26}Si states studied with the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction. II. Spin of the 5.914-MeV {sup 26}Si level and galactic {sup 26}Al production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction has been studied to resolve a controversy surrounding the properties of the {sup 26}Si level at 5.914 MeV and its contribution to the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rate in novae, which affects interpretations of galactic {sup 26}Al observations. Recent studies have come to contradictory conclusions regarding the spin of this level (0{sup +} or 3{sup +}), with a 3{sup +} assignment implying a large contribution by this level to the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rate. We have extended our previous study [Bardayan et al., Phys. Rev. C 65, 032801(R) (2002)] to smaller angles and find the angular distribution of tritons populating the 5.914-MeV level in the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction to be consistent with either a 2{sup +} or 3{sup +} assignment. We have calculated reaction rates under these assumptions and used them in a nova nucleosynthesis model to examine the effects of the remaining uncertainties in the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si rate on {sup 26}Al production in novae.

Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Hix, W. R.; Liang, J. F.; Smith, M. S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Howard, J. A.; Kozub, R. L. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Brune, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Chae, K. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Johnson, M. S. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Bldg 6008, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Lingerfelt, E. J.; Scott, J. P. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Livesay, R. J. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Visser, D. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

III IIU Em Smiii  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptemberÂť ;,III

99

Iii;.} An Ann  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type| EMSLemployed inIhorIii;.} An

100

Broensted superacidity of HCl in a liquid chloroaluminate. AlCl sub 3 -1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazolium chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The system HCl (0.1-1 atm)/AlCl{sub 3}-EMIC (55.0 mol % AlCl{sub 3}) (EMIC = 1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazolium chloride) at 23{degree}C is a Broensted superacid capable of protonating arenes to a degree similar to that of liquid HF at 0{degree}C (H{sub 0} = {minus}15.1). Arenes used in this investigation were biphenyl (I), naphthalene (II), 9H-fluorene (III), chrysene (IV), 2-methylnaphthalene (V), mesitylene (VI), pentamethylbenzene (VII), hexamethylbenzene (VIII), anthracene (IX), and 9,10-dimethylanthracene (X). In both the chloroaluminate melt and HF I is a weak base while VIII-X are strong bases. In between these extremes the order of basicities in both media is II < III and IV < V < VI < VII < VIII. A study of the effect of HCl partial pressure showed, for example that V is 50% protonated at 0.3 atm HCl. The overall reaction is arene + HCl + Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} {r reversible} arene {times} H{sup +} + 2AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and is reversible. The degree of protonation was measured by optical absorption spectrophotometry. The arenes are stable in the liquid chloroaluminate for many hours, and their protonated forms (arenium ions) are stable for 1 h or more. A new procedure for the preparation of EMIC was developed that yields exceptionally clean AlCl{sub 3}-EMIC melts with very low concentrations of protic and oxidizing impurities. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Smith, G.P.; Dworkin, A.S.; Zingg, S.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Pagni, R.M. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

1989-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Formation of mixed oxide powders in flames: Part II. SiO sub 2 --GeO sub 2 and Al sub 2 O sub 3 --TiO sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SiO{sub 2}--GeO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide powders were synthesized using a counterflow diffusion flame burner. SiCl{sub 4}, GeCl{sub 4}, Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}, and TiCl{sub 4} were used as source materials for the formation of oxide particles in hydrogen-oxygen flames. {ital In} {ital situ} particle sizes were determined using dynamic light-scattering. Powders were collected using two different methods, a thermophoretic method (particles are collected onto carbon coated TEM grids) and an electrophoretic method (particles are collected onto stainless steel strips). Their size, morphology, and crystalline form were examined using a transmission electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer. A photomultiplier at 90{degree} to the argon ion laser beam was used to measure the light-scattering intensity. The formation of the mixed oxides was investigated using Si to Ge and Al to Ti ratios of 3:5 and 1:1, respectively. Heterogeneous nucleation of the SiO{sub 2} on the surface of the GeO{sub 2} was observed. In Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2} mixtures, both oxide particles form at the same temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis of particles sampled at temperatures higher than 1553 K showed the presence of rutile, {gamma}--Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and aluminum titanate. Although the particle formation processes for SiO{sub 2}--GeO{sub 2} is very different from that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2}, both mixed oxides result in very uniform mixtures.

Hung, C.; Miquel, P.F.; Katz, J.L. (Department of Chemical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing (backing, mechanical pumps) Rotary vane Sorption Rotary lobe Scroll ScrewSorption, Rotary lobe, Scroll Phy250-1, 2011, NanoFab16 #12;IIIIII--A. Roughing: Rotary Vane PumpA. Roughing: Rotary Vane Pump (Gas

Liu, Kai

103

CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

Taylor, Jerry

104

I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet III Molecular motors Maxwell's demon and Feynman's ratchet://www.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/ arcquery?Feynman Physics of ratchets pawl asymetric tooths The Feynman Lectures on Physics, I-46 ratchet rate with attempt frequency energy provided to ratchet L work done on load Lf f B power delivered

Nielsen, Steven O.

105

EXEMPT POSTING JOB TITLE: Research Engineer I/II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analytical mechanical testing laboratory and engineering problem solving projects. The position will be responsible to design and conduct advanced mechanical testing, including testing procedures, fixtures, method. The position will also take responsibility for coordinating and managing daily activities in the testing lab

Demirel, Melik C.

106

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

107

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Procurement Training A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Independent Oversight Activity Report,...

108

Strong reactions in quantum super PDE's. I-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a work in three parts, devoted to encode strong reactions of the high energy physics, in the algebraic topologic theory of quantum super PDE's, (previously formulated by A. Pr\\'astaro). In particular strong reactions are characterized by means of boundary value problems in quantum super PDE's. In such a way one obtains representations of quantum nonlinear propagators in quantum super PDE's, by means of elementary ones (quantum handle decompositions of quantum nonlinear propagators). These are useful to encode nuclear and subnuclear reactions in quantum physics. Pr\\'astaro's geometric theory of quantum PDE's allows us to obtain constructive and dynamically justified answers to some important open problems in high energy physics.

Agostino Prástaro

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(Held &InformationWindMaliEnergy

110

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:Diesel Engines |ServicesfromJanuary2,3-13

111

Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air Jump to:KingKirkwoodKlondike IISherman

112

Early Restoration Plan (Phase III FERP)Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Library Central Branch 301 W. Claude St. Lake Charles 70605 29. LA Iberia Parish Library 445 EEarly Restoration Plan (Phase III FERP)Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP 1. AL Dauphin. Mobile 36606 6. AL City of Bayou La Batre Public Library 12747 Padgett Switch Road Irvington 36544 7. FL

113

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

SPEAR III: A brighter source at SSRL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By replacing the magnets and vacuum chamber for the 3 GeV SPEAR II storage ring, the natural emittance of the machine can be reduced from 130 to 18 nm-rad and the stored current can be raised from 100 to 200 mA with a 50 h lifetime. This configuration increases focused photon flux for insertion device beamlines by an order of magnitude and the photon brightness for future undulators would exceed 10{sup 18} at 5 keV. Due to a higher critical energy, the photon flux in the 20 keV range for bending magnet beamlines increases by more than two orders of magnitude. We present preliminary SPEAR III design study results and plans to implement the facility upgrade with minimal downtime for SSRL users.

Hettel, R.; Boyce, R.; Brennan, S. [and others

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2107007 05/05/2014 9:00 101, 108 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ingeniera Ambiental Fsica II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13/05/2014 12:00 201 Aulario III 3 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental EvaluaciĂłn del Impacto Ambiental Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental FĂ­sica II 2107010 13/05/2014 9:00 202, 203 Aulario II 1 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental BiologĂ­a 2107005 07/05/2014 9:00 104, 105 Aulario III 1 Grado en IngenierĂ­a Ambiental

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

118

Policy Flash 2015-16 AL-2015-04 FAL 2015-03 Implementation of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub.L. No 113-235. Policy Flash 2015-16 AL-2015-04 FAL 2015-03 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V,...

119

Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

Fulton, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ionization of oxygen followed by its subsequent discharge, as CO2/CO, at the anode surface. The removal of oxygen from the oxide mixture helped form the alloy in situ. The presentation shall cover the detailed experimental results pertaining to the preparation, evaluation and characterization of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (atom%) alloy.

Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis phase ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 39 www.praxair.com Low Cost Hydrogen Summary: 2004 2005 2006 Phase I Phase II Phase III 2002 Phase I...

123

The Strange Career of DDT: Experts, Federal Capacity, and ‘Environmentalism’ in World War II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. The strange career of DDT: Experts, federal capacity, and environmentalism in World War II Russell, Edmund P, III Technology and Culture; Oct...

Russell, Edmund P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa phase ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

africa phase ii Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Call For Papers SOUTHERN FORESTS Summary: in South Africa - the next phase iii JSB Scotcher Scientific Papers Variation in foliar water...

125

Local stress-induced effects on AlGaAs/AlOx oxidation front shape  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lateral oxidation of thick AlGaAs layers (>500?nm) is studied. An uncommon shape of the oxide tip is evidenced and attributed to the embedded stress distribution, inherent to the oxidation reaction. Experimental and numerical studies of the internal strain in oxidized Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs structures were carried out by dark-field electron holography and finite element methods. A mapping of the strain distribution around the AlGaAs/oxide interface demonstrates the main role of internal stress on the shaping of the oxide front. These results demonstrate the high relevance of strain in oxide-confined III-V devices, in particular, with over-500-nm thick AlOx confinement layers.

Chouchane, F.; Almuneau, G., E-mail: almuneau@laas.fr; Arnoult, A.; Lacoste, G.; Fontaine, C. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cherkashin, N. [Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, CEMES, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali feldspars ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching is spatially heterogeneous on some altered alkali Z .feldspar surfaces Gout et al., 1997 . Similar... weathering: II. Observation of feldspars from soils. Geochim....

128

-and -Coordinated Al in AlC2 . A Combined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and -Coordinated Al in AlC2 - and AlCSi- . A Combined Photoelectron Spectroscopy and ab Initio the structure and chemical bonding in AlC2 - and AlCSi-. AlC2 - was found to have a C2V structure whereas AlCSi- was found to be almost linear, thus establishing -coordination of Al in AlC2 - and -coordination in Al

Simons, Jack

129

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta III

133

Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Aluminum nitride transitional layer for reducing dislocation density and cracking of AlGaN epitaxial films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A denticulated Group III nitride structure that is useful for growing Al.sub.xGa.sub.1-xN to greater thicknesses without cracking and with a greatly reduced threading dislocation (TD) density.

Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Lee, Stephen R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Howes et al. Reply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Howes et al. Reply to Comment on "Kinetic Simulations of Magnetized Turbulence in Astrophysical Plasmas" arXiv:0711.4355

G. G. Howes; S. C. Cowley; W. Dorland; G. W. Hammett; E. Quataert; A. A. Schekochihin; T. Tatsuno

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

137

Superplastic behavior of Al-Li 2090 OE-16 (ALCOA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an argon atmosphere under a back pressure of 400 psi. Limited tests were conducted at atmospheric pressure in order to examine the effect of back pressure on superplastic formability and cavitation. The analysis consisted of an investigation of: (1.... TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION. Page II. ANALYSIS III. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 15 A. 510'C Test Temperature at 400 psi Back Pressure . . . 15 1. 0. 090L in Gauge (Longitudinal Orientation) . . . . 15 2. 0. 063L...

Douskos, Lambros Stamatiou

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

WCI-III Workshop Recap  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdatesValleyJablonowskiWCI-III Recap Workshop

139

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources JumpMicrelBirds JumpMilner Dam WindIII Jump to:

140

Registration List - WCI-III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONews Media »WCI-III Registration List

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

34 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter III: Modernizing the Electric Grid QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and...

142

A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

R. W. Swindeman

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - al diseno radial Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radial Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: al diseno radial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Metodologia de la Programacion II Analisis y...

144

Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

145

Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

146

Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 ¡ College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

Liblit, Ben

147

LABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY You have a job in a University research group investigating the effect of solar flaresLABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS Lab III - 1 Our modern society functions in part because we have learned how to manipulate electrical energy. Almost all of our technology involves

Minnesota, University of

148

ARM - Field Campaign - ARESE II IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM DatagovCampaignsARESE II IOP

149

al excitation function: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of ArII and N2 + DAMOP 2007 Amanda Fricke Dr. Timothy Gay Jack;References 1 http:prl.anu.eduaustudentinfo 2 H.M. Al-Khateeb, B.G. Birdsey, and T.J. Gay, UNL Doctoral....

150

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART A7: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS X. Introduction 75 XI. Remote diagnostics 75 1. Optical spectroscopy 2 and rotational excitation IV. Heavy particle collisions 142 V. Gas phase kinetics 143 PART B5: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICSPlasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma

Chen, Francis F.

151

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Wednesday, 22 October 2014 11:43 Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process...

152

CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2120001 13/12/2013 15:00 105, 106 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en Tecnologas Industriales Matemticas I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as Industriales MatemĂĄticas I 2120002 17/12/2013 15:00 203 Aulario III 1 Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as Industriales FĂ­sica I 2120003 08/01/2014 15:00 202, 203 Aulario II 1 Grado Ingenieria en TecnologĂ­as Industriales QuĂ­mica 2120004 20/12/2013 15:00 102, 103 Laboratorios III

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

153

ALS in the News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasandArgonneALS in the News ALS in the

154

ALS in the News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGasandArgonneALS in the News ALS in

155

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

156

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

159

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site, Vol III - August 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August 2001 August 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site This report...

160

Brambilla, et al. Reply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brambilla, et al. Reply: van Megen and Williams (vMW) question our recent claim that dense colloidal hard spheres enter at large volume fraction \\phi a dynamical regime not observed in earlier work and not described by the mode-coupling theory (MCT) of the glass transition.

Giovanni Brambilla; Djamel El Masri; Matteo Pierno; Ludovic Berthier; Luca Cipelletti; George Petekidis; Andrew B. Schofield

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Smith et al Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smith et al 1 Supporting Information for Smith et al. 2006, PLoS Computational Biology 2:e161-hyperpallium apicale; HF-hippocampal formation, and M-mesopallium. #12;Smith et al 2 FigureS2,nolinkswerefoundbetweenelectrodesindifferentbirds,andnolinkswerefoundintothesoundstimulusvariable. CombinedAnalysisofAllBirds'ElectrodesPlusSound #12;Smith et al 3 Analysis of Data from Subsections

Jarvis, Erich D.

162

Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

Smith III, Julius Orion

163

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

164

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

165

Effect of activators on promoter clearance by RNA polymerase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , 1989). TIi'IID TFIID consists of a TBP subunit and nine TBP associated factors (TAFs). TI'11D activity was first discovered in human nuclear extracts (Matsui et al. , 1980), but difficulties existed in purifying and studying the factor. On the other...-activating kinase (CAK) cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) general transcription factor (GTF) initiator element (Inr) mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (MMTV) RNA polymerase II (pol II) TATA-binding protein (TBP) TBP associated factor (TAP) upstream stimulatory...

Grier, Jason Dwain

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Online Supplemental Information.1 1) Differences with Ball et al. (1999).2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equivalent6 results. The differences in ammonia introduction methods means that a direct comparison7 between convection is expected to be similar.21 There was no (iii) periodic rinsing of the flow reactor with de-ionized water as was done by Ball22 et al. Rinsing the flow reactor was not done because it would be exposed

Meskhidze, Nicholas

167

EnvironMEntAl chEMiStry College of Natural Science and Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) aqueous/ environmental geochemistry, and (iii) environmental toxicology and contaminant fate. Students mayEnvironMEntAl chEMiStry College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Chemistry; PhD: 32 credits Environmental chemistry focuses on the chemical processes influencing the composition

Hartman, Chris

168

Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2106007 06/05/2014 15:00 205, 206 Aulario III 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geografa Humana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grado en Ciencias Ambientales GeografĂ­a Humana 2106008 08/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Historia Cultural e Instituciones de EspaĂąa y Europa 2106006 09/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales BiologĂ­a I 2106021 12/05/2014 15:00 102, 103 Laboratorio III 1

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

171

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper soil pressure on the tank walls. Seismic time histories (in the horizontal and vertical directions) are applied to the seismic model. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has code requirements for nuclear safety-related concrete structures (ACI-349-06) that are used to evaluate the structural integrity of the SSTs. ACI-349-06 recommends evaluating factored load combinations against reduced tank section capacities to account for both loading and material uncertainties. From both the TOLA and seismic models the structural demands (forces and moments) are extracted from sections throughout the tank under the appropriate load combinations. These demands are compared against the ACI-349-06 capacities at each of the sections. This ratio of demand to capacity is reported as a measure of structural integrity. The Type II and Type III appurtenances configurations are found to increase the demand to capacity ratios in local regions near the appurtenances. Away from the appurtenances the influence on structural integrity is minor. A comparison of the Type II and III results show that even though the Type II offset pits weight less, they have a larger impact on the structural integrity of the tanks due to their locations. Finally, lessons learned from the Type II and Type III appurtenance analysis, and their application to the more complex Type IV structural integrity analysis, will be discussed.

Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

175

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces ¡ Plane ¡ Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations ¡ General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 ¡ Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

Hua, Jing

176

ALS Communications Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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177

About the ALS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights MediaFuel Production ASUEMSL NewsAboutUs |ALS

178

2015 ALS Shutdown  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next ReleaseEFRC5 Calendar2015 ALS Shutdown

179

ALS Activity Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smart sensors andScience atScienceALS

180

ALS Beamlines Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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181

ALS Beamlines Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smart sensors andScienceALS

182

ALS Communications Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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183

ALS in the News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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184

ALS Beamlines Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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185

ALS Beamlines Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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186

ALS Chemistry Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During theALSSafety Safety for Users ALS

187

ALS Chemistry Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During theALSSafety Safety for Users ALS

188

REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei eiEilEiEiia ii?:lsiiiiiiiligF;i!;u gi;*:g!ifEi I iiii: '=;:E:;i:ii iii;Eliiliiilii5il:i=i:;;;Ei=? o o o \\ E r--/-o ( f EIE i l g \\ I E sli o o(J !" ( sQit s s?,3 t:is : ;*:: iqi5 ' i:iU l a . , i ^ . 9 e i;i1 li * sEisg :iiSrrl! S:ii;;.e !8*g B f E3::g f i:E; E', {*=f "sEi !xi! t i3;t

Prentiss, Mara

190

Doublet III neutral beam power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Epitaxial growth of aligned AlGalnN nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly ordered and aligned epitaxy of III-Nitride nanowires is demonstrated in this work. <1010> M-axis is identified as a preferential nanowire growth direction through a detailed study of GaN/AlN trunk/branch nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic selectivity can be used to achieve spatial and orientational control of nanowire growth. Vertically aligned (Al)GaN nanowires are prepared on M-plane AlN substrates. Horizontally ordered nanowires, extending from the M-plane sidewalls of GaN hexagonal mesas or islands demonstrate new opportunities for self-aligned nanowire devices, interconnects, and networks.

Han, Jung (Woodbridge, CT); Su, Jie (New Haven, CT)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

On the properties of massive Population III stars and metal-free stellar populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present realistic models for massive Population III stars and stellar populations based on non-LTE model atmospheres, recent stellar evolution tracks and up-to-date evolutionary synthesis models, to study their spectral properties, including their dependence on age, star formation history, and IMF. (..) The main results regarding integrated stellar populations are: * For young bursts and the case of a constant SFR, nebular continuous emission - neglected in previous studies - dominates the spectrum redward of Lyman-alpha (...). Therefore predicted emission line equivalent widths are considerably smaller than found in earlier studies, whereas the detection of the continuum is eased. Nebular line and continuous emission strongly affect the broad band photometric properties of Pop III objects. * Due to stellar evolution, the hardness of the ionising spectrum decreases rapidly, leading to the disappearance of the characteristic HeII 1640 recombination lines after ~ 3 Myr in instantaneous bursts. * The relative...

Schärer, D

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy of the Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x = 35), Al6O5 , and Al7O5 clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy of the Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x = 3­5), Al6O5 , and Al7O5 clusters Giovanni Meloni, Michael J. Ferguson and Daniel M. Neumark Department of Chemistry as an Advance Article on the web 9th September 2003 The Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x Ÿ 3­5), Al6O5 , and Al7

Neumark, Daniel M.

194

J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear Polarisation of Optically Pumped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear ~IT) is close to the earth field value. From this measurement, we determine the ~He nuclear in the gaseous and fluid phases at low temperature [ii, magnetometry [2], to polarised targets for nuclear

Boyer, Edmond

195

Vacancy diffusion in the Cu(001) surface II: Random walk theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy diffusion in the Cu(001) surface II: Random walk theory E. Somfai a,*,1 , R. van Gastel b Abstract We develop a version of the vacancy mediated tracer diffusion model, which follows the properties for the vacancy, and (iii) the diffusion rate of the vacancy is different, in our case strongly enhanced

van Saarloos, Wim

196

Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS sulfate mineralogy on Mars. Rice M. S. Bell J. F. III Cloutis E. A. Wang A. Ruff S. W. Craig M. A. Bailey) full630.pdf #12;McGlynn I. O. McSween H. Y. Jr. Fedo C. M. Mineralogical Characterization of Soils

Rathbun, Julie A.

197

Seeded growth of AlN bulk crystals in m-and c-orientation , R. Collazo a,, R.F. Dalmau b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Single crystal AlN is a promising substrate for nitride-based optoelectronic devices exploiting efficiency of optoelectronic devices [8]. Second, AlN and GaN have different valence band structures caused in higher luminous efficiency of deep UV optoelectronic devices. Although the growth of III-nitride thin

Dietz, Nikolaus

198

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

199

GAMETOPHYTIC SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY (Newbigin et al., 1993; Matton et al., 1994; Dodds et al., 1997)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAMETOPHYTIC SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY (Newbigin et al., 1993; Matton et al., 1994; Dodds et al., 1997, but expressed at high levels in the style. d. There are high levels of this gene product in self-incompatible species, whereas very low levels in self-compatible species. f. Generalized features: #12;Self-incompatibility

Bhattacharyya, Madan Kumar

200

Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Cobalt(III) Monohydride Complexes Containing Pendant Amines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new tetraphosphine ligands, PnC-PPh22NPh2 (1,5-diphenyl-3,7-bis((diphenylphosphino)alkyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl = (CH2)2, n = 2 (L2); (CH2)3, n = 3 (L3)), have been synthesized. Coordination of these ligands to cobalt affords the complexes [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+, which are reduced with KC8 to afford [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and [CoI(L3)(CH3CN)]1+. Protonation of the CoI complexes affords [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [HCoIII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+. Reduction of HCoIII results in formation of the analogous CoI complex through H-Co bond cleavage. Under voltammetric conditions, the reduced cobalt hydride reacts rapidly with a protic solvent impurity to generate H2 in a monometallic process involving two electrons per cobalt. In contrast, under bulk electrolysis conditions, H2 formation requires only one reducing equivalent per [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, indicating a bimetallic route wherein two cobalt hydride complexes react to form two equiv [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and one equiv H2. The cyclic voltammetry of [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, analyzed using digital simulation, is consistent with an ErCrEr reduction mechanism involving reversible acetonitrile dissociation from [HCoII(L2)(CH3CN)]1+. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, for support of the initial parts of this study. Current work is supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Wiedner, Eric S.; Roberts, John A.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Myosin II-Mediated Focal Adhesion Maturation Is Tension Insensitive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myosin II-Mediated Focal Adhesion Maturation Is Tension Insensitive Jonathan Stricker1,2 , Yvonne and stability in a force- insensitive fashion. Citation: Stricker J, Beckham Y, Davidson MW, Gardel ML (2013 Received April 10, 2013; Accepted June 20, 2013; Published July 29, 2013 Copyright: Ă? 2013 Stricker et al

Gardel, Margaret

202

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 4}Si{sub 2}C{sub 5}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared a new layered oxycarbide, [Al{sub 5.25(5)}Si{sub 0.75(5)}][O{sub 1.60(7)}C{sub 3.40(7)}], by isothermal heating of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}) at 2273 K near the carbon-carbon monoxide buffer. The crystal structure was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3m (centrosymmetric), Z=3, and hexagonal cell dimensions a=0.32464(2) nm, c=4.00527(14) nm and V=0.36556(3) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The reliability indices were R{sub wp}=4.45% (S=1.30), R{sub p}=3.48%, R{sub B}=2.27% and R{sub F}=1.25%. The crystal is composed of three types of domains with nearly the same fraction, one of which has the crystal structure of space group R3-bar m. The crystal structure of the remaining two domains, which are related by pseudo-symmetry inversion, is noncentrosymmetric with space group R3m. - Graphical Abstract: A new aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6). The crystal is composed of three types of domains (I, II and III), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al,Si){sub 4}(O,C){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al,Si)(O,C){sub 2}] single layers.

Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Sugiura, Keita [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of optical Fe II emission in 302 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We group the strongest Fe II multiplets into three groups according to the lower term of the transition (b{sup 4} F, a{sup 6} S, and a{sup 4} G terms). These approximately correspond to the blue, central, and red parts, respectively, of the 'iron shelf' around H{beta}. We calculate an Fe II template that takes into account transitions into these three terms and an additional group of lines, based on a reconstruction of the spectrum of I Zw 1. This Fe II template gives a more precise fit of the Fe II lines in broad-line AGNs than other templates. We extract Fe II, H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III], and [N II] emission parameters and investigate correlations between them. We find that Fe II lines probably originate in an intermediate line region. We note that the blue, red, and central parts of the iron shelf have different relative intensities in different objects. Their ratios depend on continuum luminosity, FWHM H{beta}, the velocity shift of Fe II, and the H{alpha}/H{beta} flux ratio. We examine the dependence of the well-known anti-correlation between the equivalent widths of Fe II and [O III] on continuum luminosity. We find that there is a Baldwin effect for [O III] but an inverse Baldwin effect for the Fe II emission. The [O III]/Fe II ratio thus decreases with L {sub {lambda}5100}. Since the ratio is a major component of the Boroson and Green Eigenvector 1 (EV1), this implies a connection between the Baldwin effect and EV1 and could be connected with AGN evolution. We find that spectra are different for H{beta} FWHMs greater and less than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, and that there are different correlation coefficients between the parameters.

Kovacevic, Jelena; Popovic, Luka C.; Dimitrijevic, Milan S., E-mail: jkovacevic@aob.bg.ac.r [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

Young, Paul Thomas

206

PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PHYSICS (Div. III) Chair: Professor KEVIN JONES Professors: AALBERTS, S. BOLTON*, K. JONES a laser work? What is a black hole? What are the fundamental building blocks of the universe? Physics majors and Astrophysics majors study these and related questions to understand the physical world around

Aalberts, Daniel P.

207

Photodetectors using III-V nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Edgy Science III: From NSF Physics Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edgy Science III: From NSF Physics Frontier Centers NSTA 2010 Philadelphia, PA From brains to the Big Bang, take a crash course in forefront science with the NSF Physics Frontier Centers, including - National Science Foundation (NSF) Physics Frontier Centers (PFCs) ¡ Each Center - Science News - Resources

Collar, Juan I.

209

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME III)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM DatagovCampaignsARESE II

210

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

211

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried BĂścherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II JĂźrg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

212

PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

213

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process that transforms gas-phase molecules into solid particles like soot and...

214

Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.

Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa)] [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)] [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa)] [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE Volume 23, Number 5, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3Environmental Technology Laboratory General Electric Company Niskayuna, NY 12309 ABSTRACT; Parmar et al., 2001), Co(III) (Zachara et al., 2001), and Zn(II) (Cooper et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2006

Burgos, William

218

Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

Bürger, Raimund

219

Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 ?mol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 ?mol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 ?mol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 ?mol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 ?mol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Formation of Population III Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks ¡ REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

Hua, Jing

222

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

14 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

224

Vacancy diffusion kinetics in arsenic-rich nonstoichiometric AlAsGaAs heterostructures S. Balasubramanian and S. W. Mansour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy diffusion kinetics in arsenic-rich nonstoichiometric AlAsĂ?GaAs heterostructures S. The intermixing is attributed to a supersaturated concentration of group-III vacancies and is enhanced by several temperatures. In this paper we establish that the decay of the excess vacancy concentration satisfies second

Nolte, David D.

225

The Soft X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Optically Selected Quasars II. Final Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the final results of a ROSAT PSPC program to study the soft X-ray emission properties of a complete sample of low $z$ quasars. The main results are: 1. There is no evidence for significant soft excess emission or excess foreground absorption by cold gas in 22 of the 23 quasars. 2. The mean 0.2-2 keV continuum of quasars agrees remarkably well with an extrapolation of the mean 1050-350A continuum recently determined by Zheng et al. (1996), indicating that there is no steep soft component below 0.2 keV. 3. The occurrence of warm absorbers in quasars is rather rare, in sharp contrast to lower luminosity AGN. 4. The strongest correlation found is between the spectral slope, alpha_x, and the Hb FWHM. This remarkably strong correlation may result from a dependence of alpha_x on L/L_Edd, as seen in Galactic black hole candidates. 5. There appears to exist a distinct class of ``X-ray weak'' quasars. These may be quasars where the direct X-ray source is obscured, and only scattered X-rays are observed. 6. Thin accretion disk models cannot reproduce the observed optical to soft X-ray spectral shape. An as yet unknown physical mechanism maintains a strong correlation between the optical and soft X-ray emission. 7. The well known difference in alpha_x between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars may be due only to their different Hb FWHM. 8. The agreement of the 21 cm and X-ray columns implies that He in the diffuse H II component of the Galactic ISM is ionized to He II or He III (shortened abstract).

Ari Laor; Fabrizio Fiore; Martin Elvis; Belinda J. Wilkes; Jonathan C. McDowell

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

Chase, J.

2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide standard ii-iii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a-U (*) Summary: and costly. Thus, while we were able to study the light and heavy actinide metals 1 in their cubic (high... applied to the study of some actinide...

228

Title: Research Associate I, II, or III Positions Open Pool Employment Type: Administrative Professional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by persistent effort, active planning, allocation of resources and/or accountability for diversity outcomes). Management duties may consist of managing inventory and databases, and ensuring a supply of solutions; and basic techniques in cell culture. Personal or professional commitment to diversity as demonstrated

229

ii IS -3 -( Volume V.iii THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY -Spring 1991 Volume V.111  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the chip allows for a complete solid-state voice recorder. The chip device includes on chip pre-amplifiers, filters, addressing logic, and power amplifiers. Not only is solid-state memory capacity being increased memory chip, the ISD1016. In its simplest sense, connect- ing a battery, microphone, and speaker

Mann, Tim

230

Anne-Marie Mercier-Faivre UMR LIRE (CNRS-Lyon II-Grenoble III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lecture fantasmatique de la Gazette d"Amsterdam au temps des Lettres persanes (1720-21) : le cas du despotisme oriental Les Lettres persanes, dit leur traducteur fictif, sont " une espèce de roman ", bien qu les Lettres persanes : Je te parlerai dans cette lettre d'une certaine nation qu'on appelle les

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

231

Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study introduces a new type of â??cumulative seismic attributeâ? (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

None

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

State Laboratory Program -Calibration Scope Summary Certificate Date Comments Mass I Mass II Mass III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 3000 lb 500 gal to 1 gal 500 gal to 20 gal LPG Corn 21 % to 14 % Wheat 18 % to 13 % Soy Bean 17 % to 12 gal Los Angeles County 2014 10 kg to 100 g 5000 lb to 1 lb 8 oz to 4 oz 5 gal to 1 gal Louisiana 2014

233

Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas of a building located outside of the enclosed structure). OGSF50 is also known as "California consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including in the context of the local watershed, and enhance economic, social and environmental sustainability while

California at Santa Cruz, University of

234

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and text in English. Updated periodically. N° 4 - Strategy of Aristide Government for Social and Economic Reconstruction (August 1994). 1994. Pp. iv-9. Official document setting forth recovery plan for Haiti. Introduction and text in English. N° 5... Peyi Dayiti. 1995. Pp. v-71. Haitian-language version of N° 5, in Pressoir-Faublas orthography. Introduction in English. N° 7 - Samuel G. Perkins, "On the Margin of Vesuvius": Sketches of St. Domingo, 1785-1793. 1995. Pp. vi-75. First-hand account...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

J. Phys. III Fiance 3 II 993) 1825-1832 SEPTEMBER 1993, PAGE 1825 Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for producing ohmic contacts onto Gasb have been investigated. The minimization of contact resistivity'~ cm~ ~ to 4 x 10'~ cm~ ~. Two polishing ways were used : a chemical-mechanical one made of a bromine-methanol the samples are cleaned with trichlorethylene, acetone and methanol, and they are dried under N2 fIOW. 2.I p

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

237

Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral sheet. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral...

238

Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

None

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAREHOUSE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH PAGE 1 OF 3 General project description WAREHOUSE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH PAGE 2 OF 3 Resources: 1. Motors: Design and build an autonomous robot to compete in the 2009 Mechanical Engineering Indiana Jones

Mascaro, Stephen A.

240

Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acceptor (ferrihydrite) was used (13). Addition of the humic acid analogue 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate

Roden, Eric E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

16.01-04 Unified Engineering I, II, III, & IV, Fall 2003-Spring 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The basic objective of Unified is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures ...

Hall, Steven Ray

242

activated glomeruli, (ii) the spatial combination of active neurons, (iii) the slow temporal sequence of activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system is not a static phenomenon but a dynamical process with different temporal components, eachof them probably readout byan adapted mechanism. This spatio-temporal representation is moreover dyna- mically be selected on the basis of their respiratory phase. Such a functional phase-coding relative to theta cycle (i

243

Appunti di Fisica Matematica III-II semestre Lezioni di Sandro Graffi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perpendicolarmente all'asse x. 1 Jean le Rond d'Alembert (Parigi 1717-Parigi 1783). L'equazione fu da lui scritta nel

Bologna, UniversitĂ  di

244

ajcc stage i-ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This thesis focuses on the design of a public theatre for the entire city of Boston, a "city stage." The intention is to explore through design the boundaries of an architectural...

245

G Subject: Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for Fast-Track Cooperative ResearchD,F, Title

246

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives Initiatives Through a variety ofthe Supportingand2011 |

247

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI

248

Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron transfer in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysisVents Using1of MassSurfaces.the

249

Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket

250

4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 | Open GRED Drilling

251

Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMA EnergyMagna E-Car Opening MagnaDesign Changes

252

Aspects of aqueous iron and manganese (II/III) self-exchange electron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -Grown by AtomicAshley

253

Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Model Predictive Control, Matlab Iterative Learning Control for Internal Combustion Engines Modeling and Control Description: In classical. The objective of this work is to apply learning algorithms to highly dynamic internal combustion engines

Daraio, Chiara

254

Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems, IC Engines, ...), Optimization Course, Matlab The gas-diesel engine is a natural gas engine, where the combustion is initiated by a small quantity on the investigation of the combustion process of the gas-diesel engine. A highly flexible engine test-bench with COC

Daraio, Chiara

255

Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Matlab/Simulink experience Contact for a Novel Engine Concept Position Control for an Internal Combustion Engine (Simulation) Description an internal combustion engine piston follow a reference position trajectory with sufficient accuracy

Daraio, Chiara

256

Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Allegato "B" DOMANDA DI PARTECIPAZIONE AL CONCORSO DI AMMISSIONE AL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN ROBOTICA, NEUROSCIENZE, NANOTECNOLOGIE E SCOPERTA FARMACI IN COLLABORAZIONE CON LA FONDAZIONE IIT Si prega'ammissione al Corso di Dottorato di Ricerca in Robotica, Neuroscienze, Nanotecnologie e Scoperta Farmaci

Sandini, Giulio

258

Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haddouti ˇ Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW (TUM & AUI Alumni) ˇ BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für

Cengarle, María Victoria

259

Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haddouti ˇ Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW) ˇ BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für Informatik TUM School

Cengarle, María Victoria

260

Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haddouti ˇ Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW Alumni) ˇ BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für Informatik TUM

Cengarle, María Victoria

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Quant. Phys. II, B Morrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-15) BMEN E4410 Principles of Ultrasound in Medicine, E. Konofagou CBMF W4761 Computation al Genomics, C4761 Computation al Genomics, C. Leslie #12;

Adams, Mark

262

Far-infrared spectra of complexes which exhibit magnetic cross-over: iron (III) complexes of tris (N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(III) complexes as a function of temperature, it was possible to obtain a correlation between the ground state electronic configuration and the Fe-S stretching vibrations. The pyrrolidyl (high-spin) and diisopropyl (low-spin) complexes exhibited temperature...-spin states is a function of temperature. In order to assign the Fe-S stretching vibrations in the various iron(III) dithiocarbamates the metal-isotope technique was used. ACKNOW'&LEDG&~iiENTS The author wishes to express his sincere appreciation to Dr...

Finkelstein, Alan Paul

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

(12) United States Patent Harvey et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Harvey et al. (54) ANALYZING RETURN ON INVESTMENT OF ADVERTISING US 2009/0259518 Al Oct. 15,2009 Int. Cl. G06F 17/30 (2006.01) G07G 1/00 (2006.01) U.S. Cl et al. 911980 Block et al. 511982 Eskin et al. 1111982 Barber et al. 711985 Block et al. 111996

Shamos, Michael I.

264

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

Denver, University of

265

In Memory of Al Cameron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning element formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

John J. Cowan; James W. Truran

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

267

Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) ¡ Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. ¡ Vallis, G. K

268

MOCVD synthesis of group III-nitride heterostructure nanowires for solid-state lighting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Talin, Albert Alec

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection layer for III/V multi-junction solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a novel graded refractive index antireflection coating for III/V quadruple solar cells based on bottom-up grown tapered GaP nanowires. We have calculated the photocurrent density of an InGaP-GaAs-InGaAsP-InGaAs solar cell with a MgF2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating and with a graded refractive index coating. The photocurrent density can be increased by 5.9 % when the solar cell is coated with a graded refractive index layer with a thickness of 1\\mu m. We propose to realize such a graded refractive index layer by growing tapered GaP nanowires on III/V solar cells. For a first demonstration of the feasibility of the growth of tapered nanowires on III/V solar cells, we have grown tapered GaP nanowires on AlInP/GaAs substrates. We show experimentally that the reflection from the nanowire coated substrate is reduced and that the transmission into the substrate is increased for a broad spectral and angular range.

Diedenhofen, Silke L; Haverkamp, Erik; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schermer, John; Rivas, Jaime Gómez; 10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.022

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

Jaraba-Pardo, E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperimentsInformationAnuvu IncSolarIII LLC Jump to:

272

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA RegionSpringviewNameGeothermal FacilitySteamboat III

273

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom EnergyEnergy Wind Farm JumpIII

274

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.doc RadiationI: EnergyIII:

275

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCrete Inc JumpGland,Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump

276

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik - Research FellowTechnology:III -

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - al suolo al Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DEI CAMBIAMENTI Summary: tradizionali rimboschimenti vincoli al dissodamento aumento delle provvigioni e dei turni riduzione degli... Commissione al Consiglio e al...

278

Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Formation of Population III Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ARIES-III divertor engineering design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}. The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed.

Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States); Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Herring, J.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valenti, M.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Plasma Dynamics Lab.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fluorescence of [Fe II] in H II regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of [Fe II] lines at various positions within the H II regions M42 and M43 is presented. The relative intensities of selected optical [Fe II] lines are shown to be correlated with the intensity of the apparent nebular continuous spectrum. Since the continuum of H II regions is known to be mostly stellar radiation scattered by dust intermixed with the emitting gas, these correlations provide direct evidence for the existence of fluorescent excitation in the formation process of the [Fe II] lines, irrespective of the prevailing physical state.

M. Rodriguez

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

283

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

coating. DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used...

284

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical...

285

III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

286

Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

288

Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

289

Ribosomal Database Project II  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

290

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

291

SRC-II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

293

AlN/Fe/AlN nanostructures for magnetooptic magnetometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu nanostructures with ultrathin Fe grown by sputtering on Si substrates are evaluated as probes for magnetooptical (MO) mapping of weak currents. They are considered for a laser wavelength of ??=?410?nm (3.02?eV) and operate at oblique light incidence angles, ?{sup (0)}, to enable detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization. Their performance is evaluated in terms of MO reflected wave electric field amplitudes. The maximal MO amplitudes in AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu are achieved by a proper choice of layer thicknesses. The nanostructures were characterized by MO polar Kerr effect at ?{sup (0)}???5° and longitudinal Kerr effect spectra (?{sup (0)}?=?45°) at photon energies between 1 and 5?eV. The nominal profiles were refined using a model-based analysis of the spectra. Closed form analytical expressions are provided, which are useful in the search for maximal MO amplitudes.

Lišková-Jakubisová, E., E-mail: liskova@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Viš?ovský, Š. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J. [Nanotechnology Center, Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 70833 Ostrava Poruba (Czech Republic); Harward, I.; Celinski, Z. [Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy., Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

Chi, Ji

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

AL2007-03.doc  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo. AL7.pdf6-04v2.pdfContractorAL

296

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS Doctoral Fellowship inALS

297

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS Reveals

298

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS RevealsScientific

299

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS

300

Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Al  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAPAgendaConditioning AirWhyon the way to

304

Transformer Abdullah Al-Otaibi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformer Abdullah Al-Otaibi ID#242374 Section#2 Abstract- this is a brief description for transformer and how it works. I. DEFINITION A transformer is a device that transfers electrical energy from of the transformer in 1831. The transformer is used by Faraday only to demonstrate the principle of electromagnetic

Masoudi, Husain M.

305

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88II Jump to:Meadow

308

(12) United States Patent Reardan et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Reardan et al. (54) SENSITIVE DRUG DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND METHOD (75 2004/0117205 Al Jun. 17,2004 (51) Int. Cl. G06Q 10/00 (2006.01) (52) U.S. Cl/231 4,976,351 A 1211990 Mangini et al. 5,737,539 A * 411998 Edelson et al. ................. 705/3 5

Shamos, Michael I.

309

(12) United States Patent Likourezos et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Likourezos et al. (54) SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR AUTOMATICALLY EFFECTING Publication Data US 2002/0095376 Al Jul. 18, 2002 Related U.S. Application Data Continuation Altman et al. ................ 705/36 5,715,314 A 211998 Payne et al. 5,794,219 A 811998 Brown 5

Shamos, Michael I.

310

ARM - RHUBC II Instruments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC

311

PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |GContract115I,I

312

Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

HI Content and Optical Properties of Field Galaxies from the ALFALFA Survey. II. Multivariate Analysis of a Galaxy Sample in Low Density Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the second paper of two reporting results from a study of the HI content and stellar properties of nearby galaxies detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA blind 21-cm line survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in a 2160 deg^2 region covered by both surveys. We apply strategies of multivariate data analysis to a complete HI flux-limited subset of 1624 objects extracted from the control sample of HI emitters assembled by Toribio et al. (2011a) in order to: i) investigate the correlation structure of the space defined by an extensive set of observables describing gas-rich systems; ii) identify the intrinsic parameters that best define their HI content; and iii) explore the scaling relations arising from the joint distributions of the quantities most strongly correlated with the HI mass. The principal component analysis performed over a set of five galaxy properties reveals that they are strongly interrelated, supporting previous claims that nearby HI emitters show a high degree of correlation. The bes...

Toribio, M C; Giovanelli, R; Haynes, M P; Martin, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

NONE

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ~180,000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.12sigma significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z~0.7 up to z>2 as Mdyn/Mstar~ (1+z)^{-0.30+/- 0.12} further strengthening the evidence for an increase of Mdyn/Mstar with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

Beifiori, Alessandra; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Saglia, Roberto P; Bender, Ralf; Tojeiro, Rita; Chen, Yan-Mei; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R; Johansson, Jonas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Nichol, Robert C; Schneider, Donald P; Senger, Robert; Skibba, Ramin; Wake, David; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Shelden, Alaina; Ebelke, Garrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

al tratamiento local: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and MEG data (Vigario et al., 1998; Tang et al., 2000a; Vigario et al., 1999, 2000; Wubbeler et al Pearlmutter, Barak 39 Independent Components of...

318

SCIENCE CAREER Al nanoclusters in coagulants and granulates: application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCE CAREER Al nanoclusters in coagulants and granulates: application in arsenic removal from suitable for arsenic removal. The aluminum nanocl- usters Al13 (AlO4Al12(OH)24H2O12 7? ) and Al30 (Al2O8Al coagulant or in Al granulate during water treatment. Keywords Arsenic Á Water treatment Á Al nanoclusters Á

Wehrli, Bernhard

319

III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-1.10(A) page 1 III-1.10(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROCEDURES FOR SCHOLARLY MISCONDUCT Approved. GENERAL These procedures implement the Board of Regents Policy on Misconduct in Scholarly Work (November 30, 1989). All references to the "University" in these procedures mean the University of Maryland

Shapiro, Benjamin

320

PROGRAMA FISICA II. INTRODUCCI O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAMA F´ISICA II. INTRODUCCI ´O I ELECTRICITAT I.1 Camp electrost`atic I.2 Potencial i energia I.4 `Optica #12;BIBLIOGRAFIA B`asica 1. Tipler, P.A. F´isica. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1992. 2. Purcell Blum, R. F´isica: Electricidad, Mag- netismo y Luz. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1986. Complement`aria 1

Batiste, Oriol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health at the Los Alamos...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

... 81 ii iii ACRONYMS AAAHC Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care AHA Activity Hazard Analysis AL Albuquerque Operations Office ALARA As Low As...

322

Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

Trimble, V

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fe and Al Abundances for 180 Red Giants in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present radial velocities, Fe, and Al abundances for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster Omega Centauri ($\\omega$ Cen). The majority of our data lie in the range 11.0$Al/Fe] ratios exhibit large star--to--star scatter for all populations, with the more than 1.0 dex range of [Al/Fe] decreasing for stars more metal--rich than [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4. The minimum [Al/Fe] abundance observed for all metallicity populations is [Al/Fe]$\\sim$+0.15. The maximum abundance of log $\\epsilon$(Al) is reached for stars with [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4 and does not increase further with stellar metallicity. We interpret these results as evidence for type II SNe providing the minimum [Al/Fe] ratio and a mass spectrum of intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars causing the majority of the [Al/Fe] scatter. These results seem to fit in the adopted scheme that star formation occurred in $\\omega$ Cen over $>$1 Gyr.

Christian I. Johnson; Catherine A. Pilachowski; Jennifer Simmerer; Dustin Schwenk

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along ...

Cucchiara, A.

326

PROYECTO DE CAMBIOS AL DFL1 PRESENTADO AL CONGRESO EN 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROYECTO DE CAMBIOS AL DFL1 PRESENTADO AL CONGRESO EN 1999 LEY GENERAL DE SERVICIOS ELECTRICOS hace, en materias de electricidad, gas y combustibles lĂ­quidos, al Ministerio del Interior o al Ministro del Interior, deberĂĄn entenderse referidas al Ministerio de EconomĂ­a, Fomento y ReconstrucciĂłn o

Rudnick, Hugh

327

What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

MODULATION OF COX I AND COX II-MEDIATED FORMATION OF VARIOUS ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITES IN VITRO AND IN VIVO BY DIETARY POLYPHENOLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for formation of compound I (~ 2 X 10 7 mol -1 s -1 ) versus soluble peroxides such as ethylhydroperoxide and have lower apparent K M values (~ 10 ľM versus 300 ľM for H 2 O 2 ) for the peroxidase reaction as measured by rates of oxidation of reducing... of compound I to compound 7 II/intermediate II is considerably more rapid for COX II (Lu et al., 1999). This partly accounts for the fact that for COX II, intermediate II is formed more rapidly and at lower peroxide concentrations. There is no obvious...

Bai, Hyoungwoo

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-isobutylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bi s-l, 3-dimethylbu tyl ammoni- umpentabromobi smutha (III) Bis-4-p1coliniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis-cyclohexylammoniumpentabromo- bismuthate (III) Bis-piperidiniumpentabromobis- muthate (III) Bis...103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 5x103 7. 6x103 Tri, s-methyl ammoni um- hexabromobismuthate (III) 355 7. 5x103 7, 2x103 7 ~ 5xl03 7, 6x103 7. 5x103 20 TABLE III CONTINUED Tris-dimethylammonium- hexabromobismuthate (III) Tris...

Osborne, James Ferrell

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structure and Stability of Hexa-Aqua V(III) Cations in Vanadium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrolytes. Structure and Stability of Hexa-Aqua V(III) Cations in Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes. Abstract: The Vanadium (III) cation structure in mixed acid based...

334

Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

335

Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

336

A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-benzyltrimethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 56. 79 55. Z7 + 0. 07 27. tris-cyclehexylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 6l, 39 59. 92 0. 08 TABLE III Compound Concentration l=-"'). " ~ass ( '"' o-' Avg (ass liter mole-cm tris-methylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 10 8...-di-ethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) tris-tri-ethylammonium- nonaiododibismuthate(III) 10 8 6 4 10 8 6 4 7. 79 7. 75 7. 90 7. 90 7. 66 7. 66 7. 75 7. 78 7. 8 7. 7 TABLE III (Contd) Compound tris-n-propylammonium- hexaiodobismutbate(III) Concentration x...

Scott, Jack Clinton

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - agn iii zw Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted, millimeterpeaked spectrum Summary: A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted,...

338

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9˘/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87˘/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curve CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Cubic Bezier Curves ¡ Curve: ¡ Control points ¡ Basis functions: = = 3 0 3 )()( i ii uBpuc ip CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves (degree n) ¡ Curve: ¡ Control points ¡ Basis functions

Hua, Jing

340

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. ¡ Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

Hua, Jing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

National Synchrotron Light Source II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

Steve Dierker

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Radioluminescence of curium(III) in solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioluminescence of curium(III) under the action of the intrinsic ..cap alpha..-radiation was studied in aqueous, heavy water, and organic solutions. The luminescence maximum falls at lambda approx. 600 nm. The yield of radioluminescence G is proportional to the concentration (or electronic fraction) of curium, and for a 10/sup -2/ M aqueous solution of Cm(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, G approx. 5 x 10/sup -4/ quanta per 100 eV of absorbed energy. In dilute acids the yield of radioluminescence is the same as in neutral solution, but in concentrated acid it is substantially changed. In the presence of ligands (formate, acetate, citrate ions, and others), the yield of the radioluminescence of curium in aqueous solutions increases, which is associated with complex formation, leading to a decrease in the quenching of excited curium by water molecules. The intensification of the radioluminescence of curium in the presence of sodium paratungstate is especially great; it is suggested that in this case a significant role is played by energy transfer from the ligand to curium. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/NH/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/OH, Ce/sup (IV)/, and uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in various oxidation states have no great influence on the radioluminescence of curium. Its quenching by NpO/sub 2//sup +/ ions is somewhat greater than by other actinide ions and is associated with the formation of cation-cation complexes of NpO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with Cm/sup 3 +/. In heavy water and organic solutions, a substantial increase in the radioluminescence yield of curium is observed, which is in good agreement with the data on photoluminescence. The results obtained suggest that the radioluminescence of curium in solutions (in the absence of energy-donor ligands) is excited mainly directly, while the role of energy transfer to curium from the solvent or its radiolysis products is negligible.

Yusov, A.B.; Perminov, V.P.; Krot, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

CA Wang

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Supra-Canonical 26Al/27Al and the Residence Time of CAIs in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supra-Canonical 26Al/27Al and the Residence Time of CAIs in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk Edward D initial 26Al/27Al ratio of 4.5 � 10­5 has been a fiducial marker for the beginning of the solar system that some CAIs had initial 26Al/27Al values at least 25% greater than canonical and that the canonical

Harrison, Mark

347

aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

348

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

350

COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

Aalberts, Daniel P.

351

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

Smith III, Julius Orion

352

EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

353

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Scott Taylor, ALS Safety Manager  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)ScienceScientists In thePrincetonScott Taylor, ALS

355

AL2007-02.doc  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo. AL7.pdf6-04v2.pdfContractor

356

AL PRO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification Project AtOpenLabsEspanaAL PRO Jump

357

ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During the months3ALCC PastALPES20thALS

358

ALS Doctoral Fellowship in Residence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS Doctoral Fellowship in

359

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS Doctoral Fellowship inALSALS

360

ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS Doctoral Fellowship inALSALSALS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Teatro al Sur y la escena Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

140 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW Teatro al Sur y la escena Argentina Acaba de aparecer un nuevo número de Teatro al Sur, Revista Latinoamericana. Su título de tapa - Teatro Argentino a varias voces - resume la intención de esta nueva entrega...

Editors

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ALS User Meeting Highlights Challenges, Accomplishments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

advantage of those. ALS Director Roger Falcone was up next and he began with a sad acknowledgement of the passing of a veteran ALS user, Dennis Lindle. While the past year has been...

363

PARS II KNOWN ISSUES AND SUGGESTED WORKAROUNDS  

Energy Savers [EERE]

screen, the following workaround is suggested: Close all browser windows (PARS II and web applications). Reopen a browser and proceed with the PARS II log-in. PARS II does...

364

THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three prototype Table II. aluminum-carbon bonds and theirPhysics THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, ANDLBL-l0871 The Prototype Aluminum - Carbon Single, Double.

Fox, Douglas J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) THREE-DIMENSIONAL MOLECULAR IMAGING BY INFRARED LASER/0012831 Al Jan. 21, 2010 Related U.S. Application Data (63) Continuation-in-part of application No. 121176,656,690 B2 6,744,046 B2 6,991,903 B2 7,084,396 B2 12/2003 Crooke et al. 612004 Valaskovic et al. 112006 Fu

Vertes, Akos

366

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION AND PEPTIDE SEQUENCING. (21) Appl. No.: 11/674,671 (22) Filed: Feb. 14,2007 (65) Prior Publication Data US 2009/0321626 Al Dec Suizdak et al. 6,589,485 B2 7/2003 Koster 6,794,196 B2 912004 Fonash et al. 6,846,681 B2 112005 Buriak et

Vertes, Akos

367

(12) United States Patent Reardan et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Reardan et al. (54) SENSITIVE DRUG DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND METHOD (75 US 2005/0090425 Al Apr. 28, 2005 Related U.S. Application Data Division of application No.1 0,847,764 A 711989 Halvorson 4,976,351 A 1211990 Mangini et al. 5,737,539 A 411998 Edelson et al. 5,845,255 A 1211998

Shamos, Michael I.

368

(12) United States Patent Fallon et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Fallon et al. (54) SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR DATA FEED ACCELERATION/131,631 (22) Filed: Jun. 2,2008 (65) Prior Publication Data US 200910287839 Al Nov. 19,2009 Related U References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 3,394,352 A 7/1968 Wernikoff et al. 3,490,690 A 111970 Apple et al. 4

Shamos, Michael I.

369

United States Patent [191 Jalali et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

antennas: SPIE vol. 1703 (1992) 264-271. GA Magel et al.: "Phosphosilicate Glass waveguides for phased

Jalali. Bahram

370

Aluminium distribution in ZSM-5 revisited: The role of Al-Al interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of the distribution of Al atoms in zeolite ZSM-5 with Si/Al=47, where we focus on the role of Al-Al interactions rather than on the energetics of Al/Si substitutions at individual sites. Using interatomic potential methods, we evaluate the energies of the full set of symmetrically independent configurations of Al siting in a Si{sub 94}Al{sub 2}O{sub 192} cell. The equilibrium Al distribution is determined by the interplay of two factors: the energetics of the Al/Si substitution at an individual site, which tends to populate particular T sites (e.g., the T14 site), and the Al-Al interaction, which at this Si/Al maximises Al-Al distances in general agreement with Dempsey's rule. However, it is found that the interaction energy changes approximately as the inverse of the square of the distance between the two Al atoms, rather than the inverse of the distance expected if this were merely charge repulsion. Moreover, we find that the anisotropic nature of the framework density plays an important role in determining the magnitude of the interactions, which are not simply dependent on Al-Al distances. - Graphical abstract: Role of Al-Al interactions in high silica ZSM-5 is shown to be anisotropic in nature and not dependent solely on Coulombic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si-Al distribution in ZSM-5 is revisited, stressing the role of the Al-Al interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coulomb interactions are not the key factors controlling the Al siting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisotropy of the framework is identified as a source of departure from Dempsey's rule.

Ruiz-Salvador, A. Rabdel, E-mail: rabdel@imre.oc.uh.cu [Group of Materials Developed by Design, Division of Chemistry and Technology of Materials, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering (IMRE), University of Havana, Havana 10400 (Cuba); Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Gray, Aileen E.; Lewis, Dewi W. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H OAJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H OAJ (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Classical Trajectories of the Continuum States of the ${\\cal{PT}}$ symmetric Scarf II potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the factorization technique developed by Kuru et. al. [Ann. Phys. {\\bf 323} (2008) 413] to obtain the exact analytical classical trajectories and momenta of the continuum states of the non Hermitian but ${\\cal{PT}}$ symmetric Scarf II potential. In particular, we observe that the strange behaviour of the quantum version at the spectral singularity has an interesting classical analogue.

Anjana Sinha

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effect of Al-Si-Al and Al-Si-Si-Al Pairs in the ZSM-5 Zeolite Framework on the 27 NMR Spectra. A Combined High-Resolution 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Al-Si-Al and Al-Si-Si-Al Pairs in the ZSM-5 Zeolite Framework on the 27 Al NMR Spectra. A Combined High-Resolution 27 Al NMR and DFT/MM Study Jiri´ Dedecek, Stepan Sklenak,*, Chengbin Li, Blanka of the presence of Al-O-Si-O-Al and Al-O-Si-O-Si-O-Al sequences in the ZSM-5 zeolite framework on the local

Sklenak, Stepan

373

United States Patent [19] Miura et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Pyrrole--3,4--diacetic Acid and Its Derivatives", Synthesis, pp. 262--265 (1989). Coderre et al., "Boron/1992 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Japan . Japan . WIPO . WIPO . Miura et al.,, "Synthesis, Tissue Uptake, and Toxicity Therapy for Cancer, Kobe, Japan (Oct. 31--Nov. 4, 1994). Miura et al., "Synthesis and Spectroscopic

Shelnutt, John A.

374

SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL Auxiliary Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run [Ammann et al., 2007; hereinafter CCSM] and the GKSS ECHO-g ERIK2 run [Gonzålez-Rouco et al., 2006; hereinafter ECHO-g]. The annual means of the modeled temperature fields are interpolated to 5° latitude;SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL 2 ECHO-g simulations, respectively. The above conventions

Smerdon, Jason E.

375

AUTORIT ACCADEMICHE Situazione al 27 settembre 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTORITĂ? ACCADEMICHE Situazione al 27 settembre 2012 Presidenti dei Comitati di direzione delle FacoltĂ  e Scuole FacoltĂ  di Giurisprudenza Prof. Francesco Denozza dal 10.9.2012 al 30.9.2014 FacoltĂ  di Scienze politiche, economiche e sociali Prof.ssa Laura Ammannati dal 10.9.2012 al 30.9.2014 FacoltĂ  di

De Cindio, Fiorella

376

United States Patent [19] Church et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Patent [19] Church et al. [54] CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL POLYMER MOLECULES BASED al.. "ANeutral Amino Acid Change in Segment TIS4 Dramatically Alters the Gating Properties of the Volt- age-Dependent Sodium Channel". 1990, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87:323-27. Bensirnon. A.. et al

Church, George M.

377

(12) United States Patent Likourezos et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Likourezos et al. (54) SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR EFFECTING A REAL: Nov. 14, 2001 (65) Prior Publication Data US 2002/0095377 Al Jul. 18, 2002 Related U.S. Application Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 4,799,156 A 4,876,648 A 111989 Shavit et al. 1011989 Lloyd 102 102 111111

Shamos, Michael I.

378

Deutsch als Zweitsprache in der Lehrerausbildung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deutsch als Zweitsprache in der Lehrerausbildung Bedarf ­ Umsetzung ­ Perspektiven Dokumentation. JÜrg Roche, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Mßnchen Deutsch als Zweitsprache in der Lehrerausbildung Deutsch als Fremdsprache, Ludwig- Maximilians-Universität Mßnchen Wie wird die Qualität der Da

Prediger, Susanne

379

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) NANOPHOTONIC PRODUCTION, MODULATION AND SWITCHING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 194 days. (21) References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 200910236512 Al * 912009 Naya et al. .................... 250/281 2009

Vertes, Akos

380

Dark Energy Model in Anisotropic Bianchi Type-III Space-Time with Variable EoS Parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new dark energy model in anisotropic Bianchi type-III space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter has been investigated in the present paper. To get the deterministic model, we consider that the expansion $\\theta$ in the model is proportional to the eigen value $\\sigma^{2}_{~2}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_~i$. The EoS parameter $\\omega$ is found to be time dependent and its existing range for this model is in good agreement with the recent observations of SNe Ia data (Knop et al. 2003) and SNe Ia data with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al. 2004). It has been suggested that the dark energy that explains the observed accelerating expansion of the universe may arise due to the contribution to the vacuum energy of the EoS in a time dependent background. Some physical aspects of dark energy model are also discussed.

Anirudh Pradhan; Hassan Amirhashchi

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

382

QER- Comment of William Smith III  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

383

Electrodeposition of Ni[sub 1[minus]x]Al[sub x] in a chloroaluminate melt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of Ni[sub 1[minus]x]Al[sub x] from a molten 2 AlCl[sub 3]-NaCl electrolyte containing up to 0.17 mol/liter Ni(II) has been investigated using a variety of electrochemical techniques. The standard reversible potential for Ni/Ni(II) is found to be in the range of 0.86 to 0.93 V (vs. Al). In a nickel-free electrolyte aluminum deposition on tungsten occurs via instantaneous nucleation upon an underpotential deposition aluminum layer. In contrast, bulk nickel deposition occurs by progressive formation and diffusion-limited growth of three-dimensional nuclei. The number of nickel atoms forming a critical nuclei, n[sub c], is dependent on overpotential. At potentials below 0.750 V, n[sub c] = 0 with the active sites on the electrode playing the role of critical nuclei. These sites are occupied according to first-order kinetics. At potentials above 0.7 V compact nickel deposits are obtained. As the potential is decreased below 0.6 V Ni[sub 1[minus]x]-Al[sub x] formation occurs. Between 0.6 and 0.0 V alloy composition is a function of potential. The rate of the aluminum partial reaction is first order in the Ni(II) concentration which makes alloy composition independent of Ni(II) concentration over the range investigated. Separate experiments demonstrate that aluminum underpotential deposition on nickel occurs in this potential regime. Thus, alloy formation may be envisioned as aluminum underpotential deposition proceeding simultaneously with diffusion-limited nickel deposition. The underpotential deposition reaction occurs rapidly such that the alloy composition is determined by the free energy of alloy formation. When the potential is decreased below the reversible potential of aluminum, 0.0 V, phase formation is complicated by a competition between alloy formation and overpotential driven kinetics of aluminum deposition.

Moffat, T.P. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Birth of a Galaxy: Primoridal Metal Enrichment and Population II Stellar Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population III stars first form in dark matter halos with masses around 10^6 Msun. By definition, they are metal-free, and their protostellar collapse is driven by molecular hydrogen cooling in the gas-phase, leading to a massive characteristic mass ~100 Msun and suppressed fragmentation. Population II stars with lower characteristic masses form when the star-forming gas reaches a critical metallicity of 10^{-6} - 10^{-3.5} Zsun, depending on whether dust cooling is important. We present adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamics simulations that follows the transition from Population III to II star formation. We model stellar radiative feedback with adaptive ray tracing. A top-heavy initial mass function for the Population III stars is considered, resulting in a plausible distribution of pair-instability supernovae and associated metal enrichment. We find that the gas fraction recovers from 5 percent to nearly the cosmic fraction in halos with merger histories rich in halos above 10^7 Msun. A single pa...

Wise, John H; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Chemical Evolution of the Galactic Halo through Supernova-Induced Star Formation and Its Implication for Population III Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for Galactic chemical evolution, driven by supernova-induced star formation, is formulated and used to examine the nature of the Galactic halo at early epochs. In this model, new stars are formed following each supernova event, thus their abundance pattern is determined by the combination of heavy elements ejected from the supernova itself and those elements which are already present in the interstellar gas swept up by the supernova remnant. The end result is a prediction of large scatter in the abundance ratios among low-metallicity stars, reflecting a different nucleosynthesis yield for each Type II supernova with a different progenitor mass. Formation of new stars is terminated when supernova remnants sweep up too little gas to form shells. We show from calculations based on the above scenario that (i) the observed [Fe/H] distribution for the Galactic halo field stars can be reproduced without effectively decreasing the heavy-element yields from Type II supernovae by some manipulation required by previous models (e.g., via mass loss from the early Galaxy, or later mixing with ``pristine'' hydrogen clouds), (ii) the large observed scatter in the abundance ratio [Eu/Fe] for the most metal-poor stars can also be reproduced, and (iii) the frequency distribution of stars in the [Eu/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane can be predicted. Our model suggests that the probability of identifying essentially metal-free stars (Population III) in the local halo is around one in 10^{3-4}, provided that star formation in the halo is confined to individual gas clouds with mass of 10^{6-7} Msun and that the initial mass function of metal-free stars is not significantly different from the Salpeter mass function.

Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama; Yuzuru Yoshii

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UW Cosmogenic Isotopes Al-Be 1 EXTRACTION OF Al & Be FROM QUARTZ FOR ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS Summary This method is used to separate Al and Be for AMS analysis from pure quartz samples. After adding Be carrier, quartz is dissolved in HF. The solution is sub-sampled for determination of total Al content, then dried

Stone, John

390

ccsd00001116 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00001116 (version 1) : 4 Feb 2004 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys: from 4, 2004) Zr and Sc precipitate in aluminum alloys to form the compounds Al3Zr and Al3Sc which

391

Super KEKB / Belle II Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the status of the KEKB collider and the Belle detector upgrade, along with several examples of physics measurements to be performed with Belle II at Super KEKB.

B. Golob

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

Dibble, Theodore

393

Comparative Genomic Discovery of miRNAs Grad et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Genomic Discovery of miRNAs Grad et al. Computational and Experimental Identification throughout the adult life cycle (Feinbaum and Ambros, 1999; Lee et al., 1993; Reinhart et al., 2000 al., 1993; Wightman et al., 1993; Reinhart et al., 2000; Slack et al., 2000). Both lin-4 and let-7

Church, George M.

394

Bussysteme IIII CarRing II ereits heute sind 90 Prozent al-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entwicklungen haben heutzutage viele namhafte Automobil- hersteller massive Qualitäts- und Leis- tungs Rahmen dieses Projekts mit der Entwicklung eines neuen Netzwerks fßr das Automobil beauftragt: ,,Car fßr Automobile, das eine sichere Verbindung zwischen allen Komponenten von ,,Steer by Wire" be

Zachmann, Gabriel

395

II United States Government DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: SUBJECT:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY

396

II INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTATIONAL BIOENGINEERING H. Rodrigues et al. (Eds.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*** * Computer Graphics Lab, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: { bricelis | ecoto | omaira }@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve ** Experimental Surgery Institute, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: ice@med.ucv.ve *** Bioengineering Center, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: mcerrola

Coto, Ernesto

397

Reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) Sorbed on Al (hydr)oxides. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 NationalTreatment. | EMSL NOxTc(VII)

398

Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}:Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700{degrees}C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450{degrees}C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500{degrees}C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C, respectively.

Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cooke, P.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States). Fort Monmouth Operation

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

SDSS-III: MASSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEYS OF THE DISTANT UNIVERSE, THE MILKY WAY, AND EXTRA-SOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8), which was made public in 2011 January and includes SDSS-I and SDSS-II images and spectra reprocessed with the latest pipelines and calibrations produced for the SDSS-III investigations. This paper presents an overview of the four surveys that comprise SDSS-III. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation feature of large-scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, an already completed SDSS-III survey that is the continuation of the SDSS-II Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE), measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {>=} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {mu}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {mu}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx}15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx}24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of 2011 January, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {>=} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS.

Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Agol, Eric; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aihara, Hiroaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arns, James A. [Kaiser Optical Systems, Ann Arbor, MI 48103 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris-Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Barkhouser, Robert [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bickerton, Steven J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

FIRST DETECTIONS OF THE [N II] 122 {mu}m LINE AT HIGH REDSHIFT: DEMONSTRATING THE UTILITY OF THE LINE FOR STUDYING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first detections of the [N II] 122 {mu}m line from a high-redshift galaxy. The line was strongly (>6{sigma}) detected from SMMJ02399-0136, and H1413+117 (the Cloverleaf QSO) using the Redshift (z) and Early Universe Spectrometer on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The lines from both sources are quite bright with line to far-infrared (FIR) continuum luminosity ratios that are {approx}7.0 x 10{sup -4} (Cloverleaf) and 2.1 x 10{sup -3} (SMMJ02399). With ratios 2-10 times larger than the average value for nearby galaxies, neither source exhibits the line-to-continuum deficits seen in nearby sources. The line strengths also indicate large ionized gas fractions, {approx}8%-17% of the molecular gas mass. The [O III]/[N II] line ratio is very sensitive to the effective temperature of ionizing stars and the ionization parameter for emission arising in the narrow-line region (NLR) of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using our previous detection of the [O III] 88 {mu}m line, the [O III]/[N II] line ratio for SMMJ02399-0136 indicates that the dominant source of the line emission is either stellar H II regions ionized by O9.5 stars, or the NLR of the AGN with ionization parameter log(U) = -3.3 to -4.0. A composite system, where 30%-50% of the FIR lines arise in the NLR also matches the data. The Cloverleaf is best modeled by a superposition of {approx}200 M82-like starbursts accounting for all of the FIR emission and 43% of the [N II] line. The remainder may come from the NLR. This work demonstrates the utility of the [N II] and [O III] lines in constraining properties of the ionized medium.

Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen C.; Stacey, Gordon J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Phillips, Thomas G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, Edith [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS (France); Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes G. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory (Code 665), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tucker, Carol E., E-mail: cferkinh@astro.cornell.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Site preferences of indium impurity atoms in intermetallics having Al3Ti and Al3Zr crystal structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site preferences of indium impurity atoms in intermetallics having Al3Ti and Al3Zr crystal-04843 (Metals Program) and Praveen Sinha Fund for Physics Research. L12 DO22 DO23 Cu3Au Al3Ti Al3Zr #12;Outline ¡ Indium was doped in samples of Al3V and Al3Ti (Al3Ti structure) and Al3Zr (Al3Zr structure) by arc

Collins, Gary S.

403

INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF NDCX-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III Diagnostic cell Solenoid, BPM, Vacuum pumping Figure 2:Rogowski S1 Capacitive BPM S2 S3 Inactive Induction Gap:

Lidia, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

High resolution far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M16 is an evolved, extremely density bounded H II region, which now consists only of a series of ionization fronts at molecular cloud boundaries. The source of ionization is the OB star cluster (NGC 6611) which is about 5 x 10/sup 6/ years old. We used the CFA/UA 102 cm balloon-borne telescope to map this region and detected three far-infrared (far-IR) sources embedded in an extended ridge of emission. Source I is an unresolved far-IR source embedded in a molecular cloud near a sharp ionization front. An H/sub 2/O maser is associated with this source, but no radio continuum emission has been observed. The other two far-IR sources (II and III) are associated with ionized gas-molecular cloud interfaces, with the far-IR radiation arising from dust at the boundary heated by the OB cluster. Source II is located at the southern prominent neutral intrusion with its associated bright rims and dark ''elephant trunk'' globules that delineate the current progress of the ionization front into the neutral material, and Source III arises at the interface of the northern molecular cloud fragment.

McBreen, B.; Fazio, G.G.; Jaffe, D.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optical and infrared emission of H II complexes as a clue to PAHs lifecycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of optical spectroscopy and infrared aperture photometry of more than 100 H II complexes in nine galaxies. Spectra obtained with the 6-m telescope of SAO RAS are used along with archival data from Spitzer and several ground-based telescopes to infer a strength of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, age, properties of the UV radiation field, and metallicity of studied H II complexes. Physical properties (age, radiation field parameters, metallicity) are related to the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio used as a proxy for the PAH abundance in order to reveal factors that may influence the PAH evolution in H II complexes. The well-known correlation between the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio and metallicity is confirmed in the studied complexes. The infrared flux ratio also correlates with the [O III]$\\lambda 5007/\\mathrm{H\\beta}$ ratio which is often considered as an indicator of the radiation field hardness, but this correlation seems to be a mere reflection of a correlation between [O III]$\\lambda ...

Khramtsova, M S; Lozinskaya, T A; Egorov, O V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

On the properties of massive Population III stars and metal-free stellar populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present realistic models for massive Population III stars and stellar populations based on non-LTE model atmospheres, recent stellar evolution tracks and up-to-date evolutionary synthesis models, to study their spectral properties, including their dependence on age, star formation history, and IMF. (..) The main results regarding integrated stellar populations are: * For young bursts and the case of a constant SFR, nebular continuous emission - neglected in previous studies - dominates the spectrum redward of Lyman-alpha (...). Therefore predicted emission line equivalent widths are considerably smaller than found in earlier studies, whereas the detection of the continuum is eased. Nebular line and continuous emission strongly affect the broad band photometric properties of Pop III objects. * Due to stellar evolution, the hardness of the ionising spectrum decreases rapidly, leading to the disappearance of the characteristic HeII 1640 recombination lines after ~ 3 Myr in instantaneous bursts. * The relative efficiency of ionising photon energy to heavy element rest mass production, eta, of metal-poor and metal-free populations is increased by factors of ~ 4 to 18 with respect to solar metallicity and for ``standard'' IMFs. * The lowest values of eta ~ 1.6 - 2.2 % are obtained for IMFs exclusively populated with high mass stars (M_low >~ 50 Msun). If correct, the yields dominated by pair creation SNae then predict large overabundances of O/C and Si/C compared to solar abundance ratios. Detailed results are given in tabular form and as fit formulae for implementation in other calculations. (abridged abstract)

Daniel Schaerer

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

POPULATION III STARS AND REMNANTS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H{sub 2} formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, which could host massive black hole formation through the direct gaseous collapse scenario. We show that the multiplicity of the Population III remnants grows with halo mass above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, culminating in 50 remnants located in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} halos on average. This has implications that high-mass X-ray binaries and intermediate-mass black holes that originate from metal-free stars may be abundant in high-redshift galaxies.

Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Wise, John H., E-mail: hxu@ucsd.edu, E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu, E-mail: jwise@gatech.edu [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIII Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III

409

CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2031004 16/05/2014 9:00 104, 105 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y Tecnologa de los Alimentos Biologa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grado en Ciencia y TecnologĂ­a de los Alimentos BiologĂ­a 2031007 05/05/2014 12:00 206, 207 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y TecnologĂ­a de los Alimentos BioquĂ­mica 2031002 12/05/2014 9:00 002, 003 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y TecnologĂ­a de los Alimentos FĂ­sica 2031008 09/05/2014 12:00 111 Laboratorio III 1

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

410

ENVIRONMENT AL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONMENT AL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area Power Administration Upper Molina-Lower Molina 115 kV Road Maintenance and...

411

Märchenfilme im Unterricht Deutsch als Fremdsprache.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Diese Masterarbeit befasst sich mit dem Einsatz von Märchenfilmen im Unterricht Deutsch als Fremdsprache und versucht folgende Fragen zu beantworten: Welches Potential stellen Märchenfilme für… (more)

Serdinsky, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results of all other international participants in 2014, while the remaining Phase II transient case results will be reported in 2015.

Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

INVENTORY -EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY - EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department: Principal Investigator: SARA Reporter) 75-71-8 Dielectric Oil 64742-53-6 Emetine Dihydrochloride 316-42-7 Formaldehyde 50-00-0 Fuel Oil, #2 (Inside) 68476-30-2 Fuel Oil, #4 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #4 (Underground) 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #6 68553

Entekhabi, Dara

414

Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counties. The project includes reef designs to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore and limestone layers with spacers between the layers, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feetPhase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama ¡ Florida ¡ Louisiana ¡ Mississippi ¡ Texas NOAA

415

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

416

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

Hamza, Iqbal

417

Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

Galán, Pedro

418

GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

419

TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

Chen, Yiling

420

221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field Early development of quantum mechanics was led by the fact that electro- magnetic radiation (electric current den- sity) jľ = (, j/c). For a point particle of charge e, the charge density is = e

Murayama, Hitoshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

Kurucz, Robert L.

422

Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 -W2009 Term 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the basis for our understanding of, and interaction with, the ecological, economic and social systems Systems at UBC Farm Morgan Reid and Duncan McHugh, LFS Learning Centre #12;2 Land, Food & Community III (3-822-9607 UBC Food System Project Coordinator Sophia Baker-French sophiabakerfrench@yahoo.com Teaching

Farrell, Anthony P.

423

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 on the principles of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be complemented with practical workshops of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be comple- mented with practical workshops

424

The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

Dunham, Doug

425

Updated 5-10 George M. Drakeley III PE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

national stewardship and workforce development for the Marine Engineering competency. He Develops the workforce and improves readiness. In 1978 Mr. Drakeley began his career as a Nuclear Qualified Officer of Virginia since 1988. He is DAWIA Level III certified in Systems Planning, Research, Development

426

Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brřnsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

A new step size rule in Yan et al.'s self-adaptive projection method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 29, 2015 ... Abstract: In this paper, we propose a new step size rule to accelerate Yan et al.'s self-adaptive projection method. Under the new step size ...

Gao Bin

2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Soziale Beziehungen und Unterrichtsklima im Deutsch als Fremdsprache–/Deutsch als Zweitsprache–Unterricht.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird das Konzept „Klima“ in Bezug auf den Deutsch als Fremdsprache–/Deutsch als Zweitsprache–Unterricht untersucht. Es wird dargestellt, welchen Stellenwert ein positives… (more)

Tischler, Christina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Formation of Constellation III in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed reconstruction of the star-formation history of the Constellation III region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, to constrain the formation mechanism of this enigmatic feature. Star formation in Constellation III seems to have taken place during two distinct epochs: there is the 8-15 Myr epoch that had previously been recognized, but we also see strong evidence for a separate "burst" of star formation 25-30 Myr ago. The "super-supernova" or GRB blast wave model for the formation of Constellation III is difficult to reconcile with such an extended, two-epoch star formation history, because the shock wave should have induced star formation throughout the structure simultaneously, and any unconsumed gas would quickly be dissipated, leaving nothing from which to form a subsequent burst of activity. We propose a "truly stochastic" self-propagating star formation model, distinct from the canonical model in which star formation proceeds in a radially-directed wave from the center of Constellation III to its perimeter. As others have noted, and we now confirm, the bulk age gradients demanded by such a model are simply not present in Constellation III. In our scenario, the prestellar gas is somehow pushed into these large-scale arc structures, without simultaneously triggering immediate and violent star formation throughout the structure. Rather, star formation proceeds in the arc according to the local physical conditions of the gas. Self-propagating star formation is certainly possible, but in a truly stochastic manner, without a directed, large scale pattern.

Jason Harris; Dennis Zaritsky

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Boston University AccelerAted MedicAl And dentAl ProgrAMs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boston University AccelerAted MedicAl And dentAl ProgrAMs teAcher evAlUAtion To the applicant: Applicants to any of the College of Arts & Sciences' accelerated medical or dental programs must submit three (last, first, middle initial) Date of birth Accelerated Program of application (please check one

Finzi, Adrien

431

Young Stars in the Camelopardalis Dust and Molecular Clouds. III. the GL 490 Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the infrared photometry data extracted from the 2MASS, IRAS and MSX databases, 50 suspected young stellar objects (YSOs) are selected from about 37500 infrared objects in the 3x3 deg area with the center at Galactic longitude 142.5 deg and latitude +1.0 deg, in the vicinity of the young stellar object GL 490 in the dark cloud DoH 942 (Dobashi et al. 2005). The spectral energy distributions between 700 nm and 100 mum suggest that most of the selected objects may be YSOs of classes I and II. In the color-magnitude diagram K_s vs. H-K_s the suspected YSOs occupy an area right of the main sequence what can be interpreted as being caused by the effects of luminosity, interstellar and circumstellar reddening and infrared thermal emission in circumstellar envelopes and disks.

V. Straizys; V. Laugalys

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reassessment of Al-Ce and Al-Nd Binary Systems Supported by Critical Experiments and First-Principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reassessment of Al-Ce and Al-Nd Binary Systems Supported by Critical Experiments and First The present study reinvestigates the Al-Ce and Al-Nd phase diagrams and reoptimizes their thermody- namics results and theoretical calculations show that Al2Nd (or Al2Ce) should be treated as a stoichiometric

Widom, Michael

433

Radical irradiation and misonidazole for T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer: 2 year follow-up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patients with T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer were treated in a Phase II trial of radical irradiation plus Misonidazole (MISO). Twenty-two patients were treated and the results compared with historical controls. The cystoscopic complete tumor response between 6 and 12 months post therapy were 73 and 43%, respectively. The patient two year survival was 81 and 51%, respectively, and the patient 2 year survival with bladder preservation was 61 and 48%, respectively - 4 patients in the MISO study having undergone salvage cystectomy. Complications that may be radiation related in the MISO study are would sepsis after salvage cystectomy in 2 patients, rectal stenosis requiriing colostomy 16 months after salvage cystecomy in 1 patient and the development of a contracted bladder in 1 patient with a history of prior extensive endoscopic therapy. No misonidazole neurotoxicity seen. These findings are being further evaluated in a prospective radomized trial.

Abratt, R.P.; Barnes, D.R.; Hammond, J.A.; Sarembok, L.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Williams, A.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Sun -II Alexei Gilchrist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sun - II Alexei Gilchrist #12;Some resources ¡ http://www.nineplanets.org/sol.html ¡ "The Universe: Secrets of the Sun" video ­ Search on youtube (references are to clips here http in these slides Secrets of the Sun #12;Why does the sun shine? Long and fascinating history involving - geology

Wardle, Mark

435

Robotics II June 10, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotics II June 10, 2014 Exercise 1 Consider a planar 3R robot with unitary link lengths as in Fig. 1. Taking into account the robot redundancy, a velocity control scheme is active so as to track desired end-effector position trajectories while trying to locally maximize the minimum Cartesian distance

De Luca, Alessandro

436

THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog| DepartmentThisIII.

438

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

PARS II Process Document - Project Phasing.pdf More Documents & Publications Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Slide 1 PARS II Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)...

439

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

440

PARS II - Integrated Project Team Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Meeting PARS II - Integrated Project Team Meeting More Documents & Publications PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Slide 1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Multilayer Broken Clouds. Part II: Validation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second part of our two-part paper we estimated the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations for the mean radiance that were derived in Part I. In our analysis we used the three-dimensional (3D) cloud fields provided by (i) the stochastic Boolean model, (ii) large-eddy simulation model and (iii) satellite cloud retrieval. The accuracy of the obtained equations was evaluated by comparing the ensemble-averaged radiative properties that were obtained by the numerical averaging method (reference) and the analytical averaging method (approximation). The robustness of these equations was estimated by comparing the domain-averaged radiative properties obtained by using (i) the full 3D cloud structure (reference) and (ii) the bulk cloud statistics (approximation). It was shown that the approximated equations could provide reasonable accuracy ({approx}15%) for both the ensemble-averaged and domain-averaged radiative properties.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Pavia -http://fisica.unipv.it/ -a.a. 2013/2014, II semestre Ultima modifica: 11/02/2014 Corso di Laurea in Fisica (triennale)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intr. fis. moderna Intr. fis. moderna 10-11 Lab. fisica 2 (esercit.) Elettromagnetismo 2 Elettromagnetismo 2 Intr. fis. moderna Intr. fis. moderna 11-12 Lab. fisica 2 (esercit.) Lab. fisica 2 Intr. fis Lezioni III anno/II semestre Ora lunedĂŹ martedĂŹ mercoledĂŹ giovedĂŹ venerdĂŹ 9-10 Intr. fis. subnuclare Intr

443

Kinter -Abridged Resume -Updated December 2007 -1 JAMES L. KINTER III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinter - Abridged Resume - Updated December 2007 - 1 JAMES L. KINTER III Center for Ocean, F. Giorgi, P. Hudson, J. Kinter III, M. Rodriguez- Arias, & N. Stenseth, 2007: Climate chan

Klinger, Barry

444

Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA...

445

Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

Gradecak, Silvija

446

Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

449

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

451

PARS II Training Schedule | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

will certify that user to receive a PARS II user account. PARSIITrainingSchedule03-06-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Slide 1 PARS II Course Registration Form...

452

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

Matthews, H.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cellHeat

460

Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

Liu, C.T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Thermal diffusion in Ni/Al multilayer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Ni/Al multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering of nominal design [Ni(200A)/Al(100A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 and [Ni(50A)/Al(227A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 on Si substrates were annealed at 200 Degree-Sign C. As-deposited and annealed samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray reflectometry (XRR). The effort was to study the path of alloying in the above two multilayers of same elements but of opposite stoichiometric ratio. We find distinct differences in alloying of these samples.

Swain, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, S.; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

463

ALS Reveals New State of Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS Reveals NewALS

464

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES OF THE MECHANISM OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH OF Cu Au II FROM THE DISORDERED STATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

846. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES OF THE MECHANISM OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH OF Cu Au II FROM the electron microscope. The alloy is disordered by annealing at 450 °C, and the nucleation and growth with the electron microscope by Ogawa and al. [1], and subsequently by Pashley and co-workers [2], [3], [4

Boyer, Edmond

465

Vertical minority carrier electron transport in p-type InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical minority carrier electron transport in p-type InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices G. A. Umana transport J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123715 (2012) Characteristics of built-in polarization potentials Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 243113 (2012) Thermal stability of the deep ultraviolet emission from Al

Krishna, Sanjay

466

Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

467

Ti (II) Mediated Reactions in Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' #12;Generation of Ti(II) from Ti(IV) ¡ Bercaw accessed and characterized the first Ti'X -X Generation of Ti(II) via Reductive Alkylation ¡ Ti(IV) converted to Ti(II) via reductive/Acetylene Functionalizations ¡ Reductive Couplings #12;Advantages of Titanium ¡ Titanium (IV) reagents are cheap and readily

Johnson, Jeff S.

468

I I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I II I I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy I II I I I II I I I II I I I I I CONTENTS 4 Introduction 6 Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Related to Power Production 16 Energy and Environment in Developing Countries 16 UNEP Support Activities

469

Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

Hanley, D

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Summary Slides of ALS Industry Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlight ALSNews Volume 15 Caribou Biosciences Has Roots at ALS - 09.24.2014 Vol. 357 13 Lithium-Battery Dendrite Growth: A New View 8.3.2 04.30.2014 Vol. 352 12 IBM Probes...

471

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the ALS. Beamline 6.3.1 scientists are studying magnesium battery performance and degradation with a unique new endstation that offers in situ electrochemical soft x-ray...

472

Western Baldwin County, AL Grid Interconnection Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Objective of this Project was to provide an additional supply of electricity to the affected portions of Baldwin County, AL through the purchase, installation, and operation of certain substation equipment.

Thomas DeBell

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

473

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O via magnetic field-induced reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl and [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Basova, Tamara, E-mail: basova@niic.nsc.ru; Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Peisert, Heiko; Chassé, Thomas [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)] [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)] [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

478

Early cavity growth during forward burn. [Hoe Creek III problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early portion of the forward burn phase of the Hoe Creek III field experiment, the cavity progagated rapidly down the deviated borehole and to the top of the coal seam. As a first step to understanding this phenomena we have conducted small scale coal block experiments. Drying as well as combustion tests were performed. This paper describes the test hardware and the experimental results.

Shannon, M.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.

1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

SEGS III Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRoosevelt GardensUK-basedRutherfordSCHOTTInformationIII

480

Luz II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:Luz II Jump to: navigation, search Name:

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481

Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H2O)x(H2O)y3+ (x = 8, 9; y = 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

Adriana Dinescu; Aurora E. Clark

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H?O)x(H?O)y 3+ (x =8, 9; y= 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

Dinescu, Adriana; Clark, Aurora E.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

483

Topaz II preliminary safety assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Haskin, E. (Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Institute for Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

PEP-II Operations Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEP-II is a two-ring asymmetric B factory operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. It was constructed by a SLAC-LBNL-LLNL collaboration. The collider comprises two rings, a High-Energy Ring (HER) storing 9 GeV electrons, and a Low-Energy Ring (LER) storing 3.1 GeV positrons. Commissioning of the HER began in mid-1997 and commissioning of the LER began in mid-1998. First evidence for collisions was obtained on July 23, 1998. The BaBar detector was installed in early 1999, and commissioning with the detector commenced in May 1999. By September 1999, PEP-II had reached a peak luminosity of 1.35 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. In the present run, which began in October 1999, the peak luminosity has reached 3.1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and the integrated luminosity delivered is 25 fb{sup {minus}1}. At present, PEP-II is the world's highest luminosity collider. In this paper we describe the startup experience and summarize the operational experience during fiscal year 2000 (from October 1999 through September 2000). Plan s for luminosity upgrades are briefly described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Adhesion, Atomic Structure, and Bonding at theAdhesion, Atomic Structure, and Bonding at the ----AlAl22OO33(0001)/Al(111) Interface:(0001)/Al(111) Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion, Atomic Structure, and Bonding at theAdhesion, Atomic Structure, and Bonding at the ----AlAl22OO33(0001)/Al(111) Interface:(0001)/Al(111) Interface: A First Principles StudyA First Principles--ceramic interfaces are ubiquitous in many industrial applications: ­ Microelectronics ­ Al and other metals

Adams, James B

486

Abundances, Stellar Parameters, and Spectra From the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey operated from 2011-2014 using the APOGEE spectrograph, which collects high-resolution (R~22,500), near-IR (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra with a multiplexing (300 fiber-fed objects) capability. We describe the survey data products that are publicly available, which include catalogs with radial velocity, stellar parameters, and 15 elemental abundances for over 150,000 stars, as well as the more than 500,000 spectra from which these quantities are derived. Calibration relations for the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [M/H], [alpha/M]) and abundances (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni) are presented and discussed. The internal scatter of the abundances within clusters indicates that abundance precision is generally between 0.05 and 0.09 dex across a broad temperature range; within more limited ranges and at high S/N, it is smaller for some elemental abundances. We assess the accuracy of the abundances using comparison of mean cluster metallicities with literature values...

Holtzman, Jon A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Andrews, Brett; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bovy, Jo; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Perez, Ana E Garcia; Hernandez, D Anibal Garcia; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Ivans, Inese; Majewski, Steven R; Martell, Sarah; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nidever, David L; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Pinsonneault, Marc; Robin, Annie C; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Sobeck, Jennifer; Smith, Verne V; Troup, Nicholas; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Hydration of a low-alkali CEM III/B-SiO{sub 2} cement (LAC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydration of a low-alkali cement based on CEM III/B blended with 10 wt.% of nanosilica has been studied. The nanosilica reacted within the first days and 90% of the slag reacted within 3.5 years. C-S-H (Ca/Si {approx} 1.2, Al/Si {approx} 0.12), calcite, hydrotalcite, ettringite and possibly straetlingite were the main hydrates. The pore water composition revealed ten times lower alkali concentrations than in Portland cements. Reducing conditions (HS{sup -}) and a pH value of 12.2 were observed. Between 1 month and 3.5 years of hydration more hydrates were formed due to the ongoing slag reaction but no significant differences in the composition of the pore solution or solid phase assemblage were observed. On the basis of thermodynamic calculations it is predicted that siliceous hydrogarnet could form in the long-term and, in the presence of siliceous hydrogarnet, also thaumasite. Nevertheless, even after 3.5 year hydration, neither siliceous hydrogarnet nor thaumasite have been observed.

Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Le Saout, Gwenn; Ben Haha, Mohsen; Figi, Renato [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Wieland, Erich [PSI, Laboratory for Waste Management, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997). 7. V, 671 (1997). 16. A. Vecchi et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 63, 247 (1994). 17. The presence of VEGFR-3 m. 12, 473 (1998). 21. L. C. Wang et al., EMBO J. 16, 4374 (1997). 22. P. Carmeliet et al., Nature 383

Suarez, Andrew V.

489

A new step size rule in Yan et al.'s self-adaptive projection method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 29, 2015 ... ... which can be viewed as a combination of Li and Yuan's manipulation idea of step size and descending direction presented by Yan et al. [14].

2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

490

THE THERMAL EXPANSION OF THE DIRECTIONALLY SOLIDIFIED Al-CuAl2 EUTECTIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard linear solid model, which works well for the Al-the aluminum solid solution is known to work hard- en as it

Baker, Dennis Frank

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Ii.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

sponsorship of the Materials Division of ASME in conjunction with the Mechanical Metallurgy Committee of AIME. Personne l Connecte d with Contract 1. Professor ial Staff: J....

492

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North - t ' v I tfi -- ..~

493

II  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptemberÂť ;, a

494

II*  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptemberÂť ;,

495

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY y

496

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY y

497

al embarazo reporte: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of superelastic CuAlNi single crystal shape memory alloy during stress Sun, Qing-Ping 133 Josephson effect and tunneling spectroscopy in NbAl2O3AlMgB2 thin films junctions...

498

Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be done. The anode composition needs further improvements to attain commercial purity targets. At the present corrosion rate, the vertical plate anodes will wear too rapidly leading to a rapidly increasing anode-cathode gap and thermal instabilities in the cell. Cathode wetting as a function of both cathode plate composition and bath composition needs to be better understood to ensure that complete drainage of the molten aluminum off the plates occurs. Metal buildup appears to lead to back reaction and low current efficiencies.

R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

499

ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance Print Thursday, 25 July 2013 13:44 In the...

500

New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development Print Wednesday, 21 January 2015...