Sample records for ii iii al

  1. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  2. Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Nita

    Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution Michel R 16, 2005 We present 29 Si, 27 Al, and 67 Zn NMR evidence to show that silicate ions in alkaline, with aluminate (Al(OH)4 - ). Zincate reacts with monomeric silicate at pH 14-15 to form [(HO)O2Si-O-Zn(OH)3

  3. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStormGLOBAL FINANCIALGP SolarparkII

  4. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with sponge-like internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mssbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mssbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  5. AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L....

  6. Reactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , the reactivity of lead (Pb(II)) on naturally occurring Mn(III,IV) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals was evaluated using to suggest oxidation as an operative sorption mechanism. Lead appeared to coordinate to vacancy sitesReactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface C H R I S T O P H E R J . M

  7. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  8. PopIII signatures in the spectra of PopII/I GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Q; Ciardi, B; Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate signatures of population III (PopIII) stars in the metal-enriched environment of GRBs originating from population II-I (PopII/I) stars by using abundance ratios derived from numerical simulations that follow stellar evolution and chemical enrichment. We find that at $z>10$ more than $10%$ of PopII/I GRBs explode in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (we refer to them as GRBII$\\rightarrow$III). Although the formation of GRBII$\\rightarrow$III is more frequent than that of pristine PopIII GRBs (GRBIIIs), we find that the expected GRBII$\\rightarrow$III observed rate is comparable to that of GRBIIIs, due to the usually larger luminosities of these latter. GRBII$\\rightarrow$III events take place preferentially in small proto-galaxies with stellar masses $\\rm M_\\star \\sim 10^{4.5} - 10^7\\,\\rm M_\\odot$, star formation rates $\\rm SFR \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-1}\\,\\rm M_\\odot/yr$ and metallicities $Z \\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-2}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$. On the other hand, galaxies with $Z < 10^{-2.8}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$ ar...

  9. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04...

  10. Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

  11. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,I Jump to: navigation, searchII &

  12. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

  14. Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  15. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  16. FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007 FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED the environment by coprecipitation. Index terms: nickel incorporation, nickel adsorption, X-ray diffraction

  17. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing >65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  18. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.] [ed.; Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology] [ed.; Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility] [ed.; National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  19. 1100/,,1102... twin boundaries in wurtzite ZnO and group-III-nitrides Yanfa Yan and M. M. Al-Jassim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    1100/,,1102... twin boundaries in wurtzite ZnO and group-III-nitrides Yanfa Yan and M. M. Al that the same twin boundaries in wurtzite group-III-nitrides adopt the same structure, but the twin states in the band gap in either ZnO or the wurtzite group-III-nitrides. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.71

  20. BROOKfiAVEN Work Pennit II 510-12MZ6 NATI~-AL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    None 0 Critical Lift 0 Cryogenic 0 Electrical 0 Elevated Work 0 Excavation 0 Ergonomics" 0 Explosives D.',,,,,~,'.,.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~l~~~~~~~:~'\\ii,~i'~~~ 0 Heat Stress Mon~or 0 Real Time Monitor 0 TLD o Air Effluent o Ground Water o Liquid Effluent ~~ o separate sheet Date: ~ Low 0 Moderate 0 High Authorization to start Date: (Department

  1. Mejora docente y adaptacin al Espacio Europeo de Educacin Superior Tabla III. Indicadores de Progreso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    Progreso mbito Actuacin Indicador Situacin inicial Situacin fecha informe % progreso Mejora docente y Comercio de Catalua 0 70% 70% Mejora docente y adaptacin al EEES A3: Fomento de las prcticas externas e Comercio de Catalua) 0 1 50% Mejora docente y adaptacin al EEES A4: Modernizacin de los servicios e

  2. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL 2013-06 and FAL 2013-04 Questions...

  3. Search for Proton Decay into Muon plus Neutral Kaon in Super-Kamiokande I, II, and III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regis, C; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Marti, Ll; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Yokozawa, T; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; Okumura, K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R A; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kubo, H; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Miyake, M; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Takeuchi, J; Kuno, Y; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Vagins, M R; Chen, S; Sui, H; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Wilkes, R J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for proton into muon plus neutral kaon using data from a 91.7 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-I, a 49.2 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-II, and a 31.9 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-III. The number of candidate events in the data was consistent with the atmospheric neutrino background expectation and no evidence for proton decay in this mode was found. We set a partial lifetime lower limit of 1.6x10^33 years at the 90% confidence level.

  4. Search for Proton Decay into Muon plus Neutral Kaon in Super-Kamiokande I, II, and III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; C. Regis; K. Abe; Y. Hayato; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; Y. Koshio; Ll. Marti; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; S. Nakayama; Y. Obayashi; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; Y. Takenaga; K. Ueno; T. Yokozawa; H. Kaji; T. Kajita; K. Kaneyuki; K. P. Lee; K. Okumura; T. McLachlan; L. Labarga; E. Kearns; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; M. Goldhaber; K. Bays; G. Carminati; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; K. S. Ganezer; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; J. S. Jang; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; J. B. Albert; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; R. A. Wendell; T. Wongjirad; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. N. Smith; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nishikawa; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; K. Ieki; M. Ikeda; H. Kubo; A. Minamino; A. Murakami; T. Nakaya; Y. Fukuda; K. Choi; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; M. Miyake; P. Mijakowski; J. Hignight; J. Imber; C. K. Jung; I. Taylor; C. Yanagisawa; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; J. Takeuchi; Y. Kuno; S. B. Kim; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; M. Koshiba; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; K. Martens; M. R. Vagins; S. Chen; H. Sui; Z. Yang; H. Zhang; K. Connolly; M. Dziomba; R. J. Wilkes

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for proton into muon plus neutral kaon using data from a 91.7 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-I, a 49.2 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-II, and a 31.9 kiloton-year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-III. The number of candidate events in the data was consistent with the atmospheric neutrino background expectation and no evidence for proton decay in this mode was found. We set a partial lifetime lower limit of 1.6x10^33 years at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Policy Flash 2013-53 Implementation of Division F, Title I, II, III AL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en YMedicineWhatAssistance Letter 2013-03 | Department

  6. Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

  7. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    commitments. Late in Title II, changes for the foundation and active confinement ventilation system resulted in areas of design immaturity, which led to further design changes...

  8. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section III-IX Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II, which include map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780 and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets. It should be noted that TL6100 resides in both Areas II and III. The graphic data for TL6100 are presented in Volume IV - Area III - Graphic Data of this report.

  9. Flexible Link Continual Reassessment Methods for Trivariate Binary Outcome Phase I/II Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, Bradley P.

    , or power function, to model the relationship between the dose levels and the true toxicity probabilities (O'Quigley from excessive doses and proposed by Faries (1994), Goodman et al. (1995), and O'Quigley and Shen (1996 al. (1994), O'Quigley et al. (2001), Braun (2002), and Thall and Cook (2004). One class of approaches

  10. D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I,II,IIS,III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310--381 C), time (12--144h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330 C for 72h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS {gt} II {approximately} III {gt} I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 250 C for 72 h or 330 C for 133 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115 C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of their results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, the authors suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation water are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected by exchange with water hydrogen at typical reservoir conditions over geologic time. It will be difficult to utilize D/H ratios of thermally mature bulk or fractions or organic matter to quantitatively reconstruct isotopic aspects of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment. Hope resides in compound-specific D/H ratio of thermally stable, extractable biomarkers (molecular fossils) that are less susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water-derived hydrogen.

  11. Repertori Orquestra de Cambra curs 2010-2011 I i II trimestre III trimestre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    Stamitz (Mannheim 1745 - Jena 1801) Orchester-Quartett en Fa major Op.4. IV - Allegro assai - Andante ma (Salzburg, 1756 - Viena, 1791) Divertiment II en sib major Kv 137 - Andante - Allegro di molto - Allegro - Allegro molto - Largo - Vivace #12;

  12. Operational risk: A Basel II++ step before Basel III July 19, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    II guidelines), 2. The choice of the risk measure which provides the capital amount. We emphasize these incidents in depth and propose strategies for carrying out the supervisory guidelines proposed that the expected shortfall measure enables a better anticipation of large incidents pertaining to operational risks

  13. WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4FebruaryIII

  14. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  15. Performance of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Light Source; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron laser facilities requires x-ray optical systems with extremely high performance, generally of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of such optics requires adequate, highly accurate metrology and dedicated instrumentation. Previously, we suggested ways to improve the performance of the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a slope measuring instrument widely used to characterize x-ray optics at long spatial wavelengths. The main way is use of a CCD detector and corresponding technique for calibration of photo-response non-uniformity [J. L. Kirschman, et al., Proceedings of SPIE 6704, 67040J (2007)]. The present work focuses on the performance and characteristics of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. This includes a review of the overall aspects of the design, control system, the movement and measurement regimes for the stage, and analysis of the performance by a slope measurement of a highly curved super-quality substrate with less than 0.3 microradian (rms)slope variation.

  16. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  17. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  18. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  19. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

  20. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joensuu, Greetta [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Timo [International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Nokisalmi, Petri [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  1. ORARIO DELLE LEZIONI A.A. 2013-2014 II SEMESTRE AGGIORNATO AL 31 GENNAIO 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    corso Papi Aula C 12.30 Statistica economica Fachin Aula VII Economia Politica I Corsi Aula XIII Economia Politica I Corsi Aula XIII Matematica II corso Papi Aula C 15.00 Economia Politica I Corsi Aula

  2. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  3. The preparation and characterization of aquoruthenium(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes in Y-type zeolite / by Ben-Zu Wan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Ben-Zu

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at various pH values and at room temperature. lwo kinds of zeolites were used. One was zeolite Y and the other was an ultrastable Y which could retained a certain degree of crystallinity in low pH solutions (below pH 3. 5). The x-ray diffraction pattern...TBE PREPARATION ANO CRA ACTEPZZA ION OP A~'UORUTHENZUX(III) AND TRIS(2&2'- BIPYPIDINE)RUTHENIUie(II) COKPIEXES ZN Y- YPE ZEOLITE A Thesis by Ben-Zu Wan Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABI"I University in partial fulfillment...

  4. Kb, A., et al.(2002):The new remote sensing derived Swiss glacier inventory: II. First results. Annals of Glaciology. 34. pp 362-366.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kb, Andreas

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the 1973 area. In order to track the latest trend in more detail, an intermediate glacier condition hasKb, A., et al.(2002):The new remote sensing derived Swiss glacier inventory: II. First results. Annals of Glaciology. 34. pp 362-366. The new remote sensing derived Swiss glacier inventory: II. First

  5. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (King); (Cornell); (UAB); (Glasgow); (Florida)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  6. Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Patricia Arlene

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

  7. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section I-II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II which consists of map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780, and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the presented data (1:62,500), this sub-section was divided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets.

  8. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niazi, Tamim M. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahoric, Boris [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gilbert, Lucy [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Stanimir, Gerald [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are equivalent to that of surgery. We believe that the alternative option of HDRB as the primary therapy for selected Stage I endometrial carcinoma, even in patients with low operative risks, needs further evaluation.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of ammonium hydrosulfide reagent for precipitation of group II cations at 1.0 molar hydrogen ion concentration and for separation of group II and group III cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Jerry Warren

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ basher~ The egaeea n9tr9c aced. was carefnll j nsutra19eed. . m3;th f9;ltex ' , ed. Xg" I ejnm6n9nm hykvexMe~ leav9ng the se1ntken. ud. 1$1j ac9Me, ' ~she 'beaker was p3. ace@ 9. n an 9. ee bah, '. bring9ns '. the eelu49qn terzperature tb 20 2p Q...9848?? KGB 'GQMBKRARXQS-AK& PGR. 1' k v'MC&M BG~V IM') U' 6'vLET EVE '. , ' Papa f XligRQi3UCPJX9$4" e ''i''" i' e' ' ~ e ~, ''w . ~ '. v ' ~ ' ~ s ' i:ii ' Rheo~-'+ -;~'gjjk4'@09. oy. . @ltgi, 8jrd'iso@. ', :Ging;gidjj 4h'-;~G!9i'gBk '8fd...

  10. Calculo Numerico II. Curso 03/04 Primer bloque: practica 1 Esta practica corresponde al primer tema del curso: "El problema de valor inicial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirós, Fernando

    C´alculo Num´erico II. Curso 03/04 Primer bloque: pr´actica 1 Esta pr´actica corresponde al primer punto xn-1 de la malla, que habr´a sido seleccionado por el propio m´etodo num´erico. #12;

  11. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  12. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  13. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  14. II*

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon, a 1 II

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  16. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  17. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  18. Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

  19. Tripodal aminophenolate ligand complexes of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravan, P.; Orvig, C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article focuses on the development of radiopharmaceuticals using new chelators of gallium and indium. The radionuclide kinetics and demetalation kinetics are of great consideration. This work explored the effects of ligand backbone variations on the selectivity of multidentate aminophenolate ligands among the trivalent metal ions Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) in water. 54 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. / P/>;.I II Fian(.e 4 (1994) 1813-1822 OCTOBER 1994, PAGE f813 C la,, ii icJtion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,e ic,ult, me tli,cLi,,ctl in tci iii, iii the tui hitliij, hemp di>ii ii,itetl hi Lt>I uiiii~ii ~ithei

  1. I IIII1IiI II1Ii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom I -'LI -*

  2. Ab initio all-electron calculation of absolute volume deformation potentials of IV-IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors: The chemical trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    University, Shanghai 200433, China Su-Huai Wei National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 decreases as the ionicity increases. Our calculated chemical trends of the AVDPs are explained in terms-V, and II-VI semiconductors: The chemical trends Yong-Hua Li and X. G. Gong Physics Department, Fudan

  3. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    (IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department associated with phyllosilicate minerals is higher than the mass of iron associated with oxide minerals

  4. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  5. A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

  6. A Study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Iodide and Organic Amine Hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackstock, Joseph Beauford

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isopropylammoniumnonaiododianti- montate(III) Tris-4 -picoliniumnonaiododiantimonate(III) Tris-$-picoliniumnonaiOdodiantimonate(III) Di-isobutylamine-antimony( III) iodide reaction product Triethanolam&ne-antimony(III) iodide reaction product Flelting Point, 'C Decomposed 193... to the starch end point . Antimony was determined on eacn compound in dupli- cate. The results of these analyses are tabulated in Table II. II. Determination of' Iodine in the Reaction Products: Iodine was determined potentiometrically using a silver...

  7. State of competition in gasoline marketing. Book I. A study of refiner subsidization. Book II. An analysis of the subpoenaed documents (as required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Practices Act was enacted in June 1978. One part of that Act, Title III, required the Department of Energy to study the role of vertically integrated petroleum companies in the marketing of gasoline. Specifically, the study was to focus on the pricing practices of these companies at their salaried retail outlets. A preliminary, limited analysis of nationwide market share trends was forwarded to Congress in December 1979 finding no evidence of pedatory practices. Part I of the Title III Study was transmitted to Congress in April 1980. The Part I analysis tentatively found no evidence of predatory subsidization or allocation subsidization by refiners at their company-operated retail gasoline outlets. These tentative conclusions were debated by industry groups and legislative spokesmen both favoring and opposing the dissolution of major petroleum companies at various Congressional hearings concerning legislation prohibiting refiner operations at retail. This Final Report supersedes the analysis conducted in Part I since it includes all the data used in Part I as well as additional data. The Final Report is divided into two parts. Book I examines several alleged predatory practices of refiner marketers in light of recent developments in gasoline marketing. Its basic thrust is to explore fully the hypothesis that refiners are engaged in a predatory campaign to eliminate their independent competitors, ultimately monopolizing gasoline marketing. Book II focuses on the internal financial and planning documents of nine integrated petroleum companies subpoenaed during the course of the study. This volume specifically examines the marketing strategies adopted by these companies over the last decade, i.e., if investments in gasoline marketing were made for predatory or pecuniary reasons. A brief overview of each book follows.

  8. Dissimilatory Bacterial Reduction of Al-Substituted Goethite in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiologic reduction of the 0.2-2.0 mm size fraction of an Atlantic coastal plain sediment (Eatontown) was investigated using a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32) to evaluate mineralogic controls on the rate and extent of Fe(III) reduction and resulting distribution of biogenic Fe(II). Mssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) was used to show that the sedimentary Fe(III) oxide was Al-substituted goethite (11-17% Al) that existed as 1-5 mm aggregates of indistinct morphology. Bioreduction experiments were performed in two buffers [HCO3-, 1,4-piperazinediethansulfonic acid (PIPES)] both without and with 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle. The production of biogenic Fe(II) and the distribution of Al (aqueous and sorbed) were followed over time, as was formation of Fe(II) biominerals and physical/chemical changes to the goethite.

  9. Penile bulb dose and impotence after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 9406: Findings from a prospective, multi-institutional, phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey M. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Cox, James D. [3D Quality Assurance Center at Washington University St. Louis, MO (United States); Purdy, James A. [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bosch, Walter [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lin Xiao [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shipley, William S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between the dose to the bulb of the penis and the risk of impotence in men treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406. Methods and materials: Men enrolled on a Phase I/II dose-escalation study, RTOG 9406, who were reported to be potent at entry and evaluable (n = 158) were selected for inclusion. Follow-up evaluations were scheduled every 3, 4, and 6 months for the first, second, and the third through fifth years, then annually. At each follow-up visit an assessment of potency status was made. Penile structures were defined by a single observer blinded to the potency status, using Web-based, on-line software. The dosimetry for penile structures was calculated at the Quality Assurance Center at Washington University and provided to RTOG Statistical Headquarters to determine whether there was a relationship between dose and impotence. Results: Patients whose median penile dose was {>=}52.5 Gy had a greater risk of impotence compared with those receiving <52.5 Gy (p = 0.039). In a multivariate analysis neither age, the dose to the prostate, nor the use of hormonal therapy correlated with the risk of impotence. Conclusions: Dose to the bulb of the penis seems to be associated with the risk of radiation-induced impotence.

  10. Inhibition of trace element release during Fe(II)-activatedrecrystall...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    impurities (e.g., Al) which are known to affect the chemical properties of such minerals. Here we explore the effect of Al(III), Cr(III), and Sn(IV) substitution on trace...

  11. Thermoelectric figure of merit of (In0.53Ga0.47As)0.8(In0.52Al0.48As)0.2 III-V semiconductor alloys Je-Hyeong Bahk,1 Zhixi Bian,2 Mona Zebarjadi,2 Joshua M. O. Zide,3 Hong Lu,1,4 Dongyan Xu,5 Joseph P. Feser,5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric figure of merit of (In0.53Ga0.47As)0.8(In0.52Al0.48As)0.2 III-V semiconductor alloys manuscript received 15 April 2010; published 10 June 2010 The thermoelectric figure of merit is measured, 73.50.Lw, 73.61.Ey I. INTRODUCTION Seeking a better thermoelectric material for efficient thermal

  12. Chapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and purged with dry nitrogen gas. The flask is charged with 1.6 mL (2.8 g, 15 mmol) of titanium tetrachlorideChapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE* 50. AN ACTIVE FORM OF TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE Me3SiSiMe3 + 2Ti. ANDERSEN The reduction of TiCl4 with hexamethyldisilane does not afford titanium(II) chloride as reported

  13. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  14. als teil des: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1990: TBL prgt Begriff "World Wide Web" - Beginn eines gro?en Hypertext Zachmann, Gabriel 4 Whitehead's Ausdehnungslehre Die Kapitel II und III im Teil IV von...

  15. ORFEUS II and IUE Spectroscopy of EX Hydrae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ORFEUS-SPAS II FUV spectra, IUE UV spectra, and archival EUVE deep survey photometry, we present a detailed picture of the behavior of the magnetic cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae. Like HUT spectra of this source, the FUV and UV spectra reveal broad emission lines of He II, C II-IV, N III and V, O VI, Si III-IV, and Al III superposed on a continuum which is blue in the UV and nearly flat in the FUV. Like ORFEUS spectra of AM Her, the O VI doublet is resolved into broad and narrow emission components. Consistent with its behavior in the optical, the FUV and UV continuum flux densities, the FUV and UV broad emission line fluxes, and the radial velocity of the O VI broad emission component all vary on the spin phase of the white dwarf, with the maximum of the FUV and UV continuum and broad emission line flux light curves coincident with maximum blueshift of the broad O VI emission component. On the binary phase, the broad dip in the EUV light curve is accompanied by strong eclipses of the UV emission lines and by variations in both the flux and radial velocity of the O VI narrow emission component. The available data are consistent with the accretion funnel being the source of the FUV and UV continuum and the O VI broad emission component, and the white dwarf being the source of the O VI narrow emission component.

  16. Controlli Automatici II a.a. 2005/2006 Esercitazione n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pola, Giordano

    trovare un controllore che assegni gli autovalori come richiesto nei casi (i), (ii) e (iii). Per ridurre i nei casi (i), (ii) e (iii). Il polinomio p(), le cui radici coincidono con quelle in (4), dato da p punto possiamo sostituire ai parametri a, b e c i valori come richiesto nei casi (i), (ii) e (iii) ed

  17. Sarthou et al., Deep Sea Research II, 55, 734-751 1/50 The fate of biogenic iron during a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    represent the dominant Fe biomasses above the Kerguelen plateau. The rate of Fe regeneration accounts to 50% of oceanic waters (Moore et al., 2002). Mesoscale artificial iron infusions in high-nutrient, low

  18. Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part II: Effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B., E-mail: barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch; Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration and microstructural evolution of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents between 7 and 17% wt.% have been investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O. The formation of C(-A)-S-H and hydrotalcite was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag decreased the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite, increased the Al incorporation in the C(-A)-S-H and led to the formation of straetlingite. Increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag slowed down the early hydration and a lower compressive strength during the first days was observed. At 28 days and longer, no significant effects of slag Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the degree of hydration, the volume of the hydrates, the coarse porosity or on the compressive strengths were observed.

  19. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}: Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the mixed-valent europium(II,III) fluoride sulfide EuF{sub 2}.(EuFS){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossholz, Hagen; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kotzyba, Gunter [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.d [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Trill, Henning; Mosel, Bernd D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schleid, Thomas, E-mail: schleid@iac.uni-stuttgart.d [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the method to synthesize rare-earth metal(III) fluoride sulfides MFS (M=Y, La, Ce-Lu), in some cases we were able to obtain mixed-valent compounds such as Yb{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} instead. With Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} another isotypic representative has now been synthesized. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} (tetragonal, I4/mmm, a=400.34(2), c=1928.17(9) pm, Z=2) is obtained from the reaction of metallic europium, elemental sulfur, and europium trifluoride in a molar ratio of 5:6:4 within seven days at 850 deg. C in silica-jacketed gas-tightly sealed platinum ampoules. The single-phase product consists of black plate-shaped single crystals with a square cross section, which can be obtained from a flux using equimolar amounts of NaCl as fluxing agent. The crystal structure is best described as an intergrowth structure, in which one layer of CaF{sub 2}-type EuF{sub 2} is followed by two layers of PbFCl-type EuFS when sheeted parallel to the (001) plane. Accordingly there are two chemically and crystallographically different europium cations present. One of them (Eu{sup 2+}) is coordinated by eight fluoride anions in a cubic fashion, the other one (Eu{sup 3+}) exhibits a monocapped square antiprismatic coordination sphere with four F{sup -} and five S{sup 2-} anions. Although the structural ordering of the different charged europium cations is plausible, a certain amount of charge delocalization with some polaron activity has to take place, which is suggested by the black color of the title compound. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements of Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} show Curie-Weiss behavior with an experimental magnetic moment of 8.19(5) mu{sub B} per formula unit and a paramagnetic Curie temperature of 0.3(2) K. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 4.2 K. In accordance with an ionic formula splitting like (Eu{sup II})(Eu{sup III}){sub 2}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} only one third of the europium centers in Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} carry permanent magnetic moments. {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopic experiments at 4.2 K show one signal at an isomer shift of -12.4(1) mm/s and a second one at 0.42(4) mm/s. These signals occur in a ratio of 1:2 and correspond to Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}, respectively. The spectra at 78 and 298 K are similar, thus no change in the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} fraction can be detected. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectra of mixed-valent Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}.

  20. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  1. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:II Wind FarmIII

  2. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  3. Electron-doping through La{sup III}-for-Sr{sup II} substitution in (Sr{sub 1-} {sub x} La {sub x} ){sub 2}FeTaO{sub 6}: Effects on the valences and ordering of the B-site cations, Fe and Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautama, E.-L. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); Chan, T.S. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nano Storage Research, National Taiwan University, Taipei, (China); Liu, R.S. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nano Storage Research, National Taiwan University, Taipei, (China); Chen, J.M. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu, (China); Yamauchi, H. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Karppinen, M. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)]. E-mail: karppinen@msl.titech.ac.jp

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have employed aliovalent A-site cation substitution, La{sup III}-for-Sr{sup II}, to dope the Sr(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} perovskite oxide with electrons. Essentially single-phase samples of (Sr{sub 1-} {sub x} La {sub x} )(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} were successfully synthesized up to x{approx}0.3 in a vacuum furnace at 1400 deg. C. The samples were found to crystallize (rather than with orthorhombic symmetry) in monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n that accounts for the partial ordering of the B-site cations, Fe and Ta. With increasing La-substitution level, x, the degree of Fe/Ta order was found to increase such that the La-richest compositions are best described by the B-site ordered double-perovskite formula (Sr,La){sub 2}FeTaO{sub 6}. From Fe L {sub 3} and Ta L {sub 3} XANES spectra it was revealed that upon electron doping the two B-site cations, Fe{sup III} and Ta{sup V}, are both prone to reduction. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed spin-glass type behaviour for all the samples with a transition temperature slightly increasing with increasing x. -- Graphical abstract: Valence states of Fe and Ta are controlled in the partially ordered perovskite oxide (Sr,La){sub 2}FeTaO{sub 6}, through aliovalent La{sup III}-for-Sr{sup II} substitu0010ti.

  4. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  5. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  6. MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting IIIV materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

  7. Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, Policy FLash 2014-21AL 2014-04 and FAL 2014-01 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and...

  8. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  9. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  10. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:

  11. Fe(II)-catalyzed Recrystallization of Goethite Revisited. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structural Fe in Fe(III) oxides and aqueous Fe(II) with no formation of secondary minerals or change in particle size or shape. Here we derive a mass balance model to quantify...

  12. Multicenter phase II study of matured dendritic cells pulsed with melanoma cell line lysates in patients with advanced melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TAAs (Melan-A/MART1, NY-ESO-1, tyrosinase or gp100), with noi) gp100 family, ii) tyrosinase and TRP-2 family, iii) MAGE

  13. On synchronous robotic networks - Part II: Time complexity of rendezvous and deployment algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazzoli, Emilio; Bullo, Francesco; Cortes, Jorge; Martinez, Sonia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. : SYNCHRONOUS ROBOTIC NETWORKSPART II control andFrazzoli, On synchronous robotic networksPart I: Models,et al. : SYNCHRONOUS ROBOTIC NETWORKSPART II links. ) We

  14. Recovery of Li from alloys of Al- Li and Li- Al using engineered scavenger compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, W. D. (Albany, OR); Jong, B. W. (Corvallis, OR); Collins, W. K. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, S. J. (Albany, OR)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing lithium of high purity from lithium aluminum alloys using an engineered scavenger compound, comprising: I) preparing an engineered scavenger compound by: a) mixing and heating compounds of TiO2 and Li2CO3 at a temperature sufficient to dry the compounds and convert Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to Li.sub.2 O; and b) mixing and heating the compounds at a temperature sufficient to produce a scavenger Li.sub.2 O.3TiO.sub.2 compound; II) loading the scavenger into one of two electrode baskets in a three electrode cell reactor and placing an Al-Li alloy in a second electrode basket of the three electrode cell reactor; III) heating the cell to a temperature sufficient to enable a mixture of KCl-LiCl contained in a crucible in the cell to reach its melting point and become a molten bath; IV) immersing the baskets in the bath until an electrical connection is made between the baskets to charge the scavenger compound with Li until there is an initial current and voltage followed by a fall off ending current and voltage; and V) making a connection between the basket electrode containing engineered scavenger compound and a steel rod electrode disposed between the basket electrodes and applying a current to cause Li to leave the scavenger compound and become electrodeposited on the steel rod electrode.

  15. XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

  16. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  17. Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Samuel Curtis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

  18. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title...

  19. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised...

  20. Fabrication of AlN/BN bishell hollow nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Ali; Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali Kemal [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)/boron nitride (BN) bishell hollow nanofibers (HNFs) have been fabricated by successive atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlN and sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of BN on electrospun polymeric nanofibrous template. A four-step fabrication process was utilized: (i) fabrication of polymeric (nylon 6,6) nanofibers via electrospinning, (ii) hollow cathode plasma-assisted ALD of AlN at 100?C onto electrospun polymeric nanofibers, (iii) calcination at 500?C for 2 h in order to remove the polymeric template, and (iv) sequential CVD growth of BN at 450?C. AlN/BN HNFs have been characterized for their chemical composition, surface morphology, crystal structure, and internal nanostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline hexagonal BN and AlN within the three dimensional (3D) network of bishell HNFs with relatively low impurity content. In contrast to the smooth surface of the inner AlN layer, outer BN coating showed a highly rough 3D morphology in the form of BN nano-needle crystallites. It is shown that the combination of electrospinning and plasma-assisted low-temperature ALD/CVD can produce highly controlled multi-layered bishell nitride ceramic hollow nanostructures. While electrospinning enables easy fabrication of nanofibrous template, self-limiting reactions of plasma-assisted ALD and sequential CVD provide control over the wall thicknesses of AlN and BN layers with sub-nanometer accuracy.

  1. CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

  2. Physics 321 Accelerating Reference Frames II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Physics 321 Hour 25 Accelerating Reference Frames II Consider an accelerating train car Proof 0 and S is a frame rotating with angular velocity . Examples Handout rotation.nb #12;Physics 321 Hour 26 Accelerating Reference Frames III Velocities in Rotating Frames in S0 basis in S' basis In S' basis in S0 basis

  3. I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    1 I Maxwell's demon II Feynman's ratchet III Molecular motors Maxwell's demon and Feynman's ratchet://www.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/ arcquery?Feynman Physics of ratchets pawl asymetric tooths The Feynman Lectures on Physics, I-46 ratchet rate with attempt frequency energy provided to ratchet L work done on load Lf f B power delivered

  4. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum PrintALS

  5. Reviw Al

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 JuneReviw Al now ..

  6. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals New StateALS

  7. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALSUsers'ALS

  8. AL. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( , . /'-AL.

  9. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A. [Physics and Astronomy Dept. University of Bologna, Italy viale C Berti Pichat 6/II, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  10. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  11. Broensted superacidity of HCl in a liquid chloroaluminate. AlCl sub 3 -1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazolium chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.P.; Dworkin, A.S.; Zingg, S.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Pagni, R.M. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1989-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The system HCl (0.1-1 atm)/AlCl{sub 3}-EMIC (55.0 mol % AlCl{sub 3}) (EMIC = 1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazolium chloride) at 23{degree}C is a Broensted superacid capable of protonating arenes to a degree similar to that of liquid HF at 0{degree}C (H{sub 0} = {minus}15.1). Arenes used in this investigation were biphenyl (I), naphthalene (II), 9H-fluorene (III), chrysene (IV), 2-methylnaphthalene (V), mesitylene (VI), pentamethylbenzene (VII), hexamethylbenzene (VIII), anthracene (IX), and 9,10-dimethylanthracene (X). In both the chloroaluminate melt and HF I is a weak base while VIII-X are strong bases. In between these extremes the order of basicities in both media is II < III and IV < V < VI < VII < VIII. A study of the effect of HCl partial pressure showed, for example that V is 50% protonated at 0.3 atm HCl. The overall reaction is arene + HCl + Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} {r reversible} arene {times} H{sup +} + 2AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and is reversible. The degree of protonation was measured by optical absorption spectrophotometry. The arenes are stable in the liquid chloroaluminate for many hours, and their protonated forms (arenium ions) are stable for 1 h or more. A new procedure for the preparation of EMIC was developed that yields exceptionally clean AlCl{sub 3}-EMIC melts with very low concentrations of protic and oxidizing impurities. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013...

  13. at the DTIC Research groups (I/II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -production algorithms, etc) Website: http://www.gpi.upf.edu/ #12;Image Processing Group (GPI) #12;Music Technology: http://www.mtg.upf.edu/?lang=en #12;Music Technology Group (MTG) #12;Interactive Technologies Group, videogames) Website: http://gti.upf.edu/gti/english #12;Interactive Technologies Group (GTI) #12

  14. at the DTIC Research groups (I/II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschure, Paul

    and coding, video format conversion, film post-production algorithms, etc) Website: http://www.iua.upf models of perceptual and music cognition) Website: http://www.mtg.upf.edu/?language=english #12;Music, security and digital management of rights) Website: http://dmag.upf.es/index1024.html #12;Interactive

  15. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

  16. Strong reactions in quantum super PDE's. I-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostino Prstaro

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a work in three parts, devoted to encode strong reactions of the high energy physics, in the algebraic topologic theory of quantum super PDE's, (previously formulated by A. Pr\\'astaro). In particular strong reactions are characterized by means of boundary value problems in quantum super PDE's. In such a way one obtains representations of quantum nonlinear propagators in quantum super PDE's, by means of elementary ones (quantum handle decompositions of quantum nonlinear propagators). These are useful to encode nuclear and subnuclear reactions in quantum physics. Pr\\'astaro's geometric theory of quantum PDE's allows us to obtain constructive and dynamically justified answers to some important open problems in high energy physics.

  17. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of theTechno-economicOctober 2013 -Department

  18. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,KasVinodKiribati:KlimaINVESTIII I

  19. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History ViewMali[1]OpenEIEnergy

  20. Formation of mixed oxide powders in flames: Part II. SiO sub 2 --GeO sub 2 and Al sub 2 O sub 3 --TiO sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, C.; Miquel, P.F.; Katz, J.L. (Department of Chemical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SiO{sub 2}--GeO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide powders were synthesized using a counterflow diffusion flame burner. SiCl{sub 4}, GeCl{sub 4}, Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}, and TiCl{sub 4} were used as source materials for the formation of oxide particles in hydrogen-oxygen flames. {ital In} {ital situ} particle sizes were determined using dynamic light-scattering. Powders were collected using two different methods, a thermophoretic method (particles are collected onto carbon coated TEM grids) and an electrophoretic method (particles are collected onto stainless steel strips). Their size, morphology, and crystalline form were examined using a transmission electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer. A photomultiplier at 90{degree} to the argon ion laser beam was used to measure the light-scattering intensity. The formation of the mixed oxides was investigated using Si to Ge and Al to Ti ratios of 3:5 and 1:1, respectively. Heterogeneous nucleation of the SiO{sub 2} on the surface of the GeO{sub 2} was observed. In Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2} mixtures, both oxide particles form at the same temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis of particles sampled at temperatures higher than 1553 K showed the presence of rutile, {gamma}--Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and aluminum titanate. Although the particle formation processes for SiO{sub 2}--GeO{sub 2} is very different from that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2}, both mixed oxides result in very uniform mixtures.

  1. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup 4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  2. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  3. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  4. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanga, Fengzai; Moodya, Michael P.; Martina, Tomas L.; Bagota, Paul A. J.; Kappersa, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    study of Cu grains 385 (Kempshall, et al., 2001). In terms of binary III-nitrides, the metalN bond length in the 386 wurtzite structure increases from AlN, to GaN and to InN (Ambacher, 1998), being 387 associated with corresponding bond energy of 2...

  5. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  6. Molecular Cell, Vol. 11, 12791289, May, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press RNAse III-Mediated Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    -Mediated Degradation of Unspliced Pre-mRNAs and Lariat Introns While most RNase III-like enzymes cleave ds to bacteria, where RNase III processes and degrades a large number of mRNAs (Bardwell etRPS22B and RPL18A transcripts trigger degradation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and lariat introns and can al., 1989; Court, 1993

  7. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  8. al abordaje coronal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    region of their source coronal hole. INTRODUCTION The Solar in high-speed solar wind emanating from the south polar coronal hole. Tables I and II of Ko et al. (2 Owocki,...

  9. Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14/A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Maize in Pakistan is attacked by Myzus obtusirostris David, Narayanan & Rajasingh, Rhopalosiphum

  10. The Strange Career of DDT: Experts, Federal Capacity, and Environmentalism in World War II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Edmund P.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. The strange career of DDT: Experts, federal capacity, and environmentalism in World War II Russell, Edmund P, III Technology and Culture; Oct...

  11. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

  12. Impact of GaN cap on charges in Al?O?/(GaN/)AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures analyzed by means of capacitance measurements and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?apajna, M., E-mail: milan.tapajna@savba.sk; Jurkovi?, M.; Vlik, L.; Ha?k, .; Greguov, D.; Kuzmk, J. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dbravsk cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Brunner, F.; Cho, E.-M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fr Hchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hashizume, T. [Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, 060-0814 Sapporo, Japan and JST-CREST, 102-0075 Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide/semiconductor interface trap density (D{sub it}) and net charge of Al?O?/(GaN)/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) structures with and without GaN cap were comparatively analyzed using comprehensive capacitance measurements and simulations. D{sub it} distribution was determined in full band gap of the barrier using combination of three complementary capacitance techniques. A remarkably higher D{sub it} (?58??10eV??cm?) was found at trap energies ranging from EC-0.5 to 1?eV for structure with GaN cap compared to that (D{sub it}???23??10eV??cm?) where the GaN cap was selectively etched away. D{sub it} distributions were then used for simulation of capacitance-voltage characteristics. A good agreement between experimental and simulated capacitance-voltage characteristics affected by interface traps suggests (i) that very high D{sub it} (>10eV??cm?) close to the barrier conduction band edge hampers accumulation of free electron in the barrier layer and (ii) the higher D{sub it} centered about EC-0.6?eV can solely account for the increased C-V hysteresis observed for MOS-HEMT structure with GaN cap. Analysis of the threshold voltage dependence on Al?O? thickness for both MOS-HEMT structures suggests that (i) positive charge, which compensates the surface polarization, is not necessarily formed during the growth of III-N heterostructure, and (ii) its density is similar to the total surface polarization charge of the GaN/AlGaN barrier, rather than surface polarization of the top GaN layer only. Some constraints for the positive surface compensating charge are discussed.

  13. On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ionization of oxygen followed by its subsequent discharge, as CO2/CO, at the anode surface. The removal of oxygen from the oxide mixture helped form the alloy in situ. The presentation shall cover the detailed experimental results pertaining to the preparation, evaluation and characterization of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (atom%) alloy.

  14. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  15. Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,III

  16. McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation, search NameIII

  17. Olkaria III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice ofInformation Olkaria I -II GeothermalIII

  18. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  19. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  20. II f

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f - f

  1. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r' (-r

  2. Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

  3. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  4. Adsorption of Al, O, Hf, Y, Pt, and S Atoms on r-Al2O3(0001) Berit Hinnemann and Emily A. Carter*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    *, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering) a bond coat alloy based on NiAl, deposited onto the Ni-based superalloy engine component, and (iii to the bond coat alloy slows down the growth of alumina. Experiments on NiAl oxidation indicate

  5. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  6. Local stress-induced effects on AlGaAs/AlOx oxidation front shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chouchane, F.; Almuneau, G., E-mail: almuneau@laas.fr; Arnoult, A.; Lacoste, G.; Fontaine, C. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cherkashin, N. [Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, CEMES, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral oxidation of thick AlGaAs layers (>500?nm) is studied. An uncommon shape of the oxide tip is evidenced and attributed to the embedded stress distribution, inherent to the oxidation reaction. Experimental and numerical studies of the internal strain in oxidized Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs structures were carried out by dark-field electron holography and finite element methods. A mapping of the strain distribution around the AlGaAs/oxide interface demonstrates the main role of internal stress on the shaping of the oxide front. These results demonstrate the high relevance of strain in oxide-confined III-V devices, in particular, with over-500-nm thick AlOx confinement layers.

  7. Redes III Tema 0 1 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    instalacin y mantenimiento. #12;Redes III Tema 0 13 Calidad de una red Transparencia semntica: La calidad transparencia en el tiempo. #12;Redes III Tema 0 14 Diseo de la red Debe satisfacer la calidad de servicio

  8. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  9. I II. MUSICA PRO PACE 2001 Arnold Schoenberg: Ode to Napoleon op. 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jrgen

    I II. MUSICA PRO PACE 2001 Arnold Schoenberg: Ode to Napoleon op. 41 Gustav Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 6 Schoenbergs >Ode to Napoleon Generalmusikdirektor Lothar Koenigs. Als Solisten wirkten in Schoenbergs Ode to Napoleon Wolfram Koch als Sprecher

  10. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  11. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2106007 06/05/2014 15:00 205, 206 Aulario III 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geografa Humana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geografa Humana 2106008 08/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Historia Cultural e Instituciones de Espaa y Europa 2106006 09/05/2014 9:00 005, 006 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Biologa I 2106021 12/05/2014 15:00 102, 103 Laboratorio III 1

  12. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  13. High temperature thermoelectric characterization of III-V semiconductor thin films by oxide bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    bonding Je-Hyeong Bahka) , Gehong Zenga) , Joshua M. O. Zide b) , Hong Luc) , Rajeev Singhd) , Di Lianga bonding technique is developed for high temperature thermoelectric characterization of the thin film III-W-N diffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin film ErAs:InGaAlAs metal/semiconductor nanocomposite

  14. Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

  15. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  16. III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2014 ... 7801, Springer, 2013, pp. 62. 73, ISBN 978-3-642-36693-2. The authors gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Science...

  17. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2, Issue,

  18. Aluminum nitride transitional layer for reducing dislocation density and cracking of AlGaN epitaxial films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Lee, Stephen R.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A denticulated Group III nitride structure that is useful for growing Al.sub.xGa.sub.1-xN to greater thicknesses without cracking and with a greatly reduced threading dislocation (TD) density.

  19. Superplastic behavior of Al-Li 2090 OE-16 (ALCOA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douskos, Lambros Stamatiou

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in an argon atmosphere under a back pressure of 400 psi. Limited tests were conducted at atmospheric pressure in order to examine the effect of back pressure on superplastic formability and cavitation. The analysis consisted of an investigation of: (1.... TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION. Page II. ANALYSIS III. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 15 A. 510'C Test Temperature at 400 psi Back Pressure . . . 15 1. 0. 090L in Gauge (Longitudinal Orientation) . . . . 15 2. 0. 063L...

  20. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIII

  1. PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART III -

  2. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolkerEvents)WCI-III Recap

  3. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII Jump

  4. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  5. Architetture di Elaboratori II -Sistemi Distribuiti Introduzione al corso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balsamo, Simonetta

    elaborazione locale, distribuita tecniche di compressione - protocolli efficienti di comunicazione software dei colli di bottiglia - parallelismo localit e distribuzione del controllo sicurezza - efficienza

  6. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: III-nitride materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-nitride materials SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award On September 9, 2013, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Events, News, News & Events,...

  8. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 5, Phase II tasks 6 8, and Phase III tasks 9 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  10. Formation of a heterometallic AlIII/SmIII complex involving a novel [EtAl(2-py)2O]2- ligand (2-py = 2-pyridyl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garca-Rodrguez, Ral; Simmonds, Hayley R.; Wright, Dominic S.

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    [CX (X = H,2 OR, NH2 3), N,4 P, or P=O5]. It has only been relatively recently, however, that attention has turned to Group 13 and 14 congeners containing metallic or semi-metallic bridgeheads.6-9 In addition to providing ligands with expanded bites...

  11. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  12. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  13. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  14. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  15. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  16. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  17. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  18. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  19. Minco III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc JumpMicroPlanet Name:I & II Wind Farm

  20. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-IIIs four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSSs main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  2. Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}Al and Au{sub 5}Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with Al, Au, AuAl, Au{sub 3}Al, and Au{sub 20}Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site.

  3. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  4. anticarcinogenesis mechanisms iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Engineering Websites Summary: Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order...

  5. al excitation function: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ArII and N2 + DAMOP 2007 Amanda Fricke Dr. Timothy Gay Jack;References 1 http:prl.anu.eduaustudentinfo 2 H.M. Al-Khateeb, B.G. Birdsey, and T.J. Gay, UNL Doctoral....

  6. Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe- 20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy C. Capdevila1, M. K Aldazabal from CEIT; and Monica Campos from Carlos III University (UC3) for their help with ODS for nuclear applications Acknowledgements Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-Cr-Al-Ti ODS alloy by C

  7. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  8. Early chemical enrichment of the universe and the role of very massive pop III stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Matteucci; F. Calura

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the role of very massive pop III stars in the chemical enrichment of the early universe is discussed. We first compare our predictions with the abundance ratios measured in the high redshift Lyman-alpha forest to check whether they are compatible with the values predicted by assuming that the early universe was enriched by massive pop III stars. We conclude that to explain the observed C/Si ratio in the intergalactic medium, a contribution from pop II stars to carbon enrichment is necessary, already at redshift z=5. We then evaluate the number of Pair-Instability Supernovae (SN_(gamma gamma)) required to enrich the universe to the critical metallicity Z_cr, i.e. the metallicity value which causes the transition from a very massive star regime (m > 100 M_sun) to a lower mass regime, similar to the one characteristic of the present time (m enrich a cubic megaparsec of the intergalactic medium at high redshift for a variety of initial mass functions. The number of ionizing photons provided by these SN_(gamma gamma) and also by the pop III stars ending as black holes was computed and we conclude that there are not enough photons to reionize the universe, being down by at least a factor of ~ 3. Finally, we calculate the abundance ratios generated by pop III stars and compare it with the ones observed in low metallicity Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). We suggest that pop III stars alone cannot be responsible for the abundance ratios in these objects and that intermediate mass pop II stars must have played an important role especially in enriching DLAs in nitrogen.

  9. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  10. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  11. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  12. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  13. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  14. MODIFYING PC1D TO MODEL SPONTANEOUS AND PIEZOELECTRIC POLARIZATION IN III-V NITRIDE SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    absorption coefficients and radiation tolerance. These features not only enable InGaN to be exploited III-nitrides (AlN, GaN, InN and their alloys) influence the optical and electrical properties as induced-surface/interface charges at the initialization of the solving routine. Simulations of InGaN solar

  15. On the structure of blue phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; D. Marenduzzo

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilised over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities}. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  16. A deep mosaic of [O III] 5007 A CCD images of the environment of the LBV star P Cygni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Boumis; J. Meaburn; M. P. Redman; F. Mavromatakis

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mosaic of six, deep, CCD images in the light of the [O III] 5007 A nebular emission line has been obtained with the 1.3-m Skinakas (Crete) telescope of the filamentary nebulosity surrounding P Cygni. The [O III] 5007 A line discriminates against confusing galactic H II regions along the same sight-lines and the new mosaic did not include the 4.8 mag. central star; a source of artifacts in the previous lower angular resolution observations. New giant `lobes' and `shells' are found to be clustered around P Cygni which must be the relics of historic eruptions between 2400 and up to ~10^5 yr ago.

  17. Optical Dielectric Functions of III-V Semiconductors in Wurtzite Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2010-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of semiconductors can exhibit strong polarization dependence due to crystalline anisotropy. A number of recent experiments have shown that the photoluminescence intensity in free standing nanowires is polarization dependent. One contribution to this effect is the anisotropy of the dielectric function due to the fact that most nanowires crystalize in the wurtzite form. While little is known experimentally about the band structures wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors, we have previously predicted the bulk band structure of nine III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase.Here, we predict the frequency dependent dielectric functions for nine non-Nitride wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors (AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs and InSb). Their complex dielectric functions are calculated in the dipole approximation by evaluating the momentum matrix elements on a dense grid of special k-points using empirical pseudopotential wave functions. Corrections to the momentum matrix elements accounting for the missing core states are made using a scaling factor which is determined by using the optical sum rules on the calculated dielectric functions for the zincblende polytypes. The dielectric function is calculated for polarizations perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the crystal.

  18. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  19. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  20. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  1. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  2. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Wednesday, 22 October 2014 11:43 Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process...

  3. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory PrintALS

  4. ALS User Meeting Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALS TechniqueALS

  5. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident

  6. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper soil pressure on the tank walls. Seismic time histories (in the horizontal and vertical directions) are applied to the seismic model. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has code requirements for nuclear safety-related concrete structures (ACI-349-06) that are used to evaluate the structural integrity of the SSTs. ACI-349-06 recommends evaluating factored load combinations against reduced tank section capacities to account for both loading and material uncertainties. From both the TOLA and seismic models the structural demands (forces and moments) are extracted from sections throughout the tank under the appropriate load combinations. These demands are compared against the ACI-349-06 capacities at each of the sections. This ratio of demand to capacity is reported as a measure of structural integrity. The Type II and Type III appurtenances configurations are found to increase the demand to capacity ratios in local regions near the appurtenances. Away from the appurtenances the influence on structural integrity is minor. A comparison of the Type II and III results show that even though the Type II offset pits weight less, they have a larger impact on the structural integrity of the tanks due to their locations. Finally, lessons learned from the Type II and Type III appurtenance analysis, and their application to the more complex Type IV structural integrity analysis, will be discussed.

  7. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

  8. ;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    ;tieiiFiE;igi [ilg:ii*t!H?Ei eiEilEiEiia ii?:lsiiiiiiiligF;i!;u gi;*:g!ifEi I iiii: '=;:E:;i:ii iii;Eliiliiilii5il:i=i:;;;Ei=? o o o \\ E r--/-o ( f EIE i l g \\ I E sli o o(J !" ( sQit s s?,3 t:is : ;*:: iqi5 ' i:iU l a . , i ^ . 9 e i;i1 li * sEisg :iiSrrl! S:ii;;.e !8*g B f E3::g f i:E; E', {*=f "sEi !xi! t i3;t

  9. Measurement of chromium VI and chromium III in stainless steel welding fumes with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lautner, Gerald Myron

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENT OF CHROMIUM VI AND CHROMIUM III IN STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUMES WITH ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY FOR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS A Thesis by GERALD MYRON LAUTNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Al...!M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene MEASUREMENT OF CHROMIUM VI AND CHROMIUM III IN STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUMES WITH ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY...

  10. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  11. III-V Nanowire Growth Mechanism: V/III Ratio and Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ,17,18 The growth experiments reported in this paper were performed in a horizontal OMVPE growth tube using to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature to favor vapor-solid (VS) surface growth over VLS NW growth. By tuning both the group III flow rate

  12. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2106003 16/12/2013 9:00 003, 004 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Matemticas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Matemticas 2106005 18/12/2013 9:00 106, 107 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Principios Jurdicos Bsicos, Deontologa Profesional e Igualdad 2106001 08/01/2014 9:00 003 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Geologa 2106002 10/01/2014 15:00 203 Aulario III 1

  13. Smith et al Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    Smith et al 1 Supporting Information for Smith et al. 2006, PLoS Computational Biology 2:e161-hyperpallium apicale; HF-hippocampal formation, and M-mesopallium. #12;Smith et al 2 FigureS2,nolinkswerefoundbetweenelectrodesindifferentbirds,andnolinkswerefoundintothesoundstimulusvariable. CombinedAnalysisofAllBirds'ElectrodesPlusSound #12;Smith et al 3 Analysis of Data from Subsections

  14. Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARTIAN MINERALOGY: CONSTRAINTS FROM MISSIONS sulfate mineralogy on Mars. Rice M. S. Bell J. F. III Cloutis E. A. Wang A. Ruff S. W. Craig M. A. Bailey) full630.pdf #12;McGlynn I. O. McSween H. Y. Jr. Fedo C. M. Mineralogical Characterization of Soils

  15. I. Top 20 TA Traps 83 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Other Teaching Resources Page I. Top 20 TA Traps 83 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 85 III. TA Office I. Top 20 TA Traps This list has been compiled by mentor TAs to help you avoid some common pitfalls of being a TA. These are the top twenty things TAs do that interfere with the work of teaching. General

  16. I. Top 20 TA Traps 129 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 5 Other Teaching Resources Page I. Top 20 TA Traps 129 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 131 III for TAs 152 #12;#12;Page 129 I. Top 20 TA Traps This list has been compiled by mentor TAs to help you avoid some common pitfalls of being a TA. These are the top twenty things TAs do that interfere

  17. I. Top 20 TA Traps 129 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 5 Other Teaching Resources Page I. Top 20 TA Traps 129 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 131 III for TAs 152 #12;#12;I. Top 20 TA Traps This list has been compiled by mentor TAs to help you avoid some common pitfalls of being a TA. These are the top twenty things TAs do that interfere with the work

  18. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  19. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J. (Michigan)

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  20. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear Polarisation of Optically Pumped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) l127-l132 AUGUST 1996, PAGE l127 Measurement of the Nuclear ~IT) is close to the earth field value. From this measurement, we determine the ~He nuclear in the gaseous and fluid phases at low temperature [ii, magnetometry [2], to polarised targets for nuclear

  1. Ion implantation for high performance III-V JFETS and HFETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation has been an enabling technology for realizing many high performance electronic devices in III-V semiconductor materials. We report on advances in ion implantation processing for GaAs JFETs (joint field effect transistors), AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs (heterostructure field effect transistors), and InGaP or InAlP-barrier HFETs. The GaAs JFET has required the development of shallow p-type implants using Zn or Cd with junction depths down to 35 nm after the activation anneal. Implant activation and ionization issues for AlGaAs are reported along with those for InGaP and InAlP. A comprehensive treatment of Si-implant doping of AlGaAs is given based on donor ionization energies and conduction band density-of-states dependence on Al-composition. Si and Si+P implants in InGaP are shown to achieve higher electron concentrations than for similar implants in AlGaAs due to absence of the deep donor level. An optimized P co- implantation scheme in InGaP is shown to increase the implanted donor saturation level by 65%.

  2. AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving,Response toAIRMaster+ AIRMaster+ April 10,

  3. ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacevic, Jelena; Popovic, Luka C.; Dimitrijevic, Milan S., E-mail: jkovacevic@aob.bg.ac.r [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of optical Fe II emission in 302 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We group the strongest Fe II multiplets into three groups according to the lower term of the transition (b{sup 4} F, a{sup 6} S, and a{sup 4} G terms). These approximately correspond to the blue, central, and red parts, respectively, of the 'iron shelf' around H{beta}. We calculate an Fe II template that takes into account transitions into these three terms and an additional group of lines, based on a reconstruction of the spectrum of I Zw 1. This Fe II template gives a more precise fit of the Fe II lines in broad-line AGNs than other templates. We extract Fe II, H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III], and [N II] emission parameters and investigate correlations between them. We find that Fe II lines probably originate in an intermediate line region. We note that the blue, red, and central parts of the iron shelf have different relative intensities in different objects. Their ratios depend on continuum luminosity, FWHM H{beta}, the velocity shift of Fe II, and the H{alpha}/H{beta} flux ratio. We examine the dependence of the well-known anti-correlation between the equivalent widths of Fe II and [O III] on continuum luminosity. We find that there is a Baldwin effect for [O III] but an inverse Baldwin effect for the Fe II emission. The [O III]/Fe II ratio thus decreases with L {sub {lambda}5100}. Since the ratio is a major component of the Boroson and Green Eigenvector 1 (EV1), this implies a connection between the Baldwin effect and EV1 and could be connected with AGN evolution. We find that spectra are different for H{beta} FWHMs greater and less than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, and that there are different correlation coefficients between the parameters.

  4. CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

  5. Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Cobalt(III) Monohydride Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Roberts, John A.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new tetraphosphine ligands, PnC-PPh22NPh2 (1,5-diphenyl-3,7-bis((diphenylphosphino)alkyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl = (CH2)2, n = 2 (L2); (CH2)3, n = 3 (L3)), have been synthesized. Coordination of these ligands to cobalt affords the complexes [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+, which are reduced with KC8 to afford [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and [CoI(L3)(CH3CN)]1+. Protonation of the CoI complexes affords [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [HCoIII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+. Reduction of HCoIII results in formation of the analogous CoI complex through H-Co bond cleavage. Under voltammetric conditions, the reduced cobalt hydride reacts rapidly with a protic solvent impurity to generate H2 in a monometallic process involving two electrons per cobalt. In contrast, under bulk electrolysis conditions, H2 formation requires only one reducing equivalent per [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, indicating a bimetallic route wherein two cobalt hydride complexes react to form two equiv [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and one equiv H2. The cyclic voltammetry of [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, analyzed using digital simulation, is consistent with an ErCrEr reduction mechanism involving reversible acetonitrile dissociation from [HCoII(L2)(CH3CN)]1+. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, for support of the initial parts of this study. Current work is supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  7. 2008 final exam 1a. Only (ii), (iii) and (v) are linear. Only (ii) and (v) are homogeneous.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karageorgis, Paschalis

    of the exponential, we now get etB = n=0 tn Bn n! = I + n=1 tn 3n-1 B n! = I + 1 3 n=1 (3t)n n! B = I + e3t - 1 3 B. Since B = A + I by above, this also implies etA = etB e-tI = ( I + e3t - 1 3 B ) e-t = e2t + 2e(A+B) = A2 etA etB + 2AetA BetB + etA B2 etB . Setting t = 0 and simplifying, one thus arrives at A2 + AB

  8. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  9. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  10. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  11. Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jrg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

  12. The equivalence theorem in the generalized gravity of f(R)-type and canonical quantization II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuo Ezawa; Yoshiaki Ohkuwa

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We first review the equivalence theorem of the f(R)-type gravity to Einstein gravity with a scalar field by deriving it in a self-contained and pedagogical way. Then we describe the problem of to what extent the equivalence holds. Main problems are (i) Is the surface term given by Gibbons and Hawking which is necessary in Einstein gravity also necessary in the f(R)-type gravity? (ii) Does the equivalence hold also in quantum theory? (iii) Which metric is physical, i.e., which metric should be identified with the observed one? In this work, we clarify the problem (i) and review the problem (ii) in a canonical formalism which is the generalization of the Ostrogradski one. We briefly comment on the problem (iii). Some discussions are given on one of the results of (ii) concerning the general relativity in non-commutative spacetime.

  13. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

  14. Inhomogeneous distribution of defect-related emission in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with different Al content and Si concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurai, Satoshi, E-mail: kurai@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Ushijima, Fumitaka; Yamada, Yoichi [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan); Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurimamachiya, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of luminescence in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers that differ in Al content and Si concentration has been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping in combination with scanning electron microscopy. The density of surface hillocks increased with decreasing Al content and with increasing Si concentration. The mechanisms giving rise to those hillocks are likely different. The hillocks induced surface roughening, and the compositional fluctuation and local donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) emission at hillock edges in AlGaN epitaxial layers were enhanced irrespective of the origin of the hillocks. The intensity of local DAP emission was related to Si concentration, as well as to hillock density. CL observation revealed that DAP emission areas were present inside the samples and were likely related to dislocations concentrated at hillock edges. Possible candidates for acceptors in the observed DAP emission that are closely related in terms of both Si concentration and hillock edges with large deformations are a V{sub III}-Si{sub III} complex and Si{sub N}, which are unfavorable in ordinary III-nitrides.

  15. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AS A DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of damped Ly{alpha} absorbers (DLAs) can be used to measure gas-phase metallicities at large cosmological look-back times with high precision. Furthermore, relative abundances can still be measured accurately deep into the reionization epoch (z > 6) using transitions redward of Ly{alpha}, even though Gunn-Peterson absorption precludes measurement of neutral hydrogen. In this paper, we study the chemical evolution of DLAs using a model for the coupled evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM), which is constrained by a variety of observations. Our goal is to explore the influence of Population III stars on the abundance patterns of DLAs to determine the degree to which abundance measurements can discriminate between different Population III stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). We include effects, such as inflows onto galaxies due to cosmological accretion and outflows from galaxies due to supernova feedback. A distinct feature of our model is that it self-consistently calculates the effect of Population III star formation on the reionization of an inhomogeneous IGM, thus allowing us to calculate the thermal evolution of the IGM and implement photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation. We find that if the critical metallicity of Population III to II/I transition is {approx}< 10{sup -4} Z{sub Sun }, then the cosmic Population III star formation rate drops to zero for z < 8. Nevertheless, at high redshift (z {approx} 6), chemical signatures of Population III stars remain in low-mass galaxies (halo mass {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). This is because photoionization feedback suppresses star formation in these galaxies until relatively low redshift (z {approx} 10), and the chemical record of their initial generation of Population III stars is retained. We model DLAs as these low-mass galaxies, and assign to them a mass-dependent H I absorption cross-section in order to predict the expected distribution of DLA abundance ratios. We find that these distributions are anchored toward abundance ratios set by Population II supernova yields, but they exhibit a tail which depends significantly on the Population III IMF for z > 5. Thus, a sample of DLA metallicity and relative abundance measurements at high redshift holds the promise to constrain Population III enrichment and the Population III IMF. We find that a sample of just 10 DLAs with relative abundances measured to an accuracy of 0.1 dex is sufficient to constrain the Population III IMF at 4{sigma}. These constraints may prove stronger than other probes of Population III enrichment, such as metal-poor stars and individual metal-poor DLAs. Our results provide a global picture of the thermal, ionization, and chemical evolution of the universe, and have the potential to rule out certain Population III scenarios.

  16. ALS Activity Reports

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  17. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. ALS Chemistry Lab

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  20. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. ALS Communications Group

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  3. About the ALS

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  4. ALS Communications Group

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  5. ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship Highlights

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  6. ALS User Meeting Archives

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  7. ALS in the News

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  8. 2013 ALS User Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004AugustApril 2013 Wed,SeptemberNovember33 ALS

  9. Access to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME -ToggleAccess to the ALS Print

  10. Epitaxial growth of aligned AlGalnN nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Jung (Woodbridge, CT); Su, Jie (New Haven, CT)

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly ordered and aligned epitaxy of III-Nitride nanowires is demonstrated in this work. <1010> M-axis is identified as a preferential nanowire growth direction through a detailed study of GaN/AlN trunk/branch nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic selectivity can be used to achieve spatial and orientational control of nanowire growth. Vertically aligned (Al)GaN nanowires are prepared on M-plane AlN substrates. Horizontally ordered nanowires, extending from the M-plane sidewalls of GaN hexagonal mesas or islands demonstrate new opportunities for self-aligned nanowire devices, interconnects, and networks.

  11. Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization(6), 066012 (June 2011) Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3593003] Keywords: europium; silica; luminescent; nanoshells; endocytosis. Paper

  12. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R. [comp.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  13. Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report Rosemary Lapka, Neesha Modi, Lauren Start and David Weinglass Report No. CSS11-07 April 19, 2011 #12;Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III Keoleian, Professor #12;Document Description AURORA ORGANIC DAIRY PHASE III: CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  14. III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE HYGIENE DES MAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Lonie

    III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE PREVENTION HYGIENE DES MAINS HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE HYGIENE - IRD - MNHN - Cemagref 24/88 III.1. HYGIENE DES MAINS Elle est fondamentale et renouveler plusieurs, on peut utiliser un gel ou une solution hydro alcoolique. III.2. HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE Un certain nombre de

  15. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  16. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 4}Si{sub 2}C{sub 5}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Sugiura, Keita [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared a new layered oxycarbide, [Al{sub 5.25(5)}Si{sub 0.75(5)}][O{sub 1.60(7)}C{sub 3.40(7)}], by isothermal heating of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}) at 2273 K near the carbon-carbon monoxide buffer. The crystal structure was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3m (centrosymmetric), Z=3, and hexagonal cell dimensions a=0.32464(2) nm, c=4.00527(14) nm and V=0.36556(3) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The reliability indices were R{sub wp}=4.45% (S=1.30), R{sub p}=3.48%, R{sub B}=2.27% and R{sub F}=1.25%. The crystal is composed of three types of domains with nearly the same fraction, one of which has the crystal structure of space group R3-bar m. The crystal structure of the remaining two domains, which are related by pseudo-symmetry inversion, is noncentrosymmetric with space group R3m. - Graphical Abstract: A new aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6). The crystal is composed of three types of domains (I, II and III), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al,Si){sub 4}(O,C){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al,Si)(O,C){sub 2}] single layers.

  17. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa)] [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)] [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa)] [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.

  18. Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks · REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

  19. Bandgap in Al12xScxN Ruopeng Deng, Sarah R. Evans, and Daniel Gall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    phase wurtzite solid- solution optical band gap of Eg(x) 3.37 1.07x eV for x 0.17.6 (ii) ScN crystalizes in the rock salt structure8 such that substitutional Sc within a wurtzite structure III to a strain induced phase transition from the wurtzite structure to a metastable non-polar hexagonal structure

  20. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  1. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brger, Raimund

    Analisis Numerico III Apuntes Curso Codigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. Metodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. Metodo de disparo numerico para problemasisticas numericos 74 5.2.1. Metodo de caracteristicas aproximado 74 5.2.2. Metodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  2. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  3. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  4. Acetate-Bridged Platinum(III) Complexes Derived from Cisplatin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin J.

    Oxidation of the acetate-bridged half-lantern platinum(II) complex cis-[Pt[superscript II](NH[subscript 3])[subscript 2](?-OAc)[subscript 2]Pt[superscript II](NH[subscript 3])[subscript 2

  5. Specific features of kinetics of molecular beam epitaxy of compounds in the GaN-AlN system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, A. N.; Byrnaz, A. E.; Krasovitsky, D. M.; Pavlenko, M. V.; Petrov, S. I., E-mail: support@semiteq.ru; Pogorel'sky, Yu. V.; Sokolov, I. A.; Sokolov, M. A.; Stepanov, M. V.; Shkurko, A. P.; Chalyi, V. P. [ZAO Svetlana-ROST (Russian Federation)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of growth conditions (V/III ratio, substrate temperature) on the properties of materials in AlN-GaN systems is discussed. A concept of the growth of the AlN/AlGaN/GaN multilayer heterostructure, which provides the improvement of crystal quality and surface morphology of the layers, is suggested and realized. The improvement of the properties of GaN in the AlN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN multilayer heterostructure is confirmed by a considerable increase in electron mobility in the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the upper heterointerface GaN/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N.

  6. The Soft X-Ray Properties of a Complete Sample of Optically Selected Quasars II. Final Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Fabrizio Fiore; Martin Elvis; Belinda J. Wilkes; Jonathan C. McDowell

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the final results of a ROSAT PSPC program to study the soft X-ray emission properties of a complete sample of low $z$ quasars. The main results are: 1. There is no evidence for significant soft excess emission or excess foreground absorption by cold gas in 22 of the 23 quasars. 2. The mean 0.2-2 keV continuum of quasars agrees remarkably well with an extrapolation of the mean 1050-350A continuum recently determined by Zheng et al. (1996), indicating that there is no steep soft component below 0.2 keV. 3. The occurrence of warm absorbers in quasars is rather rare, in sharp contrast to lower luminosity AGN. 4. The strongest correlation found is between the spectral slope, alpha_x, and the Hb FWHM. This remarkably strong correlation may result from a dependence of alpha_x on L/L_Edd, as seen in Galactic black hole candidates. 5. There appears to exist a distinct class of ``X-ray weak'' quasars. These may be quasars where the direct X-ray source is obscured, and only scattered X-rays are observed. 6. Thin accretion disk models cannot reproduce the observed optical to soft X-ray spectral shape. An as yet unknown physical mechanism maintains a strong correlation between the optical and soft X-ray emission. 7. The well known difference in alpha_x between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars may be due only to their different Hb FWHM. 8. The agreement of the 21 cm and X-ray columns implies that He in the diffuse H II component of the Galactic ISM is ionized to He II or He III (shortened abstract).

  7. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  8. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Model Predictive Control, Matlab Iterative Learning Control for Internal Combustion Engines Modeling and Control Description: In classical. The objective of this work is to apply learning algorithms to highly dynamic internal combustion engines

  9. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, Engine Class (IC Engines and Propulsion Systems, Introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems,...), Matlab/Simulink experience Contact for a Novel Engine Concept Position Control for an Internal Combustion Engine (Simulation) Description an internal combustion engine piston follow a reference position trajectory with sufficient accuracy

  10. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems, IC Engines, ...), Optimization Course, Matlab The gas-diesel engine is a natural gas engine, where the combustion is initiated by a small quantity on the investigation of the combustion process of the gas-diesel engine. A highly flexible engine test-bench with COC

  11. Prerequisites: Control Systems I+II, System Modeling, Engine Class (Introduction to Modeling and Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    and Control The gas-diesel engine is a natural gas engine, where the combustion is initiated by a small is much higher than the ignition energy of a common spark plug. As a consequence, the natural gas and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems, IC Engines, ...), Matlab/Simulink experience Contact

  12. Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron and Atom Exchange as a Mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    acceptor (ferrihydrite) was used (13). Addition of the humic acid analogue 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate

  13. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Prostate A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF GEFITINIB GIVEN CONCURRENTLY WITH RADIOTHERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed patients varies from 30% to 90% in different series. Despite increased awareness and earlier diagnosis

  14. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral sheet. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral...

  15. activated glomeruli, (ii) the spatial combination of active neurons, (iii) the slow temporal sequence of activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system is not a static phenomenon but a dynamical process with different temporal components, eachof them probably readout byan adapted mechanism. This spatio-temporal representation is moreover dyna- mically be selected on the basis of their respiratory phase. Such a functional phase-coding relative to theta cycle (i

  16. ajcc stage i-ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This thesis focuses on the design of a public theatre for the entire city of Boston, a "city stage." The intention is to explore through design the boundaries of an architectural...

  17. Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including, bathtubs, showers, bathroom sinks, or any other source that has a low likelihood of fecal contamination that have a high likelihood of fecal contamination (e.g., toilets). Potable Water: Water that meets state

  18. actinide standard ii-iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectrometry (ICP-MS). This alternate calibration is mass bias adjusted using thorium-232 (232Th) and uranium-238 (238U) standards. One of the benefits of this standard...

  19. 16.01-04 Unified Engineering I, II, III, & IV, Fall 2003-Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Steven Ray

    The basic objective of Unified is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures ...

  20. State Laboratory Program -Calibration Scope Summary Certificate Date Comments Mass I Mass II Mass III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 3000 lb 500 gal to 1 gal 500 gal to 20 gal LPG Corn 21 % to 14 % Wheat 18 % to 13 % Soy Bean 17 % to 12 gal Los Angeles County 2014 10 kg to 100 g 5000 lb to 1 lb 8 oz to 4 oz 5 gal to 1 gal Louisiana 2014

  1. J. Phys, iii France 3 ii 993) 1739-1749 SEPTEMBER 1993, PAGE 1739 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is experimen- tally shown in the low-medium frequency range. Measurements of this electrical are troublesome these kinds of noise impede attempts to improve optical coherence. Many studies have been made in order to introduce the terminal electrical noise (TEN) as a mean of in situ characterization of laser

  2. ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A.

    the Spring semester, the objective will be to complete the robot by incorporating additional sensors, control not necessarily be exactly the same as all the other students in your group; (optional) team evaluations components: resistors, capacitors, op-amps, wire, infrared emitters, infrared detectors, etc. 5. Scrap

  3. Compte-rendu Mission GPS Re-mesure Rgions III-Nord / II-Taltal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    Esmeralda cte -25,87900 -70,69700 67 Delmont 0,0440 0,0440 ZX ZE1200452010 GD-IV 8919 ESM1 Esmeralda 10km

  4. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  5. GLASSES CONTAINING IRON (II III) OXIDES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HEO J; XU K; CHOI JK; HRMA PR; UM W

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as {approx} 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to {approx}50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

  6. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  7. Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gouvernement d'adopter les recommandations formules par la Commission et de mettre en uvre toutes les mesures ncessaires pour leur ralisation. Article 24 Pour le financement des activits de la Commission, le Gouvernement d'Hati pourra rechercher la... collgues Commissaires et le dvouement des autres membres de la grande famille que nous formions, le but sera atteint. Je pars avec le sentiment d'avoir apport le meilleur de moi-mme la Commission. Comme vous le savez, j'ai t appel faire partie...

  8. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a new type of ??cumulative seismic attribute? (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  9. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

  10. G Subject: Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfittedof6Executive CompensationD,F, Title

  11. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturing | Department ofInsulationInsurance2011 |

  12. 4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | OpenDevelopment GuideMexico20082008GRED

  13. Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapters II, III, and X

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of EnergySelected |Diffusion Plant

  14. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |PrepareMOJAVEDeveloping andDepartment

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE Volume 23, Number 5, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    3Environmental Technology Laboratory General Electric Company Niskayuna, NY 12309 ABSTRACT; Parmar et al., 2001), Co(III) (Zachara et al., 2001), and Zn(II) (Cooper et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2006

  16. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  17. P-doping-free III-nitride high electron mobility light-emitting diodes and transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baikui; Tang, Xi; Chen, Kevin J., E-mail: eekjchen@ust.hk [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Jiannong [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that a simple metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diode is capable of producing GaN band-edge ultraviolet emission at 3.4?eV at a small forward bias larger than ?2?V at room temperature. Based on the surface states distribution of AlGaN, a mature impact-ionization-induced Fermi-level de-pinning model is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of the electroluminescence (EL) process. By experimenting with different Schottky metals, Ni/Au and Pt/Au, we demonstrated that this EL phenomenon is a universal property of metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes. Since this light-emitting Schottky diode shares the same active structure and fabrication processes as the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, straight-forward and seamless integration of photonic and electronic functional devices has been demonstrated on doping-free III-nitride heterostructures. Using a semitransparent Schottky drain electrode, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility light-emitting transistor is demonstrated.

  18. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

  19. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future bioremediation field experiments at the WAG5 site.

  20. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  1. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process that transforms gas-phase molecules into solid particles like soot and...

  2. II Edici L'ECONOMIA A DEBAT Professorat: Margalida Payeras, Mara Antonia Garca, Mara Llompart, Marta Jacob,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    FM0410 II Edici L'ECONOMIA A DEBAT Professorat: Margalida Payeras, Mara Antonia Garca, Mara Econmic) Alumnat Indicat per al pblic en general, estudiants d'economia i professionals del sector

  3. DESIGN OF EPOXY-FREE SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS AND PERFORMANCE IN BOTH HELIUM I AND PRESSURIZED HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exchange I " L ^ v v / / / / > > y^ffHn Helium II cryostatWarren et. al. , "A Pressurized Helium H-Cooled Magnet Testin Pressurized Superfluid Helium", CXS 40 11th International

  4. Quant. Phys. II, B Morrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    -15) BMEN E4410 Principles of Ultrasound in Medicine, E. Konofagou CBMF W4761 Computation al Genomics, C4761 Computation al Genomics, C. Leslie #12;

  5. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en sntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagnicos de la sociedad...

  6. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  7. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII

  8. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:

  9. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII(b)

  10. Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen(Redirected(NorthernIII

  11. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562 RevisionI: Energy GoalsIII:

  12. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

  13. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  14. MOCVD synthesis of group III-nitride heterostructure nanowires for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Talin, Albert Alec

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  15. Broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection layer for III/V multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedenhofen, Silke L; Haverkamp, Erik; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schermer, John; Rivas, Jaime Gmez; 10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.022

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel graded refractive index antireflection coating for III/V quadruple solar cells based on bottom-up grown tapered GaP nanowires. We have calculated the photocurrent density of an InGaP-GaAs-InGaAsP-InGaAs solar cell with a MgF2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating and with a graded refractive index coating. The photocurrent density can be increased by 5.9 % when the solar cell is coated with a graded refractive index layer with a thickness of 1\\mu m. We propose to realize such a graded refractive index layer by growing tapered GaP nanowires on III/V solar cells. For a first demonstration of the feasibility of the growth of tapered nanowires on III/V solar cells, we have grown tapered GaP nanowires on AlInP/GaAs substrates. We show experimentally that the reflection from the nanowire coated substrate is reduced and that the transmission into the substrate is increased for a broad spectral and angular range.

  16. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  17. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  18. SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

  19. Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (?-Fe2O3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David S.; Hull, Christopher J.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Riha, Shannon C.; Martinson, Alex B.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxides are a ubiquitous class of compounds that are involved in many biological, geological, and technological processes, and the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple is a fundamental transformation pathway; however, the study of iron oxide surfaces in aqueous solution by powerful spectroscopic techniques has been limited due to "strong absorber problem". In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) thin films of polycrystalline alpha-Fe2O3 were analyzed using the Eisenthal chi((3)) technique, a variant of second harmonic generation that reports on interfacial potentials. By determining the surface charge densities at multiple pH values, the point of zero charge was found to be 5.5 +/- 0.3. The interaction of aqueous Fe(II) at pH 4 and in 1 mM NaCl with ALD-prepared hematite was found to be fully reversible and to lead to about 4 times more ferrous iron ions adsorbed per square centimeter than on fused-silica surfaces under the same conditions. The data are consistent with a recently proposed conceptual model for net Fe(II) uptake or release that is underlain by a dynamic equilibrium between Fe(II) adsorbed onto hematite, electron transfer into favorable surface sites with attendant Fe(III) deposition, and electron conduction to favorable remote sites that release and replenish aqueous Fe(II).

  20. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program...

  1. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca....

  2. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  3. AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison...

  4. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  5. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  6. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  7. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  8. CHAOS II: Gas-Phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croxall, Kevin V; Berg, Danielle; Skillman, Evan D; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed NGC5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs (MODS) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O III] 4363, [N II] 5755, [S III] 6312) and thus measure "direct" gas-phase abundances in 29 individual HII regions. [O III] 4363 is only detected in two HII regions both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC5194 and find excellent agreement for all but one region (Delta[log(O/H)] ~ 0.04). We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (sigma = -0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10) relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretica...

  9. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW (TUM & AUI Alumni) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr

  10. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr Informatik TUM School

  11. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW Alumni) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr Informatik TUM

  12. Effect of activators on promoter clearance by RNA polymerase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Jason Dwain

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of their respective missmg GTFs. In some cases thc holoenzyme complexes are capable in vitro of activated transcription (Kolcske and Young, 1994; Maldonado et al. , 1996; Pan et al. , 1997). RNA polymerase II general transcription factors TFIIA 37kD 19kD... Activation 13kD TFIIB TFIID TEP TAFII250 TAFII 150 TAFII135 TAFII95 TAFII80 TAF II55 TAFII31 TAFII28 TAFII20 38kD 250kD 150kD 135kD 95kD 80kD 55kD 31kD 28kD 20kD binds TATA box 35kD recruits RNAPII; start site selection TFIIE 56kD...

  13. I. Top 20 TA Traps 123 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 5 Other Teaching Resources Page I. Top 20 TA Traps 123 II. Team Meeting Guidelines 125 III.0.0 143 IX. Useful Information for TAs 147 #12;#12;Page 123 I. Top 20 TA Traps This list has been compiled by mentor TAs to help you avoid some common pitfalls of being a TA. These are the top twenty things TAs do

  14. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  15. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  16. Temperature fluctuations in H II regions: t2 for the two-phase model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; B. Ercolano; X. -W. Liu

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate temperature fluctuations in H II regions in terms of a two-phase model, which assumes that the nebular gas consists of a hot and a cold phase. Methods: We derive general formulae for T([O III), the [O III] forbidden line temperature, and T(H I), the hydrogen Balmer jump temperature, in terms of the temperatures of the hot and cold phases, T_h and T_c. Results: For large temperature differences, the values of t2 required to account for the observed difference between T([O III]) and T(H I) are much lower than those deduced using the classical formulae that assume random and small amplitude temperature fluctuations. One should therefore be cautious when using a two-phase model to account for empirically derived $t^2$ values. We present a correction of a recent work by Giammanco & Beckman, who use a two-phase model to estimate the ionization rate of H II regions by cosmicrays. We show that a very small amount of cold gas is sufficient to account for t2 values typically inferred for H II regions.

  17. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  18. ZHAO ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 10 ' 86848691 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hgberg, Bjrn

    nanostructures to optimize the delivery of doxorubicin (Dox) to human cancer cells. Recently Ke et al.15 the DNA nanostructures for optimal delivery of the anthracycline doxorubicin (Dox) to human breast cancer and (ii) increase the cytotoxicity and lower the intracellular elimination rate when compared to free Dox

  19. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  20. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home

  1. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityAprilAreAroundArthur P.I ArtificialII

  2. II.1 Itic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f -

  3. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  4. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Saglia, Roberto P; Bender, Ralf; Tojeiro, Rita; Chen, Yan-Mei; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R; Johansson, Jonas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Nichol, Robert C; Schneider, Donald P; Senger, Robert; Skibba, Ramin; Wake, David; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Shelden, Alaina; Ebelke, Garrett

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ~180,000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.12sigma significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z~0.7 up to z>2 as Mdyn/Mstar~ (1+z)^{-0.30+/- 0.12} further strengthening the evidence for an increase of Mdyn/Mstar with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  5. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  6. A New Use for a Familiar Fold: the X-Ray Crystal Structure of GTP-Bound GTP Cyclohydrolase III From Methanocaldococcus Jannaschii Reveals a Two Metal Ion Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, S.D.; Roberts, S.A.; Zegeer, A.M.; Montfort, W.R.; Bandarian, V.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH) III from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, which catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate (FAPy), has been shown to require Mg{sup 2+} for catalytic activity and is activated by monovalent cations such as K{sup +} and ammonium [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074-15084]. The reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by a GCH II ortholog (SCO 6655) from Streptomyces coelicolor; however, SCO 6655, like other GCH II proteins, is a zinc-containing protein. The structure of GCH III complexed with GTP solved at 2 {angstrom} resolution clearly shows that GCH III adopts a distinct fold that is closely related to the palm domains of phosphodiesterases, such as DNA polymerase I. GCH III is a tetramer of identical subunits; each monomer is composed of an N- and a C-terminal domain that adopt nearly superimposible structures, suggesting that the protein has arisen by gene duplication. Three metal ions were located in the active site, two of which occupy positions that are analogous to those occupied by divalent metal ions in the structures of a number of palm domain containing proteins, such as DNA polymerase I. Two conserved Asp residues that coordinate the metal ions, which are also found in palm domain containing proteins, are observed in GCH III. Site-directed variants (Asp{yields}Asn) of these residues in GCH III are less active than wild-type. The third metal ion, most likely a potassium ion, is involved in substrate recognition through coordination of O6 of GTP. The arrangement of the metal ions in the active site suggests that GCH III utilizes two metal ion catalysis. The structure of GCH III extends the repertoire of possible reactions with a palm fold to include cyclohydrolase chemistry.

  7. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uli Walther

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of A-hypergemetric systems. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems ... Power series ansatz: z = ?. ? k=0 aktk shows ak ? vj >0 vj ?1. ? l=0.

  8. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  9. Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

  10. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  11. Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 an important environmental problem. As a result, the disposal of the dredged material removed from the Harbor in developing methods for the environmentally responsible handling of the approximately 3,000,000 m3 of dredged

  12. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  13. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

  14. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS EvidenceALS

  15. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALS

  16. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  17. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  18. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  19. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  20. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  1. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Christopher Dean, Mr. Steven Shapiro, and Mr. Matthew Gilstrap. United States Fuel Resiliency: Volume III - Regional Vulnerability and Resilience iii Table of Contents I....

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  3. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Ji

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

  4. Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Transistors, 2006 ABSTRACT We report the rational synthesis of dopant-free GaN/AlN/AlGaN radial nanowire-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that the GaN/ AlN/AlGaN

  5. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  6. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  7. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  8. A study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Bromide and Organic Amine Hydrobromide Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeakley, Richard Lee

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is deeply appreciated. In addition, I wish to thank the other members of my committee. A special word of appreciation is due the Dow Chemical Company for allowing me to do this work. ABLE OP SON~EN S I?RODU'(~'PION EXPEHINEN:. 'AL PBOOETJTJPZ...-C+He)&NH&)SbBr+, and ((CHs)sNH&)sSbsBrr~ from the reaction of ant;imony( II) brom' de and the correspond- . ng amine hvdrabrom"des. Dragules . u and Florea (10) used the react' on of acridine in excess hydrobr. omic acid t;a develop a sens' t've spot. test; for antimony...

  9. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergyonWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III

  10. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiara, A.

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along ...

  11. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial Solid Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  12. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  13. Physical Chemistry II Spring 2007 Physical Chemistry II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Entropy and spontaneity. Calculation and measurement of entropy changes. IV. Free energy and spontaneity Chapter 22 Gibbs and Helmholtz free energies and the natural direction of processes. V. Phase behavior Chapter 19 Heat, work, and thermodynamic energy. The First Law and chemical reactions. III. Entropy

  14. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  15. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

  16. Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

  17. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  18. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  19. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

  20. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  1. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early restoration project types Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement). Criteria

  2. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INICISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dey'ee of MASTER OF ARTS... December 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INCISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Approved as to style and content by: George F, Bass (Chair of Committee) c~) Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr...

  3. Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

  4. al tratamiento local: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and MEG data (Vigario et al., 1998; Tang et al., 2000a; Vigario et al., 1999, 2000; Wubbeler et al Pearlmutter, Barak 39 Independent Components of...

  5. Scott Taylor, ALS Safety Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics LabwildfiresScott Taylor, ALS Safety

  6. The Birth of a Galaxy: Primoridal Metal Enrichment and Population II Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, John H; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population III stars first form in dark matter halos with masses around 10^6 Msun. By definition, they are metal-free, and their protostellar collapse is driven by molecular hydrogen cooling in the gas-phase, leading to a massive characteristic mass ~100 Msun and suppressed fragmentation. Population II stars with lower characteristic masses form when the star-forming gas reaches a critical metallicity of 10^{-6} - 10^{-3.5} Zsun, depending on whether dust cooling is important. We present adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamics simulations that follows the transition from Population III to II star formation. We model stellar radiative feedback with adaptive ray tracing. A top-heavy initial mass function for the Population III stars is considered, resulting in a plausible distribution of pair-instability supernovae and associated metal enrichment. We find that the gas fraction recovers from 5 percent to nearly the cosmic fraction in halos with merger histories rich in halos above 10^7 Msun. A single pa...

  7. Classical Trajectories of the Continuum States of the ${\\cal{PT}}$ symmetric Scarf II potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anjana Sinha

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the factorization technique developed by Kuru et. al. [Ann. Phys. {\\bf 323} (2008) 413] to obtain the exact analytical classical trajectories and momenta of the continuum states of the non Hermitian but ${\\cal{PT}}$ symmetric Scarf II potential. In particular, we observe that the strange behaviour of the quantum version at the spectral singularity has an interesting classical analogue.

  8. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  9. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S/explaining the trends in J as a function of altitude and solar zenith angle. The second involves analyzing real

  10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    ;. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii 1 1 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 4 2.1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 7 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3

  11. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  12. Fabrication of novel III-N and III-V modulator structures by ECR plasma etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum well microdisk laser structures have been fabricated in the GaN/InGaN, GaAs/AlGaAs and GaAs/InGaP systems using a combination of ECR dry etching (Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar or CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma chemistries respectively) and subsequent wet chemical etching of a buffer layer underlying the quantum wells. While wet etchants such as HF/H{sub 2}O and HCl/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2} O are employed for AlGaAs and InGaP, respectively, a new KOH based solution has been developed for AlN which is completely selective over both GaN and InGaN. Typical mask materials include PR or SiN{sub x}, while the high surface recombination velocity of exposed AlGaAs ({approximately} 10{sup 5} cm{center_dot}sec {sup {minus}1}) requires encapsulation with ECR-CVD SiN{sup x} to stabilize the optical properties of the modulators.

  13. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  14. Chemical Evolution of the Galactic Halo through Supernova-Induced Star Formation and Its Implication for Population III Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama; Yuzuru Yoshii

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for Galactic chemical evolution, driven by supernova-induced star formation, is formulated and used to examine the nature of the Galactic halo at early epochs. In this model, new stars are formed following each supernova event, thus their abundance pattern is determined by the combination of heavy elements ejected from the supernova itself and those elements which are already present in the interstellar gas swept up by the supernova remnant. The end result is a prediction of large scatter in the abundance ratios among low-metallicity stars, reflecting a different nucleosynthesis yield for each Type II supernova with a different progenitor mass. Formation of new stars is terminated when supernova remnants sweep up too little gas to form shells. We show from calculations based on the above scenario that (i) the observed [Fe/H] distribution for the Galactic halo field stars can be reproduced without effectively decreasing the heavy-element yields from Type II supernovae by some manipulation required by previous models (e.g., via mass loss from the early Galaxy, or later mixing with ``pristine'' hydrogen clouds), (ii) the large observed scatter in the abundance ratio [Eu/Fe] for the most metal-poor stars can also be reproduced, and (iii) the frequency distribution of stars in the [Eu/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane can be predicted. Our model suggests that the probability of identifying essentially metal-free stars (Population III) in the local halo is around one in 10^{3-4}, provided that star formation in the halo is confined to individual gas clouds with mass of 10^{6-7} Msun and that the initial mass function of metal-free stars is not significantly different from the Salpeter mass function.

  15. Dark Energy Model in Anisotropic Bianchi Type-III Space-Time with Variable EoS Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirudh Pradhan; Hassan Amirhashchi

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new dark energy model in anisotropic Bianchi type-III space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter has been investigated in the present paper. To get the deterministic model, we consider that the expansion $\\theta$ in the model is proportional to the eigen value $\\sigma^{2}_{~2}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_~i$. The EoS parameter $\\omega$ is found to be time dependent and its existing range for this model is in good agreement with the recent observations of SNe Ia data (Knop et al. 2003) and SNe Ia data with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al. 2004). It has been suggested that the dark energy that explains the observed accelerating expansion of the universe may arise due to the contribution to the vacuum energy of the EoS in a time dependent background. Some physical aspects of dark energy model are also discussed.

  16. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Thomas J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the essential RNA polymerases present in all eukaryotes, plants have two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V, that play nonredundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing. We show that Arabidopsis Pol IV and Pol V are composed of subunits that are paralogous or identical to the 12 subunits of Pol II. Four subunits of Pol IV are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, six subunits of Pol V are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, and four subunits differ between Pol IV and Pol V. Importantly, the subunit differences occur in key positions relative to the template entry and RNA exit paths. Our findings support the hypothesis that Pol IV and Pol V are Pol II-like enzymes that evolved specialized roles in the production of noncoding transcripts for RNA silencing and genome defense.

  17. THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three prototype Table II. aluminum-carbon bonds and theirPhysics THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, ANDLBL-l0871 The Prototype Aluminum - Carbon Single, Double.

  18. SDSS-III: MASSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEYS OF THE DISTANT UNIVERSE, THE MILKY WAY, AND EXTRA-SOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Agol, Eric; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aihara, Hiroaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arns, James A. [Kaiser Optical Systems, Ann Arbor, MI 48103 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris-Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Barkhouser, Robert [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bickerton, Steven J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8), which was made public in 2011 January and includes SDSS-I and SDSS-II images and spectra reprocessed with the latest pipelines and calibrations produced for the SDSS-III investigations. This paper presents an overview of the four surveys that comprise SDSS-III. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation feature of large-scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, an already completed SDSS-III survey that is the continuation of the SDSS-II Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE), measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {>=} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {mu}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {mu}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx}15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx}24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of 2011 January, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {>=} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS.

  19. Strain effects in group-III nitrides: Deformation potentials for AlN, GaN, and InN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in quantum cryptography5 or in photocatalysis6 are being explored. Applications in solid state lighting

  20. Optical and infrared emission of H II complexes as a clue to PAHs lifecycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khramtsova, M S; Lozinskaya, T A; Egorov, O V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of optical spectroscopy and infrared aperture photometry of more than 100 H II complexes in nine galaxies. Spectra obtained with the 6-m telescope of SAO RAS are used along with archival data from Spitzer and several ground-based telescopes to infer a strength of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, age, properties of the UV radiation field, and metallicity of studied H II complexes. Physical properties (age, radiation field parameters, metallicity) are related to the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio used as a proxy for the PAH abundance in order to reveal factors that may influence the PAH evolution in H II complexes. The well-known correlation between the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio and metallicity is confirmed in the studied complexes. The infrared flux ratio also correlates with the [O III]$\\lambda 5007/\\mathrm{H\\beta}$ ratio which is often considered as an indicator of the radiation field hardness, but this correlation seems to be a mere reflection of a correlation between [O III]$\\lambda ...

  1. AL2007-03.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL 2007-03

  2. AL2007-05.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL7-05

  3. ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL.AFTFutureALPES20thALS 20th

  4. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS Evidence

  5. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS

  6. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals NewScientific

  7. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals

  8. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS RevealsScientific

  9. AL PRO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th Day EnergyADAPTItalyAL PRO

  10. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugust 2011October 2012 Thu, 10/04/20122 ALS User

  11. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugust 2011October 2012 Thu, 10/04/20122 ALS

  12. ALS Doctoral Fellowship in Residence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications Group

  13. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALSALS

  14. Al Geist | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefault Sign InLeaksGreenAl

  15. INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF NDCX-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III Diagnostic cell Solenoid, BPM, Vacuum pumping Figure 2:Rogowski S1 Capacitive BPM S2 S3 Inactive Induction Gap:

  16. CDIGO DIA HORA AULA CURSO TITULACION ASIGNATURA 2031004 16/05/2014 9:00 104, 105 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y Tecnologa de los Alimentos Biologa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Grado en Ciencia y Tecnologa de los Alimentos Biologa 2031007 05/05/2014 12:00 206, 207 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y Tecnologa de los Alimentos Bioqumica 2031002 12/05/2014 9:00 002, 003 Aulario II 1 Grado en Ciencia y Tecnologa de los Alimentos Fsica 2031008 09/05/2014 12:00 111 Laboratorio III 1

  17. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years Janos Kirz, ALS Abstract Rntgen's great...

  18. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray...

  19. United States Patent [19] Church et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    United States Patent [19] Church et al. [54] CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL POLYMER MOLECULES BASED 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 US005795782A [11] Patent Number: [45] Date of Patent: 5,795,782 Aug. 18, 1998 Boulanger et al

  20. Lattice site location of impurities in group III nitrides using emission channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich

    The group III nitrides comprise the semiconducting materials InN, GaN, AlN and their ternary alloys. During the last decade, GaN has attracted widespread attention due to its large band gap and hardness. These properties, combined with the fact that its band gap can be adjusted by alloying it with InN and AlN, make GaN a suitable material for the fabrication of optical components that operate in the blue to ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for microwave and high-power applications. Indeed, during the last couple of years, GaN-based blue and violet light-emitting devices (LEDs) and laser diodes have been realized and commercialized: the violet laser diodes will even be the keystone to the next generation of optical data storage standards, Blu-ray and HD-DVD. A key aspect in device production is the incorporation of dopants that can alter the electronic, magnetic or optical properties of the host material. For example, Si is often used to generate n-type GaN, while Mg is the most frequent...

  1. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  2. Multiple Deprotonation of Primary Aromatic Diamines by LiAlH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Robert J.; Allen, Lucy K.; Steiner, Alexander; Wright, Dominic S.

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for organic and inorganic transformations and single-source precursors for technologically important III/V semiconductor materials (e.g., AlN and GaN).1 More recent developments in lithium amido aluminate chemistry include derivatives based on TMP (2... be employed to produce a range of amido- and mixed amido/imido lithium ate compounds.7 Our current focus on this area stems jointly from long standing interests in the synthesis and structural chemistry of main group metal imido complexes...

  3. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc H. Pinsonneault; Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  4. Electrodeposition of Ni[sub 1[minus]x]Al[sub x] in a chloroaluminate melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, T.P. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of Ni[sub 1[minus]x]Al[sub x] from a molten 2 AlCl[sub 3]-NaCl electrolyte containing up to 0.17 mol/liter Ni(II) has been investigated using a variety of electrochemical techniques. The standard reversible potential for Ni/Ni(II) is found to be in the range of 0.86 to 0.93 V (vs. Al). In a nickel-free electrolyte aluminum deposition on tungsten occurs via instantaneous nucleation upon an underpotential deposition aluminum layer. In contrast, bulk nickel deposition occurs by progressive formation and diffusion-limited growth of three-dimensional nuclei. The number of nickel atoms forming a critical nuclei, n[sub c], is dependent on overpotential. At potentials below 0.750 V, n[sub c] = 0 with the active sites on the electrode playing the role of critical nuclei. These sites are occupied according to first-order kinetics. At potentials above 0.7 V compact nickel deposits are obtained. As the potential is decreased below 0.6 V Ni[sub 1[minus]x]-Al[sub x] formation occurs. Between 0.6 and 0.0 V alloy composition is a function of potential. The rate of the aluminum partial reaction is first order in the Ni(II) concentration which makes alloy composition independent of Ni(II) concentration over the range investigated. Separate experiments demonstrate that aluminum underpotential deposition on nickel occurs in this potential regime. Thus, alloy formation may be envisioned as aluminum underpotential deposition proceeding simultaneously with diffusion-limited nickel deposition. The underpotential deposition reaction occurs rapidly such that the alloy composition is determined by the free energy of alloy formation. When the potential is decreased below the reversible potential of aluminum, 0.0 V, phase formation is complicated by a competition between alloy formation and overpotential driven kinetics of aluminum deposition.

  5. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) NANOPHOTONIC PRODUCTION, MODULATION AND SWITCHING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 194 days. (21) References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 200910236512 Al * 912009 Naya et al. .................... 250/281 2009

  6. United States Patent [19] Miura et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    of Pyrrole--3,4--diacetic Acid and Its Derivatives", Synthesis, pp. 262--265 (1989). Coderre et al., "Boron/1992 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Japan . Japan . WIPO . WIPO . Miura et al.,, "Synthesis, Tissue Uptake, and Toxicity Therapy for Cancer, Kobe, Japan (Oct. 31--Nov. 4, 1994). Miura et al., "Synthesis and Spectroscopic

  7. Mejora docente y adaptacin al Espacio Europeo de Educacin Superior Tabla II. Principales resultados conseguidos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    calidad docente y reconocer las mejores prcticas segn los estndares de calidad internacional la Normativa de movilidad de la UPF, introduciendo garantas de calidad para la movilidad saliente

  8. Performance of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Advanced Light Source

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Advanced Light Source, BESSY Measurement Report (July,for X- ray Optics at BESSY, AIP Conf. Proc. 705, 847-850measuring instruments, such as BESSY NOM. 5 A few years ago,

  9. II INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTATIONAL BIOENGINEERING H. Rodrigues et al. (Eds.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coto, Ernesto

    *** * Computer Graphics Lab, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: { bricelis | ecoto | omaira }@opalo.ciens.ucv.ve ** Experimental Surgery Institute, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: ice@med.ucv.ve *** Bioengineering Center, Central University of Venezuela, Venezuela e-mail: mcerrola

  10. II United States Government DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/

  11. A Near-Infrared Stellar Spectral Library: III. J-Band Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind C. Ranade; N. M. Ashok; Harinder P. Singh; Ranjan Gupta

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the third in the series of papers published on near-infrared (NIR) stellar spectral library by Ranade et al. (2004 & 2007). The observations were carried out with 1.2 meter Gurushikhar Infrared Telescope (GIRT), at Mt. Abu, India using a NICMOS3 HgCdTe $256 \\times 256$ NIR array based spectrometer. In paper I (Ranade et al. 2004), H-band spectra of 135 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 16$\\AA & paper II (Ranade et al. 2007), K band spectra of 114 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 22$\\AA were presented. The J-band library being released now consists of 126 stars covering spectral types O5--M8 and luminosity classes I--V. The spectra have a moderate resolution of $\\sim 12.5$\\AA in the J band and have been continuum shape corrected to their respective effective temperatures. The complete set of library in near-infrared (NIR) will serve as a good database for researchers working in the field of stellar population synthesis. The complete library in J, H & K is available online at: http://vo.iucaa.ernet.in/$\\sim$voi/NIR\\_Header.html

  12. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results of all other international participants in 2014, while the remaining Phase II transient case results will be reported in 2015.

  13. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  14. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

  15. SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Two Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of ii iii2014 UpdateRobertRound-UpDataS

  16. Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind II CEC WindCamelot1Q08) WindWindIII

  17. Herman et al. 1 SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudner, David

    primers oJW020 and oJW043 and pLM029 DNA as template) cut with HindIII and NheI and pDR111 cut with the same enzymes. pLM029 [refZ-gfp (spec)(amp)] was generated in a two-way ligation with a PCR productI and HindIII. The linker contains a large multi-cloning site. pLM028 [refZ-gfp (spec)(amp)] was generated

  18. ccsd00001116 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd00001116 (version 1) : 4 Feb 2004 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys: from 4, 2004) Zr and Sc precipitate in aluminum alloys to form the compounds Al3Zr and Al3Sc which

  19. DIVALENT LANTHANIDE CHEMISTRY; BIS (PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II) DERIVATIVES: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF BIS(PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) YTTERBIUM (II)TETRAHYDROFURAN HEMI (TOLUENE) AT 176K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilley, T.Don

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PENTAMETHYL CYCLOPENTADIENYL)EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II)pentamethylcyclopentadienide and europium trichloride inbiscyclopentadienyl- europium and ~ytterbium, respectively,

  20. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline Background on issue Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  1. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  2. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  3. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  4. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galn, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  5. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

  6. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  7. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  8. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, Joo Pimentel

    Analise Matematica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exercicio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exercicio na construc~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  9. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, Joo Pimentel

    Analise Matematica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exercicio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pratica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Apos t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  10. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    Analise Matematica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exercicio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pratica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Apos t^e-los resolvido de cabeca, com

  11. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  12. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  13. TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

  14. MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

  15. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  16. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    amorphous materials, such as ferrihydrite, to well-crystallized minerals such as goethite and hematite (5 assemblages. Experimental Section Oxide Synthesis and Characterization.A variety of synthetic Fe(III) oxides included a series of goethites with differing crystallinity and surface area, synthesized from Fe(NO3

  17. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  18. Activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for transformation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, H.L.; Zhang, W.X.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture has been developed in the laboratory. Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are infused and activated within an alkaline solution. Optimal Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio is in the range of 0.1 to 1. Batch experiments have demonstrated that the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture can rapidly dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Due to the high reactivity, light density and low cost, the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be used as a remediation agent in ex-situ treatment of industrial effluent, in-situ treatment wall, and for direct injection into ground water.

  19. DOBLE GRADO EN INGENIERA INFORMTICA + ADMINISTRACIN Y DIRECCIN DE EMPRESAS (ADE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    FC CAL 10 11 IEC ED IEC FC CAL 11 12 FC IE-II IEC DM ED 12 13 FC ED 13 14 CAL 14 15 CAL-II Introduccin a al Empresa II 1 A Grado ADE (III-102) IEC Introduccin a la Economa 1 A Grado ADE (III-102

  20. Trabajo Practico 4 Calculo II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    Trabajo Practico 4 Calculo II 2do semestre 2007 (1) Calcular a partir de la definicion de instante en que el tanque se vacia completamente? (4) La distancia (en metros) recorrida por un auto de

  1. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  2. Robotics II June 10, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Robotics II June 10, 2014 Exercise 1 Consider a planar 3R robot with unitary link lengths as in Fig. 1. Taking into account the robot redundancy, a velocity control scheme is active so as to track desired end-effector position trajectories while trying to locally maximize the minimum Cartesian distance

  3. Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations January 21, 2002 This assignment is meant to give you some practical experience in using the Saha and Boltzmann equations that govern the level populations in atoms;s =kT the partition function of ionization stage r. The Saha equation: N r+1 N r = 2U r+1 U r P e #18

  4. Mittwoch, 28.05.2014 Zeit H17, NW II H18, NW II H20, NW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Beliefs and Fracking Gebude Audimax 09:40 (Gebudewechsel Audimax -> NW II) 10:00 "Hydrogeologie von

  5. Radical irradiation and misonidazole for T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer: 2 year follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abratt, R.P.; Barnes, D.R.; Hammond, J.A.; Sarembok, L.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Williams, A.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients with T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer were treated in a Phase II trial of radical irradiation plus Misonidazole (MISO). Twenty-two patients were treated and the results compared with historical controls. The cystoscopic complete tumor response between 6 and 12 months post therapy were 73 and 43%, respectively. The patient two year survival was 81 and 51%, respectively, and the patient 2 year survival with bladder preservation was 61 and 48%, respectively - 4 patients in the MISO study having undergone salvage cystectomy. Complications that may be radiation related in the MISO study are would sepsis after salvage cystectomy in 2 patients, rectal stenosis requiriing colostomy 16 months after salvage cystecomy in 1 patient and the development of a contracted bladder in 1 patient with a history of prior extensive endoscopic therapy. No misonidazole neurotoxicity seen. These findings are being further evaluated in a prospective radomized trial.

  6. Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

  7. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  8. Photon Sciences | NSLS-II Beamline Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL People National Synchrotron Light Source II Home About NSLS-II Overview Storage Ring Parameters NSLS: A History Strategic Plan (PDF) For Users & Staff PASS User Guide Proposal...

  9. PERFORMANCE OF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Pressurized Superfluid Helium", EX5 40 11th InternationalOF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II R. Althaus, S. Cacpi, W.S.OF DIMLE NMMETS IN HELIUM II* R. Althaus, S. Caspl, W.S.

  10. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  11. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  12. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  13. Hydrologic Flow Controls on Biologic Iron(III) Reduction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    for energy that likely increased cell synthesis, and decreased the concentration of sorbed Fe(II) that) in a goethite-coated sand was bioreduced by the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in a flow-through column

  14. Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradecak, Silvija

    III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

  15. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  16. Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective Strategy to Improve the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of surface titanium and oxygen atoms present. PageRIVERSIDE Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an EffectiveDISSERTATION Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective

  17. Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and passivation of a compound semiconductor surface duringIn 2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, in press with2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, ECS Transaction (

  18. Abundance anomalies in metal-poor stars from Population III supernova ejecta hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sluder, Alan; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simulation of the long-term evolution of a Population III supernova remnant in a cosmological minihalo. Employing passive Lagrangian tracer particles, we investigate how chemical stratification and anisotropy in the explosion can affect the abundances of the first low-mass, metal-enriched stars. We find that reverse shock heating can leave the inner mass shells at entropies too high to cool, leading to carbon-enhancement in the re-collapsing gas. This hydrodynamic selection effect could explain the observed incidence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars at low metallicity. We further explore how anisotropic ejecta distributions, recently seen in direct numerical simulations of core-collapse explosions, may translate to abundances in metal-poor stars. We find that some of the observed scatter in the Population II abundance ratios can be explained by an incomplete mixing of supernova ejecta, even in the case of only one contributing enrichment event. We demonstrate that the customary hypothes...

  19. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E. [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Keenan, F. P., E-mail: c.ramsbottom@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4dgiving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  20. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

  2. Tidal Downsizing Model. III. Planets from sub-Earths to Brown Dwarfs: structure and metallicity preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present improved population synthesis calculations in the context of the Tidal Downsizing (TD) hypothesis for planet formation. Our models provide natural explanations and/or quantitative match to exoplanet observations in the following categories: (i) most abundant planets being super-Earths; (ii) cores more massive than $\\sim 5-15 M_\\oplus$ are enveloped by massive metal-rich atmospheres; (iii) the frequency of occurrence of close-in gas giant planets correlates strongly with metallicity of the host star; (iv) no such correlation is found for sub-Neptune planets; (v) presence of massive cores in giant planets; (vi) the composition of gas giant planets is over-abundant in metals compared to their host stars; (vii) this over-abundance decreases with planet's mass, as observed; (viii) a deep valley in the planet mass function between masses of $\\sim 10-20 M_\\oplus$ and $\\sim 100 M_\\oplus$. We provide a number of observational predictions distinguishing the model from Core Accretion: (a) composition of the m...

  3. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5.mu.m to .congruent.5.0.mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

  5. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystem Size Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystems >10 kW Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics

  6. Young Stars in the Camelopardalis Dust and Molecular Clouds. III. the GL 490 Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Straizys; V. Laugalys

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the infrared photometry data extracted from the 2MASS, IRAS and MSX databases, 50 suspected young stellar objects (YSOs) are selected from about 37500 infrared objects in the 3x3 deg area with the center at Galactic longitude 142.5 deg and latitude +1.0 deg, in the vicinity of the young stellar object GL 490 in the dark cloud DoH 942 (Dobashi et al. 2005). The spectral energy distributions between 700 nm and 100 mum suggest that most of the selected objects may be YSOs of classes I and II. In the color-magnitude diagram K_s vs. H-K_s the suspected YSOs occupy an area right of the main sequence what can be interpreted as being caused by the effects of luminosity, interstellar and circumstellar reddening and infrared thermal emission in circumstellar envelopes and disks.

  7. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer and interlayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    N buffer layer BL grown on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL grown under the AlGaN ternary layer TL. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an AlN BL on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL between an AlGaNStructural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer

  8. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  9. Ti (II) Mediated Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeff S.

    ' #12;Generation of Ti(II) from Ti(IV) · Bercaw accessed and characterized the first Ti'X -X Generation of Ti(II) via Reductive Alkylation · Ti(IV) converted to Ti(II) via reductive/Acetylene Functionalizations · Reductive Couplings #12;Advantages of Titanium · Titanium (IV) reagents are cheap and readily

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  11. J. Phys. III Fiance 3 II 993) 11-1 121 JUNE 1993, PAGE I I I1 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    la pointe et (es impulsions de courant en tension alternative, relatives h deux hydrocarbures aromatiques, le tolukne et le benzyltolukne, et (es avons compardes h ceux d'un hydrocarbure saturd, le n hydrocarbure saturd. Ce comportement est attribud aux caractdristiques d'ionisation et d

  12. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  13. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

  14. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  15. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

  16. Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ALS, with most of his research supporting pharmaceutical companies working on new treatments for metabolic diseases and cancer. Pauly spent 15 years of his career working...

  17. http://www.mat.ucm.es/imi/ III Modelling Week

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Mencin de calidad MCD2006-00482 Fabrizio Broglia, Universit degli Studi di Pisa INTRODUCTION TO STIEFEL. Actividad perteneciente al Postgrado en Investi- gacin Matemtica con Mencin de calidad MCD2006 al Postgrado en Investi- gacin Matemtica con Mencin de calidad MCD2006-00482 http

  18. Plasma chemistries for dry etching GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; Donovan, S.M.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Abernathy, C.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McLane, G.F. [Army Research Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States); Ren, F. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Etch rates up to 7,000 {angstrom}/min. for GaN are obtained in Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar or BCl{sub 3}/Ar ECR discharges at 1--3mTorr and moderate dc biases. Typical rates with HI/H{sub 2} are about a factor of three lower under the same conditions, while CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} produces maximum rates of only {approximately}2,000 {angstrom}/min. The role of additives such as SF{sub 6}, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2} or Ar to the basic chlorine, bromine, iodine or methane-hydrogen plasma chemistries are discussed. Their effect can be either chemical (in forming volatile products with N) or physical (in breaking bonds or enhancing desorption of the etch products). The nitrides differ from conventional III-V`s in that bond-breaking to allow formation of the etch products is a critical factor. Threshold ion energies for the onset of etching of GaN, InGaN and InAlN are {ge} 75 eV.

  19. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  20. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate