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1

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions concerning conference spending, should be directed to Jason Taylor at 202-287-1560 or jason.taylor@hq.doe.gov For DOE question concerning the policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at 202-287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov for the AL or Richard Bonnell at 202-287-1747 or at richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov for the FAL. For NNSA questions concerning the policy flash should be directed NNSA by contacting 202-586-6681 Policy Flash 2013-53 FY 2013 appropriations.pdf AL 2013-06 FY 2013 appro.pdf FAL 2013 - 04 FY13 Approp.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation

2

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions concerning conference spending, should be directed to Jason Taylor at 202-287-1560 or jason.taylor@hq.doe.gov For DOE question concerning the policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at 202-287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov for the AL or Richard Bonnell at 202-287-1747 or at richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov for the FAL. For NNSA questions concerning the policy flash should be directed NNSA by contacting 202-586-6681 Policy Flash 2013-53 FY 2013 appropriations.pdf AL 2013-06 FY 2013 appro.pdf FAL 2013 - 04 FY13 Approp.pdf More Documents & Publications

3

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

4

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 000521 & 000519...

5

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA Regulations, the last version appeared in the Federal Register of Friday, December 21,1984 (49 FR 49754). Note: The specfic contact information is outdated and should not be used for consultation or outreach. Appendix I - Federal and Federal-State Agency NEPA Contacts Appendix II - Federal and Federal- State Agencies With Jurisdiction by Law or Special Expertise on Environmental Quality Issues Appendix III - Federal and Federal-State Agency Offices for

6

Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II & III II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Electric Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.839104°, -162.556894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.839104,"lon":-162.556894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Absorption spectrophotometric characterization of Sm(II), Sm(III), and Sm(II/III) bromides and Sm(III) oxybromide in the solid state  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption spectra obtained from SmBr/sub 3/, SmBr/sub 2/, and Sm0Br were used in identifying the samarium species in several mixed-valence Sm(II/III) compounds produced by H/sub 2/ reduction of SmBr/sub 3/. The nature of the absorption of Sm0Br made it possible to detect even traces of Sm0Br in the Sm bromides.

Wood, A.B.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Haschke, J.M.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schrder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

10

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

11

Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commodity Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 464 490 49 518 1,521 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 89 236 1 209 539 Residual Fuel Oil 26 18 11 16 469 540 Still Gas 13,838 50,328 108,359 8,694 38,875 220,094 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 528 166 694 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 9,003 17,611 42,614 2,852 12,416 84,496 Natural Gas (million cubic feet) 38,347 143,702 474,359 26,971 159,849 843,228 Coal (thousand short tons) 30 0 0 0 0 30 Purchased Electricity (million kWh) 2,355 11,892 23,255 2,003 5,130 44,635 Purchased Steam (million pounds) 3,849 12,723 88,922 1,439 14,426 121,359 Other Products 40 47 677 67 1,141 1,972

12

Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Changes Late in Title II or Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2006-Y12-HEUMF-0001 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Victoria Pratt Date: 4/24/2010 Contact: 202-586-7358 Statement: Expect increased costs as well as omissions and errors if significant design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous changes in design requirements late in Title II and early in Title III resulted in significant concurrency in the design-and-build process, making it difficult to avoid major schedule delays and meet commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity, which led to further design changes and refinements in Title III. This necessitated major structural changes to address

13

Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

Tjandra, Meiliana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

NEPA Implementation Procedures; Appendices I, II, and III  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ~ - Friday December 21, 1984 DOE Note: Some contact information may be outdated. Refer to the current edition of Directory o f Potential Stakeholders for Department of Energy Actions under the National Environmental Policy Act (updated annually). Part 11 Council on Environmental Quality 40 CFR Ch. V National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementation Procedures; Appendices I, II, and 111; Final Rule 49750 Federal Register I Vol. 49, No. 247 / Friday, December 21, 1984 I Rules and Regulations COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 40 CFRCh. V National Envircnmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementation Procedures; Appendices I, I!, and lli AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President. ACTION: Appendices to regulations,

16

Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for Fe Isotope Fractionation I C E . R O D E N , A N D B R I A N L . B E A R D Department of Geology and Geophysics, University (DIR) is an important pathway for carbon oxidation in anoxic sediments, and iron isotopes may

Roden, Eric E.

17

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III: a quasi-harmonic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The results of this approach are compared to phase diagrams previously derived by thermodynamic integration using path integral and classical simulations, as well as to experimental data. The studied models are based on both flexible (q-TIP4P/F) and rigid (TIP4P/2005, TIP4PQ/2005) descriptions of the water molecule. Many aspects of the simulated phase diagrams are reasonably reproduced by the quasi-harmonic approximation. Advantages of this simple approach are that it is free from the statistical errors inherent to computer simulations, both classical and quantum limits are easily accessible, and the error of the approximation is expected to decrease in the zero temperature limit. We find that the calculated phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III depends strongly on the hydrogen disorder of ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. Either ice II (in the classical limit) or ice III (in t...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P; 10.1063/1.4757064

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sb(III) and Sb(V) Sorption onto Al-Rich Phases: Hydrous Al Oxide and the Clay Minerals Kaolinite KGa-1b and Oxidized and Reduced Nontronite NAu-1  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the immobilization of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by Al-rich phases - hydrous Al oxide (HAO), kaolinite (KGa-1b), and oxidized and reduced nontronite (NAu-1) - using batch experiments to determine the uptake capacity and the kinetics of adsorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy to characterize the molecular environment of adsorbed Sb. Both Sb(III) and Sb(V) are adsorbed in an inner-sphere mode on the surfaces of the studied substrates. The observed adsorption geometry is mostly bidentate corner-sharing, with some monodentate complexes. The kinetics of adsorption is relatively slow (on the order of days), and equilibrium adsorption isotherms are best fit using the Freundlich model. The oxidation state of the structural Fe within nontronite affects the adsorption capacity: if the clay is reduced, the adsorption capacity of Sb(III) is slightly decreased, while Sb(V) uptake is increased significantly. This may be a result of the presence of dissolved Fe(II) in the reduced nontronite suspensions or associated with the structural rearrangements in nontronite due to reduction. These research findings indicate that Sb can be effectively immobilized by Al-rich phases. The increase in Sb(V) uptake in response to reducing structural Fe in clay can be important in natural settings since Fe-rich clays commonly go through oxidation-reduction cycles in response to changing redox conditions.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The He II Fowler lines and the O III and N III Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new measure of reddening (E$_{(B-V)}$$\\sim$0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the $\\ion{He}{ii}$ Fowler (n$\\to$3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of n$_H$ from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-$\\alpha$ line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative $\\ion{O}{iii}$ intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new $\\ion{O}{iii}$ Bowen lines near $\\lambda$ 2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the $\\ion{N}{iii}$ $\\lambda$ 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d $^2D_{5/2}$ and 3d $^2D_{3/2}$ levels of $\\ion{N}{iii}$. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ and $\\ion{N}{iii}$ near $\\lambda$ 374 and show that the observed $\\ion{N}{iii}$ line ratios and intensities can be explained in terms of line fluorescence by the three resonance lines of $\\ion{O}{iii}$ at $\\lambda$$\\lambda$ 374.432, 374.162 and 374.073 under optically thick conditions.

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Study of Row Phase Dependent Skew Quadrupole Fields in Apple-II Type EPUs at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLE-II TYPE EPUs AT THE ALS ? C. Steier , S. Marks, S.very successfully at the ALS to generate high brightnessswitching, the EPUs at the ALS pro- vide the capability to

Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, Soren; Robin, David; Schlueter, Ross; Wolski, Andrzej

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46 Federal Register 46 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 132 / Monday, July 11, 2011 / Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comment. SUMMARY: Through this notice, the Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of its preliminary plan for retrospective analysis of existing rules to make the agency's regulatory program more effective and less burdensome in achieving its regulatory objectives. As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ''Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' issued by the President on January 18, 2011, DOE sought public comments on

24

Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III III Comment Response Document September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOE/EIS-0026-S-2 COMMENT RESPONSE DOCUMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS TC-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................AC-1 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................IN-1 1.0 ALTERNATIVES ................................................................................ 1-1 01.01 General..................................................................................... 1-1 01.02 Proposed Action and Action Alternatives ........................................... 1-2 01.03 No Action Alternatives and Other Disposal

27

GATE Air-Sea Interactions II: Numerical-Model Calculation of Regional Sea-Surface Temperature Fields Using the GATE Version III Gridded Global Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical model of air-sea interaction previously described in Brown et al. (1982), Pandolfo and Jacobs (1972) and Pandolfo (1969) is applied over a limited horizontal portion of the GATE III Gridded Global Data set (including continental ...

P. S. Brown Jr.; J. P. Pandolfo; G. D. Robinson

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. III. KINEMATIC DISTANCES  

SciTech Connect

Using the H I emission/absorption method, we resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity and derive distances for 149 of 182 (82%) H II regions discovered by the Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS). The HRDS is an X-band (9 GHz, 3 cm) GBT survey of 448 previously unknown H II regions in radio recombination line and radio continuum emission. Here, we focus on HRDS sources from 67 Degree-Sign {>=} l {>=} 18 Degree-Sign , where kinematic distances are more reliable. The 25 HRDS sources in this zone that have negative recombination line velocities are unambiguously beyond the orbit of the Sun, up to 20 kpc distant. They are the most distant H II regions yet discovered. We find that 61% of HRDS sources are located at the far distance, 31% at the tangent-point distance, and only 7% at the near distance. 'Bubble' H II regions are not preferentially located at the near distance (as was assumed previously) but average 10 kpc from the Sun. The HRDS nebulae, when combined with a large sample of H II regions with previously known distances, show evidence of spiral structure in two circular arc segments of mean Galactocentric radii of 4.25 and 6.0 kpc. We perform a thorough uncertainty analysis to analyze the effect of using different rotation curves, streaming motions, and a change to the solar circular rotation speed. The median distance uncertainty for our sample of H II regions is only 0.5 kpc, or 5%. This is significantly less than the median difference between the near and far kinematic distances, 6 kpc. The basic Galactic structure results are unchanged after considering these sources of uncertainty.

Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Bania, T. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Rood, Robert T., E-mail: Loren.Anderson@mail.wvu.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions...

31

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Neutrino masses and mixings with non-zero $?_{13}$ in Type I+II Seesaw Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the survivability of neutrino mass models with normal as well as inverted hierarchical mass patterns in the presence of both type I and type II seesaw contributions to neutrino mass within the framework of generic left-right symmetric models. At leading order, the Dirac neutrino mass matrix is assumed to be diagonal with either charged lepton (CL) type or up quark (UQ) type structure which gets corrected by non-leading effects giving rise to deviations from tri-bi-maximal (TBM) mixing and hence non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$. Using the standard form of neutrino mass matrix which incorporates such non-leading effects, we parametrize the neutrino mass matrix incorporating both oscillation as well as cosmology data. Also considering extremal values of Majorana CP phases such that the neutrino mass eigenvalues have the structure $(m_1, -m_2, m_3)$ and $(m_1, m_2, m_3)$, we then calculate the predictions for neutrino parameters in the presence of both type I and type II seesaw contributions, taking one of them dominant and the other sub-dominant. We show that these mass models can survive in our framework with certain exceptions.

Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hierarchical Neutrino Masses and Leptogenesis in Type I+II Seesaw Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The baryon to photon ratio in the present Universe is very accurately measured to be $6.19 \\times 10^{-10}$. We study the possible origin of this baryon asymmetry in the neutrino sector through the generic mechanism of baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We consider both type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses within the framework of left right symmetric models (LRSM). Using the latest best fit global neutrino oscillation data and assuming the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be either charged lepton (CL) or up quark (UQ) type, we compute the predictions for baryon to photon ratio keeping the lightest active neutrino mass eigenstate a free parameter for both normal and inverted hierarchical cases. We show that in inverted hierarchical scenario with type I seesaw, observed baryon asymmetry can not be generated for both CL and UQ type Dirac neutrino mass matrices. We also study the predictions for baryon asymmetry when the neutrino masses arise from a combination of both type I and type II seesaw (with one of them dominant at a time) as well as different combinations of Majorana neutrino phases and show that the observed baryon asymmetry can be generated within these models upto certain exceptions.

Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

DETERMINATION OF TETRAVALENT URANIUM IN THORIUM OXIDE-URANIUM OXIDE MIXTURES. PARTS I, II, AND III  

SciTech Connect

For the determination of milligram quantities of uranium(N) in thorium oxide-uranium oxide mixtures which may also contain uranium(VI), it was necessary to devise a means of dissolving the sample so as to prevent any air oxidation of the uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). For this determination, the conventional potassium dichromate volumetric method was used except that the sample was dissolved under reflux in 7 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ which contained an excess of standard dichromate solution. Following the dissolution of the sample, this excess was determined by back titration with a standard solution of iron(II). Barium diphenylaminesulfonate was used as the indicator. Initial tests on the dissolution of samples of thorium oxide-uranium oxide in hot HC1O/sub 4/ and hot HCI are described. (auth)

Menis, O.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Performance of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project developed by the ALS Scientific Support Group,Beamline 4.0.1: www-als.lbl.gov/als/techspecs/ bl4.0.1.html.GLIDCOP Grating Blank for ALS Beamline 10.0.1, LSBL-842 (

Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Advanced Light Source

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Session II: Intersubband Devices: AlInN and InGaN Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2011 ... However, the numerous experimental attempts to study the vertical transport in the III-Nitride thin film resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) haven't...

37

Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Atmospheric neutrino oscillation analysis with sub-leading effects in Super-Kamiokande I, II, and III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for non-zero theta_{13} and deviations of sin^2 theta_{23} from 0.5 in the oscillations of atmospheric neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande -I, -II, and -III. No distortions of the neutrino flux consistent with non-zero theta_{13} are found and both neutrino mass hierarchy hypotheses are in agreement with the data. The data are best fit at Delta m^2 = 2.1 x 10^-3 eV^2, sin^2 theta_{13} = 0.0, and sin^2 theta_{23} =0.5. In the normal (inverted) hierarchy theta_{13} and Delta m^2 are constrained at the one-dimensional 90% C.L. to sin^2 theta_{13} < 0.04 (0.09) and 1.9 (1.7) x 10^-3 < Delta m^2 < 2.6 (2.7) x 10^-3 eV^2. The atmospheric mixing angle is within 0.407 <= sin^2 theta_{23} <= 0.583 at 90% C.L.

Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; R. Wendell; C. Ishihara; K. Abe; Y. Hayato; T. Iida; M. Ikeda; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; K. Kobayashi; Y. Koshio; Y. Kozuma; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; S. Nakayama; Y. Obayashi; H. Ogawa; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; Y. Takenaga; Y. Takeuchi; K. Ueno; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; S. Yamada; T. Yokozawa; S. Hazama; H. Kaji; T. Kajita; K. Kaneyuki; T. McLachlan; K. Okumura; Y. Shimizu; N. Tanimoto; M. R. Vagins; F. Dufour; E. Kearns; M. Litos; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; W. Wang; M. Goldhaber; K. Bays; D. Casper; J. P. Cravens; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; C. Regis; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; K. S. Ganezer; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; J. S. Jang; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; J. Albert; M. Fechner; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; S. Tasaka; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; Y. Watanabe; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nishikawa; H. Nishino; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; A. Minamino; T. Nakaya; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; T. Tanaka; C. K. Jung; G. Lopez; C. McGrew; C. Yanagisawa; N. Tamura; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; S. Mino; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; H. Toyota; Y. Kuno; M. Yoshida; S. B. Kim; B. S. Yang; T. Ishizuka; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; Y. Yokosawa; M. Koshiba; M. Yokoyama; Y. Totsuka; S. Chen; Y. Heng; Z. Yang; H. Zhang; D. Kielczewska; P. Mijakowski; K. Connolly; M. Dziomba; E. Thrane; R. J. Wilkes

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)], E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Baillet, Georges [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Cuvier, Caroline [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Sarandi, Farid [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sunnybrook.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chartier, Carole [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. XIV. Classical and Type II Cepheids in the Galactic Bulge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fourteenth part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) contains Cepheid variables detected in the OGLE-II and OGLE-III fields toward the Galactic bulge. The catalog is divided into two main categories: 32 classical Cepheids (21 single-mode fundamental-mode F, four first-overtone 1O, two double-mode F/1O, three double-mode 1O/2O and two triple-mode 1O/2O/3O pulsators) and 335 type II Cepheids (156 BL Her, 128 W Vir and 51 RV Tau stars). Six of the type II Cepheids likely belong to the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy. The catalog data include the time-series photometry collected in the course of the OGLE survey, observational parameters of the stars, finding charts, and cross-identifications with the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We discuss some statistical properties of the sample and compare it with the OGLE catalogs of Cepheids in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Multi-mode classical Cepheids in the Galactic bulge show systematically smaller period ratios than their counter...

Soszynski, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recovery of Cr(III) from tannery spent chrome liquor for reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper embodies details on the extraction behavior of Cr(III) along with Al(III), Fe(III), Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from hydrochloric acid media employing the Cyanex 301-toluene system. All of these metals, except Cr(III), Mg(II), and Mn(II), are extracted into the organic phase. This property of the extractant has been used to separate Cr(III) from the binary mixtures. The partition data have been extended onto spent chrome liquor, and this waste has been treated in such a manner so that it becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. The hydrolytic stability and recycling capacity has been reported. Because the concentration of Cr(III) in the waste is much lower than that required for chromium depositions in Cr(III) plating baths, a concentration step using MgO as a precipitating agent has been appended. To summarize, this paper envisages a new approach to tannery waste management that focuses on treating spent chrome liquors using a solvent extraction technique in such a manner that the waste becomes suitable for use in trivalent plating baths. This would not only help abate pollution but also recover the metal in a pure form.

Khwaja, A.R.; Singh, R.; Tandon, S.N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cirrus Cloud Properties Derived from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Spectrometry during FIRE II. Part III: Ground-Based HIS Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FIRE II, cirrus clouds were observed in the wavelength range 319, m with two High Resolution Interferometer Sounders as described in the Part I companion paper. One, known as AC-HIS, was mounted on the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to look ...

A. D. Collard; S. A. Ackerman; W. L. Smith; X. Ma; H. E. Revercomb; R. O. Knuteson; S-C. Lee

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

Kim, Tae-Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoo-Hyung [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang-Sik [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Kun [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Shin, E-mail: jayslee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemical and electrochemical behavior of the Cr(III)/Cr(II) half cell in the NASA Redox Energy Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cr(III) complexes in the NASA Redox Energy Storage System have been isolated and identified as Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup +3/ and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/ by ion-exchange chromatography and visible spectrophotometry. The cell reactions during charge-discharge cycles have been followed by means of visible spectrophotometry. The spectral bands were resolved into component peaks and concentrations calculated using Beer's Law. During the charge mode Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/ is reduced to Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +/ and during the discharge mode Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +/ is oxidized back to Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/. Both electrode reactions occur via a chloride-bridge inner-sphere reaction pathway. Hysteresis effects can be explained by the slow attainment of equilibrium between Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup +3/ and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/Cl/sup +2/.

Johnson, D.A.; Reid, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ALS Project Management Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19 ii iii Introduction This manual has been prepared to helpWhile following the manual will certainly not guarantee goodelements discussed in this manual. The resulting document

Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

48

The Value of Botox-A in Acute Radiation Proctitis: Results From a Phase I/II Study Using a Three-Dimensional Scoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis (ARP) is a common side effect of pelvic radiotherapy, and its management is challenging in daily practice. The present phase I/II study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in ARP treatment for rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients, treated with neoadjuvant HDREBT, 26-Gy in 4 fractions, received the study treatment that consisted of a single injection of BTX-A into the rectal wall. The injection was performed post-HDREBT and prior to the development of ARP. The control group, 20 such patients, did not receive the BTX-A injection. Both groups had access to standard treatment with hydrocortisone rectal aerosol foam (Cortifoam) and anti-inflammatory and narcotic medication. The ARP was clinically evaluated by self-administered daily questionnaires using visual analog scores to document frequency and urgency of bowel movements, rectal burning/tenesmus, and pain symptoms before and after HDREBT. Results: At the time of this analysis, there was no observed systemic toxicity. Patient compliance with the self-administered questionnaire was 100% from week 1 to 4, 70% during week 5, and 40% during week 6. The maximum tolerated dose was established at the 100-U dose level, and noticeable mean differences were observed in bowel frequency (p = 0.016), urgency (p = 0.007), and pain (p = 0.078). Conclusions: This study confirms the feasibility and efficacy of BTX-A intervention at 100-U dose level for study patients compared to control patients. A phase III study with this dose level is planned to validate these results.

Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Waschke, Kevin [Department of Gastroenterology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Niazi, Tamim [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Richard, Carole [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Parent, Josee [Department of Gastroenterology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Liberman, Sender [Department of Colorectal Surgery, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Mayrand, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Loungnarath, Rasmy [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Stein, Barry [Department of Colorectal Surgery, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Devic, Slobodan [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

50

Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor of LRC, MFS, and OS.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Setter, Cornelia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Dahl, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Noack, Frank [Institute of Pathology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Semicontinuous Low-Dose-Rate Teletherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Glial Brain Tumors: Final Report of a Phase I/II Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Semicontinuous low-dose-rate teletherapy (SLDR) is a novel irradiation strategy that exploits the increased radiosensitivity of glial cells in a narrow range of reduced dose rate. We present the final report of a prospective Phase I/II study testing the feasibility of SLDR for the treatment of recurrent gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously irradiated recurrent gliomas were enrolled from November 1993 to March 1998. Patients received SLDR, delivered 6 to 8 hours/day at a dose rate of 40 to 50 cGy/hour for a total dose of 30 to 35 Gy given over 12 days using a modified cobalt-60 treatment unit. Acute central nervous system toxicity after SLDR treatment was the primary endpoint. Overall survival was a secondary endpoint. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled (14 World Health Organization Grade 4 glioma, 5 Grade 2 glioma, 1 ependymoma). No patients developed {>=}Grade 3 central nervous system toxicity at 3 months without radiographic evidence of tumor progression. Overall survival after SLDR was 56% at 6 months, 28% at 12 months, and 17% at 24 months. One patient survived >48 months, and 1 patient survived >60 months after SLDR treatment. Re-resection before SLDR treatment significantly improved 1-year overall survival for all patients and patients with Grade 4 glioma. Conclusion: The delivery of SLDR is feasible in patients with recurrent gliomas and resulted in improved outcomes for patients who underwent re-resection. There were 2 long-term survivors (>48 months). This pilot study supports the notion that reduced dose rate influences the efficacy and tolerance of reirradiation in the treatment of recurrent gliomas.

Siker, Malika L.; Firat, Selim Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Mueller, Wade [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Krouwer, Hendrikus [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Schultz, Christopher J., E-mail: cschultz@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

Weiss, Christian, E-mail: christian.weiss@kgu.d [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Departments of Haematology and Oncology, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Liersch, Torsten [Departments of General and Visceral Surgery, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); Hipp, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen (Germany); Hinke, Axel [WiSP, Research Institute Pharma GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

From dihydrated iron(III) phosphate to monohydrated ammonium-iron(II) phosphate: Solvothermal reaction mediated by acetone-urea mixtures  

SciTech Connect

By reaction between synthetic phosphosiderite FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, urea (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO, and acetone (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, we report a novel solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is also described. The obtained product is a function of the reaction time and the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture, and the existence of structural memory in the dissolution-precipitation processes is discussed. Below 25 K, NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O behaves magnetically in a complex way, because both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic signals are superimposed, suggesting the existence of a canting of iron(II) magnetic moments. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O is presented. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as a function of the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture and the reaction time, is also described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvothermal synthesis of NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O from an Fe(III) phosphate: reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of two intermediate metastable phases: phase diagram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition in two steps: mass loss of both water and ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behaviour: AF+constant spontaneous magnetization.

Alfonso, Belen F., E-mail: mbafernandez@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Trobajo, Camino [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)] [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pique, Carmen [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain)] [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)] [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Blanco, Jesus A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain)] [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Satellite and Correlative Measurements of the Stratospheric Aerosol. III: Comparison of Measurements by SAM II, SAGE, Dustsondes, Filters, Impactors and Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large satellite validation experiment was conducted at Poker Flat, Alaska, 1619 July 1979. Instruments included the SAM II and SAGE satellite sensors, dustsondes impactors, a fitter collector and an airborne lidar. We show that the extinction ...

P. B. Russell; M. P. McCormick; T. J. Swissler; J. M. Rosen; D. J. Hofmann; L. R. McMaster

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Table of Exhibits..................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents..................................................................................................... ii

Pjm Interconnection

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

SiN{sub x}-induced intermixing in AlInGaAs/InP quantum well through interdiffusion of group III atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the composition profiles within intermixed and non-intermixed AlInGaAs-based multiple quantum wells structures by secondary ion mass spectrometry and observe that the band gap blue shift is mainly attributed to the interdiffusion of In and Ga atoms between the quantum wells and the barriers. Based on these results, several AlInGaAs-based single quantum well (SQW) structures with various compressive strain (CS) levels were grown and their photoluminescence spectra were investigated after the intermixing process involving the encapsulation of thin SiN{sub x} dielectric films on the surface followed by rapid thermal annealing. In addition to the annealing temperature, we report that the band gap shift can be also enhanced by increasing the CS level in the SQW. For instance, at an annealing temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C, the photoluminescence blue shift is found to reach more than 110 nm for the sample with 1.2%-CS SQW, but only 35 nm with 0.4%-CS SQW. We expect that this relatively larger atomic compositional gradient of In (and Ga) between the compressively strained quantum well and the barrier can facilitate the atomic interdiffusion and it thus leads to the larger band gap shift.

Lee, Ko-Hsin; Thomas, Kevin; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Manganaro, Marina; Corbett, Brian [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Pelucchi, Emanuele; Peters, Frank H. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Session III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Quantification of Rumpling in an MCrAlY TBC Bond Coat Using SEM-Based 3D Imaging: Sina Shahbazmohamadi1; Eric Jordan1; 1University...

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61

Final Technical Report; Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definitioni (GRED) Program-Phases I, II, and III for the Animas Valley, NM Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbon dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.

Cunniff, Roy A.; Bowers, Roger L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Electronic structure of BAs and boride III-V alloys  

SciTech Connect

Boron arsenide, the typically ignored member of the Group-III--V arsenide series BAs-AlAs-GaAs-InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its {Gamma} conduction-band minimum is p-like ({Gamma}{sub 15}), not s-like ({Gamma}{sub 1c}), it has an X{sub 1c}-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong s--s repulsion in BAs relative to most other Group-III--V compounds. We find unexpected valence-band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence-band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAs-GaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small ({approx}3.5 eV) and composition-independent band-gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap; (ii) boron ''semilocalized'' states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaN-GaAs alloys); and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies that are smaller than in GaN-GaAs alloys. The unique features of boride Group-III--V alloys offer new opportunities in band-gap engineering.

Hart, Gus L. W.; Zunger, Alex

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Electronic structure of BAs and boride IIIV alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron arsenide, the typically-ignored member of the IIIV arsenide series BAsAlAsGaAs InAs is found to resemble silicon electronically: its ? conduction band minimum is p-like (?15), not s-like (?1c), it has an X1c-like indirect band gap, and its bond charge is distributed almost equally on the two atoms in the unit cell, exhibiting nearly perfect covalency. The reasons for these are tracked down to the anomalously low atomic p orbital energy in the boron and to the unusually strong ss repulsion in BAs relative to most other IIIV compounds. We find unexpected valence band offsets of BAs with respect to GaAs and AlAs. The valence band maximum (VBM) of BAs is significantly higher than that of AlAs, despite the much smaller bond length of BAs, and the VBM of GaAs is only slightly higher than in BAs. These effects result from the unusually strong mixing of the cation and anion states at the VBM. For the BAsGaAs alloys, we find (i) a relatively small (?3.5 eV) and composition-independent band gap bowing. This means that while addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs lowers the gap, addition of small amounts of boron to GaAs raises the gap (ii) boron semi-localized states in the conduction band (similar to those in GaNGaAs alloys), and (iii) bulk mixing enthalpies which are smaller than in GaNGaAs alloys. The unique features of boride IIIV alloys offer new opportunities in band gap engineering. I.

Gus L. W. Hart; Alex Zunger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The progenitors of present-day massive red galaxies up to z {\\approx} 0.7 - finding passive galaxies using SDSS-I/II and SDSS-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive study of 250,000 galaxies targeted by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) up to z {\\approx} 0.7 with the specific goal of identifying and characterising a population of galaxies that has followed passive evolution (no mergers) as closely as possible. We compute a likelihood that each BOSS galaxy is a progenitor of the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) sample, targeted by SDSS-I/II up z {\\approx} 0.5, by using the fossil record of LRGs and their inferred star-formation histories, metallicity histories and dust content. We determine merger rates, luminosity growth rates and the evolution of the large-scale clustering between the two surveys, and we investigate the effect of using different stellar population synthesis models in our conclusions. We demonstrate that our sample is slowly evolving (of the order of 2 {\\pm} 1.5% Gyr-1 by merging) by computing the change in weighted luminosity-per-galaxy between the two samples, and that this result is robust to our choice of stell...

Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A; Maraston, Claudia; Skibba, Ramin A; Zehavi, Idit; Ross, Ashley J; Conroy, Charlie; Guo, Hong; Manera, Marc; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Group III-selenides: new silicon compatible semiconducting materials for phase change memory applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project investigates a series of III-Selenide materials (III xSey), where III=Al, Ga and In, through study of the interacting chemical, kinetic and structural constraints (more)

Lu, Chih-Yuan, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SECTION III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Revision 1 August 20, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1386 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan 20 August 2009 Revision 1 Submitted to: The Honorable Joe Manchin III, Governor, State of West Virginia Submitted by: West Virginia Division of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory US DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Research and Development Solutions (RDS) Allegheny Power American Electric Power West Virginia University ...powering the 21 st century economy... West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan Final Report 29 June 2009 2 of 142 Disclaimer This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the West Virginia

67

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

68

H. R. 2092(Report No. 99-121, Parts I, II, and III): a bill to amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1986 and 1987, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Nineth-Ninth Congress, First Session, April 17, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Parts I, II, and III of the House report amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to preclude discriminatory tax treatment by states and local governments imposing an overvalued assessment against interstate gas transmission for ad valorem taxes. The amendment clarifies assessment terms and stipulates that federal courts may intervene if tax assessments exceed five per cent of true market value. The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 1986 and 1987 appropriations.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Session Q: III-Nitrides: Electronics II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2011... base stations and switches in power conditioning applications. ..... that the current is caused by tunneling through dislocations in the space...

70

II TEAM/TRAINING III SWIM GEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAND+SPORT VI STRENGTH2O CATEGORYSECTION #12;ELITE #12;SWIMWEAR COMPETITION Fast, fluid, sleek AGAINST YOURSELF. HALF TIGHT 6 3 4 1 5 TRI TECH _ 4-needle flat lock construction; streamline HALF TIGHT TRI TOP 1 #12;BRA CONSTRUCTION Internal double layer front, one layer power net mesh

Cromarty, Stuart I.

71

ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: Session III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent applications of PLD include high temperature superconductors, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistive materials and ferrites. Ferroelectric thin films grown by...

72

Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Fe(III) and U(V) Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Our new research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Our previous NABIR project (DE-FG02-01ER63180/63181/63182, funded within the Biotransformation Element) focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II) and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. The new project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Burgos, William D.; Roden, Eric E.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}: Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the mixed-valent europium(II,III) fluoride sulfide EuF{sub 2}.(EuFS){sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the method to synthesize rare-earth metal(III) fluoride sulfides MFS (M=Y, La, Ce-Lu), in some cases we were able to obtain mixed-valent compounds such as Yb{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} instead. With Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} another isotypic representative has now been synthesized. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} (tetragonal, I4/mmm, a=400.34(2), c=1928.17(9) pm, Z=2) is obtained from the reaction of metallic europium, elemental sulfur, and europium trifluoride in a molar ratio of 5:6:4 within seven days at 850 deg. C in silica-jacketed gas-tightly sealed platinum ampoules. The single-phase product consists of black plate-shaped single crystals with a square cross section, which can be obtained from a flux using equimolar amounts of NaCl as fluxing agent. The crystal structure is best described as an intergrowth structure, in which one layer of CaF{sub 2}-type EuF{sub 2} is followed by two layers of PbFCl-type EuFS when sheeted parallel to the (001) plane. Accordingly there are two chemically and crystallographically different europium cations present. One of them (Eu{sup 2+}) is coordinated by eight fluoride anions in a cubic fashion, the other one (Eu{sup 3+}) exhibits a monocapped square antiprismatic coordination sphere with four F{sup -} and five S{sup 2-} anions. Although the structural ordering of the different charged europium cations is plausible, a certain amount of charge delocalization with some polaron activity has to take place, which is suggested by the black color of the title compound. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements of Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} show Curie-Weiss behavior with an experimental magnetic moment of 8.19(5) mu{sub B} per formula unit and a paramagnetic Curie temperature of 0.3(2) K. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 4.2 K. In accordance with an ionic formula splitting like (Eu{sup II})(Eu{sup III}){sub 2}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} only one third of the europium centers in Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} carry permanent magnetic moments. {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopic experiments at 4.2 K show one signal at an isomer shift of -12.4(1) mm/s and a second one at 0.42(4) mm/s. These signals occur in a ratio of 1:2 and correspond to Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}, respectively. The spectra at 78 and 298 K are similar, thus no change in the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} fraction can be detected. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectra of mixed-valent Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}.

Grossholz, Hagen; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kotzyba, Gunter [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.d [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Trill, Henning; Mosel, Bernd D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schleid, Thomas, E-mail: schleid@iac.uni-stuttgart.d [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GD: Membrane properties of type II spiral ganglion neuronesJP, Ryan AF, Housley GD: Type III intermediate filamentinhibits neuritogenesis in type II spiral ganglion neurons

Barclay, Meagan; Ryan, Allen F; Housley, Gary D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

On EPR-type Entanglement in the Experiments of Scully et Al. II. Insight in the Real Random Delayed-choice Erasure Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was pointed out in the first part of this study that EPR-type entanglement is defined by the possibility of performing any of two mutually incompatible distant, i. e.,direct-interaction-free, measurements. They go together under the term 'EPR-type disentanglement'. In this second part, quantum-mechanical insight is gained in the real random delayed-choice erasure experiment of Kim et al. [Kim et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1-5 (2000)] by a relative-reality-of- unitarily-evolving-state (RRUES) approach (explained in the first part). Finally, it is shown that this remarkable experiment, which performs, by random choice, two incompatible measurements at the same time, is actually an EPR-type disentanglement experiment, closely related to the micromaser experiment discussed in the first part.

Fedor Herbut

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

77

Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory,Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long TraceAdvanced Light Source (ALS) Optical Metrology Laboratory (

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory,Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Traceto operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The

Yashchuk, Valeriy V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ALS Spectrum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Spectrum Print Begun in 2007, ALS Spectrum is a publication that encapsulates the same type of information contained in the ALS Activity Report but in a short, readable,...

80

Synthesis and Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted N4-Tetradentate Ligands for Implementation in An(III)/Ln(III) Separations  

SciTech Connect

The previous literature demonstrates that donor atoms softer than oxygen are effective for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) from trivalent actinides (An(III)) (Nash, K.L., in: Gschneider, K.A. Jr., et al. (eds.) Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, vol. 18-Lanthanides/Actinides Chemistry, pp. 197-238. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1994). It has also been shown that ligands that 'restrict' their donor groups in a favorable geometry, appropriate to the steric demands of the cation, have an increased binding affinity. A series of tetradentate nitrogen containing ligands have been synthesized with increased steric 'limits'. The pK a values for these ligands have been determined using potentiometric titration methods and the formation of the colored copper(II) complex has been used as a method to determine ligand partitioning between the organic and aqueous phases. The results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted amine ligands are encouraging, but the results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted diimines indicate that these ligands are unsuitable for implementation in a solvent extraction system due to hydrolysis.

Mark D. Ogden; G. Patrick Meier; Kenneth L. Nash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ALS Spectrum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum Print Begun in 2007, ALS Spectrum is a publication that encapsulates the same type of information contained in the ALS Activity Report but in a short, readable,...

82

Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III - Permitting and Initial Development III - Permitting and Initial Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase III: Permitting and Initial Development GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

83

At-wavelength Optical Metrology Development at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory,of Energy, LBL, LBNL, ALS, or BNL, nor does it imply thatSlope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace

Yuan, Sheng Sam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,111 ,111 DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE *I W INDSOR, CONNECTICUT 111 E. W . ABELQUIST Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy I- II I- .:jj;jiE// .:::=::::: .ipij!li' ,:::i::.:. ..::I::::/. ,:ii~iiiiai, ..' iiiiiiiiii!!liiii~~~~,~:~:. ~i!i.~iii~' :' -' +g?' gg;; ,- ZY :i/ .:;i" .:!! .:::a .(/i?j i:/i;jl? I!kr ' -:~i~jg~;...,.;, ..,::&Si! :(j)//ji//(!: 3.. :jijiiiiiiqi:wi l~,. ,,v..::;:~/j~B/; g#;$ .;::::::::::! :::::::::: ::j/j j/i; :(/;;I . . :/:jij; ,:j:,i/; ::::::: ,i/j//:j ;igg;ij iii:::: ,;(iii$ :::::i:ii. ,,,,,, :i.;ifi;iuij;; ,,:,: ii ,,:::::::::::: .:zy,:l::... Lb. .::i:::. .,:.:::;:. ](i:iii:;!! :.:::::::p "'.'j?'~ fix&$ .ii .:::i .::i;;!jg#ggi& i///jjji_

85

Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later Operable Unit III documents and Operable Units I and II post-Record of Decision documents are located in the Information Repository. Complete copies of the records are located at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503, and at the Monticello Field Office, 1665 S. Main Street,

86

RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Cost Considerations III: Cost Considerations Moderator: Dana Christensen Panelists: Phil Macey Paul Torcellini Rich von Luhrte NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Road to Net Zero Dana Christensen Deputy Laboratory Director Science & Technology RSF Workshop July 27-28, 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Managing Costs Paul Torcellini, PhD, PE Group Manager, Advanced Commercial Buildings Research Group Innovation for Our Energy Future 4 I II III IV Value Added 5 * Owner made tough decisions up-front * Set budget * Sought maximum value for that budget

87

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

88

Volume III, Issue 9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issue 9 September 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science First NSLS-II Beamlines Begin to Take Shape BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source II will be a...

89

ALS@20  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

feed-image feed-image Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource Home About the ALS ALS@20 ALS@20 ALS@20 Kick-Off Celebration Print On Friday, January 11, the Advanced Light Source celebrated the beginning of its 20th anniversary year with a brunch attended by more than 150 current and past staff members. After introductory remarks describing the trials and tribulations encountered during the construction of the ALS from former Director Jay Marx, current ALS Scientific Director Steve Kevan and Director Roger Falcone talked about the progress of the facility over the years. Attendees were then able to view more than 500 historical photos of the ALS and its staff displayed around the room.

90

Nicholas Camillone III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanometer-Thick Covalently-Bound Organic Overlayers" N. Camillone III, T. Pak, K. Adib, K.A. Khan, and R.M. Osgood, Jr. J. Phys. Chem. B, 110, 11334 (2006). Full Publications List...

91

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

92

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy. March 2010 ALS Project Manager Steve Rossi hosted a group of visitors from Kazakhstan on Friday, March 5. The visitors, including a representative from the Kazakhstan...

93

Session II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... et al, Adv Mater 20, 1488 (2008) [6]C Brown et al, Nanoscale 3, 3805 (2011) [7] C Brown et al, ACS Nano 6, 1961 (2012)[8]O Seddiki et al, in preparation

94

Notices III. Summary of Public Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32 Federal Register 32 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 246 / Friday, December 21, 2012 / Notices III. Summary of Public Comments Received and Agency Response to Comments During the public comment period provided, EPA received no comments in response to the September 26, 2012 Federal Register notice announcing the Agency's receipt of the requests for voluntary cancellation and termination of all uses of products listed in Table 1 of Unit II. IV. Cancellation Order Pursuant to FIFRA section 6(f), EPA hereby approves the requested cancellation and termination of all uses of halofenozide registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. Accordingly, the Agency hereby orders that the product registrations identified in Table 1 of Unit II. are canceled and all uses of halofenozide are terminated. The

95

Metal Matrix Composites III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... Ti/Al 6081/Ti foil-foil layup are hot pressed for a lamellar composite structure symmetrically arranged. Inter diffusion bonding between Ti and Al...

96

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

97

Structural Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II: ... On the Evolution Late Blooming Phases in RPV Steels: Theoretical...

98

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Visitors ALS Visitors ALS Visitors Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

99

Iron(II) Oxidation by SO 2 /O 2 in Uranium Leach Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2003 ... Oxidants are added in uranium leaching in acid media to convert iron(II) in solution to iron(III). Iron(III) has an important role in the leaching of...

100

Role of structural Fe in nontronite NAu-1 and dissolved Fe(II) in redox transformations of arsenic and antimony  

SciTech Connect

Oxidation state is a major factor affecting the mobility of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in soil and aquatic systems. Metal (hydr)oxides and clay minerals are effective sorbents, and may also promote redox reactions on their surfaces via direct or indirect facilitation of electron transfer. Iron substituted for Al in the octahedral sites of aluminosilicate clay minerals has the potential to be in variable oxidation states and is a key constituent of electron transfer reactions in clay minerals. This experimental work was conducted to determine whether structural Fe in clays can affect the oxidation state of As and Sb adsorbed at the clay surface. Another goal of our study was to compare the reactivity of clay structural Fe(II) with systems containing Fe(II) present in dissolved/adsorbed forms. The experimental systems included batch reactors with various concentrations of As(III), Sb(III), As(V), or Sb(V) equilibrated with oxidized (NAu-1) or partially reduced (NAu-1-Red) nontronite, hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) and kaolinite (KGa-1b) suspensions under oxic and anoxic conditions. The reaction times ranged from 0.5 to 720 h, and pH was constrained at 5.5 (for As) and at 5.5 or 8.0 (for Sb). The oxidation state of As and Sb in the liquid phase was determined by liquid chromatography in line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and in the solid phase by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our findings show that structural Fe(II) in NAu-1-Red was not able to reduce As(V)/Sb(V) under the conditions examined, but reduction was seen when aqueous Fe(II) was present in the systems with kaolinite (KGa-1b) and nontronite (NAu-1). The ability of the structural Fe in nontronite clay NAu-1 to promote oxidation of As(III)/Sb(III) was greatly affected by its oxidation state: if all structural Fe was in the oxidized Fe(III) form, no oxidation was observed; however, when the clay was partially reduced ({approx}20% of structural Fe was reduced to Fe(II)), NAu-1-Red promoted the most extensive oxidation under both oxic and anoxic conditions. Electron balance considerations suggest that structural Fe(III) in the NAu-1-Red was the sole oxidant in the anoxic setup, while dissolved O{sub 2} also contributes in oxic conditions. Long-term batch experiments revealed the complex dynamics of As aqueous speciation in anoxic and oxic systems when reduced arsenic was initially added: rapid disappearance of As(III) was observed due to oxidation to As(V) followed by a slow increase of aqueous As(III). This behavior is explained by two reactions: fast initial oxidation of As(III) by structural Fe(III) (anoxic) or Fe(III) and dissolved O2 (oxic) followed by the slow reduction of As(V) by dissolved Fe(II). The resulting re-mobilization of As due to As(V) reduction by aqueous Fe(II) occurs on time scales on the order of days. These reactions are likely significant in a natural soil or aquifer environment with seasonal cycling or slightly reducing conditions with an abundance of clay minerals and dissolved Fe(II).

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Foster, Andrea L.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks); (USGS)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Visitors Print ALS Visitors Print ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

102

Al Weinrub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Al Weinrub Al Weinrub Author, "COMMUNITY POWER: Decentralized Renewable Energy in California" Member, Sierra Club California Clean Energy-Climate CommitteeMember, Steering Committee, Bay Area Clean Energy Alliance al.weinrub@comcast.net This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Al Weinrub is a member of the Sierra Club California Energy-Climate Committee and serves on the Steering Committee of the Bay Area's Local Clean Energy Alliance. He is the author of COMMUNITY POWER: Decentralized Renewable Energy in California (http://www.localcleanenergy.org/Community-Power-Publication)

103

Al Gallo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As the Director for the Office of Technology Evaluation, Al Gallo works closely with the Chief Technology Officer as well as many Program Offices to advance the introduction and adoption of...

104

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

105

Cationic Ir(III) alkyl and hydride complexes: stoichiometric ...  

80 S.R. Klei et al./Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 189 (2002) 7994 platinum(II) catalyst capable of converting methane to methyl bisulfate, which could ...

106

G Subject: Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No.113- References: Consolidated and Further Continuing...

107

The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AECL and CTH). 2. Phase II: 3D ice-sheet/drainage modelingmodeling (AECL and CTH). 3. Phase III: 3D ice-sheet/drainagePhase I: Enhancing numerical tools for simulations of the climate drive, ice-

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick Facts Quick Facts ALS Visitors Print ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

109

Studies on transition metals and alloy Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their electronic and bulk properties. (I: Fe/MnO; II: Fe/TiO/sub 2/; III: Fe/Mord. ). Final report, July 1, 1982-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives were: (1) to characterize samples D1, 10% FeO/90% MnO, and D2, 48% FeO/52% MnO, under varying conditions of reduction (at 250/sup 0/C or 350/sup 0/C in H/sub 2/) and of syngas reaction 1:1 of CO:H/sub 2/ at 290/sup 0/C) and in some cases use CO only for reduction and to identify species by Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Magnetization (sigma/sub s) measurement; (2) similarly, to see if there is any metal (oxide)/support (Mordenite) interaction by the same techniques. The characterization was carried out with above techniques and the kinetic results for syngas were obtained on the above systems mostly at PETC. During reduction of Fe-oxide/Mn-oxide an intermediate Mn-ferrite phase was detected. After reduction, species such as Fe/sup 0/+Fe/sup 3 +/+Fe/sup 2 +/ in varying total proportions (45% at 290/sup 0/C and Fe/sup 0/+Fe/sup 2 +/ 75% were found at 350/sup 0/C). Syngas conversion showed Fe-carbides (Fe/sub 2/C/sub 2/+Fe/sub 3/C) depending on the reaction conditions, and the composition of D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/. With the fresh ..gamma..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (identified by Moessbauer) on Mordenites with varying ratios of SiO/sub 2//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, a decrease in (sigma/sub s/) was found with lowering of the ratios from 60 to 17. At 17% ratio (sigma/sub s/) was smallest and the change in the isomer shift was maximum, which established an interaction with the Broensted cities. 24 figures.

Mulay, L.N.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Volume III, Issue 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

111

AL. I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AL. I AL. I Department of Energy Washington, DC 20545 OCT 13 Vii87 Mr. John T. Shields A214 National Fertilizer Development Center Tennessee Valley Authority Muscle Shoals, Alabama 35660 Dear Mr. Shields: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. AEC work at the TVA during the period 1951 through 1955 involved the development of a process to recover uranium from the production of phosphate fertilizer. A laboratory and pilot plant were operated at the site, but very little

112

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 ii This page intentionally left blank. iii Acronyms AGHC Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell AGHCF Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable ANL...

113

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

114

IIS5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1) enabled/disabled, (1) Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager GUI: Right Click on Server > Properties > Home Directory tab > Read, Chapter 2 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of SDSS-III DR8 photometric luminous galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872,921 galaxies over ~ 10,000 deg^2 between 0.45~ 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS (Percival et al. 2010) and WiggleZ (Blake et al. 2011). We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al. 2011; de Putter et al. 2011) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.

Seo, Hee-Jong; White, Martin; Cuesta, Antonio; Ross, Ashley; Saito, Shun; Reid, Beth; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J; de Putter, Roland; Schlegel, David; Eisenstein, Daniel; Xu, Xiaoying; Schneider, Donald; Skibba, Ramin; Verde, Licia; Nichol, Robert; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Costa, Luiz; Gott, J; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Nicholas; Simmons, Audrey; Simoni, Fernando; Shelden, Alaina; Snedden, Stephanie; Zehavi, Idit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT-WEIGHT METALLIC MATERIALS II: III ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore an unconventional rolling process which causes shear deformation has been introduced in addition to the conventional rolling process. Various...

117

Processing Materials for Properties III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 20, 2008 ... PLEASE NOTE: The PMP-III Conference originally scheduled for December 2008 in Thailand was cancelled by TMS and the co-sponsoring...

118

Separation of actinide(III) from lanthanide(III) by thermo-sensitive gel co-polymerized with TPPEN derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) was examined by the thermal-swing extraction technique using a thermo-sensitive gel, poly-N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPA) co-polymerized with a TPEN derivative, N,N,N',N'- tetrakis(4-propenyl-oxy-2-pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN). The separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) was observed in the swollen state of gel (5 deg. C) and the separation factor of Am(III) was evaluated as about 18 at pH 5.2. More than 90% of Am(III) extracted into the gel was released by the volume phase transition of gel from the swollen state (5 deg. C) to the shrunken one (40 deg. C). The repetition test for the thermal swing extraction of a soft metal ion, Cd(II), which was used as a substitute of Am(III), was carried out and the extraction and release of Cd(II) were repeated three times stably under the thermal-swing operation between 5 deg. C and 40 deg. C. The radiation effect of gel on the extraction of Am and Eu was tested by the irradiation of {gamma}-ray (10 kGy) and the long-term adsorption of {alpha}-emitter ({sup 244}Cm). The TPPEN-NIPA gel sustained no damage by these radiation tests. These results suggest that the thermal-swing extraction technique is applicable to the MA partitioning process indispensable for the establishment of P and T technology. (authors)

Takeshita, Kenji; Fugate, Glenn [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsumura, Tatsuro [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaragi, 319-1195 (Japan); Nakano, Yoshio [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8502 (Japan); Mori, Atsunori; Fukuoka, Sachio [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,- -.-=* ,- -.-=* Stub 4000. ,955 L' EnJan: Plaza. 5. W.. Wahington. D. C. 20021. T&phone: (20.2) 188.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.02 13 January 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of E,nergy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: CONTACT REPORT - DISCUSSIONS WITH MR. WILLIAM A. HOOPER MANAGER, PLANT ENGINEERING, ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE SECTOR TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY Per your request, the undersigned contacted Mr. William A. Hooper on 8 January 1987 to obtain information that might assist'in the iden- tification of the source or sources of elevated concentrations of thorium and radium discovered on properties in the vicinity of the Bendix Plant described in the ORNL letter of December 22, 1986, to

120

Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III III Wind Farm Klondike III III Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser PG&E/PSE/EWEB/BPA Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ISLSCP II Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISLSCP II The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project, Initiative II (ISLSCP II) Overview ISLSCP II Logo The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology...

122

ALS Project Management Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management practices across all ALS projects. It describesthat the primary weakness in ALS project management effortsrich projects common at the ALS. It is sometimes difficult

Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE/EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers (9/25/07)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers ii This page intentionally blank Supplement Analysis for the Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................................1 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION...........................................................................1 3.0 PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................1

124

SIMULATION OF EMITTANCE GROWTH IN THE ALS PRE--INJECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Emittance Growth in the ALS Pre-injector C.R.Kim OctoberOF EMITIANCE GROWTH IN THE ALS PRE-INJECTOR* Charles H. KimOF EMIlTANCE GROWTIIIN TilE ALS PRE-INJECTOR' Charles II.

Kim, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

126

Microsoft Word - SRS - Em Mgt Vol II FINAL.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE Volume II February 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE AND SAVANNAH RIVER SITE Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 3 3.0 Conclusions............................................................................................................................................

127

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria 1 Version: 20070606 Frontotemporal syndromes in amyotrophic, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA (5) Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center, San Francisco Kingdom (8) Science Director & Vice President, The ALS Association, Palm Harbor, Florida, U.S.A. (9

Dickerson, Brad

128

Microsoft Word - Vol II-091009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume II Volume II Institutional Controls Plan April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 4 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Grand Junction 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-4.0-Final Volume II-Institutional Controls Plan April 2010 Page i Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1-1

129

Access to the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to the ALS Access to the ALS Print User Access The ALS experiment floor (Building 6) is a Controlled Access Area for radiation protection. All ALS users are required to...

130

Access to the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to the ALS Print User Access The ALS experiment floor (Building 6) is a Controlled Access Area for radiation protection. All ALS users are required to register with the ALS...

131

Charge Profiling of the p-AlGaN Electron Blocking Layer in AlGaInN Light Emitting Diode Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charge Profiling of the p-AlGaN Electron Blocking Layer in AlGaInN Light Emitting Diode Structures, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Characterization of operational AlGaInN heterostructure light emitting diodes (LEDs the device lifetime in a non-destructive mode. INTRODUCTION Group ­ III nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs

Wetzel, Christian M.

132

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

133

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Study at Ambient and High Pressure Diane E. Cabelli, James F. Wishart, Jerzy Holcman, Martin Meier, and Rudi van Eldik J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5131-5136 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction between OH radicals and [CuII(P2O7)2(H2O) 2]6- results in the formation of a Cu(III) complex. No reaction is observed with N3· or Br2·-, whereas SO4·- initiates the same steps as seen with ·OH. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves a ligand interchange or H · atom abstraction process. The Cu(III) complex undergoes a rapid first-order reaction, probably loss of a P2O74- chelate, followed by addition of OH- (pKOH ~ 10) to yield a Cu(III) complex that is predominantly hydroxylated

134

Shiloh III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh III Facility Shiloh III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Montezuma Hills Coordinates 38.1550771°, -121.7336226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1550771,"lon":-121.7336226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula III Facility Ashtabula III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Barnes County ND Coordinates 47.135175°, -97.935219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.135175,"lon":-97.935219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Minco III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco III Minco III Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco III Facility Minco III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Minco OK Coordinates 35.35444115°, -98.13928127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.35444115,"lon":-98.13928127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

Aluminum II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... The thermodynamic modelling is carried out for forecasting of oxidation products in the interaction of Al-Nb alloys with CaO2, CaCO3, Na2SO4...

138

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

PARS II User Account Access Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Management Office of Management Office of Engineering and Construction Management User Account Access Guide for PARS II Version 1.5 June 25, 2011 Submitted by: Energy Enterprise Solutions 20440 Century Blvd. Suite 150 Germantown, MD 20874 Phone 301-916-0050 Fax 301-916-0066 www.eesllc.net June 25, 2011 (V1.5) PARS II User Account Access Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. June 25, 2011 (V1.5) PARS II User Account Access Guide iii Title Page Document Name: User Account Access Guide for PARS II Version Number: V1.5 Publication Date: June 25, 2011 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07 CLIN 4 Prepared by: Scott Burns, Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC Reviewed by: Judith Bernsen, Energy Enterprise Solutions, LLC

140

Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ICP dry etching of III-V nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN, AlN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was investigated in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of dc bias, and ICP power. The etch rates were generally quite low, as is common for III-nitrides in CH{sub 4} based chemistries. The etch rates increased with increasing dc bias. At low rf power (150 W), the etch rates increased with increasing ICP power, while at 350 W rf power, a peak was found between 500 and 750 W ICP power. The etched surfaces were found to be smooth, while selectivities of etch were {le} 6 for InN over GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN under all conditions.

Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Signature Page.........................................................................................................iii Dedication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ii The dissertation of Suzanne Noelle Lyons is approved, and it is acceptable in quality and form for publication on microfilm:

Yehuda Bock; Kevin Brown; Robert Parker

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: III: YBCO Conductor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: Session III: YBCO Conductor Development. Sponsored by: Jt: EMPMD/SMD Superconducting Materials...

144

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

145

ALS superbend magnet system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS Superbend Magnet System J. Zbasnik , S. T. Wang ,of a High-Field Magnet for the ALS, Transactions AppliedRefrigeration options for the ALS Superbend dipole magnets,

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Access to the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gate Access Access to the ALS Print User Access The ALS experiment floor (Building 6) is a Controlled Access Area for radiation protection. All ALS users are required to register...

147

ALS Longitudinal Kicker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be published in the Proceedings ALS Longitudinal Kickers F.IJ3Ir-33088 lE93 005961 ALS Longitudinul Kickers* F. VoelkerContract No. DE-AC03-76SFOOO98. ALS LONGITUDINAL KICKERS F.

Voelkner, F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

ALS superbend magnet performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS Superbend Magnet Performance S. Marks, J. Zbasnik, W.the Advanced Light Source (ALS), with the fourth magnet as ahe Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Alta III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta III Alta III Facility Alta III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

2012 ALS User Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 ALS User Meeting 2012 ALS User Meeting Print Tuesday, 14 June 2011 12:37 user meeting web banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation...

151

ALS Users' Association Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organized framework for the interaction between those who use the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for their research and the ALS management,...

152

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline...

153

Al,N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Significantly Bandgap-reduced and Enhanced PEC Response of Al and N Co-doped ZnO:(Al,N) Films for Solar Driven Hydrogen Production.

154

Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation  

SciTech Connect

Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

Fulton, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

156

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety

157

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase II: Resource Exploration and Confirmation GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

159

Microsoft Word - PARS II 102 Training Workbook V1.0.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

160

The Numerical Simulation of Nonsupercell Tornadogenesis. Part III: Parameter Tests Investigating the Role of CAPE, Vortex Sheet Strength, and Boundary Layer Vertical Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonsupercell tornadogenesis has been investigated in a three-part numerical study. Building on the results of Parts I and II, Part III addresses the sensitivity of nonsupercell tornadogenesis to variations in convective available potential energy ...

Bruce D. Lee; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14/A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Maize in Pakistan is attacked by Myzus obtusirostris David, Narayanan & Rajasingh, Rhopalosiphum

Recanati, Catherine

163

WIPP SEIS-II - Main Menu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Start Here Start Here Volume III Comment Response Document Summary Supplement Volume I Volume I Chapters Supplement Volume II Volume II Appendices MAIN MENU To view a particular volume of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, click on the corresponding box. NOTE Volume III, the Comment Response Document, contains links to original comments and to DOE responses. Tips for using those links are contained in a note represented by the following icon: When you see this icon, double-click on it to read the tips. To return to this menu at any time, click on the first bookmark called "Main Menu" in every volume. To return to the "Start Here" file, which contains instructions for navigating through Acrobat Reader, click here

164

Error Structure of Multiparameter Radar and Surface Measurements of Rainfall. Part III: Specific Differential Phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parts I and II of this three part paper dealt with the error structure of differential reflectivity and X-band specific attenuation in rainfall as estimated by radar and surface disdrometers. In this Part III paper we focus on the error structure ...

V. Chandrasekar; V. N. Bringi; N. Balakrishnan; D. S. Zrni?

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microsoft Word - Vol II.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 2013 January 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 6 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Legacy Management 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-6.0-Final Volume II-Institutional Controls Plan January 2013 Page i Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................1-1

167

Extraction of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III) from citrate medium by high molecular weight amines  

SciTech Connect

High molecular weight amines have been used for the extraction of citrate complexes of Ce(III), Gd(III) and Yb(III). The effect of different variables on extraction has been studied. The citrate species extracted in the organic phase have been proposed as ((RNH/sub 3//sup +/)/sub 3/) (M(Cit)/sub 2/)/sup 3 -/.

Jain, A.; Singh, O.V.; Tandon, S.N.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Potentiometric studies on mixed ligand complexes of La (III), Pr (III), and Nd (III) with nitrilotriacetic acid and mercapto acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to investigate the systems MAL (where M = La (III), Pr (III), or Nd (III), A = NTA, and L = TGA or TMEA) in order to observe the contribution of pi-interaction in the M-S bond.

Tandon, J.P.; Rana, H.S.; Sharma, M.K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i5W 95.5 L' i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

170

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

171

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session III: Processing, Microstructure and Properties. Sponsored by: MSD Flow & Fracture and Phase...

172

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

173

Up-Hill ET in (NH3)5Ru(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c: Rates, Thermodynamics, and the Mediating Role of the Ruthenium Moiety Ji Sun, James F. Wishart, and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 34, 3998-4000 (1995) Abstract: At moderate to high ionic strengths (>0.1 M), Co(oxalate)33- oxidizes native cytochrome c very slowly, however it undergoes a rapid reaction with pendant ruthenium complexes covalently attached to the surface of the protein. Under these conditions, the rate of the thermodynamically unfavorable (up-hill) FeII-to-RuIII electron transfer process in pentaammineruthenium-modified horse-heart cytochrome c can be revealed using sufficiently high Co(oxalate) 33- concentrations. Rate measurements performed over a wide range of CoIII concentrations confirm the proposed

174

Toxic and hazardous chemicals, Title III and communities: An outreach manual for community groups  

SciTech Connect

The manual was prepared for State and local government officials, local emergency planning committee (LEPCs), and other community groups that want to make Title III work. It is intended as a practical guide for those who have little or no previous experience in the field of communication, whose time must be snatched from home and office, and whose resources are limited. The manual has three major sections: Part I discusses planning, which is vital to the success of a communication program; Part II suggests ways to get and keep people involved, especially important because Title III affects so many different sectors of the community; Part III, a how-to-do-it section, talks about specific tasks, such as giving a speech or writing a press release. Appendices include a detailed explanation of the law, a glossary, a list of recent studies related to Title III communications, a list of educational materials, and a list of State contacts.

McNeil, C.; Arkin, E.B.; McCallum, D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidation Promotes Organic Carbon Acquisition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation is usually considered to be a lithoautotrophic metabolism that contributes to primary production in Fe-based ecosystems. In this study, we employed Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 as a model organism to test the hypothesis that phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation can be coupled to organic carbon acquisition. R. capsulatus SB1003 oxidized Fe(II) under anoxic conditions in a light-dependent manner, but it failed to grow lithoautotrophically on soluble Fe(II). When the strain was provided with Fe(II)-citrate, however, growth was observed that was dependent upon microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-citrate. Subsequent photochemical breakdown of Fe(III)-citrate yielded acetoacetic acid that supported growth in the light but not the dark. The deletion of genes (RRC00247 and RRC00248) that encode homologs of atoA and atoD, required for acetoacetic acid utilization, severely impaired the ability of R. capsulatus SB1003 to grow on Fe(II)-citrate. The growth yield achieved by R. capsulatus SB1003 in the presence of citrate cannot be explained by lithoautotrophic growth on Fe(II) enabled by indirect effects of the ligand [such as altering the thermodynamics of Fe(II) oxidation or preventing cell encrustation]. Together, these results demonstrate that R. capsulatus SB1003 grows photoheterotrophically on Fe(II)-citrate. Nitrilotriacetic acid also supported light-dependent growth on Fe(II), suggesting that Fe(II) oxidation may be a general mechanism whereby some Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria mine otherwise inaccessible organic carbon sources.

Rhodobacter Capsulatus Sb; Nicky C. Caiazza; Douglas P. Lies; Dianne K. Newman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

178

ALS Staff Photo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Staff Photo Print On May 14, 2013, members of ALS staff posed for a group photo in front of the dome. A hi-res version can be downloaded here. The last staff photo was taken in...

179

ALS User Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS User Meeting Print Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab Web sites, including ALS sites, are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress approves...

180

ALS User Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Meeting ALS User Meeting Print Tuesday, 14 June 2011 12:37 Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab Web sites, including ALS sites, are accessible, but may...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

ALS User Meeting Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS User Meeting Archives ALS User Meeting Archives Print Monday, 06 June 2011 09:25 Past User Meeting Agendas, Workshops, and Awards Year Agenda Workshops David A. Shirley...

182

111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 us 20060200344Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20060200344Al (19) United States (12) Patent Application Publication Kosek et al. (10) Pub. No.: US 2006) Inventors: Daniel A. Kosek, Missoula, MT (US); Robert Crawford Maher, Bozeman, MT (US) A method of reducing

Maher, Robert C.

183

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts TRUPACT-III Quick Facts Please see below for TRUPACT-III fact sheet. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts More Documents & Publications EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement...

185

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

186

LIGHT WEIGHT ALLOYS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION IV: II: Al ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tech., Pohang 790784, Korea; M.C. Kim, Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Tech., Pohang 790600, Korea. Amorphous aluminum alloys show an attractive...

187

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultt III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio-und Werkstoffwissenschaften  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät III Chemie, Pharmazie, Bio- und Werkstoffwissenschaften Spannende Chemie-Vorträge für saarländische Schulen Professor / Fachgebiet Thema der Vorträge Prof. Dr. G. Kickelbick / Anorganische Chemie kickelbick@mx.uni-saarland.de Chemiker als Architekten für neue High

Mayberry, Marty

188

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY VOLUME II TECHNICAL APPENDICES May 2005 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Technical Appendices Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions #1 - #4)..................................................... 1 Appendix D - Feedback and Continuous Improvement (Core Function #5) ............................................. 35 Appendix E - Essential System Functionality ............................................................................................

189

PhaseII1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stakeholder Meeting Stakeholder Meeting DOE-NETL Proposed Phase II Large Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program September 12, 2002 Meeting Summary A meeting was held in Arlington, VA on September 12 on DOE-NETL's plans to go forward with a second phase of field testing of advanced mercury control technology. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Air Quality III Conference and was attended by approximately 53 representatives from the coal and electric-utility industries, technology developers, EPA, and other interested parties (see attached attendees list). Scott Renninger provided a brief overview of DOE-NETL's current mercury field testing program. A summary of the results from an earlier stakeholder meeting held in Washington on June 4 were also presented as a starting point for discussion to help

190

DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond  

SciTech Connect

An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

ALS User Meeting Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mike Scheinfein (Arizona State University) for development of the PEEM2 photoemission electron microscope. to the members of the ALS User Services Office (Ruth Pepe, Bernie...

193

ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

x-ray radiation for scientific and technological research. As the world's first third-generation synchrotron radiation source, the ALS offers outstanding performance in the...

194

ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postdoctoral Fellowship Highlights Print Since its inception in 2005, the ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship program has supported young scientists in new and ongoing research projects at...

195

Howes et al. Reply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Howes et al. Reply to Comment on "Kinetic Simulations of Magnetized Turbulence in Astrophysical Plasmas" arXiv:0711.4355

Howes, G G; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W; Quataert, E; Schekochihin, A A; Tatsuno, T; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.149502

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ALS Users' Association Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users' Executive Committee ALS Users' Association Charter Print The purpose of the Advanced Light Source Users' Association (ALSUA) is to provide an organized framework for the...

197

Decameter Type III-Like Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

V. N. Melnik; A. A. Konovalenko; B. P. Rutkevych; H. O. Rucker; V. V. Dorovskyy; E. P. Abranin; A. Lecacheux; A. I. Brazhenko; A. A. Stanislavskyy

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute; Javier LLorca,...

199

PMP-III 2008: Travel - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PMP-III: Travel. For Thailand and Bangkok travel information, visit the Tourism Authority of Thailand. AIRORT TRANSPORTATION. Public metered taxi is the...

200

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Volume II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy July 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II July 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

202

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico - Volume II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy February 2003 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES - NEW MEXICO Volume II February 2003 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES - NEW MEXICO Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................

203

Aluminum nitride transitional layer for reducing dislocation density and cracking of AlGaN epitaxial films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A denticulated Group III nitride structure that is useful for growing Al.sub.xGa.sub.1-xN to greater thicknesses without cracking and with a greatly reduced threading dislocation (TD) density.

Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Lee, Stephen R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

SNAP-III--THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR ENVIRONMENTAL TEST. VOLUME III  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests on four thermoelectric generators (two each of two different configurations) of the Snap III type to both the J.P.L. and the L.M.S.D. specifications for shock, vibration. and acceleration test are reported. The simulated levels were based on the anticipated environments of the Vega (J.P.L.) and WS117L (L.M.S.D.) systems. All four generators exhibited the same characteristic behavior pattern throughout the vibration portion of the test prograna, showing a d-c ripple in the generator output only in the Y place. This behavior of the generator is attributed to the oscillatory change in internal resistance resulting from vibratory elastic deformation of the thermoelectric elements. This produces a transient in the electrical output with a resultant reduction in generator efficiency. The maximum reduction in efficiency was noted in the 700 cps region. A resonance on the generator shell at 1845 cps was noted, but generator electrical output and efficiency were not affected. Upon discontinuance of the induced vibration, the generators returned to normal operating conditions. While undergoing shock test, a d-c transient was noted at the time of impact, resulting in a slight decrease in effi ciency. The generators immediately returned to their normal operating efficiency. In the acceleration portion of the test no d-c transient was evident in any of the three planes, therefore the generator efficiency remained constant. Steady state conditions were re-established at the start of each new test phase (i.e., changing planes of excitation, changing from shock to vibration, etc.). Thus, any variation from pretest efficiency was attributed to the external load resistance becoming umnatched due to the change in internal resistance. The important result is that complete generator recovery was consistent in all cases and normal operation continued The generator, shell, internal structure and pressure, and the hot and cold junction temperature were not affected during the test. As a result of this test program, it was concluded that the Snap III thermoelectric generator will operate reliably in the enviromnents associated with the Vega and WS117L vehicles. (auth)

Gross, L.W.; Schramm, E.J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Science DMZ for ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS ALS About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ for ALS Many beamline scientists at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) are or will be experiencing slower network speeds because of instrument upgrades. These new instruments, or more specifically detectors, are

206

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

207

Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

209

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

210

PARS II TRAINING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

211

John Hale III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hale III John Hale III About Us John Hale III - Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization John Hale III Career Highlights Hale is the former Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Capital Access at the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In that role, he managed the agency's operations and initiatives designed to enhance customer service for its internal and external stakeholders. John Hale III is the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at the Department of Energy, reporting directly to the Office of the Secretary. In this role, Hale advocates for small businesses including small disadvantaged, 8(a), women-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, and Historically Underutilized Business Zone businesses. He

212

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Steamboat III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Steamboat III Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Washoe, Nevada Coordinates 40.5608387°, -119.6035495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5608387,"lon":-119.6035495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel) [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Beamlines Directory Print ALS Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines, Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline Parameters Beamline and endstation technical information is available through the links below. Unless otherwise noted, all beamlines are currently operational. Individual beamline schedules are posted when available. Please contact the responsible beamline scientist for additional schedule information. When calling from off-site, all beamline (BL) phone numbers that begin with a "2" are preceded by 495- (i.e., 495-2014); all others are preceded by 486-. Beamline Number Source Technique/ Group Name Energy Range Beamline Contact Schedule/BL Phone

216

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Beamlines Directory Print ALS Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines, Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline Parameters Beamline and endstation technical information is available through the links below. Unless otherwise noted, all beamlines are currently operational. Individual beamline schedules are posted when available. Please contact the responsible beamline scientist for additional schedule information. When calling from off-site, all beamline (BL) phone numbers that begin with a "2" are preceded by 495- (i.e., 495-2014); all others are preceded by 486-. Beamline Number Source Technique/ Group Name Energy Range Beamline Contact Schedule/BL Phone

217

ALS User Meeting Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS User Meeting Archives ALS User Meeting Archives Past User Meeting Agendas, Workshops, and Awards Year Agenda Workshops David A. Shirley (Science) Klaus Halbach (Instrumentation) Tim Renner (Service) 2012 2012 User Meeting Agenda 2012 User Meeting Workshops 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Carl Percival, Dudley Shallcross, Craig Taatjes and David Osborn (Sandia), for making the first direct measurements of the reactions of Criegee intermediates, and showing that their impact on tropospheric chemistry and climate may be substantially greater than previously assumed. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Jeff Dickert and Simon Morton of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division for the invention and implementation of the Compact Variable Collimator (CVC), which has led to a dramatic increase in productivity of protein crystallography.

218

2012 ALS Open House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House 2012 ALS Open House Print More than 6000 people came up the hill to see what is happening at Berkeley Lab during Open House on Saturday, October 13, and more than 1500 of...

219

ALS User Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab Web sites, including ALS sites, are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress approves funds for Fiscal...

220

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

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221

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owens, Et Al., 2005) Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes magneto-telluric surveys are pending for the near future when geochemical and surface geophysical surveys are complete. Results of this survey should verify the occurrence of low-resisitivity fluids and alteration at depth. References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=388765

223

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinidelanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UVvisible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III) lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Synthesis and Mechanical Properties of AL/ ?-Al12Mg17 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advances in Mechanics of One-Dimensional Micro/Nano Materials. Presentation Title, Synthesis and Mechanical Properties of AL/ ?-Al12Mg17...

225

Data Management at the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management at the ALS Print Users of the ALS are responsible for meeting their data management obligations to their home institutions and granting agencies. The ALS does not...

226

EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota EIS-0437: Interconnection of the Buffalo Ridge III Wind Project, Brookings...

227

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (a) III (a) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (a) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenrock III Wind Farm Glenrock III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenrock III Wind Farm Facility Glenrock III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser EnXco Location Converse WY Coordinates 43.0347917°, -105.8439737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0347917,"lon":-105.8439737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Waverly III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waverly III Wind Farm Waverly III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly III Wind Farm Facility Waverly III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Waverly Light & Power Developer Waverly Light & Power Energy Purchaser Waverly Light & Power Location Waverly IA Coordinates 42.7241°, -92.4786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7241,"lon":-92.4786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

233

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

234

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked chromosomes. These enzymes are also exploited clinically as targets of antibiotics and anticancer therapeutics. Researchers at ALS Beamline 8.3.1 imaged type II topoisomerase's ordinarily short-lived state in which it is linked to a DNA's nucleic acid segment through its active site tyrosine, cleaving the DNA. Details of this molecular model provide evidence for the chemical mechanism by which type II topoisomerases (topo IIs) and a related topo family (topo IA) accomplish DNA cleavage. The structure also reveals how the enzyme avoids dissociating when DNA is cleaved, preventing the aberrant formation of mutagenic genomic lesions.

235

ALS in the News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

feed-image feed-image Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource Home About the ALS ALS in the News ALS in the News Roman Seawater Concrete Holds the Secret to Cutting Carbon Emissions Print Tuesday, 04 June 2013 00:00 An international team led by Paulo Monteiro of the Advanced Light Source and UC Berkeley has analyzed samples of Roman concrete from harbor installations that have survived 2,000 years of chemical attack and wave action, "one of the most durable construction materials on the planet," says UC Berkeley's Marie Jackson, a leading member of the team. Says Monteiro, "It's not that modern concrete isn't good, but manufacturing Portland cement accounts for seven percent of the carbon dioxide that industry puts into the air." The carbon footprint of Roman concrete, made from lime, volcanic ash, and seawater, is much smaller.

236

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Directory Beamlines Directory ALS Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines, Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline Parameters Beamline and endstation technical information is available through the links below. Unless otherwise noted, all beamlines are currently operational. Individual beamline schedules are posted when available. Please contact the responsible beamline scientist for additional schedule information. When calling from off-site, all beamline (BL) phone numbers that begin with a "2" are preceded by 495- (i.e., 495-2014); all others are preceded by 486-. Beamline Number Source Technique/ Group Name Energy Range Beamline Contact Schedule/BL Phone

237

Microsoft Word - al95-14.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORITY AUTHORITY This Acquisition Letter (AL) is issued by the Procurement Executive pursuant to a delegation from the Secretary and under the authority of the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) subsections 901.301-70 and 901.301-71. CONTENTS CITATION TITLE DEAR 970.7103 Contractor Purchasing System I.Purpose. This AL is to inform the Department of Energy (DOE) Procurement Directors about the use of a model clause set in subcontracts between DOE national laboratories and scientific institutes in the New Independent States of the former Soviet Union (NIS). At present, there are approximately 250 subcontracts between DOE laboratories and NIS scientific institutes. II.Background. DOE laboratories have been placing subcontracts

238

Al-Zr (Aluminum - Zirconium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Al-Zr crystallographic data...6 3 / mcm ZrAl 22.8 oC 8 Cmcm Zr 2 Al 3 31 oF 40 Fdd 2 ZrAl 2 37.2 hP 12 P 6 3 / mmc ZrAl 3 47 tI 16 I 4/ mmm (Al) 99.86 to 100 cF 4 Fm m...

239

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS User Meeting Awards Print Recipients of the 2012 Users' Executive Committee awards and Student Poster Competition were announced Tuesday, October 9, at the ALS User Meeting....

240

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Print Recipients of the 2012 Users' Executive Committee awards and Student Poster Competition were announced Tuesday, October 9, at the ALS User...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ALS User Meeting Awards Recipients of the 2012 Users' Executive Committee awards and Student Poster Competition were announced Tuesday, October 9, at the ALS User Meeting. David...

242

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Print Recipients of the 2012 Users' Executive Committee awards and Student Poster Competition were announced Tuesday, October 9, at the ALS User...

243

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR AL-TECHSPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AL-TECHSPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION AL-TECHSPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THEFoRMERALLEGHENY-LUDLUMSTEELCORPORATION) WATERVLIET,NEWYORK,ANDOFFSITEPROPER?YIN DUNKIRK,NEWYORK Department of Energy Office of Nuciear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects CONTENTS Page Introduction to the Certification Docket for the Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation, (the Former Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corporation) Watervliet, New York, and Offsite Property in Dunkirk, New York Purpose Docket Contents Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at the Al-Teen Specialty Steel Corporation, (the Former Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corporation) Watervliet, New York, and Offsite Property in Dunkirk, New York Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of the Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation,

245

Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

Bargar, John R

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Study Protocol: Phase III single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the randomisation sequence, and contributed to revising the paper. PM co-designed Phase III (economic evaluation), co-applied for funding, and contributed to revising the paper. JG was the research associate during the first half of the Phase III RCT and led... studies of breath- lessness interventions had focused on patients with malignancies. Funding was sought for a Phase II trial with patients with malignancies but was unsuccessful. Thus the methods outlined here for Phase III have not been tested on patients...

Farquhar, Morag C; Prevost, A Toby; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J; Gray, Jennifer; Brafman-Kennedy, Barbara; Booth, Sara

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

248

NIST STARR II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on board, a calibrated reference reflector, called a solar diffuser, is ... efficiently coupled to a monochromator, the tunable source power in STARR II ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines, Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline Parameters Beamline and endstation technical information is available through the links below. Unless otherwise noted, all beamlines are currently operational. Individual beamline schedules are posted when available. Please contact the responsible beamline scientist for additional schedule information. When calling from off-site, all beamline (BL) phone numbers that begin with a "2" are preceded by 495- (i.e., 495-2014); all others are preceded by 486-. Beamline Number Source Technique/ Group Name Energy Range Beamline Contact Schedule/BL Phone

250

ALS User Meeting Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Meeting Archives Print User Meeting Archives Print Past User Meeting Agendas, Workshops, and Awards Year Agenda Workshops David A. Shirley (Science) Klaus Halbach (Instrumentation) Tim Renner (Service) 2012 2012 User Meeting Agenda 2012 User Meeting Workshops 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Carl Percival, Dudley Shallcross, Craig Taatjes and David Osborn (Sandia), for making the first direct measurements of the reactions of Criegee intermediates, and showing that their impact on tropospheric chemistry and climate may be substantially greater than previously assumed. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Jeff Dickert and Simon Morton of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division for the invention and implementation of the Compact Variable Collimator (CVC), which has led to a dramatic increase in productivity of protein crystallography.

251

ALS Beamlines Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines Directory Print Beamlines, Parameters, Contact Information, and Schedules Download a high-resolution version of the ALS Beamclock. See Beamclock to view the ALS energy-related beamlines beamclock. Beamline Parameters Beamline and endstation technical information is available through the links below. Unless otherwise noted, all beamlines are currently operational. Individual beamline schedules are posted when available. Please contact the responsible beamline scientist for additional schedule information. When calling from off-site, all beamline (BL) phone numbers that begin with a "2" are preceded by 495- (i.e., 495-2014); all others are preceded by 486-. Beamline Number Source Technique/ Group Name Energy Range Beamline Contact Schedule/BL Phone

252

Direct observation of crack opening as a function of applied load in the interior of a notched tensile sample of Al-Li 2090  

SciTech Connect

Results of in situ high resolution X-ray computed tomography are reported for a notched tensile sample of Al-Li 2090 T841. The fatigue crack within the interior of the sample is imaged with 6 {micro}m voxels as a function of applied load, and the crack face morphology is found to be similar to that observed in compact tension samples of this alloy. The loads and approximate stress intensities at which the tomography data were obtained were 82, 50, 25 and 5 kg and 7.1, 4.3, 2.2 and 0.4 MPa{radical}m, respectively. Crack openings measured during unloading as a function of position show that physical closure at portions of the crack tip and at positions behind the crack tip precedes (during unloading) the bend in the sample`s load-displacement curve. The three-dimensional pattern of crack opening shows substantial mixed mode I-III contact on the faces of asperities behind the crack tip, even at the maximum load of the fatigue cycle. Mixed mode I-II contact is also observed at loads above the bend in the load-displacement curve. The fraction of voxels open remains nearly constant for the loads immediately above and below the nominal closure load, as determined from the load-displacement curve, of 41 kg; and this suggests that these mixed mode I-III surfaces begin to carry significant load at the point where the load-displacement curve starts to deflect, and is the source of the apparent stiffening of the sample at loads below the nominal closure load.

Guvenilir, A.; Breunig, T.M.; Stock, S.R. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Kinney, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stoney Corners III Stoney Corners III Facility Stoney Corners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location McBain MI Coordinates 44.209°, -85.275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.209,"lon":-85.275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kotzebue Wind Project III Kotzebue Wind Project III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.83716°, -162.556955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.83716,"lon":-162.556955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pomeroy III Wind Farm Pomeroy III Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pocahontas County IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Crystal Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility Crystal Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Hancock/Winnebago Counties IA Coordinates 43.304401°, -93.824029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.304401,"lon":-93.824029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

PARS II FAQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

259

Portable Automated Mesonet II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portable Automated Mesonet II (PAM II) system was developed by NCAR to provide surface mesoscale data for the research needs of the atmospheric science community. The PAM system has 60 remote stations with planned growth to 300. In such a ...

Fred V. Brock; George H. Saum; Steven R. Semmer

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Extraction and separation of nickel(II) using bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 301) and its recovery from spent catalyst and electroplating bath residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper embodies the details on the extraction behavior of Ni(II) along with Cr(III), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from sulfuric acid media employing Cyanex 301-toluene system. The effect of various parameters like concentration of acid, metal ion and extractant and nature of diluent on the extraction of Ni(II) has been studied. On the basis of the distribution data the extracting species has been proposed. The recycling capacity of the extractant has been assessed. Some binary and ternary separations have also been achieved. The practical utility of the extractant has been demonstrated by recovering Ni(II) from spent catalyst and electroplating bath residue.

Singh, R.; Khwaja, A.R.; Gupta, B.; Tandon, S.N. [Univ. of Roorkee (India). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

III-Nitride Semiconductors for Photovoltaic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a band-structure method that includes bandgap correction, we study the chemical trends of the bandgap variation in III-V semiconductors and predict that the bandgap for InN is 0.85 0.1 eV. This result suggests that InN and its III-nitride alloys are suitable for photovoltaic applications. The unusually small bandgap for InN is explained in terms of the atomic energies and the bandgap deformation potentials. The electronic and structural properties of the nitrides and their alloys are also provided.

Wei, S. H.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

263

Optical and electrical properties of III-V nitride wide bandgap semiconductors. Annual report, April 1, 1997--May 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to investigate the optical and electrical properties of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors (GaN, InGaN, AlGaN) and quantum wells, to understand the fundamental optical transitions and impurity properties of these materials, to study the physics components of GaN-based devices, and to provide input for new approaches toward the improvement of materials quality and the optimization of device design. We were the first group to employ transport measurement techniques on the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) state to study the impurity properties of III-nitrides. We were also one of the few research groups m in the world to employ picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement technique to study mechanisms of optical transitions, LED emission, and lasing m in GaN materials. During this funding period, we have investigated a variety of GaN samples and structures grown by MBE as well as by MOCVD. We have also made a significant progress in MOCVD GaN materials growth. This report briefly discusses the following accomplishments: effects of deep level impurities in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures; materials characterization of III-nitrides alloys; optical studies of III-nitride epilayers and quantum wells; fabrication and optical studies of III-nitride microdisk arrays; and materials growth by MOCVD.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Coatings for Wear and Corrosion III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of deposited films...

265

Session L: III-N HEMTs I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2010 ... Enhancement-depletion-mode subcritical barrier AlN/GaN inverters ... The demonstrated inverter is operating at VDD = 5 V and consists of an...

266

2012 ALS User Meeting Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ALS User Meeting Awards 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards Print Wednesday, 10 October 2012 15:30 Recipients of the 2012 Users' Executive Committee awards and Student Poster...

267

Electroslag Remelting II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 23, 2013 ... Experimental Research on the Absorption of Fluorine in Gamma-TiAl during Electroslag Remelting: Peter Spiess1; Bernd Friedrich1; 1RWTH...

268

NSLS-II Project Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Pages Project Management Team Project Schedule Integrated Project Team (IPT) Monthly Status Meetings Advisory Committees Project Reviews Documents NSLS-II...

269

Microsoft Word - S05096_Title II Transition Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Transition of Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance March 2012 LMS/S05096 This page intentionally left blank LMS/S05096 Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance March 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Process for Transition of UMTRCA Title II Disposal Sites to LM for LTSM March 2012 Doc. No. S05096 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii

270

CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

PARS II User Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document serves as a reference manual to assist DOE end-users in performing their respective functions within the PARS II web application. The document provides a description and How To for...

272

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

273

Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Kainz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods: All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results: Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is

Wolfgang Kainz; Franois Alesch; Dulciana Dias; Chan Open Access

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect

This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

R. P. Wells

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy of the Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x = 35), Al6O5 , and Al7O5 clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy of the Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x = 3­5), Al6O5 , and Al7O5 clusters Giovanni Meloni, Michael J. Ferguson and Daniel M. Neumark Department of Chemistry as an Advance Article on the web 9th September 2003 The Al3O2 , Al3O3 , Al4Ox , Al5Ox (x ¼ 3­5), Al6O5 , and Al7

Neumark, Daniel M.

276

2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights 2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights 2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights Print This year's ALS User Meeting launched with a welcome from Users' Executive Committee Chair Corie Ralston and LBNL Director Paul Alivisatos. ALS Director Roger Falcone followed with a "state of the ALS" presentation that began with a reminder of the ALS mission, which he noted remains true even in the midst of a government shutdown: "Supporting users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." Falcone gave the 414 meeting attendees an update on the ALS beamlines, which included good news about increased user numbers thanks to the new RAPIDD access system, enhanced robotics, and remote capabilities. Falcone reflected that ALS metrics continue to represent our highly productive users-the number of journal articles and papers per user that come from ALS research have continued to grow in the past year. Looking forward, Falcone touched on how a proposed ALS upgrade to a diffraction-limited light source would increase scientific capabilities.

277

2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights 2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights 2013 ALS User Meeting Highlights Print Thursday, 24 October 2013 09:06 This year's ALS User Meeting launched with a welcome from Users' Executive Committee Chair Corie Ralston and LBNL Director Paul Alivisatos. ALS Director Roger Falcone followed with a "state of the ALS" presentation that began with a reminder of the ALS mission, which he noted remains true even in the midst of a government shutdown: "Supporting users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." Falcone gave the 414 meeting attendees an update on the ALS beamlines, which included good news about increased user numbers thanks to the new RAPIDD access system, enhanced robotics, and remote capabilities. Falcone reflected that ALS metrics continue to represent our highly productive users-the number of journal articles and papers per user that come from ALS research have continued to grow in the past year. Looking forward, Falcone touched on how a proposed ALS upgrade to a diffraction-limited light source would increase scientific capabilities.

278

Directed synthesis of crystalline plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalates: accessing redox-controlled separations in acidic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both binary and ternary solid complexes of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) oxalates have been previously reported in the literature. However, uncertainties regarding the coordination chemistry and the extent of hydration of some compounds remain mainly because of the absence of any crystallographic characterization. Single crystals of hydrated oxalates of Pu(III), Pu{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (I) and Pu(IV), KPu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){center_dot}2.5H{sub 2}O (II), were synthesized under moderate hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds I and II are the first plutonium(III) or (IV) oxalate compounds to be structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Crystallographic data for I: monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 11.246(3) A, b = 9.610(3) A, c = 10.315(3) A, Z = 4 and II: monoclinic, space group C2/c, a = 23.234(14) A, b = 7.502(4) A, c = 13.029(7) A, Z = 8.

Runde, Wolfgang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brodnax, Lia F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goff, George S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bean, Amanda C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II) II) General Compliance Supplement April 2012 1 II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature. For example, most programs have eligibility requirements. While the criteria for determining eligibility vary by program, the objective of the compliance requirement that only eligible entities participate is consistent across all programs. Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws

280

Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apollo Energy III LLC Apollo Energy III LLC Place Delaware, Delaware Product The company owns and operates a landfill gas to liquiefied natural gas production facility. Coordinates 39.145271°, -75.418762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.145271,"lon":-75.418762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b) b) Jump to: navigation, search Name Altech III (b) Facility Altech III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

284

ENVIRONMENT AL REVI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT AL REVI EW for CATEG ORI CAL EXCLUS ION DETE RMINATION Rocky Mo unta in Region, Weste rn A rea Power Administra tion Stru cture Replace ment Fla min g Go rge-Vern a l No.3 138-kV tra nsmiss ion lin e (Struct ure No. 25/6) Spr ing 201 2 A. Ilricf J)cscription of Proposal: Western Area Power Adm inistration (Western) proposes to replace Structure No. 25/6 on the Flaming Gorge-Vernal No.3 138-kV transmission line. The structure is located on Bureau of Land Management lands in Uintah County. Utah (Township 3S, Range 22E, Section 7; Donkey Flat 7.5' USGS quadrangle). Work consists of removal and in-kind replacement of the wood H-frame structure and anchors utilizing rubber tired vehicles. crane, bucket truck, pole trucks/trailers, auger rig. and pick-up trucks. All work will be conducted on Western's existing

285

Assessment of potential wood supply for intermediate scale thermoconversion facilities, Tasks I, II, III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program has been concerned with the potential of wood biomass to contribute to the Nation's energy supply. One of the factors inhibiting the selection of wood biomass for energy by non-forest industries, especially by those requiring large quantities (500 to 2000 green tons per day), is concern with adequate fuel supply in terms of both a supply system and an adequate resource base. With respect to the latter, this report looks at the gross resource base as has been historically reported and also examines factors other than traditional product removals that could reduce to some degree the amount of resource that is available. The study also examined the conversion of a New England utility from coal to wood chips.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

16.01-04 Unified Engineering I, II, III, & IV, Fall 2003-Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic objective of Unified is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures ...

Hall, Steven Ray

287

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume II of III Reports F and G, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report here their on-ground restoration actions. Part 1 describes work conducted by the Underwood Conservation District (UCD) on private lands. This work involves the Stabler Cut-Bank project. Part 2 describes work conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. The Stabler Cut-Bank Project is a cooperative stream restoration effort between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the UCD, private landowners, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The Stabler site was identified by UCD during stream surveys conducted in 1996 as part of a USFWS funded project aimed at initiating water quality and habitat restoration efforts on private lands in the basin. In 1997 the Wind River Watershed Council selected the project as a top priority demonstration project. The landowners were approached by the UCD and a partnership developed. Due to their expertise in channel rehabilitation, the Forest Service was consulted for the design and assisted with the implementation of the project. A portion of the initial phase of the project was funded by USFWS. However, the majority of funding (approximately 80%) has been provided by BPA and it is anticipated that additional work that is planned for the site will be conducted with BPA funds.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Multi-paradigm modeling of mode I&II dynamic fracture mechanisms in single crystal silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to its semi-conducting properties, silicon has the ability to be manipulated with high precision at very small length- scales. This property makes it very useful in the design of Nano/Micro-Electromechanical ...

Cohen, Alan, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

GLASSES CONTAINING IRON (II III) OXIDES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as {approx} 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to {approx}50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

KRUGER AA; HEO J; XU K; CHOI JK; HRMA PR; UM W

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Technology I, II, and III: Criteria for Understanding and Improving the Practice of Instructional Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In an earlier era of instructional technology, researchers proposed a set of criteria to help practitioners understand what assumptions about their work could help them (more)

McDonald, Jason K 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solar energy school heating augmentation experiment. Sections I, II, and III. ITC report No. 281076  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fauquier High School Solar Heating System utilizes a solar collector array of 2415 square feet active area. The collectors are mounted in a single plane which is tilted at a 53/sup 0/ angle from the horizontal. The latitude of Warrenton, Virginia is 38.6/sup 0/. Thermal storage is provided by water stored in two concrete tanks, each of 5500 gallon capacity. The tanks are insulated with 4'' of polyurethane and have a temperature loss of 1/sup 0/F per day at a temperature of 140/sup 0/F. Piping to the tanks is arranged so they can be used separately for maximum efficiency. A drain-down mode is used to provide freeze protection for the collectors. No antifreeze is used in the system. There are no heat exchangers in the system except for the classrooms where two water--air convectors are used for space heating. The convectors are equipped with a two speed fan and are sized to provide the heating requirements of the classrooms with 100/sup 0/F water storage temperatures. Back-up heating is provided with the electric resistance heaters originally installed in the classrooms. One classroom has, in addition, an oil heater. The operation, performance, maintenance, and modifications to the system over the 1974-75 and 1975-76 heating seasons are reported in detail. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

I-Energy II-Magentic Materials III-Chemical Sensing and Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is developing technologies for the next generation of higher-efficiency, lower emission...

295

Commercialization strategy report for oil shale. Parts I, II, and III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is designed to begin to answer questions concerning the commercial readiness of Oil Shale. The report identifies some of the barriers to be overcome before this technology is ready to be used commercially. The report also identifies possible actions that might be considered to remove specific barriers. The full implications of the various proposed actions have not been fully developed and many actions listed undoubtedly have substantial problems associated with them. Their inclusion here does not constitute an endorsement of their soundness or appropriateness by the Department of Energy.

Guthrie, H.D.; Blum, E.H.; Braitsch, R.J.

296

49 Fed Reg 49750: NEPA Implementation Procedures, Appendices I, II, and III  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

297

XAS studies of Ni(I), Ni(II), and Ni(III) complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

XAS techniques for studying structural and electronic changes taking place during oxidation and reduction reactions of nickel complexes are described and applied to selected models for Factor 430, a nickel containing cofactor catalyzing an important step in the conversion of carbon dioxide to methane by methanogenic bacteria.

Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fujita, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvancedLightSource Home Science Highlights Industry @ ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Print Wednesday, 23...

299

Das Leben als Krankheit: Kafkas Ein Landarzt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Das Leben als Krankheit. Franz Kafkas Ein Landarzt Muhammedsei. Die menschliche Existenz als eine unheilbare Krankheit:Vorstellung vom Menschen als Be- herrscher seines Lebens.

Al-Azzawi, Muhammed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Joint SSRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conclusion of his SRRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop presentation inJoint SSRTNet/ALS-MES Workshop This joint workshop broughtthe Advanced Light Source (ALS) Users Association Annual

Shuh, David; Van Hove, Michel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ALS Beamline Design Requirements - Revision 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials are not allowed in the ALS experiment area withoutlocations provided by the ALS. c. Cleaning proceduresa successful walkthrough, the ALS Director or designee gives

Heimann, Phil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

2012 ALS User Meeting Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and notable science highlights, which communicated ALS advances in structural biology, battery research, and fundamental science. Falcone acknowledged the work of Simon Morton and...

303

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This document was revised and approved December 18, 2008. I. FUNCTION AND REPORTING The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) is advisory to the Berkeley Lab Director through...

304

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 4}Si{sub 2}C{sub 5}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6)  

SciTech Connect

We have prepared a new layered oxycarbide, [Al{sub 5.25(5)}Si{sub 0.75(5)}][O{sub 1.60(7)}C{sub 3.40(7)}], by isothermal heating of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}) at 2273 K near the carbon-carbon monoxide buffer. The crystal structure was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3m (centrosymmetric), Z=3, and hexagonal cell dimensions a=0.32464(2) nm, c=4.00527(14) nm and V=0.36556(3) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The reliability indices were R{sub wp}=4.45% (S=1.30), R{sub p}=3.48%, R{sub B}=2.27% and R{sub F}=1.25%. The crystal is composed of three types of domains with nearly the same fraction, one of which has the crystal structure of space group R3-bar m. The crystal structure of the remaining two domains, which are related by pseudo-symmetry inversion, is noncentrosymmetric with space group R3m. - Graphical Abstract: A new aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6). The crystal is composed of three types of domains (I, II and III), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al,Si){sub 4}(O,C){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al,Si)(O,C){sub 2}] single layers.

Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Sugiura, Keita [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NY. NY. 0 -02-3 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE F01umz ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) WATERVLIET, NEW YORK, AND OFFSITE PROPERTY IN DUNKIRK, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects CONTENTS Introduction to the Certification Docket for the Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation, (the Former Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corporation) Watervliet, New York, and Offsite Property in Dunkirk, New York Exhibit I: Exhibit II: Purpose Docket Contents Summary of Activities at the Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation, (the Former Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corporation) Watervliet, New York, and Offsite Property in Dunkirk, New York

306

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

307

N-polar III-nitride quantum well light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen-polar III-nitride heterostructures present unexplored advantages over Ga(metal)-polar crystals for optoelectronic devices. This work reports N-polar III-nitride quantum-well ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy that integrate polarization-induced p-type doping by compositional grading from GaN to AlGaN along N-face. The graded AlGaN layer simultaneously acts as an electron blocking layer while facilitating smooth injection of holes into the active region, while the built-in electric field in the barriers improves carrier injection into quantum wells. The enhanced doping, carrier injection, and light extraction indicate that N-polar structures have the potential to exceed the performance of metal-polar ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

Verma, Jai; Simon, John; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kosel, Thomas; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

308

Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Structures of Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(II) Iodide and Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(III) p-Toluenesulfonate Pentahydrate James F. Wishart, Avi Bino and Henry Taube Inorg. Chem. 25, 3318-3321 (1986) Abstract: The crystal structures of [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] I3 and [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] (CH3C6H4SO3)4°5H2O have been solved to weighted R factors of 0.053 and 0.083, respectively. For the former structure, the space group is Pmma with a = 10.655(2)Å, b = 7.704(1)Å, c = 21.488(3)Å, and Z = 4. The Ru(II)-N(Mepyz) distance of 1.95(1)Å in this complex is the shortest yet reported for a ruthenium(II) to heteroctclic nitrogen bond. A difference of 0.04(1)Å between the cis (2.122(7)Å and 2.136(8)Å) and

310

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

311

PARS II Training Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 4 5 6 7 8 WEEK 3 11 12 13 14 15 WEEK 4 18 19 20 21 22 WEEK 5 25 26 27 28 PARS II Training Schedule FEBRUARY 2013 Webinar PARS 102: Session A) 10:00 - 12:00 1 Hour Break...

312

SDSS-III: MASSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEYS OF THE DISTANT UNIVERSE, THE MILKY WAY, AND EXTRA-SOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8), which was made public in 2011 January and includes SDSS-I and SDSS-II images and spectra reprocessed with the latest pipelines and calibrations produced for the SDSS-III investigations. This paper presents an overview of the four surveys that comprise SDSS-III. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation feature of large-scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {>=} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {mu}m data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of 2011 January, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {>=} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS.

Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Agol, Eric; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aihara, Hiroaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arns, James A. [Kaiser Optical Systems, Ann Arbor, MI 48103 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris-Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Barkhouser, Robert [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bickerton, Steven J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

PARS II Software Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These...

314

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

315

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP...

316

Radiometry J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center University at Albany State University of New York Albany, NY 12205 depths without the necessity of human intervention (Harrison and Michalsky 1993); 3) the cosine bench for measuring the cosine response functions of the RSRs and other radiometers (Michalsky et al. 1992); 4) rotating shadowband spectroradiometer progress (Harrison et al., in press); and 5) the effects of Mount Pinatubo on the aerosol above the Oklahoma-Kansas Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site (Michalsky and Larson 1993). Introduction Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer The MFRSR (see Figure 1) is a ground-based instrument for simultaneously measuring total horizontal, diffuse

317

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II. Purpose: On May 20, 2010, NIST hosted the first Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

319

Clean Coal III Project: Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project Trial 1 Report - Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection - Results with Low Volatile Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first coal trial test conducted with the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Burns Harbor Plant. This demonstration project is divided into three phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation The design phase was conducted in 1991-1993. Construction of the facility began in August 1993 and was completed in late 1994. The coal injection facility began operating in January 1995 and Phase III began in November 1995. The Trial 1 base test orI C furnace was carried out in October 1996 as a comparison period for the analysis of the operation during subsequent coal trials.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

322

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

AL PRO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AL PRO AL PRO Jump to: navigation, search Name AL-PRO Place Grossheide, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 26532 Sector Wind energy Product AL-PRO is an inndependent expert office for wind forecasts, wind potential studies, turbulence inquiries, visualizations as well as sound and shade throw forecasts Coordinates 53.592743°, 7.34313° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.592743,"lon":7.34313,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

325

SunShot Initiative: Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions...

326

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

327

Microsoft Word - FINAL Class 1 Revise TRUPACT-III Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to: * Revise TRUPACT-III Management Language * Revise Procedure Reference for the Bolting Station in Table...

328

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

329

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

330

Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 3.0 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2A 2.6 x 10 2 kgals SDU 2, Cell 2B c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout disposed to date Not Applicable 1.4 x 10 4 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L

331

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

332

Mechanism of photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in a liquid-liquid extraction system and its application for a hydrometallurgical process  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in the liquid-liquid extraction process was investigated by employing (2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid mono(2-ethylhexyl) ester (EHPNA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as extractants, n-dodecane and kerosene as diluents, and a xenon lamp as the light source. The photoreductive stripping of iron(III) progressed by photoirradiation following an initial induction period caused by dissolved oxygen in the extraction system. The iron(III)-extractant complex was photoexcited in the organic phase and photoreduced to the iron(II) complex by electron donation from the water at the aqueous/organic interface. A kinetic study of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) revealed that the photochemical reduction of iron(III) was the rate-determining step. The removal of iron from a simulated zinc refinery residue solution by using liquid-liquid extraction combined with photochemical reduction of iron was also investigated, showing that the rare metals in the refinery residue, gallium and indium, were recovered effectively and leaving almost all iron(III) in the aqueous phase.

Nishihama, Syouhei; Hirai, Takayuki; Komasawa, Isao

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Soham Al Snih Al Snih, MD., PhD. Curriculum Vitae CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soham Al Snih Al Snih, MD., PhD. Curriculum Vitae 1 CURRICULUM VITAE NAME: Soham Al Snih Al Snih, M at the Sealy Center on Aging, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. #12;Soham Al Snih Al Snih, MD arthritis. B. Grant Support Current Grant Support: 1R03 AG029959-01A2 (Al Snih ­PI) Period: 06

Wood, James B.

334

Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres: The influence of speciation on uranyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Batson et al., 1996), as well as from weathering of uranium minerals near mine tailings (Landa and Gray for immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments. Although the presence of surfaces has been shown(II) relative to aqueous Fe(II). ? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. INTRODUCTION Uranium has become

Roden, Eric E.

335

On the Security of Liaw et al.'s Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, Liaw et al. proposed a remote user authentication scheme using smartcards. They claimed a number of features of their scheme, e.g. a dictionary of verification tables is not required to authenticate users; users can choose their password freely; mutual authentication is provided between the user and the remote system; the communication cost and the computational cost are very low; users can update their password after the registration phase; a session key agreed by the user and the remote system is generated in every session; and the nonce-based scheme which does not require a timestamp (to solve the serious time synchronization problem) etc. In this paper We show that Liaw et al.'s scheme does not stand with various security requirements and is completely insecure. Keywords: Authentication, Smartcards, Remote system, Attack.

Awasthi, Amit K

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82oC at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=389518

337

Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deymonaz, Et Al., Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes (1) Assembly and review of relevant published and proprietary literature and previous geothermal investigations in the region; References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(Deymonaz,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510804"

338

Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes (2) detailed geologic mapping of the Emigrant Miocene sedimentary basin and surrounding Paleozoic basement rocks; References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(Deymonaz,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510737"

339

Build Your Own Pentium III PC, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Build your own Pentium III PC and save a bundle!Why pay big bucks for a Pentium III system when legendary build-it-yourself guru Aubrey Pilgrim can help you construct one at home for a fraction of dealer prices? In Build Your Own Pentium ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

III-Nitride LEDs with photonic crystal structures.  

SciTech Connect

Electrical operation of III-Nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic crystal structures is demonstrated. Employing photonic crystal structures in III-Nitride LEDs is a method to increase light extraction efficiency and directionality. The photonic crystal is a triangular lattice formed by dry etching into the III-Nitride LED. A range of lattice constants is considered (a {approx} 270-340nm). The III-Nitride LED layers include a tunnel junction providing good lateral current spreading without a semi-absorbing metal current spreader as is typically done in conventional III-Nitride LEDs. These photonic crystal III-Nitride LED structures are unique because they allow for carrier recombination and light generation proximal to the photonic crystal (light extraction area) yet displaced from the absorbing metal contact. The photonic crystal Bragg scatters what would have otherwise been guided modes out of the LED, increasing the extraction efficiency. The far-field light radiation patterns are heavily modified compared to the typical III-Nitride LED's Lambertian output. The photonic crystal affects the light propagation out of the LED surface, and the radiation pattern changes with lattice size. LEDs with photonic crystals are compared to similar III-Nitride LEDs without the photonic crystal in terms of extraction, directionality, and emission spectra.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Sigalas, M. M. (Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto, CA); Epler, J. E. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Krames, M. R. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Li, D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Brueck, Stephen R. J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM); Shagam, M. (Boston University, Boston, MA); Gardner, N. F. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA); Wierer, Jonathan J. (Lumileds Lighting, San Jose, CA)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PADD IV PADD II lakes PADD V - PADD II - inland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Source Maritime Canada Caribbean PADD V - other PADD II lakes PADD V -

342

Impact of superbends at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prototype [2] . At the ALS injection is made off axis inField Bend Magnet for the ALS", in the Proceedings of theto zero. [5)At present the ALS operates with the dispersion

Nishmura, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Compton Scattering in the ALS Booster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compton Scattering in the ALS Booster D. Robin, C. Kim, and410 COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE ALS BOOSTER* D. Robin, C. Kim,COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE ALS BOOSTER* D. Robin, C. Kim, and

Robin, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS-NIM/SRI07 Figure 3 Ancollected on Beamline 7 at the ALS is shown here. The photonSpin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS-NIM/SRI07 Spin

Tobin, James G; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Missouri-Rolla; Boyd Technologies

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DYNAMIC APERTURE OF THE ALS BOOSTER SYNCHROTRON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nelson, "Magnetic Properties of the ALS noosler Synchrotron23,1989 Dynamic Aperture of the ALS Booster Synchrotron C.H.DYNAMIC APERTURE OF TIlE ALS BOOSTER SYNCIIROlRON CharI""

Kim, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

17th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Achievement at the ALS went to Andrea Cavalleri (with an art student's impression of the ALS (center) ;and ALS Acting Director Janos Kirz gave an overview of the

Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nonlinear longitudinal dynamics studies at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics studies at the ALS J. M. Byrd , W-H Cheng, S.MV 4.5 mm Table 1: Nominal ALS longitudinal parameters. "in the Advanced Light Source (ALS), an electron storage ring

Byrd, J.M.; Cheng, W.-H.; De Santis, S.; Li, D.; Stupakov, G.; Zimmermann, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Impedance Measurements of Components for the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impedance Measurements on the ALS Curved Sector Tank", R.A.of the Higher Order Modes of the ALS 500 MHz Acceleratingof Components for the ALS J.N. Corlett and R.A. Rimmer May

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Recent research highlights from the ALS OML  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research highlights from the ALS OML V. V. Yashchuk, E. D.the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to ensure state-of-the-instruments laid out in the ALS strategic plan as well as

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ALS@20 Kick-Off Celebration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS@20 ALS@20 Kick-Off Celebration ALS@20 Kick-Off Celebration Print On Friday, January 11, the Advanced Light Source celebrated the beginning of its 20th anniversary year with a...

351

Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

ALS Doctoral Fellowship in Residence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doctoral Fellowship in Residence Print Doctoral Fellowship in Residence Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a national user facility that generates intense x-ray radiation for scientific and technological research. As the world's first third-generation synchrotron radiation source, the ALS offers outstanding performance in the VUV-soft x-ray energy range and excellent performance into the hard x-ray region. The facility welcomes researchers from universities, industries, and government laboratories around the world. It is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Applications to Shape the Future of Synchrotron Radiation Science Synchrotron radiation is now an established tool in many areas of physical and biological science. The ALS Doctoral Fellowships will allow beginning researchers to work at the frontier of synchrotron radiation research and to help advance state-of-the-art applications.

353

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

355

High Pressure Pulse Radiolysis-Reduction Cyt c by Ru(II) Complexes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for a for a Reversible Intermolecular Electron-Transfer Reaction involving Isonicotinamide(pentaammine)ruthenium and Cytochrome c Beate Bänsch, Martin Meier, Pablo Martinez, Rudi van Eldik, Chang Su, Ji Sun, Stephan S. Isied and James F. Wishart Inorg. Chem. 33, 4744-4749 (1994) Abstract: The reversible intermolecular electron-transfer reaction between pentaammineisonicotinamideruthenium(II/III) and horse-heart cytochrome c iron(III/II) was subjected to a detailed kinetic and thermodynamic study as a function of temperature and pressure. Theoretical calculations based on the Marcus-Hush theory were employed to predict all rate and equilibrium constants as well as activation parameters. There is an excellent agreement between the kinetically and thermodynamically determined equilibrium

356

Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

SciTech Connect

In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides.

Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

AL2007-08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Through the Use of the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Through the Use of the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) References: Presidential Executive Order 13423 Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.7 Contracting for Environmentally Preferable Products and Services DOE Order 450.1, Chg 2, Environmental Protection Program DOE Acquisition Guide, Chapter 23, Greening the Government - Environmental Considerations in Acquisition Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool, IEEE Standard 1680-2006 for Environmental Assessment of Personal Computer Products. When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective immediately upon issuance.

358

Microsoft Word - AL2005-01.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued ALs have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, andor...

359

Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS Print Wednesday, 06 February 2013 15:50 cc Tom Pauly and Josh...

360

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

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361

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

362

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

363

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU`s) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Quadrant III RFI draft report: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data that will: characterize the environmental setting, including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; define and characterize sources of contamination; characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS), which will follow the RFI, if required. A total of 18 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU's) were investigated. All surficial soil samples (0--2 ft), sediment samples and surface-water samples proposed in the approved Quadrant III RFI Work Plan were collected as specified in the approved work plan and RFI Sampling Plan. All soil, sediment and surface-water samples were analyzed for parameters specified from the Target Compound List and Target Analyte List (TCL/TAL) as listed in the US EPA Statement of Work for Inorganic (7/88a) and Organic (2/88b) analyses for Soil and Sediment, and analyses for fluoride, Freon-113 and radiological parameters (total uranium, gross alpha, gross beta and technetium).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

366

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Oral Examination Boards Phase III, Part 8 of 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy Peter O'Connell U.S. Department of Energy William D. Ulicny ATL International, Inc. DOE-HDBK-1122-99

367

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory), at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its seventh annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I Summary Report provides an executive summary and overview; Volume II Technical Report provides a detailed report of activities, methodologies and findings; Volume III Technical Appendix contains detailed data from simulations for each of the counties included in the analysis.

Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II Sponsored by: The Minerals,...

370

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI;...

371

Method of making monolithic intergrated III-V type laser devices and silicon devices on silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of fabricating compound semiconductor devices of III-V or II-VI material and semiconductor devices of silicon on a common substrate. It comprises: forming Si electronic devices on selected areas of the substrate; forming a mask layer over the Si devices and the selected regions; forming openings through the mask layer to exposure the selected regions; forming layers of the compound semi-conductor over at least the exposed selected regions which layers are single crystalline and form optoelectronic compound semiconductor devices with a lasing layer; forming contact metallization on the devices; removing regions of silicon adjacent and underlying portions of the compound semiconductor devices leaving the compound semiconductor devices isolated from silicon on lateral sides with two cantilevered beam sections of compound semiconductor devices extending in opposite directions; and separating the cantilevered sections from the compound semiconductor devices to provide end facets for the compound semiconductor devices.

Zavracky, P.M.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Category:Montgomery, AL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montgomery, AL Montgomery, AL Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Montgomery, AL" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 88 KB SVHospital Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVHospital Montgomery ... 90 KB SVLargeHotel Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Montgomer... 86 KB SVLargeOffice Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Montgome... 87 KB SVMediumOffice Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Montgom... 89 KB SVMidriseApartment Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVMidriseApartment Mon... 91 KB SVOutPatient Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png SVOutPatient Montgomer... 87 KB SVPrimarySchool Montgomery AL Alabama Power Co.png

373

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Solar neutrino results in Super-Kamiokande-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of the third phase of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino measurement are presented and compared to the first and second phase results. With improved detector calibrations, a full detector simulation, and improved analysis methods, the systematic uncertainty on the total neutrino flux is estimated to be ?2.1%, which is about two thirds of the systematic uncertainty for the first phase of Super-Kamiokande. The observed 8B solar flux in the 5.0 to 20 MeV total electron energy region is 2.32+/-0.04 (stat.)+/-0.05 (sys.) *10^6 cm^-2sec^-1, in agreement with previous measurements. A combined oscillation analysis is carried out using SK-I, II, and III data, and the results are also combined with the results of other solar neutrino experiments. The best-fit oscillation parameters are obtained to be sin^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.30+0.02-0.01(tan^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.42+0.04 -0.02) and {\\Delta}m2_21 = 6.2+1.1-1.9 *10^-5eV^2. Combined with KamLAND results, the best-fit oscillation parameters are found to be sin^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.31+/-0.01(tan^2 {\\theta}12 = 0.44+/-0.03) and {\\Delta}m2_21 = 7.6?0.2*10^-5eV^2 . The 8B neutrino flux obtained from global solar neutrino experiments is 5.3+/-0.2(stat.+sys.)*10^6cm^-2s^-1, while the 8B flux becomes 5.1+/-0.1(stat.+sys.)*10^6cm^-2s^-1 by adding KamLAND result. In a three-flavor analysis combining all solar neutrino experiments, the upper limit of sin^2 {\\theta}13 is 0.060 at 95% C.L.. After combination with KamLAND results, the upper limit of sin^2 {\\theta}13 is found to be 0.059 at 95% C.L..

K. Abe; Y. Hayato; T. Iida; M. Ikeda; C. Ishihara; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; K. Kobayashi; Y. Koshio; Y. Kozuma; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; S. Nakayama; Y. Obayashi; H. Ogawa; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; Y. Takenaga; K. Ueno; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; S. Yamada; T. Yokozawa; S. Hazama; H. Kaji; T. Kajita; K. Kaneyuki; T. McLachlan; K. Okumura; Y. Shimizu; N. Tanimoto; M. R. Vagins; L. Labarga; L. M Magro; F. Dufour; E. Kearns; M. Litos; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; W. Wang; M. Goldhaber; K. Bays; D. Casper; J. P. Cravens; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; C. Regis; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; K. S. Ganezer; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; J. S. Jang; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; J. Albert; R. Wendell; T. Wongjirad; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; Y. Watanabe; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nishikawa; H. Nishino; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; A. Minamino; T. Nakaya; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; T. Tanaka; C. K. Jung; G. Lopez; C. McGrew; R. Terri; C. Yanagisawa; N. Tamura; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; S. Mino; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; H. Toyota; Y. Kuno; M. Yoshida; S. B. Kim; B. S. Yang; T. Ishizuka; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; Y. Yokosawa; M. Koshiba; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; S. Chen; Y. Heng; Z. Yang; H. Zhang; D. Kielczewska; P. Mijakowski; K. Connolly; M. Dziomba; E. Thrane; R. J. Wilkes

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

377

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

378

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

379

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

380

Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and Data Release Nine from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-IIIs four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSSs main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

SDSS Collaboration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

HYFIRE II: a fusion/synfuel producer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HYFIRE II is a point design study of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor coupled to a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) system for the production of hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the application of fusion energy for the production of these basic fuels. The HYFIRE II fusion reactor design is based on the STARFIRE commercial power reactor, the primary differences are in the type of blankets between the two reactors, the power cycle design and in the increased thermal power rating (to 6000 MW(th)). Otherwise, the major features of STARFIRE which are maintained include: steady-state operation; rf drive; mechanical limiters; number of TF coils; etc. Based on HYFIRE conceptual design studies to date, the following observations are made: a) blanket designs have been identified to simultaneously meet global tritium breeding requirements and required energy splits between process steam and helium; b) attractive tritium breeders such as LiAlO/sub 2/ and liquid lead with dissolved lithium have been identified; c) gross power cycle efficiencies in the 40 to 45% range appear achievable; and d) high H/sub 2/ production efficiencies in the 50 to 55% range appear achievable.

Fillo, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in that those glasses that were found to contain nepheline after the centerline canister cooled (ccc) heat treatment generally had normalized release values that were greater than their quenched counterparts on a statistically significant basis. The current nepheline discriminator as implemented at the DWPF was shown to continue to work well in predicting nepheline prone glass compositions. A main objective of this study was to identify any compositional regions where conservatism in the current nepheline discriminator was preventing access to those regions that would otherwise be acceptable for DWPF processing by the PCCS models. Four glasses (based on the measured compositions) were identified through this study that met those criteria. However, a review of the individual compositions of these glasses revealed no clear trends that might indicate a driver for suppression of nepheline. Another objective of this study was to evaluate an alternative nepheline discriminator model developed using theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. Unfortunately this new model, in its current state, was unsuccessful in predicting nepheline crystallization in the glass compositions selected for this study. It is recommended that the data collected in this study be incorporated into the new model for further refinement.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

387

Anderson Todd ALS Annis Edna EETD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EH&S Anderson Todd ALS Annis Edna EETD OCFO EETD EETD Beavers Christine ALS Bennett Stacy HR Borden Chakraborty Romy ESD Condon Martha AFRD Crippen Katie Non LBNL Crofoot Derrick ALS Donovan Thomas EH&S Flynn Michelle Facilities Fox Brian OCFO Geller Jil ESD George Anthe PBD Gerasimova Anna PBD Giangrasso Gary ALS

388

Al Magnifico Rettore Prof Luigi Frati  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Al Magnifico Rettore Prof Luigi Frati Al Direttore Generale Dott. Montaguti Ubaldo OGGETTO: Accordo che nell'Assemblea RS.U. del 23 novembre 2009 è stato richiesto all'unanimità di dare mandato al persona del Dott. Ubaldo Montaguti e le OO.SS. ed RS.U in merito al salario accessorio del personale

Di Pillo, Gianni

389

The He ii Fowler lines and the O iii and N iii Bowen fluorescence lines in the symbiotic nova RR Tel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Received.....; accepted Aims. A detailed study of the Oiii and Niii Bowen lines in the spectrum of RR Tel Methods. Absolute intensities for the Heii, Oiii, and Niii emission lines have been obtained from STIS, UVES, FEROS and IUE data, after re-calibration of UVES and FEROS on the STIS scale. Results. A new measure of reddening (E(B?V)?0.00) has been obtained from the comparison between the observed and the theoretical intensity decrement for 20 emission lines of the Heii Fowler (n?3) series. This value has been confirmed by the STIS and IUE continuum distribution, and by the value of nH from the damped profile of the IS H Ly-? line. We have obtained very accurate measurements for about thirty Bowen lines of Oiii and a precise determination of the efficiency in the O1 and O3 excitation channels (18 % and 0.7 %, respectively). The relative Oiii intensities are in good agreement with the predictions by Froese Fischer (1994). A detailed study of the decays from all levels involved in the Bowen mechanism has lead to the detection of two new Oiii Bowen lines near?2190. High resolution IUE data have shown a nearly linear decline with time, from 1978 to 1995, in the efficiency of the O1 and O3 processes, with a steeper slope for the O3 channel. A detailed study of the Niii? 4640 lines and of their excitation mechanism has shown that, recombination and continuum fluorescence being ruled out, line fluorescence remains the only viable mechanism to pump the 3d 2 D5/2 and 3d 2 D3/2 levels of Niii. We point out the important role of multiple scattering in the resonance lines of Oiii

P. Selvelli; J. Danziger; P. Bonifacio; Cifist Marie; Curie Excellence Team

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Microsoft Word - AL2007-01.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL-2007-01 (12/15/06) AL-2007-01 (12/15/06) 1 Department of Energy No. AL-2007-01 Acquisition Regulation Date 12/15/06 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued by the Procurement Executive of DOE. Subject: Implementation of Functional Accountability Requirements References: Secretary of Energy Memorandum dated May 23, 2006, Functional Accountability When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL, which includes the attached OPAM Implementation Plan and DOE Corporate Implementation Plan, are effective immediately. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled and is subject to change as needed. Who is the Point of Contact?

391

AL2007-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-05 7-05 Acquisition Regulation Date 03/29/2007 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued ALs have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT NUMBER DATE SUBJECT 93-4 04/07/93 Displaced Workers Benefits Program 94-19 12/09/94 Basic Labor Policies Fringe Benefits 95-06 06/28/95 Personal Property Letter System 95-14 11/17/95 Subcontracts under the New Independent States - Industrial Partnering Program

392

AL2007-03.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL 2007-03 AL 2007-03 Acquisition Regulation Date 03/30/07 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: Interagency Acquisition References: FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supplies and Services FAR Part 10 Market Research FAR Subpart 17.2 Options FAR Subpart 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions under the Economy Act FAR Part 37 Service Contracting FAR Part 38 Federal Supply Schedule Contracting FAR Part 42 Contract Management DEAR 970.1707 Work For Others Guide Chapter 7.1 Acquisition Planning Guide Chapter 17.1 Interagency Agreements Guide Chapter 38.1 Task Order Contracting Strategic Acquisition Transaction Guide

393

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D III-V Multijunction Materials and Devices R&D NREL has a strong research capability in III-V multijunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology, which is fundamentally a new technology path with breakthrough performance and cost advantages, is a particular focus. We invented and first demonstrated the IMM solar cell and introduced it to the PV industry. Our scientists earlier invented and demonstrated the first-ever multijunction PV cell-and then worked with industry to develop the industry-standard GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge) technology. III-V multijunction cells, which address both space and terrestrial power needs, have achieved the highest energy conversion efficiencies of all PV cells, with the current record exceeding 40%.

394

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin- phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility General Information Name GEM Resources III Geothermal Facility Facility GEM Resources III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 3300 East Evan Hewes Highway Location Holtville, California Zip 92250 Coordinates 32.776035405529°, -115.26321172714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.776035405529,"lon":-115.26321172714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III (EUI) Wind Farm III (EUI) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Energy Unlimited Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Weld County CO Coordinates 40.998405°, -104.811466° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.998405,"lon":-104.811466,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea III Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea III Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157583013418°, -115.63876390457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157583013418,"lon":-115.63876390457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm Facility Pyron (Roscoe III) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Near Roscoe TX Coordinates 32.354161°, -100.344825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.354161,"lon":-100.344825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico 88221-3100 RE: NMED INSPECTION OF CHANGES TO PERMITTED FACILITY TO SUPPORT TRUPACT- III ACTIVITIES WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Quantum capacitance in scaled down III-V FETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As Si CMOS approaches the end of the roadmap, finding a new transistor technology that allows the extension of Moore's law has become a technical problem of great significance. Among the various candidates, III-V-based ...

Jin, Donghyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Weatherization program in Region III: a management study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Weatherization Program, which uses Federal funds and job training program employees to weatherize the homes of low-income homeowners, was examined in the five states of Federal Region III (Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia).

Baldwin, F.D.; Kinney, L.F.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates Speaker(s): Connie Chang-Hasnain Date: February 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location:...

404

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Creek III Wind Farm Panther Creek III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek III Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location TX Coordinates 31.9685988°, -99.9018131° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9685988,"lon":-99.9018131,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT SELECTIONS FOR DOE PHASE III XLERATOR SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM Biomass Technologies: Harvesting/Dewatering Technology for Algal Biofuels Renewable Algal Energy, LLC (Kingsport, Tenn.) - Algal Biodiesel via Innovative Harvesting and Aquaculture Systems - Renewable Algal Energy LLC, will leverage its experience in algal aquaculture, harvesting, and extraction, to demonstrate at small commercial-scale, improved, low cost, energy-efficient methods for harvesting and

406

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

407

PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation (Course 103) PARS II Course Presentation (Course 103) PARS103Presentation.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II PARS II...

408

PARS II Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II Training PARS II Training PARS II training is delivered as traditional, instructor-led, hands-on classroom training, and also, as instructor-led Webinars with limited...

409

The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey of the Solar neighbourhood III. Improved distances, ages, and kinematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ages, chemical compositions, velocity vectors, and Galactic orbits for stars in the solar neighbourhood are fundamental test data for models of Galactic evolution. We aim to improve the accuracy of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey data by implementing the recent revision of the Hipparcos parallaxes. The new parallaxes yield improved astrometric distances for 12,506 stars in the GCS. We also check the GCS II scales of T_eff and [Fe/H] and find no need for change. Introducing the new distances, we recompute M_V for 16,086 stars, and U, V, W, and Galactic orbital parameters for the 13,520 stars that also have radial-velocity measurements. We also recompute stellar ages from the Padova stellar evolution models used in GCS I-II, using the new values of M_V, and compare them with ages from the Yale-Yonsei and Victoria-Regina models. Finally, we compare the observed age-velocity relation in W with three simulated disk heating scenarios to show the potential of the data. With these revisions, the basic data for the GCS stars should now be as reliable as is possible with existing techniques. Further improvement must await consolidation of the T_eff scale from angular diameters and fluxes, and the Gaia trigonometric parallaxes. We discuss the conditions for improving computed stellar ages from new input data, and for distinguishing different disk heating scenarios from data sets of the size and precision of the GCS.

J. Holmberg; B. Nordstrm; J. Andersen

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effect of AlN buffer layer properties on the morphology and polarity of GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Low-temperature AlN buffer layers grown via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) were found to significantly affect the subsequent growth morphology of GaN nanowires. The AlN buffer layers exhibited nanowire-like columnar protrusions, with their size, shape, and tilt determined by the AlN V/III flux ratio. GaN nanowires were frequently observed to adopt the structural characteristics of the underlying AlN columns, including the size and the degree of tilt. Piezoresponse force microscopy and polarity-sensitive etching indicate that the AlN films and the protruding columns have a mixed crystallographic polarity. Convergent beam electron diffraction indicates that GaN nanowires are Ga-polar, suggesting that Al-polar columns are nanowire nucleation sites for Ga-polar nanowires. GaN nanowires of low density could be grown on AlN buffers that were predominantly N-polar with isolated Al-polar columns, indicating a high growth rate for Ga-polar nanowires and suppressed growth of N-polar nanowires under typical growth conditions. AlN buffer layers grown under slightly N-rich conditions (V/III flux ratio = 1.0 to 1.3) were found to provide a favorable growth surface for low-density, coalescence-free nanowires.

Brubaker, Matt D. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); DARPA Center for Integrated Micro/Nano-Electromechanical Transducers (iMINT), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Levin, Igor; Davydov, Albert V. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Rourke, Devin M.; Sanford, Norman A.; Bertness, Kris A. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Bright, Victor M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); DARPA Center for Integrated Micro/Nano-Electromechanical Transducers (iMINT), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82 degrees C at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from

412

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

413

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

414

Coatings, Composites and Lubricants II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010... for the United Stated Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under contract DE-AC0494AL85000.

415

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

416

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

417

NSLS-II Design and Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Design & Performance NSLS-II CD-0 Proposal Preliminary Design Report (PDR) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) Source Properties (.pdf) Cell section Last Modified: April 2,...

418

PARS II FAQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PARS 3.0 Data Model Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

419

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

420

ACOUSTIC SCALE FROM THE ANGULAR POWER SPECTRA OF SDSS-III DR8 PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872, 921 galaxies over {approx}10,000 deg{sup 2} between 0.45 < z < 0.65. The extensive spectroscopic training set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey luminous galaxies allows precise estimates of the true redshift distributions of galaxies in our imaging catalog. Utilizing the redshift distribution information, we build templates and fit to the power spectra of the data, which are measured in our companion paper, to derive the location of Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) while marginalizing over many free parameters to exclude nearly all of the non-BAO signal. We derive the ratio of the angular diameter distance to the sound horizon scale D{sub A} (z)/r{sub s} = 9.212{sup +0.416}{sub -{sub 0.404}} at z = 0.54, and therefore D{sub A} (z) = 1411 {+-} 65 Mpc at z = 0.54; the result is fairly independent of assumptions on the underlying cosmology. Our measurement of angular diameter distance D{sub A} (z) is 1.4{sigma} higher than what is expected for the concordance {Lambda}CDM, in accordance to the trend of other spectroscopic BAO measurements for z {approx}> 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS and WiggleZ. We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al.; de Putter et al.) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.

Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Reid, Beth; Schlegel, David J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio J.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Xu Xiaoying; Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Verde, Licia [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Barcelona (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory, 2001 Apache Point Road, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); and others

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ii iii al" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fe and Al Abundances for 180 Red Giants in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present radial velocities, Fe, and Al abundances for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster Omega Centauri ($\\omega$ Cen). The majority of our data lie in the range 11.0$Al/Fe] ratios exhibit large star--to--star scatter for all populations, with the more than 1.0 dex range of [Al/Fe] decreasing for stars more metal--rich than [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4. The minimum [Al/Fe] abundance observed for all metallicity populations is [Al/Fe]$\\sim$+0.15. The maximum abundance of log $\\epsilon$(Al) is reached for stars with [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4 and does not increase further with stellar metallicity. We interpret these results as evidence for type II SNe providing the minimum [Al/Fe] ratio and a mass spectrum of intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars causing the majority of the [Al/Fe] scatter. These results seem to fit in the adopted scheme that star formation occurred in $\\omega$ Cen over $>$1 Gyr.

Christian I. Johnson; Catherine A. Pilachowski; Jennifer Simmerer; Dustin Schwenk

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone  

SciTech Connect

Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may transition between asymmetric and symmetric dimers in response to changes in either biochemical modifications (e.g. proteolytic cleavage) or other biological cues. Such transitions may contribute to the broad range of protein-protein interactions and functions attributed to class II chaperones.

Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Session O: III-Nitrides: UV Emitters and Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2011 ... A light emitting diode grown on AlN single crystal substrates based on pseudomorphic AlGaN films will be described. In addition, an estimation...

425

Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yongliang, Xiong [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The ALS Gun Electronics system  

SciTech Connect

The ALS Gun Electronics system has been designed to accommodate gun with a custom made socket and high speed electronics circuit which is capable of producing single and multiple electron bunches with time jitters measured at better than 50 PS. The system generates the gated RF signal at ground level before sending it up to the 120 KV-biased gun deck via a fiber optic cable. The current pulse width as a function of grid bias, using an Eimac 8847A planar triode simulating an electron gun, was measured to show the relationship between the two parameters.

Lo, C.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Penascal II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penascal II Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Kenedy County TX Coordinates 27.003108°, -97.584014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.003108,"lon":-97.584014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Cimarron II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cimarron II Facility Cimarron II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Developer CPV Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Kansas City Power & Light Location Cimarron KS Coordinates 37.90154236°, -100.3934097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.90154236,"lon":-100.3934097,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Limon II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limon II Limon II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Limon CO Coordinates 39.33323523°, -103.5521507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.33323523,"lon":-103.5521507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Aegir II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates 43.098°, -86.597° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.098,"lon":-86.597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

Photovoltaics II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Energy Nanomaterials: Photovoltaics II ... and Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Ziqi Sun1; Jung Ho Kim1; Yue Zhao1; ... the electron lifetime (?n) are examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

432

P-3: As(III) Oxidation with Bacteria and AP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biosorption Characteristics of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution onto Poplar Cotton Characterization of Aluminum Cathode Sheets Used for Zinc Electrowinning.

433

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

434

The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ~0.4 to ~0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for gamma-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 1E-8 pb to be probed.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; K. Lyons; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; R. Taylor; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electrical properties and interfacial chemical environments of in situ atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy grown GaAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfacial chemical analyses and electrical characterization of in situ atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al"2O"3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown n- and p- GaAs (001) with a (4x6) surface reconstruction are performed. The capacitance-voltage ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition, III-V compound semiconductor, Molecular beam epitaxy

Y. H. Chang; M. L. Huang; P. Chang; C. A. Lin; Y. J. Chu; B. R. Chen; C. L. Hsu; J. Kwo; T. W. Pi; M. Hong

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Ni(II) Sorption on Biogenic Mn-Oxides with Varying Mn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lightsource (SSRL), Menlo Park, CA. EXAFS spectra from Ni(II) organic standards were collected in transmission-3 at SSRL. This method is described in detail in Zhu et al. (6). Results Sorption Isotherms and Dissolved Mn,anationaluserfacilityoperatedbyStanfordUniversity on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular

Sparks, Donald L.

437

Ni(II) Sorption on Biogenic Mn-Oxides with Varying Mn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lightsource (SSRL), Menlo Park, CA. EXAFS spectra from Ni(II) organic standards were collected in transmission 11-3 at SSRL. This method is described in detail in Zhu et al. (6). Results Sorption Isotherms,anationaluserfacilityoperatedbyStanfordUniversity on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular

Sparks, Donald L.

438

Microsoft Word - AL2002-03.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL 2002-03 (3/13/2002) AL 2002-03 (3/13/2002) Subject: Public Relations Requirements References: Deputy Secretary Letter dated February 25, 2002 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective 10 business days from the date of issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Bob Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202) 586-8264, or via e-mail at robert.webb@hq.doe.gov Visit our website at www.pr.doe.gov for information on Acquisition Letters and other policy issues. What is the Purpose of this AL? The purpose of this AL is to provide guidance regarding the processing of procurement requests for obtaining contractual services from public relations

439

Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Al-Corn Clean Fuel Place Claremont, North Dakota Product Al-Corn is an ethanol plant located in Claremont, North Dakota, which is owned by local...

440

ALS Operating Schedule on Google Calendar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Operating Schedule on Google Calendar Print ALS Operating Schedule Your browser does not appear to support JavaScript, but this page needs to use JavaScript to display...

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441

Al Husseini Amelio JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Al Husseini Amelio JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Al-Husseini & Amelio JV Place Jordan Sector Solar Product JV company to develop a 1GW solar plant in Jordan and an integrated...

442

ELE TRO HEMI AL SOLUTION GROWTH  

market Utility grid modernization (incorporation of renewable energy using energy storage) TE HNOLOGI AL High potential for producing

443

FLUORES ENT OPTI AL POSITION SENSOR  

POTENTIAL APPLI ATIONS TE HNOLOGI AL Hazardous environments Oil & gas drilling Mineral drilling Water well drilling ENEFITS Measures fluorescent light ...

444

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRICE MATRIX PRICE MATRIX ATTACHMENT 5 VOLUME II SUMMARY Logistics Services A-76 Study - Service Provider Price Offer for Phase in Period, Volume III. Service Provider Name: GSA Schedule Contract Number: Expiration Date of GSA Schedule Contract: Duration Base Period: 3 Calendar Years SUMMARY FORRESTAL Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One 07/01/2005 - 06/30/2006 $ Year Two 07/01/2006 - 06/30/2007 $ Period Three 07/01/2007 - 09/30/2007 $ $ Option Period Year One 10/01/2007 - 09/30/2008 $ Period Two 10/01/2008 - 09/30/2009 $ $ SUMMARY GERMANTOWN Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One

445

Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

Reed, T.B. (comp.)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

II2, GaN/AlN Heterostructures on Vertical {111} Fin Facets of Si (110)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I4, Electrical Spin Injection in a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Spin-Polarized Light Emitting Diode (Spin-LED) I5, Properties of MnAs/GaMnAs/MnAs Magnetic...

447

II United States Government DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: SUBJECT...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for Remedial Action at the Former Baker Brothers Inc. Site, Toledo, Ohio Manager, DOE Oak Ridge Field Office This is to notify you that the Former Baker Brothers, Inc. site...

448

4 November 2003 Kaufmann et al. 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 November 2003 Kaufmann et al. 2005 #12;Two questions raised by submm- observations presented by Kaufmann et al. 2004: By what mechanism(s) is the emission produced? · Thermal free-free radiation? · Anomalous widths of the 511 keV emission? · High energy electrons? #12;Kaufmann et al. 2004 4 November 2003

White, Stephen

449

Carbon Nanomaterials II & Computational Studies on Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2014 Functional Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties and Applications: Carbon Nanomaterials II & Computational Studies on Nanomaterials Sponsored by:...

450

Das Standard Modell als Theorie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as a Theory as a Theory Ungelöste Rätsel Das Standard Modell als Theorie Auch wenn das Standard Modell die im Experiment beobachteten Phänomene sehr gut beschreibt, so ist es dennoch eine unvollständige Theorie. Das Problem liegt darin, dass das Standard Modell nicht erklären kann, warum einige Teilchen gerade diejenigen Eigenschaften haben, die wir beobachten. Zum Beispiel, auch wenn den Physikern die Massen aller Quarks - mit Ausnahme derjenigen des top Quarks - seit Jahren bekannt waren, so war es dennoch nicht möglich die Masse des top Quarks ohne die Hilfe experimenteller Daten genau vorherzusagen. Das ist deshalb so, weil das Standard Modell keine Erklärung dafür geben kann, warum die Liste der Teilchenmassen gerade diese Zahlenwerte aufweist.

451

Effect of Al-Si-Al and Al-Si-Si-Al Pairs in the ZSM-5 Zeolite Framework on the 27 NMR Spectra. A Combined High-Resolution 27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Al-Si-Al and Al-Si-Si-Al Pairs in the ZSM-5 Zeolite Framework on the 27 Al NMR Spectra. A Combined High-Resolution 27 Al NMR and DFT/MM Study Jiri´ Dedecek, Stepan Sklenak,*, Chengbin Li, Blanka of the presence of Al-O-Si-O-Al and Al-O-Si-O-Si-O-Al sequences in the ZSM-5 zeolite framework on the local

Sklenak, Stepan

452

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

453

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III Clean Coal Power Initiative Round III In December 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. These projects will help to enable commercial deployment to ensure the United States has clean, reliable, and affordable electricity and power. An investment of up to $979 million, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be leveraged by more than $2.2 billion in private capital cost share as part of the third round of the Department's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The selections demonstrate technologies that: make progress toward a target CO2 capture efficiency of 90 percent;

454

Mountain View Power Partners III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Partners III Wind Farm Power Partners III Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Grand Ridge III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser AEP-Appalachian Power Location La Salle County IL Coordinates 41.15496°, -88.750234° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.15496,"lon":-88.750234,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

SEGS III Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Solar Power Plant III Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS III Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 35.021632311687°, -117.56598472595° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.021632311687,"lon":-117.56598472595,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Klondike III I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klondike III I Wind Farm Klondike III I Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.572921°, -120.551527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.572921,"lon":-120.551527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Foote Creek Rim III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III Wind Farm III Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWestM&N Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Carbon County WY Coordinates 41.643488°, -106.198876° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.643488,"lon":-106.198876,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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461

Visible Light Absorption of Binuclear TiOCoII Charge-Transfer UnitAssembled in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect

Grafting of CoII(NCCH3)2Cl2 onto mesoporous Ti-MCM-41 silicain acetonitrile solution affords binuclear Ti-O-CoII sites on the poresurface under complete replacement of the precursor ligands byinteractions with anchored Ti centers and the silica surface. The CoIIligand field spectrum signals that the Co centers are anchored on thepore surface in tetrahedral coordination. FT-infrared action spectroscopyusing ammonia gas adsorption reveals Co-O-Si bond modes at 831 and 762cm-1. No Co oxide clusters are observed in the as-synthesized material.The bimetallic moieties feature an absorption extending from the UV intothe visible to about 600 nm which is attributed to the TiIV-O-CoII?3TiIII-O-CoIII metal-to-metal charge-transfer (MMCT) transition. Thechromophore is absent in MCM-41 containing Ti and Co centers isolatedfrom each other; this material was synthesized by grafting CoII onto aTi-MCM-41 sample with the Ti centers protected by a cyclopentadienylligand. The result indicates that the appearance of the charge-transferabsorption requires that the metal centers are linked by an oxo bridge,which is additionally supported by XANES spectroscopy. The MMCTchromophore of Ti-O-CoII units has sufficient oxidation power to serve asvisible light electron pump for driving multi-electron transfer catalystsof demanding uphill reactions such as water oxidation.

Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Microsoft Word - AL2006-01.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-01 6-01 Acquisition Regulation Date 10/27/05 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System (eSRS) References: FAR Subpart 19.7 The Small Business Subcontracting Program DEAR 919.705-6 Postaward responsibilities of the contracting officer AL 2005-07 Small Business Procurement Goals What is the Effective date of this Acquisition Letter (AL)? This AL is effective immediately after the eSRS goes online. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. What are the Points of Contact?

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